Bailliage sentence example

bailliage
  • The approaching convocation of the statesgeneral made his friends very active on his behalf; he circulated in every bailliage the pamphlets which F.
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  • Claude Antoine de Besiade, marquis d'Avaray, was deputy for the bailliage of Orleans in the states-general of 1789, and proposed a Declaration of the Duties of Man as a pendant to the Declaration of the Rights of Man; he subsequently became a lieutenant-general in 1814, a peer of France in 1815, and duc d'Avaray in 1818.
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  • He served in the American War of Independence under Rochambeau, and in 1789 was sent as deputy to the States General by the nobles of the bailliage of Peronne.
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  • In 1690 he became president of the bailliage of Rouen, a post which he retained almost until his death, leaving it to his son.
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  • His father was lieutenant-general of the bailliage of Guise, and through the efforts of a friend obtained a bourse for his son, who at the age of fourteen left home°for Paris, and entered the college of Louis le Grand.
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  • Having been nominated deputy from the bailliage of Guise, he appeared at Laon as one of the commissioners for the election of deputies to the States-General summoned by royal edict of January 24th.
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  • In 1789 he drew up the first article of the cahier of the electors of the bailliage of Roye, demanding the abolition of feudal rights.
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  • The chief buildings are the church of St Pierre (15th and 16th centuries), which has an imposing tower and rich interior decoration; a hotel de ville of the 18th century; and the Bailliage (16th century), a small building in the Renaissance style.
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  • The first office which he held was that of lieutenant-general in the bailliage of Montferrand; in 1507 he became first president of the parlement of Paris.
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  • Public worship was permitted everywhere where it had existed in 1596-1597, in two places within each bailliage and senechaussee, and in the châteaux of the Protestant nobility, with slight restrictions in the case of lower nobility.
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  • In 1788 he published Deputation aux Etats generaux, a pamphlet remarkable for its bold exposition of liberal principles, and partly on the strength of this he was elected deputy to the states-general by the Third Estate of the bailliage of Metz.
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  • In 1789 he was elected a member of the states-general by the clergy of the bailliage of Peronne, and from the first proved to be the most able and persevering defender of the ancien regime, although he had drawn up the greater part of the cahier of the clergy of Peronne, which contained a considerable programme of reform.
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  • During the Revolution period he advocated constitutional monarchy, and was returned as deputy by the Third Estate of the bailliage of Nemours to the states-general, and then to the Constituent Assembly, of which he was elected president on the 16th of October 1790.
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  • He was elected in 1789 by the clergy of the bailliage of Nancy to the states-general, where he soon became conspicuous in the group of clerical and lay deputies of Jansenist or Gallican sympathies who supported the Revolution.
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  • His father, whose Christian name was the same, was avocat du roi a la Table de Marbre du Palais, and also held the position of maitre des eaux et forets in the vicomte (or bailliage, as some say) of Rouen.
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  • The duke of Savoy, who had held back from the treaty of Vervins in 1598, signed the treaty of Lyons in 1601; in exchange for the marquisate of Saluzzo, France acquired Bresse, Bugey, Valromey and the bailliage of Gex.
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  • In every bailliage and senechaussee each estate drew up its own cahier and the cahiers of the Third Estate were condensed from separate cahiers drawn up by each parish in the district.
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  • Loriquet (2 vols., Arras, 1891); Cahiers des paroisses et communautes du bailliage d'Autun, by A.
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  • The Protestants could also worship in two towns in each bailliage and senechausee.
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  • This was a compromise between the royal government and the Huguenot government, the latter giving up the question of public worship, which was only authorized where it, had existed before 591 and in two towns of each bailliage, with the exception of Paris; but it secured liberty of con.science throughout the kingdom, state payment for its ministers, admission to all employments, and courts composed equally of Catholics and Protestants in the parlements.
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  • His political life began when he was elected deputy to the states-general of 1789 by the clergy of the bailliage of Huningue.
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  • In 1790 he was a country attorney (counsellor for the bailliage of Aurillac) and in 1792 he was chosen deputy to the National Convention.
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  • He was president (bdtonnier) of the order of avocats in Colmar, and in 1789 was elected deputy to the States-General by the Third Estate of the bailliage of Colmar-Schlestadt.
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  • This secured complete liberty of conscience everywhere within the realm and the free right of public worship in all places in which it existed during the years 1596 and 1597, or where it had been granted by the edict of Poitiers (1577) interpreted by the convention of Nerac (1578) and the treaty of Fleix (1580) - in all some two hundred towns; in two places in every bailliage and senechaussee; in the castles of Protestant seigneurs hauts justiciers (some three thousand); and in the houses of lesser nobles, provided the audience did not consist of more than thirty persons over and above relations of the family.
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  • His father was lieutenant-general of the bailliage of Guise, and through the efforts of a friend obtained a bourse for his son, who at the age of fourteen left home°for Paris, and entered the college of Louis le Grand.
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  • Public worship was permitted everywhere where it had existed in 1596-1597, in two places within each bailliage and senechaussee, and in the châteaux of the Protestant nobility, with slight restrictions in the case of lower nobility.
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  • ANTOINE CHRISTOPHE MERLIN (1762-1833), French revolutionist, called "of Thionville" to distinguish him from his namesake of Douai (see below), was born at Thionville on the 13th of September 1762, being the son of a procureur in the bailliage of Thionville.
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