Baader sentence example

baader
  • The idealisms of Fichte and Schelling made contributions to Hegel's thought; Krause and the Roman Catholic Baader represent parallel if minor phases of idealism.
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  • The later philosophy of Schelling and the philosophy of Franz von Baader, both largely founded upon Boehme, belong rather to theosophy (q.v.) than to mysticism proper.
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  • Franz Xaver von Baader >>
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  • A more complicated pump, but of much the same principle, was devised in 1784 by Joseph Baader, to be improved by C. F.
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  • In his studies he had come under the influence of Schleiermacher, Hegel and Franz Baader; but he was a man of independent mind, and developed a peculiar speculative theology which showed a disposition towards mysticism and theosophy.
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  • Hoffmann, the editor and disciple of von Baader, published Grundziige einer Geschichte der Begri f f'e der Logik in Deutschland von Kant bis Baader (1851).
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  • Schelling's Philosophical Inquiries into the Nature of Human Freedom (1809) is almost entirely a reproduction of Boehme's ideas, and forms, along with Baader's writings, the best' modern example of theosophical speculation.
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  • This theosophical transformation of Schelling's doctrine was largely due to the influence of his contemporary Baader (q.v.).
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  • Baader, who combined his theosophy with the doctrines of Roman Catholicism, has had many followers.
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  • A bitter reply from Schelling was left without answer by Jacobi, but gave rise to an animated controversy in which Fries and Baader took prominent part.
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  • FRANZ XAVER VON BAADER (1765-1841), German philosopher and theologian, born on the 27th of March 1765 at Munich, was the third son of F.
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  • P. Baader, court physician to the elector of Bavaria.
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  • Yet Baader is no disciple of Schelling, and probably gave out more than he received.
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  • Their friendship continued till about the year 1822, when Baader's denunciation of modern philosophy in his letter to the emperor Alexander I.
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  • All this time Baader continued to apply himself to his profession of engineer.
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  • Baader starts from the position that human reason by itself can never reach the end it aims at, and maintains that we cannot throw aside the presuppositions of faith, church and tradition.
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  • Baader's philosophy is thus essentially a theosophy.
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  • Concrete reality or personality is given to this divine Ternar, as Baader calls it, through nature, the principle of self-hood, of individual being, which is eternally and necessarily produced by God.
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  • The physical philosophy and anthropology which Baader, in connexion with this, unfolds in various works, is but little instructive, and coincides in the main with the utterances of Boehme.
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  • As regards ethics, Baader rejects the Kantian or any autonomic system of morals.
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  • Baader is, without doubt, among the greatest speculative theologians of modern Catholicism, and his influence has extended itself even beyond the precincts of his own church.
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  • Schaden, Lutterbeck, von Osten-Sacken and Schluter - Baader's sammtliche Werke (16 vols., 1851-1860).
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  • Hoffmann, Vorhalle zur spekulativen Lehre Baader's (1836); Grundziuge der Societats-Philosophie Franz Baader's (1837); Philosophische Schriften (3 vols., 1868-1872); Die Weltalter (1868); Biographie and Briefwechsel (Leipzig, 1887); J.
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  • He lived for a time in Berlin and became a privatdozent, but was unable to obtain a professorship. He therefore proceeded to Gottingen and afterwards to Munich, where he died of apoplexy at the very moment when the influence of Franz von Baader had at last obtained a position for him.
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  • Baader distinguishes, in a manner which may be paralleled from Boehme, between an immanent or esoteric process of self-production in God, through which He issues from His unrevealed state, and the emanent, exoteric or real process, in which God overcomes and takes up into Himself the eternal "nature" or the principle of selfhood, and appears as a Trinity of persons.
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  • It is difficult to summarize Baader's philosophy, for he himself generally gave expression to his deepest thoughts in obscure aphorisms, or mystical symbols and analogies (see Ed.
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