Anglosaxon sentence example

anglosaxon
  • Chadwick (Studies on AngloSaxon Institutions, 1905) says that "the sense of subordination must have been inherent in the word from the earliest time," but it has no connexion with the German dienen, to serve.
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  • He had not those rights of sovereign which the Norman kings of England inherited from their AngloSaxon predecessors, or the Capetian kings of France from the Carolings; nor was he able therefore to come into direct touch with each of his subjects, which William I., in virtue of his sovereign rights, was able to attain by the Salisbury oath of 1086.
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  • Far greater interest attaches to the so-called AngloSaxon Map of the World in the British Museum (Cotton MSS.), where it is bound up in a codex which also contains a copy of the Periegesis of Priscianus.
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  • The earliest delineation of the description has already been referred to as the AngloSaxon map of the world.
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  • He entered public life in 1849 as Liberal member for the county of Sherbrooke, but opposed the chief measure of his party, the Rebellion Losses Bill, and in the same year signed a manifesto in favour of union with the United States, believing that in no other way could Protestant and AngloSaxon ascendancy over the Roman Catholic French majority in his native province be maintained.
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  • He bore the title not of king but of judge, a title which may be compared with that of ealdorman among the AngloSaxon invaders of Britain.
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  • His grammars of Old Frisian, Icelandic and AngloSaxon were unapproached in his own time, and are still admirable.
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  • At Lafayette he introduced the first carefully scientific study of English in any American college, and in 1870 published A Comparative Grammar of the AngloSaxon Language, in which its Forms are Illustrated by Those of the Sanskrit, Greek, Latin, Gothic, Old Saxon, Old Friesic, Old Norse and Old High German, and An Anglo-Saxon Reader; he was editor of the "Douglass Series of Christian Greek and Latin Classics," to which he contributed Latin Hymns (1874); he was chairman of the Commission of the State of Pennsylvania on Amended Orthography; and was consulting editor of the Standard Dictionary, and in 1879-1882 was director of the American readers for the Philological Society's (New Oxford) Dictionary.
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  • Aryan o became a, as in Irish ldr, cognate with AngloSaxon flor, Eng.
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  • The numismatic collection is notable for its series of AngloSaxon coins.
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  • This term occurs three times in AngloSaxon documents.
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  • According to Jordanes the kings of the Goths during these campaigns were Ostrogotha and afterwards Cniva, the former of whom is praised also in the AngloSaxon poem Widsith.
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  • Wharton in the second volume of his Anglia sacra (London, 1691) gives considerable portions of a life of Wulfstan which is an amplified translation of an AngloSaxon biography.
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  • Foxe was one of the earliest students of AngloSaxon, and he and Day published an edition of the Saxon gospels under the patronage of Archbishop Parker.
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  • I of Wight fit in happily with the English annals constructed long centuries after by King Alfreds scribes in the first edition of the AngloSaxon Chronicle.
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  • Even the Chronicle becomes meagre a few years after Alfreds death, and its value depends largely upon the ballads which it incorporates; nor is it materially supplemented by the lives of St Dunstan, for hagiologists have never treated historical accuracy as a matter of moment; and our knowledge of the last century of AngloSaxon history is derived mainly from Anglo-Norman writers who wrote after the Norman Conquest.
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  • There was an AngloSaxon coin termed stilling, or scylling, worth about fivepence, which is said to be derived from a Teutonic root, skil, to divide, +ling on the analogy of farthing.
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  • During the 5th century the Angli invaded this country (see Britain, AngloSaxon), after which time their name does not recur on the continent except in the title of the code mentioned above.
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