Andronicus sentence example

andronicus
  • Danae formed the subject of tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Livius Andronicus and Naevius.
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  • Marx as indicating that Plautus was a member of the theatrical staff of Livius Andronicus.
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  • This the Latin drama first received from Livius Andronicus; but it did so at the cost of its originality.
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  • While under the protection of the grand prince, Andronicus brought about an alliance between him and the emperor Manuel, and so restored himself to the emperor's favour.
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  • After a successful campaign they returned together to Constantinople (1168); but a year after, Andronicus refused to take the oath of allegiance to the prince of Hungary, whom Manuel desired to become his successor.
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  • Being still under the displeasure of the emperor, Andronicus fled to the court of Raymund, prince of Antioch.
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  • The anger of the emperor was again roused by this dishonour, and Andronicus was compelled to fly.
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  • Although Andronicus was at that time fifty-six years old, age had not diminished his charms, and Theodora became the next victim of his artful seduction.
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  • Into that province Andronicus, with a body of adventurers, made frequent and successful incursions.
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  • To obtain their release Andronicus made abject submission to the emperor; and, appearing in chains before him, implored pardon.
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  • Her conduct excited popular indignation; and the consequent disorders, amounting almost to civil war, gave an opportunity to the ambition of Andronicus.
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  • Andronicus seems then to have resolved to exterminate the aristocracy, and his plans were nearly crowned with success.
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  • When Andronicus arrived he found that his power was overthrown, and that Isaac had been proclaimed emperor.
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  • Among the earlier buildings of this period is the Horologium The Horo- of Andronicus of Cyrrhus (the " Tower of the Winds"), logium of still standing near the eastern end of the Roman Agora.
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  • Led away by evil counsellors, Sauji Bey plotted with Andronicus, son of the emperor, to dethrone their respective fathers.
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  • The attempt was foiled; Andronicus was blinded by his father's orders and Sauji was put to death (1387).
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  • The young prince Andronicus, who 3fd9-/-t0 had not been completely blinded, sent secretly to Bayezid and offered him 30,000 ducats to dethrone his father John Palaeologus and make him emperor.
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  • As distinguished from Livius Andronicus, Naevius was a native Italian, not a Greek; he was also an original writer, not a mere adapter or translator.
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  • After the capture many Greek slaves were brought to Rome, and among them the young Livius Andronicus (c. 284-204), who was employed in teaching Greek in the family of his master, a member of the Livian gens.
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  • In the year after the war (240), when the armies had returned and the people were at leisure to enjoy the fruits of victory, Livius Andronicus substituted at one of the public festivals a regular drama, translated or adapted from the Greek, for the musical medleys (saturae) hitherto in use.
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  • His tenure of the bishopric was troubled not only by domestic bereavements but also by barbaric invasions of the country (in repelling which he proved himself a capable military organizer) and by conflicts with the prefect Andronicus, whom he excommunicated for interfering with the Church's right of asylum.
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  • Andronicus Palaeologus Comnenus was Great Domestic under Theodore Lascaris and John Vatatzes; his eldest son by Irene Palaeologina, Michael (q.v.), became the eighth emperor of that name in 1260, and was in turn followed by his son Andronicus II.
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  • Michael, the son of Andronicus, and associated with him in the empire, died in 1320, but left a son, Andronicus III., who reigned from 1328 to 1341; John VI.
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  • On the one hand, there is the curious story given partly by Strabo (608-609) and partly in Plutarch's Sulla (c. 26), that Aristotle's successor Theophrastus left the books of both to their joint pupil, Neleus of Scepsis, where they were hidden in a cellar, till in Sulla's time they were sold to Apellicon, who made new copies, transferred after Apellicon's death by Sulla to Rome, and there edited and published by Tyrannio and Andronicus.
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  • But two corollaries follow from our present investigation of his extant writings; the first, that it was the long continuance of the Peripatetic school which gradually caused the publication, and in some cases the forgery, of the separate writings; and the second, that his Peripatetic successors arranged and edited some of Aristotle's writings, and gradually arrived by the time of Andronicus, the eleventh from Aristotle, at an order of the whole body of writings forming the system.
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  • On the other hand, in the case of logic, it is certain that he did not combine his works on the subject into one whole, but that the Peripatetics afterwards put them together as organic, and made them the parts of logic as an organon, as they are treated by Andronicus.
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  • Secondly, the traditional order, which for nearly 2000 years has descended from the edition of Andronicus to the Berlin edition, is satisfactory in details, but unsatisfactory in system.
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  • Acting on this hint, not Aristotle but the Peripatetics inferred that all logic is an instrument (6pyavov) of all sciences; and by the time of Andronicus, who was one of them and sometimes called " the eleventh from Aristotle," the order, LogicPhysics-Metaphysics, had become established pretty much as we have it now.
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  • But what has become of Logic, with which the traditional order of Andronicus begins Aristotle's works (1-148 b 8)?
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  • Now, both were in the hands of his readers in the time of Andronicus.
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  • As regards the last point, the authority of Andronicus proves that he at all events did not exaggerate his own share in publishing Aristotle's works; but it does not prove either that this correspondence between Alexander and Aristotle took place, or that Aristotle called his philosophical writings acroamatic, or that he had published them wholesale to the world.
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  • The term was first applied to one of the treatises of Aristotle on the basis of the arrangement of the Aristotelian canon made by Andronicus of Rhodes, in which it was placed " after the physical treatises" with the description ra.
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  • Certainly the Rosa Ventorum, or Wind-rose, is far older than the compass itself; and the naming of the eight principal "winds" goes back to the Temple of the Winds in Athens built by Andronicus Cyrrhestes.
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  • In 1341 the dispute came before a synod held at Constantinople and presided over by the emperor Andronicus; the assembly, influenced by the veneration in which the writings of the pseudoDionysius were held in the Eastern Church, overawed Barlaam, who recanted and returned to Calabria, afterwards becoming bishop of Hierace in the Latin communion.
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  • His literary activity was considerable, his most important work being a Byzantine history in 13 books, in continuation of that of Georgius Acropolita from 1261 (or rather 1255) to 1308, containing the history of the reigns of Michael and Andronicus Palaeologi.
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  • Livius Andronicus, laid the foundation of a new Latin literature by his translation of the Odyssey, and that the Greek dramas were recast in a Latin mould.
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  • The Aaron of the Shakespearian play of Titus Andronicus was eventually derived from this source.
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  • Rebuilt by Andronicus II.
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  • In the year 905 the Greek general Andronicus took Marash, and penetrated as far as Haleb (Aleppo), but the Moslems were successful at sea, and in 907 captured Iconium, whilst Andronicus went over to the caliph's side, so that the Byzantine emperor sent an embassy to Bagdad to ask for a truce and an exchange of prisoners.
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  • Their party was defeated(May 2,1182),but Andronicus Comnenus took advantage of these disorders to aim at the crown, entered Constantinople, where he was received with almost divine honours, and overthrew the regents.
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  • At an early age he settled at Constantinople, where his reputation for learning brought him under the notice of Andronicus II., by whom he was appointed Chartophylax (keeper of the archives).
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  • When Andronicus was dethroned (1328) by his grandson Andronicus III., Gregoras shared his downfall and retired into private life.
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  • Gregoras remained loyal to the elder Andronicus to the last, but after his death he succeeded in gaining the favour of his grandson, by whom he was appointed to conduct the unsuccessful negotiations (for a union of the Greek and Latin churches) with the ambassadors of Pope John XXII.
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  • Amongst them may be mentioned a history of the dispute with Palamas; biographies of his uncle and early instructor John, metropolitan of Heraclea, and of the martyr Codratus of Antioch; funeral orations for Theodore Metochita, and the two emperors Andronicus; commentaries on the wanderings of Odysseus and on Synesius's treatise on dreams; tracts on orthography and on words of doubtful meaning; a philosophical dialogue called Florentius or Concerning Wisdom; astronomical treatises on the date of Easter and the preparation of the astrolabe; and an extensive correspondence.
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  • He appears to have outlived Andronicus I., who died in 1185.
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  • The impulse was due to Andronicus of Rhodes.
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  • His critical edition of Aristotle indicated to the later Peripatetics the direction in which they could Andronicus.
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  • Repairs are recorded under Basil I., Basil II., Andronicus III.
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  • This is expressed on the Horologium of Andronicus Cyrrhestes, called the Temple or Tower of the Winds, at Athens, where Boreas is represented as a bearded man of stern aspect, thickly clad, and wearing strong buskins; he blows into a conch shell, which he holds in his hand as a sign of his tempestuous character.
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  • Another of his daughters, Anna, married the Greek emperor Andronicus Palaeologus.
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  • In Constantinople he had audience of Andronicus II.; he gives an enthusiastic description of St Sophia.
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  • His son Milutin continued that policy for some time, and increased his territory by taking several fortified places from the Greeks; but later he joined the Greeks under the emperor Andronicus against the Turks.
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  • He was assassinated by Andronicus's son and colleague, the emperor Michael IX., in 1305.
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  • His adventurers (known as the Catalan Grand Company) declared war upon Andronicus, and, after devastating Thrace and Macedonia, conquered the duchy of Athens and Thebes.
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  • From 1320 onwards the emperor was engaged in war with his grandson Andronicus (see below).
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  • She had also a temple on the Aventine, which was the meeting-place for dramatic poets and actors, whose organization into gilds under her patronage dated from the time of Livius Andronicus.
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  • After the deposition of his patron by Andronicus III., Metochita was deprived of his office of great logothete (chancellor) and sent into exile.
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  • Andronicus rebelled; he had a powerful party, and the first period of civil war ended in his being crowned and accepted as colleague by his grandfather, 1325.
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  • The city was several times besieged, the most formidable attack being that which occurred in the reign of Andronicus I., the second emperor, when the Seljuks, under the command of Melik, the son of the great sultan Ala-ed-din, first assaulted the northern wall in the direction of the sea, and afterwards endeavoured to storm the upper citadel by night.
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  • About this time (1153) a conspiracy against the emperor, in which Andronicus participated, was discovered and he was thrown into prison.
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