Alpina sentence example

alpina
  • The following species, none of which are found in European Russia, are characteristic of the tundras - arbutus (Arctostaphilus alpina), heaths or andomedas (Cassiope tetragona and C. hypnoides), Phyllodoce taxifolia, Loiseleuria procumbens, a species of Latifolium, a Polar azalea (Osmothamnus fragrans) and a Polar willow (Salix arctica).
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  • On the upper verge of the pine forests, or in the scrubby vegetation just beyond, the following are not uncommon - black woodpecker (Picus martius), ring-ousel (Turdus torquatus), Bonelli's warbler (Phylloscopus Bonellii), crested tit (Parus cristatus), citril finch (Citrinella alpina), siskin (Chrysomitris spinus), crossbill (Loxia curvirostra), nutcracker (Nucifraga caryocatactes), blackcock (Tetrao tetrix), and the alpine varieties of the marsh-tit (Parus palustris, borealis) and tree-creeper (Certhia familiaris, costae).
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  • Some species, such as Poa stricta, are known only in this viviparous condition; others, like our British species Festuca ovina, and Poa alpina, become viviparous under the special climatic. conditions.
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  • Buttermere Fells is also a locality for the rare Alpine catchfly Lychnis alpina.
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  • Typical mountain steppe mammals include Altai pika Ochotona alpina, arctic ground squirrel Citellus undulatus and Siberian chipmunk Tamias sibiricus.
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  • Scarcer plants that occasionally occur throughout include Alpine saw-wort Saussurea alpina, alpine meadow rue Thalictrum alpinum.
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  • Rarer arctic-Alpines on the site include alpine saw-wort Saussurea alpina, alpine saxifrage Saxifraga nivalis and holly-fern Polystichum lonchitis.
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  • Rarer arctic-alpines on the site include alpine saw-wort Saussurea alpina, alpine saxifrage Saxifraga nivalis and holly-fern Polystichum lonchitis.
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  • Rare plants, such as touch-me-not balsam Impatiens noli-tangere and alpine enchanter's-nightshade Circaea alpina, also have important British occurrences here.
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  • Alpina, angustifolia, Clusii, and Kochiana, which thrive best in calcareous soils, except the last, which requires a soil free of it.
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  • Of this group A. alpina is useful for rocky banks or edging bogbeds.
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  • A. alpina, the Black Bearberry, has trailing stems and white or flesh-colored flowers.
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  • C. alpina is much smaller, and when once established not difficult to cultivate or increase, but more affected by excessive moisture than C. fragilis.
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  • Several kinds are bold and handsome in leaf, especially R. alpina, R. libanotica, and R. tinctoria, and in a less degree others like Purshiana, Caroliniana, alnifolia, and davurica.
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  • P. alpina differs from all other kinds in having white flowers, marked more or less with lemon-yellow on the lip, but sometimes tinted with pale pink.
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  • A small form, with leaves like those of P. alpina, both in form and color, is found in alpine bogs in the north of England.
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  • The Mountain Cats-ears, A. dioica and A. alpina, and such forms as A. minima, are neat little plants with whitish foliage, used as carpeting.
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  • Alpine Hairbell (Campanula Alpina) - Covered with stiff down, giving it a slightly grey appearance, 5 to 10 inches high; flowers of dark fine blue, scattered along the stems, margins of mixed border, and the rock garden.
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  • S. alpina is of more alpine habit, forming dense tufts close to the ground, from these arising slender stems bearing yellow button-like flowers.
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  • L. alpina, a native of New Zealand, is dwarf, and produces from a creeping rhizome abundance of dark shining green fronds, 4 to 6 inches in height.
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  • S. alpina is one of the most interesting of the plants growing near the snow-line on the great mountain-chains of Europe.
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  • S. montana is allied to S. alpina, but with larger leaves and purer blue flowers.
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  • N. alpina, better known as Hutchinsia, is also attractive, with its glossy green leaves and white flowers.
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  • P. alpina, from the mountains of Tasmania, is probably the hardiest of the group, but is only a Yew-like shrub of semi-prostrate habit, more interesting than beautiful.
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  • It is closely allied to the alpine Rock Cress (A. alpina), so widely distributed on the Alps, but is distinct, and the best kind.
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  • The alpine Skullcap (S. alpina) is a spreading plant with all the vigour of the coarsest weeds of its natural order, but neat in habit and ornamental in flower.
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  • D. Aizoon, alpina, ciliaris, cuspidata, lapponica, rupestris, frigida, and helvetica are very dwarf, compact-growing plants.
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