Advocatus sentence example

advocatus
  • The vidame was originally, like the avoue (advocatus), an official chosen by the bishop of the diocese, with the consent of the count.
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  • But the causes that changed the character of the advocatus operated also in the case of the vidame.
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  • The liberties of the burghers were, however, still restrained by the presence of a royal advocatus (Vogt) and bailiff.
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  • Direct collection of taxes by imperial procurators was substituted for the system of farming, and a special official (advocatus fisci) was instituted to look after the interests of the imperial treasury.
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  • Subsequently it became the seat of the Landvogt of Hagenau, the imperial advocatus in Lower Alsace.
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  • The counts, of course, as over-lords, had their Vogt (advocatus) in the town, but this official, as the city grew in power, became subordinate to the Rath, as at Lubeck.
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  • In feudal subordination to him a royal count, who was also Vogt (advocatus) of the cathedral church of St Martin, had his seat at Utrecht as the chief town of the Gouw (Gau, pagus) of Ifterlake.
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  • By the middle of the 14th century this situation was exactly reversed; the elected town council was the supreme legislative power in all criminal and civil causes, and in the court of the advocatus two Ratsm¢nner sat as assessors.
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  • Later the overlordship was claimed by the archbishops of Mainz, on the strength of charters granted by the emperor Otto I., and their authority in Erfurt was maintained by a burgrave and an advocatus, the office of the latter becoming in the 12th century hereditary in the family of the counts of Gleichen.
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  • The chief of these was usually the advocatus or Vogt, some neighbouring noble who served as the proctor of the church in all secular affairs.
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  • The vidame was originally, like the avoue (advocatus), an official chosen by the bishop of the diocese, with the consent of the count (see Advocate).
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  • During the Carolingian epoch, indeed, advocatus and vice-dominus were interchangeable terms; and it was only in the 11th century rthat they became generally differentiated: the title of avoue being commonly reserved for nobles charged with the protection of an abbey, that of vidame for those guarding an episcopal see.
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