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zurich

zurich

zurich Sentence Examples

  • In 1911 he accepted the chair of physics in Prague, only to be induced to return to his own polytechnic school at Zurich as full professor in the following year.

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  • He was ordained at Zurich, and from him Court himself received ordination.

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  • In 1867 he became privatdozent in Berlin University, and in the following year was chosen professor of physics at the Zurich Polytechnic: then, after a year or two at Wurzburg, he was called in 1872 to Strassburg, where he took a great part in the organization of the new university, and was largely concerned in the erection of the Physical Institute.

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  • He was educated at Zurich and at Saumur (where he graduated), studied theology at Orleans under Claude Pajon, at Paris under Jean Claude and at Geneva under Louis Tronchin, and was ordained to the ministry in his native place in 1683.

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  • degree at the university of Zurich and published his first papers on physical subjects.

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  • These were so highly thought of that in 1909 he was appointed extraordinary professor of theoretical physics at the university of Zurich.

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  • The terms of the treaty of peace signed at Zurich on the 10th of November were practically identical with those of the preT liminaries of Villafranca.

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  • Flahault and Schroter, Phytogeographicol Nomenclature: reports and propositions (Zurich, 1910).

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  • Thus his " studious and sedentary life " passed pleasantly enough, interrupted only at rare intervals by boyish excursions of a day or a week in the neighbourhood, and by at least one memorable tour of Switzerland, by Basel, Zurich, Lucerne and Bern, made along with Pavilliard in the autumn of 1755.

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  • Allamand of Bex, and the Professor Breitinger of Zurich, and opened a new one with the Professor Gesner of Göttingen.

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  • of Zurich.

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  • Massena's triumph at Zurich (September 25th-26th, 1799) paralysed the Second Coalition; and, though the Austrians continued to make progress along the Italian riviera, the French Republic was in little danger on that side so long as it held Switzerland.

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  • 2 Meanwhile the study received a great impulse from the appearance, at Zurich in 1555, of the third book of Conrad Gesner's Historia Animalium " qvi est de Auium natura," and at Paris in the same year of Pierre Belon's (Bellonius) Histoire de la nature des Oyseaux.

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  • The general movement for the extension of cotton cultivation wa.s welcomed by the International Congress of representatives of master cotton spinners and manufacturers' associations at the meeting at Zurich in May 1904.

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  • He was the son of a physician, and went to study medicine first at Zurich University in 1851, and then, two years later, at Wurzburg, where he had R.

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  • Ludwig, under whom he studied at Zurich, decided him to devote his attention to physiological chemistry, and therefore he went, after his graduation (18J4), to Heidelberg, where R.

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  • Wagner fled to Paris and thence to Zurich, where he lived in almost unbroken retirement until the autumn of 1859.

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  • C. Gyger (Canton of Zurich, a masterpiece, 1667); Italy by G.

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  • Meyer of Aarau and Muller of Engelberg in papier mache, now in Zurich.

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  • A little below the town of Glarus the river, keeping its northerly direction, runs through the alluvial plain which it has formed, towards the Walensee and the Lake of Zurich.

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  • But between the Lake of Zurich and the Walensee the huge desolate alluvial plain grew ever in size, while great damage was done by the river, which overflowed its bed and the dykes built to protect the region near it.

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  • The necessary works were begun in 1807 under the supervision of Hans Conrad Escher of Zurich (1767-1823).

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  • The second portion, known as the "Linth canal," regulated the course of the river between the Walensee and the Lake of Zurich and was completed in 1816.

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  • On issuing from the Lake of Zurich the Linth alters its name to that of "Limmat," it does not appear wherefore, and, keeping the north-westerly direction it had taken from the Walensee, joins the Aar a little way below Brugg, and just below the junction of the Reuss with the Aar.

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  • Johann Lucas Schdnlein (1793-1864) was first professor at Wiirzburg, afterwards at Zurich, and for twenty years at Berlin (from 1839-1859).

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  • This act by tradition happened on the market-place, where in 1895, at the foot of an old tower (with rude frescoes commemorating the feat), there was set up a fine bronze statue (by Richard Kissling of Zurich) of Tell and his son.

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  • In the 14th century there were schools at Mainz, Strassburg, Frankfort, Wiirzburg, Zurich and Prague; in the 15th at Augsburg and Nuremberg, the last becoming in the following century, under Hans Sachs, the most famous of all.

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  • Philipp, Linguet, ein Nationaliikonom des X VIII Jahrhunderts in seinen rechtlichen, socialen and volkswirtschaftlichen Anschauungen (Zurich, 1896); A.

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  • by rail from Zurich, and is the meeting-point of the routes from Italy over many Alpine passes (the Lukmanier, the Splugen, the San Bernardino) as well as from the Engadine (Albula, Julier), so that it is the centre of an active trade (particularly in wine from the Valtelline), though it possesses also a few local factories.

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  • The bishopric still exists, with jurisdiction over the Cantons of the Grisons, Glarus, Zurich, and the three Forest Cantons, as well as the Austrian principality of Liechtenstein.

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  • von Juvalt, Forschungen uber die Feudalzeit im Curischen Raetien, 2 parts (Zurich, 1871); C. Kind, Die Reformation in den Bisthumern Chur and Como (Coire, 1858); Conradin von Moor, Geschichte von Curraetien (2 vols., Coire, 1870-1874); P. C. von Planta, Das alte Raetien (Berlin, 1872); Idem, Die Curraetischen Herrschaften in der Feudalzeit (Bern, 1881); Idem, Verfassungsgeschichte der Stadt Cur im Mittelalter (Coire, 1879); Idem, Geschichte von Graubunden (Bern, 1892).

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  • His education, begun in Zurich and Berlin, was completed at the university of Leipzig, where he graduated in 1876.

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  • In 1877 he became professor of philosophy in Zurich, where he died on the 18th of August 1896.

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  • He must not be confused with Emil Kopp (1817-1875), who, born at Warselnheim, Alsace, became in 1847 professor of toxicology and chemistry at the Ecole superieure de Pharmacie at Strasburg, in 1849 professor of physics and chemistry at Lausanne, in 1852 chemist to a Turkey-red factory near Manchester, in 1868 professor of technology at Turin, and finally, in 1871, professor of technical chemistry at the Polytechnic of Zurich, where he died in 1875.

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  • de Gingins-la-Sarra, Memoires pour servir a l'histoire de Provence et de Bourgogne Jurane (Zurich, 1851).

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  • Ochino escaped to Geneva, and Vermigli to Zurich, thence to Basel, and finally to Strassburg, where, with Bucer's support, he was appointed professor of theology and married his first wife, Catherine Dammartin of Metz.

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  • He befriended a number of English exiles, but had himself in 1556 to accept an offer of the chair of Hebrew at Zurich owing to his increased alienation from Lutheranism.

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  • He was invited to Geneva in 1.557, and to England again in 1561, but declined both invitations, maintaining, however, a constant correspondence with Jewel and other English prelates and reformers until his death at Zurich on the 12th of November 1562.

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  • Vermigli's second wife, Caterina Merenda, whom he married at Zurich, survived him, marrying a merchant of Locarno.

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  • (General Index), especially the Zurich Letters; Strype's Works; Foxe's Acts and Monuments; Burnet's Hist., ed.

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  • Switzerland The Nova litteraria helvetica (1703-1715) of Zurich is the earliest literary periodical which Switzerland can show.

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  • The Swiss History was re-issued at Leipzig and Zurich, in 15 vols.

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  • Wyss's Geschichte der Historiographie in der Schweiz (Zurich, 18 95), pp. 3 0 5-3 11, and in the Festschrift der Stadt Schaffhausen (Schaffhausen, 1891), pt.

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  • Miller's letters to Fi sslin (1771-1807) were issued at Zurich (1812), and those to Ch.

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  • These interviews settled the preliminaries of an alliance; but they rested on the assumption that the theological feud between Wittenberg and Zurich could be removed, or its violence at least abated.

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  • bis Ende Juli 1855 (Geneva, 1855); and Aus meinen Erinnerungen (translated from the Hungarian, Zurich, 1887).

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  • The accession of Mary in 1553 drove him from England, and he became pastor of the Italian congregation at Zurich.

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  • Ochino was banished from Zurich, and, after being refused a shelter by other Protestant cities, directed his steps towards Poland, at that time the most tolerant state in Europe.

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  • Kekule, De fabula meleagrea dissertatio (1861); Surber, Die Meleagersage (Zurich, 1880); articles on "Meleager" and "Meleagrides" in Roscher's Lexikon der Mythologie; L.

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  • von Wyss, Karl der Grosse als Gesetzgeber (Zurich, 1869); Th.

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  • Next morning, having sold his horse, he walked into Geneva, put up at " the Rose," and asked for a boat to take him towards Zurich on his way to Naples.

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  • He did not stay long at Prague, and we find him next at Zurich, whence he accepted an invitation to Venice from a young patrician, Giovanni Mocenigo.

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  • Volkmar, Epistula Polycarpi Smyrnaei genuina (Zurich, 1885); T.

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  • A tutorship at Zurich was, however, obtained in the spring of 1788, and Fichte spent in Switzerland two of the happiest years of his life.

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  • It had been arranged that he should return to Zurich and be married to Johanna Rahn, but the plan was overthrown by a commercial disaster which affected the fortunes of the Rahn family.

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  • This success was coincident with an improvement in the fortunes of the Rahn family, and the marriage took place at Zurich in October 1793.

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  • The remainder of the year he spent at Zurich, slowly perfecting his thoughts on the fundamental problems left for solution in the Kantian philosophy.

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  • The religious ideas in South Germany were affected by the development of a reform party in Switzerland, under the influence of Zwingli, who claimed that at Einsiedeln, near the lake of Zurich, he had begun to preach the gospel of Christ in the year 1516 " before any one in my locality tion in had so much as heard the name of Luther."

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  • Three Switzer- ears later he became preacher in the cathedral of Zurich.

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  • Since no one presented himself to refute him, the town council ratified his conclusions, so that the city of Zurich practically withdrew from the Roman Catholic Church.

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  • Some other towns, including Bern, followed Zurich's example, but the Forest cantons refused to accept the innovations.

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  • In 1525 a religious and political league was arranged between Zurich and Constance, which in the following year was joined by St Gallen, Biel, Muhlhausen, Basel and Strassburg.

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  • He heard Zwingli at Zurich in 1527, and next year accompanied him to the disputation at Berne.

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  • On the 9th of December 1531 he was chosen to succeed Zwingli as chief pastor of Zurich.

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  • The volumes of the Zurich Letters, published by the Parker Society, testify to his influence on the English reformation in later stages.

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  • He died at Zurich on the 17th of September 1575.

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  • In the same year he was elected parish priest of Glarus, in spite of the pope's nomination of Heinrich Goldli, an influential pluralist of Zurich, whom Zwingli found it necessary to buy off at an expense of more than a hundred gulden.

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  • His convictions on this matter were so much intensified by his later experiences as army chaplain that in 1521 he prevailed upon the authorities of the canton of Zurich to renounce the practice altogether.

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  • Zwingli prevailed on the council to forbid his entrance into Zurich; and even then the pope argued that, so long as the preacher was still receiving a papal pension, he could not be a formidable adversary, and he gave him a further sop in the form of an acolyte chaplaincy.

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  • Zwingli had never meant to remain at Einsiedeln long, and he now threw himself into a competition for the place of people's priest at the Great Minster of Zurich, and obtained it (1518) after some opposition.

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  • In the beginning of 1519 he began a series of discourses on St Matthew's Gospel, the Acts of the Apostles, and the Pauline epistles; and with these it may be said that the Reformation was fairly begun in Zurich.

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  • them before the council of Zurich.

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  • Thus legal sanction was given in Zurich to the Reformation.

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  • When a solemn embassy of rebuke was sent to Zurich from a diet held at Lucerne, on the 26th of January 1524, the city replied that in matters relating to the Word of God and the salvation of souls she would brook no interference.

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  • When a new embassy threatened Zurich with exclusion from the union she began to make preparations for war.

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  • Zwingli's theological views are expressed succinctly in the sixtyseven theses published at Zurich in 1523, and at greater length in the First Helvetic Confession, compiled in 1536 by a number of his disciples.'

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  • All rules and regulations about the public worship, doctrines and discipline of the Church were made in Zwingli's time, and with his consent, by the council of Zurich, which was the supreme civil authority in the state.

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  • Finsler, Zwingli-Bibliographie (Zurich, 1897).

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  • (Zurich, 1545, 1581); by M.

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  • (Zurich, 1828-42, with "supplementorum fasciculus," 1861); by E.

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  • published twice a year since 1897 at Zurich.

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  • Muller, Der Aargau, 2 vols., Zurich, 1870; E.

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  • Schweizer, Die protestantischen Centraldogmen in ihrer Entwicklung innerhalb der reformierten Kirche, zweite Halfte (Zurich, 1856), 25-224; H.

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  • In 1833 he was called to the university of Zurich as professor ordinarius of theology.

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  • At Zurich he laboured for a period of twenty-eight years, during which, besides commentaries on The Psalms (1835-1836; 2nd ed..

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  • He was also a contributor to the Monatsschrift des wissenschaftlichen Vereins in Zurich, the Zeitschrift der deutschen morgenliindischen Gesellschaft, the Theologische Studien u.

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  • The principal groups are those in the Lakes of Bourget, Geneva, Neuchatel, Bienne, Zurich and Constance lying to the north of the Alps, and in the Lakes Maggiore, Varese, Iseo and Garda lying to the south of that mountain range.

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  • - The materials for the investigation of this singular phase of prehistoric life were first collected and systematized by Dr Ferdinand Keller (1800-1881), of Zurich, and printed in Mittheilungen der Antiquarischen Gesellschaft in Zurich, vols.

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  • In 1 555 a number of Protestant inhabitants were expelled for religious reasons, and going to Zurich founded the silk industry there.

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  • The canton is, save Zug, the smallest in the Swiss Confederation, while the city, long the most populous in the land, is now surpassed by Zurich and by Basel.

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  • In 1579 Geneva was included in the alliance concluded by France with Bern and Soleure, while in 1584 Zurich joined Bern in another alliance with Geneva.

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  • Other compilations were those of Oecolampadius (Basel, 1526), Leo Juda (Zurich, 1534), and Bullinger (Zurich, 1555).

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  • In 18J3 Semper left London for Zurich on his appointment as professor of architecture, and with a commission to build in that town the polytechnic school and the hospital.

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  • They are as follows: Institutum Societatis Jesu (7 vols., Avignon, 1830-1838); Orlandini, Historia Societatis Jesu (Antwerp, 1620); Imago primi saeculi Societatis Jesu (Antwerp, 1640); Nieremberg, Vida de San Ignacio de Loyola (9 vols., fol., Madrid, 1645-1736); Genelli, Life of St Ignatius of Loyola (London, 1872); Backer, Bibliotheque des ecrivains de la Compagnie de Jesus (7 vols., Paris, 1853-1861); Cretineau Joly, Histoire de la Compagnie de Jesus (6 vols., Paris, 1844); Guettee, Histoire des Jesuites (3 vols., Paris, 1858-1859); Wolff, Allgemeine Geschichte der Jesuiten (4 vols., Zurich, 1789-1792); Gioberti, Il Gesuita moderno (Lausanne, 1846); F.

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  • Lecturing on Isaiah he condemned current ecclesiastical abuses, and in a public disputation (loth of August 1523) was so successful that Erasmus writing to Zurich said "Oecolampadius has the upper hand amongst us."

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  • Christopher Froschouer of Zurich, 3 who printed the edition of 1550, and that the sheets were sent for binding and distribution to James Nicolson, the Southwark printer.'

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  • p. 163) identifies as Luther, the Zurich Bible, the Latin version of Pagninus, the Vulgate, and, in all likelihood, the English translation of Tyndale.

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  • This curious and interesting plan has been made the subject of a memoir both by Keller (Zurich, 1844) and by Professor Robert Willis (Arch.

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  • Kolliker, Entwickelungsgeschichte der Cephalopoden (Zurich, 1844).

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  • In 1874 he was elected regular professor of philosophy at Zurich, and in the following year was called to the corresponding chair at Leipzig, where he founded an Institute for Experimental Psychology, the precursor of many similar institutes.

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  • Third on the list of continental producers is Switzerland; Zurich takes the lead with broad goods (failles, armures, satins, serges, &c.), and Basel rivals St Etienne in the ribbon trade.

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  • He was, nevertheless, suspected, fled to London, and thence to Frankfort, which he reached in March 1555 There he sided with Coxe against Knox, but soon joined Martyr at Strassburg, accompanied him to Zurich, and then paid a visit to Padua.

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  • DANIEL SCHENKEL (1813-1885), Swiss Protestant theologian, was born at Dagerlen in the canton of Zurich on the 21st of December 1813.

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  • De Gerando gained the prize, and heard of his success after the battle of Zurich, in which he had distinguished himself.

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  • Walder, Aus den Bergen (Zurich, 1896); A.

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  • A phrod., Ammonii, et aliorum de Fate quae supersunt (Zurich, 1824).

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  • Kayser (Zurich, 1844; Leipzig, 1870-1871), and another by Westermann (Paris, 1849), with Latin translation; these supersede those by F.

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  • This change was due to the influence of Zwingli whose colleague at Zurich Jud became after serving for four years (1518-1522) as pastor of Einsiedeln.

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  • His chief activity was as a translator; he was the leading spirit in the translation of the Zurich Bible and also made a Latin version of the Old Testament.

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  • He died at Zurich on the 19th of June 1542.

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  • Holtzmann, Die synoptischen Evangelien, p. 373), the Apocalypse (Hitzig, Ueber Johannes Marcus, Zurich, 1843).

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  • Christ, Das Pflanzenleben der Schweiz (1882) - the chief classic on the subject; Engler, Die Pflanzenformationen and die pflanzengeographische Gliederung der Alpenkette (1901); Heer, Ueber die nivale Flora der Schweiz (1885); Jerosch, Geschichte and Herkunft der schweizerischen Alpenflora; eine Ubersicht fiber den gegenwartigen Stand der Frage (1903); Schroter, Das Pflanzenleben der Alpen (Zurich, 1908); R.

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  • Berne), after the Grisons, the largest of the Swiss cantons, but by far the most populous, though politically Bern ranks after that of Zurich.

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  • Wislicenus at Zurich.

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  • Weith (1844-1881), professor of chemistry at Zurich University, he undertook to continue the lectures on benzene derivatives, and this led him to the discovery of thiophen.

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  • of Zurich or 142 m.

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  • He thus visited in succession Colmar, Nuremberg, Appenzell, Zurich, Pfaffers, Augsburg, Villach, Meran, Middelheim and other places, seldom staying a twelvemonth in any of them.

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  • Benoit Turretin (1588-1631), the son of Francesco Turretini, a native of Lucca, who settled in Geneva in 1579, was born at Zurich on the 9th of November 1588.

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  • From 1879 to 1882 he lived at Zurich, then the headquarters of Social Democracy, when, besides attending the university, he took part in editing the Social Demokrat.

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  • In addition to a couple of books on the preservation of forests, he published Der isolierte Soziale Staat (Zurich, 1880).

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  • A few weeks later Hutten died on an island in the lake of Zurich.

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  • A weekly paper, the Social-Democrat, was established at Zurich.

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  • Its introduction into Germany was of course forbidden, but it was soon found possible regularly to distribute thousands of copies every week in every part of the country, and it continued to exist till 1887 at Zurich, and till 1890 in London.

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  • In 1516 he was called, as schoolmaster, to Zurich, where (1518) he attached himself to the reforming party of Zwingli.

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  • This led to his being transferred to Lucerne, and again (1523) reinstated at Zurich.

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  • Murray, Phycological Memoirs (London, 1892-1895); An Introduction to the Study of Seaweeds (London, 1895); C. Naegeli, Die neueren Algensysteme (Zurich, 1847); F.

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  • 45 (Vierteljahrsschrift der naturforschenden Gesellschaft in Zurich, 1878), has given a resume of the manuscripts still preserved at Cassel, which throw much light on the methods adopted in the observations and reductions.

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  • He assisted Kinkel in editing the Bonner Zeitung, and on the outbreak of the Revolution of 1848 took the field, but when Rastatt surrendered he escaped to Zurich.

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  • The first leaders of the movement in Zurich - Grebel, Manz, Blaurock, Hubmaier - were men learned in Greek, Latin and Hebrew.

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  • The earliest Anabaptists of Zurich allowed that the Picardi or Waldensians had, in contrast with Rome and the Reformers, truth on their side, yet did not claim to be in their succession; nor can it be shown that their adult baptism derived from any of the older Baptist sects, which undoubtedly lingered in parts of Europe.

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  • Both appear first in the 15th century, probably as results of the war for the Toggenburg inheritance (1436-50); for the intense hatred of Austria, greatly increased by her support of the claims of Zurich, favoured the circulation of stories which assumed that Swiss freedom was of immemorial antiquity, while, as the war was largely a struggle between the civic and rural elements in the Confederation, the notion that the (rural) Schwyzers were of Scandinavian descent at once separated them from and raised them above the German inhabitants of the towns.

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  • Several details, but only one name, are added in the De Nobilitate et Rusticitate Dialogus (cap. 33) of Felix Hemmerli, a canon of Zurich, who wrote it after 1451 and before 1454; in this last year he was imprisoned by the Schwyzers, whom he had repeatedly insulted and attacked in his books.

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  • In the final recension of Tschudi's Chronicle (1734-36), which, however, differs in many particulars from the original draft still preserved at Zurich, we are told how Albert of Austria, with the view of depriving the Forest lands of their ancient freedom, sent bailiffs (among them Gessler) to Uri and Schwyz, who committed many tyrannical acts, so that finally on 8th November 1307, at the Riitli, Werner von Stauffacher of Schwyz, Walter Fiirst of Uri, Arnold von Melchthal in Unterwalden, each with ten companions, among whom was William Tell, resolved on a rising to expel the oppressors, which was fixed for New Year's Day 1308.

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  • Unterwalden - in den Jahren1212-1315(Zurich, 1858); Alf.

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  • The chief fruit of these studies is the vast commentary on the Bible (Zurich, 7 vols., 1532-1539), which shows a remarkably sound judgment on questions of the text, and a sense for historical as opposed to typological exegesis.

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  • At length, when the position was becoming quite untenable, he received through Zwingli a call to Zurich as professor of Greek and Hebrew, and formally throwing off his monk's habit, entered on a new life.

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  • JOHANN HEINRICH HEIDEGGER (1633-1698), Swiss theologian, was born at Barentschweil, in the canton of Zurich, Switzerland, on the 1st of July 1633.

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  • He returned in 1665 to Zurich, where he was elected professor of moral philosophy.

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  • He was educated in his native town and at Berlin, and after teaching in a private family became Privatdocent at Erlangen (184r) and then professor of theology at Zurich (1844).

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  • C. Orelli, Zurich, 1824; and his commentaries on the Metaphysica by H.

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  • On the second of these journeys he revisited Friederike in Sesenheim, saw Lili, who had married and settled in Strassburg, and made the personal acquaintance of Lavater in Zurich.

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  • Landsgemeinden (Zurich, 1903); J.

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  • The first, known also as the Second Confession of Basel, was drawn up at that city in 1536 by Bullinger and Leo Jud of Zurich, Megander of Bern,Oswald Myconius and Grynaeus of Basel, Bucer and Capito of Strassburg, with other representatives from Schaffhausen, St Gall, Muhlhausen and Biel.

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  • The first draft was in Latin and the Zurich delegates objected to its Lutheran phraseology.'

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  • Turning his attention to technical chemistry, he became chemist at several works both in Germany and England, and in 1876 he was appointed professor of technical chemistry at Zurich polytechnic. Lunge's original contributions cover a very wide field, dealing both with technical processes and analysis.

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  • His jubilee was celebrated at Zurich on the 15th of September 1909.

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  • The principal treaties affecting the distribution of territory between the various states of Central Europe are those of Westphalia (Osnabruck and Miinster), 1648; Utrecht, 1713;1713; Paris and Hubertusburg, 1763; for the partition of Poland, 1772, 1793; Vienna, 1815; London, for the separation of Belgium from the Netherlands, 1831, 1839; Zurich, for the cession of a portion of Lombardy to Sardinia, 1859; Vienna, as to SchleswigHolstein, 1864; Prague, whereby the German Confederation was dissolved, Austria recognizing the new North German Confederation, transferring to Prussia her rights over SchleswigHolstein, and ceding the remainder of Lombardy to Italy, 1866; Frankfort, between France and the new German Empire, 1871.

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  • In point of population it is exceeded in Switzerland by Zurich, Basel and Geneva, though the number of inhabitants has risen from 27,558 in 1850 and 43,197 in 1880 to 64,227 in 1900.

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  • From 1815 to 1848 it shared with Zurich and Lucerne the supreme rule (which shifted from one to the other every two years) in the Swiss confederation, while in 1848 a federal law made Bern the sole political capital, where the federal government is permanently fixed and where the ministers of foreign powers reside.

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  • Bern (Zurich, 1902).

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  • About this time, during the interregnum, a federation of more than a hundred towns was formed, beginning on the Rhine, but spreading as far as Bremen in the north, Zurich in the south, and Regensburg in the east, with the object of helping to preserve the peace.

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  • Zurich, however, is the only German place where a kind of tyrannis, so frequent in Italy, came to be for a while established.

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  • In 1856 he became a Privat-docent, and in 1858 extraordinary professor at Leipzig; in 1861 professor of philology and archaeology at Tubingen; in 1864 professor of classical antiquities at Zurich; in 1869 at Jena, where he was also director of the archaeological museum; in 1874 at Munich, where he remained until his death on the 21st of September 1883.

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  • Culmann, Graphische Stalik (2nd ed., Zurich, 1895); A.

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  • Culmann, published at Zurich in 1866.

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  • There is more than one meaning of Zurich discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

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  • JOSIAS SIMLER (1530-1576), author of the first book relating solely to the Alps, was the son of the former prior of the Cistercian convent of Kappel (Canton of Zurich), and was born at Kappel, where his father was the Protestant pastor and schoolmaster till his death in 1557.1544 Simler went to Zurich to continue his education under his godfather, the celebrated reformer, Heinrich Bullinger.

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  • After having completed his studies at Basel and Strasburg, he returned to Zurich, and acted as a pastor in the neighbouring villages.

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  • In 1552 he was made professor of New Testament exegesis at the Carolinum at Zurich, and in 1560 became professor of theology.

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  • It was republished by the Elzevirs at Leiden in 1633, and again at Zurich in 1735, while an elaborate annotated edition (prepared by Mr Coolidge), with French translation, notes and appendices, appeared at Grenoble in 1904.

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  • Another fragment of his vast plan was the work entitled De Helvetiorum republics, which appeared at Zurich in 1576, just before his death.

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  • von Wyss (Zurich, 1855), and in Mr Coolidge's book, pp. cxlvii.-clviii.

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  • See Walther, Darmstadt wie es war and wie es geworden (Darms. 1865); and Zernin and Worner, Darmstadt and seine Umgebung (Zurich, 1890).

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  • T., Zurich, 1880;1880; Bab.

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  • Theodore Beza from Geneva and Peter Martyr Vermigli from Zurich appeared at the colloquy; the German theologians to whom invitations had been despatched only arrived in Paris after the discussion was broken off.

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  • On the 7th of March 1526 the Zurich Rath issued an edict threatening all who were baptized anew with death by drowning, and in 1529 the emperor Charles V., at the diet of Spires, ordered Anabaptists to be put to death with fire and sword without even the form of ecclesiastical trial.

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  • Manz was drowned at Zurich and Michael Sattler (ca.

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  • It is strange that the Protestant Council of Zurich, which had scarcely won its own liberty, and was still in dread of the persecution of the Romanists, should pass the decree which instituted the cruel persecution of the Anabaptists.

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  • In the reign of Edward VI., after the return of the exiles from Zurich, John Hooper (bishop of Gloucester and Worcester, d.

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  • to take severe measures against Arnold, who had to leave France and take refuge at Zurich.

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  • JOHANN HEINRICH HOTTINGER (1620-1667), Swiss philo logist and theologian, was born at Zurich on the 10th of March 1620.

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  • In 1661, however, he returned to Zurich, where in 1662 he was chosen principal of the university.

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  • His SOD, JOHANN JAKOB HOTTINGER (1652-1735), who became professor of theology at Zurich in 1698, was the author of a work against Roman Catholicism, Helvetische Kirchengeschichte (4 vols., 1698-1729); and his grandson, JOHANN HEINRICH HOTTINGER (1681-1750), who in 1721 was appointed professor of theology at Heidelberg, wrote a work on dogmatics, Typus doctrinae christianae (1714).

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  • Between the publication of this work and that of the Friedliche Bleitter he had been elected to a chair of theology in the university of Zurich.

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  • (Zurich, 1858).

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  • valley, canton of Zurich, Switzerland, and by rail 17 m.

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  • In 1292 the men of Zurich were beaten back in an attempt to take the town.

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  • of Zurich in 1467, its rights and liberties being reserved, and its history since then has been that cf the other lands ruled by Zurich.

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  • In1717-1726Zurich tried hard by means of heavy dues to crush the rival silk and cotton industries at Winterthur, which, however, on the whole very successfully maintained its ancient rights and liberties against the encroachments of Zurich.

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  • In Switzerland, on the contrary, there is an organized body of the New Church; divine service being held in the Society at Zurich and by circles at Berne, Herisau and Nesslau.

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  • The Zurich pastor is a member of the American Convention, and has oversight also of the Austrian societies at Vienna and Trieste.

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  • There he married Anne de Tserclaes, and later on he proceeded by way of Basle to Zurich, where his Zwinglian convictions were confirmed by constant intercourse with Zwingli's successor, Bullinger.

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  • It was not until May 1549, after he had published various works at Zurich, that Hooper again arrived in England.

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  • It was at this time that he laid the foundations of his military fame, and he particularly distinguished himself in Massena's great Swiss campaign, and especially at the battle of Zurich.

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  • Durege, Bessels Leben and Wirken (Zurich, 1861); J.

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  • He was educated at Duisburg, Zurich and Bonn, where he distinguished himself by gymnastics as much as by study.

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  • In 1866, discouraged by affairs in Germany, he moved to Winterthur, near Zurich, to become connected with the democratic newspaper, Winterthurer Landbote.

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  • In 1869 he was Privatdozent at Zurich, and next year professor.

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  • Becoming a teacher in a private school of his own, he made a name as a profound student of literature; and after the troubles of the '48, when he held office under the revolutionary government and was imprisoned for three years at Naples, his reputation as a lecturer on Dante at Turin brought him the appointment of professor at Zurich in 1856.

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  • He travelled on the continent, and in 1856 settled down as professor of French literature at the Polytechnic of Zurich.

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  • The earliest known mention of the incident is found in a Zurich chronicle (discovered in 1862 by G.

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  • (1) There is the total silence of all the old Swiss and Austrian chroniclers until 1538, with the solitary exception of the Zurich chronicle of 1476 (and this while they nearly all describe the battle in more or less detail).

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  • Burkli (Der wahre Winkelried, - die Taktik der alien Urschweizer, Zurich, 1886) has put forth a theory of the battle which is, he allows, opposed to all modern accounts, but entirely agrees, he strongly maintains, with the contemporary authorities.

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  • Wyss, Uber eine Ziircher-Chronik aus dem isten Jahrhundert (Zurich, 1862); A.

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  • Oechsli, Zur Sempacher Schlachtfeier (Zurich, 1886); E.

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  • 550559 (3rd ed., Zurich, 1893).

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  • Mommsen found an asylum in Switzerland, and became professor at Zurich: he repaid the hospitality of the Republic by writing exhaustive monographs on Roman Switzerland, His spare time was occupied with the Roman History, the three volumes of which appeared between 1854 and 1856.

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  • Heim, Les Dislocations de l'ecorce terrestre (Zurich, 1888); A.

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  • He did not, however, identify himself either with Zwinglianism or Lutheranism; he disputed with Zwingli at Zurich in 1522, and then made his way to Eisenach and Wittenberg, where he married in 1523.

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  • Notwithstanding the exertions which Great Britain made to avert h06tilities, the provocation of Count Cavour induced Austria to declare war against Piedmont, and Napoleon thereupon moved to the support of his ally, promising to free Italy from the Alps.to the Adriatic. As a matter of fact, the attitude of northern~ Germany, which was massing troops on the Rhine, and the defenceless condition of France, which was drained of soldiers for the Italian campaign, induced the emperor to halt before he had carried out his purpose, and te~ms of peace were hastily concerted at Villafranca, and were afterwards confirmed at Zurich, by which Lombardy was given Unhficatioii to Piedmont, while Austria was left in possession of of Italy.

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  • The invasion of Switzerland was baffled by want of concert between Austrians and Russians and by Massena's victory at Zurich on the 25th and 26th of September.

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  • HORGEN, a small town in the Swiss canton of Zurich, situated on the left or west shore of the Lake of Zurich, and by rail roe m.

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  • of the town of Zurich.

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  • It possesses many industrial establishments of various kinds, and is a centre of the Zurich silk manufacture.

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  • It came in 1406 into the possession of Zurich, with which it communicates by means of steamers on the lake, as well as by rail.

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  • They went first to Bern, and soon after to Zurich, where a synod of the Swiss pastors had been convened.

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  • The question was submitted to the churches at Basel, Bern, Zurich and Neuchatel, but they also, to Calvin's disappointment, were divided in their judgment, some counselling severity, others gentle measures.

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  • The venture seems to have been projected by Jacob van Meteren, who apparently employed Coverdale to do the translation, and Froschover of Zurich to do the printing.

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  • German) "and Latyn": and Coverdale mentions that he used five interpreters, which are supposed to have been the Vulgate, the Latin version of Pagninus, Luther's translation, the Zurich version, and Tyndale's Pentateuch and New Testament.

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  • He was professor of history at the university of Basel (1845-1847,1849-1855and 1858-1893) and at the federal polytechnic school at Zurich (1855-1858).

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  • Although Brune and Massna retrieved the fight at Bergen and Zurich, and although the Allies lingered on the frontier as Coup they had done after Valmy, still the fortunes of the ~rtaf of Directory were not restored.

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  • Christinger, Herbarts Erziehungslehre and ihre Fortbildner (Zurich, 1895); O.

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  • Mommsen, Die Schweiz in romischer Zeit (Zurich, 1854); J.

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  • Heer, Flora tertiaria Helvetiae (3 vols., Winterthur, 18 5518 59); Flora fossilis arctica (7 vols., Zurich, 1868-1883), " Beitrage zur Kreideflora, - (1) Flora von Moletein in Maren," Neue Denkschr.

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  • 22 (Zurich, 1869-1872); Primaeval World in Switzerland (2 vols., 1876); F.

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  • Geiser's pamphlet Zur Erinnerung an Steiner (Zurich, 1874).

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  • Cavour resigned office, and by the peace of Zurich (loth of November 1859) Austria ceded Lombardy to Piedmont but retained Venetia; the central Italian princes who had been deposed by the revolution were to be reinstated, and Italy formed into a confederation of independent states.

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  • The specialist he flew in from Zurich arrives tonight.

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  • Sophie Taeuber's increasingly abstract collages lead off rooms showing Zurich developments.

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  • Zurich Insurance company a limited company incorporated in Switzerland.

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  • infant baptism began anew in Zurich.

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  • licentiate thesis, Institute of Computational Linguistics, University of Zurich. [pdf] Stefan Hoefler.

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  • Switzerland rounded off their pre-World Cup preparations with a 4-1 win against upcoming footballing nation China in Zurich.

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  • No special health precautions are needed to travel to Zurich and compulsory vaccinations are not required.

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  • Hottinger in Helvetische Kirchengeschichte (Zurich, 1708); and F.

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  • He was ordained at Zurich, and from him Court himself received ordination.

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  • 1903); Pichler, Chronik des Hof-und National Theaters in Mannheim (Mannheim, 1879); Landgraf, Mannheim and Ludwigshafen (Zurich, 1890); Die wirthschaftliche Bedeutung Mannheims, published by the Mannheim Chamber of Commerce (Mannheim, 1905); the Forschungen zur Geschichte Mannheims and der Pfalz, published by the Mannheimer Altertumsverein (Leipzig, 1898); and the annual Chronik der Hauptstadt Mannheim (1901 seq.).

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  • In 1867 he became privatdozent in Berlin University, and in the following year was chosen professor of physics at the Zurich Polytechnic: then, after a year or two at Wurzburg, he was called in 1872 to Strassburg, where he took a great part in the organization of the new university, and was largely concerned in the erection of the Physical Institute.

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  • He was educated at Zurich and at Saumur (where he graduated), studied theology at Orleans under Claude Pajon, at Paris under Jean Claude and at Geneva under Louis Tronchin, and was ordained to the ministry in his native place in 1683.

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  • He attended lectures while supporting himself by teaching mathematics and physics at the polytechnic school at Zurich until 1900 and finally, after a year as tutor at Schaffhausen, was appointed examiner of patents at the patent office at Berne, where, having become a Swiss citizen, he remained until 1909.

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  • degree at the university of Zurich and published his first papers on physical subjects.

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  • These were so highly thought of that in 1909 he was appointed extraordinary professor of theoretical physics at the university of Zurich.

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  • In 1911 he accepted the chair of physics in Prague, only to be induced to return to his own polytechnic school at Zurich as full professor in the following year.

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  • The terms of the treaty of peace signed at Zurich on the 10th of November were practically identical with those of the preT liminaries of Villafranca.

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  • Flahault and Schroter, Phytogeographicol Nomenclature: reports and propositions (Zurich, 1910).

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  • Thus his " studious and sedentary life " passed pleasantly enough, interrupted only at rare intervals by boyish excursions of a day or a week in the neighbourhood, and by at least one memorable tour of Switzerland, by Basel, Zurich, Lucerne and Bern, made along with Pavilliard in the autumn of 1755.

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  • Allamand of Bex, and the Professor Breitinger of Zurich, and opened a new one with the Professor Gesner of Göttingen.

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  • of Zurich.

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  • Massena's triumph at Zurich (September 25th-26th, 1799) paralysed the Second Coalition; and, though the Austrians continued to make progress along the Italian riviera, the French Republic was in little danger on that side so long as it held Switzerland.

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  • 2 Meanwhile the study received a great impulse from the appearance, at Zurich in 1555, of the third book of Conrad Gesner's Historia Animalium " qvi est de Auium natura," and at Paris in the same year of Pierre Belon's (Bellonius) Histoire de la nature des Oyseaux.

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  • The general movement for the extension of cotton cultivation wa.s welcomed by the International Congress of representatives of master cotton spinners and manufacturers' associations at the meeting at Zurich in May 1904.

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  • It is now the second most populous (109,161 inhabitants) town (ranking after Zurich) in the Swiss Confederation, while it is reputed to be the richest, the number of resident millionaires (in francs) exceeding that of any other Swiss town.

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  • He was the son of a physician, and went to study medicine first at Zurich University in 1851, and then, two years later, at Wurzburg, where he had R.

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  • Ludwig, under whom he studied at Zurich, decided him to devote his attention to physiological chemistry, and therefore he went, after his graduation (18J4), to Heidelberg, where R.

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  • Wagner fled to Paris and thence to Zurich, where he lived in almost unbroken retirement until the autumn of 1859.

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  • C. Gyger (Canton of Zurich, a masterpiece, 1667); Italy by G.

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  • Meyer of Aarau and Muller of Engelberg in papier mache, now in Zurich.

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  • The Nouvelles de la republique des lettres (see Louis P. Betz, P. Bayle and die Nouvelles de la republique des lettres, Zurich, 1896) was the first thorough-going attempt to popularize literature, and it was eminently successful.

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  • A little below the town of Glarus the river, keeping its northerly direction, runs through the alluvial plain which it has formed, towards the Walensee and the Lake of Zurich.

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  • But between the Lake of Zurich and the Walensee the huge desolate alluvial plain grew ever in size, while great damage was done by the river, which overflowed its bed and the dykes built to protect the region near it.

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