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vital

vital

vital Sentence Examples

  • You're a vital asset and the director knows it.

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  • What we're accomplishing with Howie is vital; we can't stop doing it.

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  • You… you're meant to maintain a vital balance in this world.

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  • Of far more vital importance is the conception of Israel as God's suffering servant.

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  • How can a man be a philosopher and not maintain his vital heat by better methods than other men?

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  • The result is dulness of sight, a stagnation of the vital circulations, and a general deliquium and sloughing off of all the intellectual faculties.

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  • Vital force is only an expression for the unknown remainder over and above what we know of the essence of life.

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  • But until death came she had to go on living, that is, to use her vital forces.

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  • As if it were no particular problem, he said they had lost vital signs in flight a couple times.

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  • The mechanism of life, the arrangement of the day so as to be in time everywhere, absorbed the greater part of his vital energy.

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  • Of course the vital heat is not to be confounded with fire; but so much for analogy.

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  • The grand necessity, then, for our bodies, is to keep warm, to keep the vital heat in us.

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  • I lingered most about the fireplace, as the most vital part of the house.

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  • The question is, however, vital to the atomic theory.

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  • If you want to show expertise, consistent practice is vital.

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  • The organism is largely dependent for its vital processes upon gaseous interchanges.

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  • All this is only the coincidence of conditions in which all vital organic and elemental events occur.

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  • To Aristotle the whole of nature is instinct with a vital impulse towards some higher manifestation.

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  • Within it or its modifications all the vital phenomena of which living organisms are capable have their origin.

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  • For the rest, his theory is chiefly important as emphasizing the vital character of the original substance.

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  • Theists, on the other hand, will contend that the distinctiveness of moral necessity is vital to religion.

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  • The heat attendant on these actions, and on the vital processes of the animal organism, naturally first attracted attention.

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  • A detailed plan for the entire rapid is vital when facing the holes, drops, haystacks, rocks and chutes served up by even the most diminutive river.

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  • Yet her need to reach the car was vital.

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  • The fact it's clandestine is vital.

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  • The facts of the relationships of animals to one another, which had been treated as the outcome of an inscrutable law by most zoologists and glibly explained by the transcendental morphologists, were amongst the most powerful arguments in support of Darwin's theory, since they, together with all other vital phenomena, received a sufficient explanation through it.

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  • Meantime the existing (nominated) legislative council was dealing with another and a vital phase of the Asiatic question.

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  • As has been said, a large proportion of water enters into the composition of all living matter; a certain amount of drying arrests vital activity, and the complete abstraction The properties of living matter are intimately related to temperature.

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  • The mechanical laws, to which external things were subject, were conceived as being valid only in the inorganic world; in the organic and mental worlds these mechanical laws were conceived as being disturbed or overridden by other powers, such as the influence of final causes, the existence of types, the work of vital and mental forces.

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  • Final causes, vital and mental forces, the soul itself can, if they act at all, only act through the inexorable mechanism of natural laws.

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  • He may, in fact, be called the father of modern pathology, for his view, that every animal is constituted by a sum of vital units, each of which manifests the characteristics of life, has almost uniformly dominated the theory of disease.since the middle of the 59th century, when it was enunciated.

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  • This is the so-called c narion, or pineal gland, where in a minimized point the mind on one hand and the vital spirits on the other meet and communicate.

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  • But, on the other hand, the vital spirits cause a movement in the gland by which the mind perceives the affection of the organs, learns that something is to be loved or hated, admired or shunned.

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  • Neither Hegelianism nor Aristotelianism is "vital" enough to sound the depths of religious life.

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  • According to ' Yahweh's spirit, thought of as Yahweh's vital principle, as man's spirit is man's vital principle, is to be breathed into them, as, in Gen.

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  • deep, which baffled every effort to reach the interior until in 1813, when a summer of severe drought had made it of vital importance to find new pastures, three of the colonists, Messrs Blaxland, Lawson and Wentworth, more fortunate than their predecessors in exploration, after crossing the Nepean river at Emu Plains and ascending the Dividing Range, were able to reach a position enabling them to obtain a view of the grassy valley of the Fish river, which lies on the farther side of the Dividing Range.

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  • But in Italy, although they were severally identified with the papal and imperial parties, they really served as symbols for jealousies which altered in complexion from time to time and place to place, expressing more than antagonistic political principles, and involving differences vital enough to split the social fabric to its foundation.

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  • His disappearance snapped the chief link with the heroic period, and removed from the helm of state a ruler of large heart, great experience and civil courage, at a moment when elements of continuity were needed and vital problems of internal reorganization had still to be faced.

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  • Diogenes made this conception of a vital and intelligent air the ground of a teleological view of climatic and atmospheric phenomena.

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  • or vital principle, with heat or fire which pervades in unequal proportions, not only man and animals, but plants and nature as a whole, and through the agitation of which by incoming effluvia all sensation arises.

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  • In the system of Giordano Bruno, who sought to construct a philosophy of nature on the basis of new scientific ideas, more particularly the doctrine of Copernicus, we find the outlines of a theory of cosmic evolution conceived as an essentially vital process.

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  • Robinet thus laid the foundation of that view of the world as wholly vital, and as a progressive unfolding of a spiritual formative principle, which was afterwards worked out by Schelling.

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  • It can only be understood by subordinating the mechanical conception to the vital, by conceiving the world as one organism animated by a spiritual principle or intelligence (Weltseele).

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  • All these processes are regarded as a series of manifestations of a vital principle in higher and higher forms. Oken, again, who carries Schelling's ideas into the region of biological science, seeks to reconstruct the gradual evolution of the material world out of original matter, which is the first immediate appearance of God, or the absolute.

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  • Luria himself wrote no mystical works; what we know of his doctrines and habits comes chiefly from his Boswell, Ilayim Vital.

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  • Hayim Vital reports that on his death-bed Luria said to his disciples: " Be at peace with one another: bear with one another: and so be worthy of my coming again to reveal to you what no mortal ear has heard before."

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  • He has the familiar Calderonian limitations; the substitution of types for characters, of eloquence for vital dialogue.

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  • It is from such a living and assimilating cell, performing as it does all the vital functions of a green plant, that, according to current theory, all the different cell-forms of a higher plant have been differentiated in the course of descent.

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  • The remaining tissue of the plant-body, a tissue that we must regard phylogenetically as the remnant of the undifferentiated tissu~ of the primitive thallus, but which often undergoes further different,iation of its own, the better to fulfil its characteristically vital functions for the whole plant, is known, from its peripheral position in relation to the primitively central conducting tissue, as (3) the cortex.

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  • types of glands also exist, either in connection with the epidermis or not, such as nectaries, digestive glands, oil, resin and mucilage glands, &c. They serve the most various purposes in the life of the plant, but they are not of significance in relation to the primary vital activities, and cannot be dealt with in the limits of the present article.l The typical epidermis of the shoot of a land plant does not absorb water, but some plants living in situations where they cannot depend on a regular supply from the roots (e.g.

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  • The material and the energy go together, the decomposition of the one in the cell setting free the other, which is used at once in the vital processes of the cell, being in fact largely employed in constructing protoplasm or storing various products.

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  • the framework of the fabric of the cell, and the construction of a continuously increasing skeleton; part is used in maintaining the normal temperature of the~plant, part in constructing various substances which are met with in the interior, which serve various purposes in the working of the vital mechanism.

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  • (5) There must be a supply of oxygen to the growing cell, for the protoplast is dependent upon this gas for the performance of its vital functions, and particularly for the liberation of the energy which is demanded in the constructive processes.

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  • He showed that all the organs of plants are built up of cells, that the plant embryo originates from a single cell, and that the physiological activities of the plant are dependent upon the individual activities of these vital units.

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  • This conception of,the plant as an aggregate or colony of independent vital units governing the nutrition, growth and reproduction of the whole cannot, however, be maintained.

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  • It is true that in the unicellular plants all the vital activities are performed by a single cell, but in the multicellular plants there is a more or less highly developed differentiation of physiological activity giving rise to different tissues or groups of cells, each with a special function.

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  • Foremost among these was Ilayyim Vital, author of the 'Ez hayyim, and his son Samuel, who wrote an introduction to the Kabbalah, called Shemoneh She`arim.

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  • On the other hand, criticism has given a deeper meaning to the Old Testament history, and has brought into relief the central truths which really are vital; it may be said to have replaced a divine account of man by man's account of the divine.

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  • But the surviving material is extremely uneven; vital events in these centuries are treated with a slightness in striking contrast to the relatively detailed evidence for the preceding period - evidence, however, which is far from being contemporary.

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  • Although the light thrown upon ancient conditions of life and thought has destroyed much that sometimes seems vital for the Old Testament, it has brought into relief a more permanent and indisputable appreciation of its significance, and it is gradually dispelling that pseudo-scientific literalism which would fetter the greatest of ancient Oriental writings with an insistence upon the verity of historical facts.

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  • Vital and Arab.

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  • The transcendental deduction, or proof from the possibility of experience in general, which forms the vital centre of the Kantian scheme, is wanting in Reid; or, at all events, if the spirit of the proof is occasionally present, it is nowhere adequately developed.

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  • These lectures reveal all the charm of style and directness of presentation which made Hausser's work as a professor so vital.

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  • "The chemical act of fermentation," writes Pasteur, "is essentially a correlative phenomenon of a vital act beginning and ending with it."

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  • Its chief importance is perhaps the stress which it laid on the vital connexion which must subsist between true economic theory and the wider facts of social and national development.

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  • In our own day we have had many illustrations of the manner in which special circumstances may at once bring an almost unnoticed series of scientific investigations into direct and vital relation with the business world.

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  • deep. Railway rates have also been a matter of vital importance in recent years; Boston, like New York, complaining of discriminations in favour of Philadelphia, Baltimore, New Orleans and Galveston.

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  • They refused to permit the vital problem of limitation of armaments to be side-tracked, and surprised the conference by proposing a ten-year naval holiday and a drastic scrapping of tonnage by the three chief naval Powers.

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  • to allow the hope of gaining two small towns to induce them to break the vital alliance with Damascus.

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  • The army which was besieging Acre was soon joined by various contingents; for Acre, after all, was the vital point, and its capture would open the way to Jerusalem.

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  • - In one vital respect the result of the Crusades may be written down as failure.

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  • The men of that nation and of that epoch were bent on creating a new intellectual atmosphere for Europe by means of vital contact with antiquity.

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  • His conclusion is that men should do now with all their might what they have to do; the future of man's vital part, the spirit, is wholly uncertain.

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  • This last clause does not affirm the immortality of the soul; it is simply an explanation of what becomes of the vital principle (the" breath of life "of Gen.

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  • on, many of the most vital changes in ecclesiastical discipline were adopted in convocations at St Paul's and in the Abbey.

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  • One of his last trials was to see in 1556 the election as pope of his old opponent Caraffa, who soon showed his intention of reforming certain points in the Society that Ignatius considered vital.

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  • At this time there existed a belief, held at a later date by Berzelius, Gmelin and many others, that the formation of organic compounds was conditioned by a so-called vital force; and the difficulty of artificially realizing this action explained the supposed impossibility of synthesizing organic compounds.

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  • But this would not help Wagner to feel that contemporary music was really a great art; indeed it could only show him that he was growing up in a pseudo-classical time, in which the approval of persons of " good taste " was seldom directed to things of vital promise.

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  • They attach, however, supreme value to the realities of which the observances are reminders or types - on the Baptism which is more than putting away the filth of the flesh, and on the vital union with Christ which is behind any outward ceremony.

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  • But wherever theocratic organizations established themselves slavery in the ordinary sense did not become a vital element in the social system.

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  • Turkey was at this time the only neutral state in Europe; it was of vital im- Treaty of portance that she should not be absorbed into the Napoleonic system, as in that case Russia would have been exposed to a simultaneous attack from France, Austria, Turkey and Persia.

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  • He seemed unaware of the vital importance of the moment, crouched shivering over a bivouac fire, and finally rode back to Dresden, leaving no specific orders for the further pursuit.

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  • A still more vital contrast occurs concerning the place of sacrificing the Passover; as enjoined in Deuteronomy this is to be by the males of the family at Jerusalem, whereas both in the presumably earlier Yahwist and in the later Priestly Code the whole household joins in the festival which can be celebrated wherever the Israelites are settled.

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  • This treaty contains reservations of all questions involving the vital interests, the independence or the honour of the contracting parties.

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  • Some of these differences may be slight, while others may be vital, or (which amounts to the same thing) may seem to the parties to be so.

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  • But his limited resources, and, above all, the proved incapacity of the militia in the field, compelled him instantly to take in hand the vital question of army reform.

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  • The theory of probabilities, which Laplace described as common sense expressed in mathematical language, engaged his attention from its importance in physics and astronomy; and he applied his theory, not only to the ordinary problems of chances, but also to the inquiry into the causes of phenomena, vital statistics and future events.

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  • So long as vital frontier disputes were unregulated, the central Government in Belgrade held that elections could not be held, and governed for the first two years through a provisional Parliament, for which no one could claim a really representative character.

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  • A mass of living protoplasm is simply a molecular machine of great complexity, the total results of the working of which, or its vital phenomena, depend - on the one hand, Life con- of this water is absolutely incompatible with either moister by a ctual or potential life.

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  • But many of the simpler P Y ler P forms of life may undergo desiccation to such an extent as to arrest their vital manifestations and convert them into the semblance of not-living matter, and yet remain potentially alive.

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  • This vital despatch was sent off in duplicate at midnight and reached von Blumenthal at 4 a.m.

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  • When Virchow wrote, in 1850, " every animal presents itself as a sum of vital unities, every one of which manifests all the characteristics of life," he expressed a doctrine whose sway since then has practically been uninterrupted.

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  • As fat is a food element essential to the carrying out of the vital energies of the cell, a certain amount of fatty matter must be present, in a form, however, unrecognizable by our present microchemical and staining methods.

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  • To this end he examined such immediate vital products as blood, bile and urine; he analysed the juices of flesh, establishing the composition of creatin and investigating its decomposition products, creatinin and sarcosin; he classified the various articles of food in accordance with the special function performed by each in the animal economy, and expounded the philosophy of cooking; and in opposition to many of the medical opinions of his time taught that the heat of the body is the result of the processes of combustion and oxidation performed within the organism.

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  • In science, the more we know the more extensive" the contact with surrounding nescience."In religion the really vital and constant element is the sense of mystery.

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  • This vital, as opposed to a mechanical, constitution of nature, together with the conceptions of nature as not complete in itself - as if it were dissevered from the divine energy - shows how a miracle may take place without any disturbance elsewhere of the constancy of nature, all whose forces are affected sympathetically, with the consequence that its orderly movement goes on unhindered " (Mikrokosmos, iii.

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  • Unfortunately his success caused some jealousy in official quarters, and when, in the middle of February 1849, a commander-in-chief was appointed to carry out Kossuth's plan of campaign, that vital appointment was given, not to the man who had made the army what it was, but to a foreigner, a Polish refugee, Count Henrik Dembinski, who, after fighting the bloody and indecisive battle of Ka olna (Feb.

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  • When William Harvey by his discovery of the circulation furnished an explanation of many vital processes which was reconcilable with the ordinary laws of mechanics, the efforts of medical theorists were naturally directed to bringing all the departments of medicine under similar laws.

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  • Fermentation, which was supposed to take place in the stomach, played an important part in the vital processes.

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  • In nervous diseases disturbances of the vital "spirits" were most important.

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  • The original malady being thus got rid of, the vital force would easily be able to cope with and extinguish the slighter disturbance caused by the remedy.

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  • The first clinical laboratory seems to have been that of Von Ziemssen (1829-1902) at Munich, founded in 1885; and, although his example has not yet been followed as it ought to have been, enough has been done in this way, at Johns Hopkins University and elsewhere, to prove the vital importance of the system to the progress of modern medicine.

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  • The number of these instances, and the variety of them, are now known to be very large; and it is supposed that what is true of these simpler agents is true also of far more elaborate phases of vital metabolism.

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  • In the third book he applies the principles of the atomic philosophy to explain the nature of the mind and vital principle, with the view of showing that the soul perishes with the body.

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  • cooling the manufactured objects sufficiently slowly to allow the constituent particles to settle into a condition of equilibrium, is of vital importance.

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  • The first step towards overcoming this vital defect in optical glass was taken by P. L.

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  • (b) Another feature of vital importance in the history of Anglo-Saxon law is its tendency towards the preservation of peace.

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  • The climate has a beneficial effect on pulmonary diseases, especially in their earlier stages, and is remarkable in arresting the decay of vital power consequent upon old age.

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  • Contemporaries usually spoke of 70, 72, 73 or 77 members, and perhaps the list is complete with Daenell's recent count of 72, but the obscurity on so vital a point is significant of the amorphous character of the organization.

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  • But, like all the great paradoxes of philosophy, it has its value in directing our attention to a vital, yet much neglected, element of experience.

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  • Communications.-The problem of easy and cheap transportation between the coast and the interior has been a vital one for Peru, for upon it depends the economic development of some of the richest parts of the republic. The arid character of the coastal zone, with an average width of about 80 m., permits cultivation of the soil only where water for irrigation is available.

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  • These roads added much to the productive resources of the country, but their extension to the sierra districts was still a vital necessity.

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  • Apparatus for the economic production of a potable water from sea-water is of vital importance in the equipment of ships.

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  • So, according to one view, Samuel's death marks a vital change in the fortunes of Israel (xxv.

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  • Comte thought almost as meanly of Plato as he did of Saint-Simon, and he considered Aristotle the prince of all true thinkers; yet their vital difference about Ideas did not prevent Aristotle from calling Plato master.

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  • The point was obviously one of vital importance; and we learn from Lord Selborne, who was lord chancellor at the time, that Gladstone " was sensible of the difficulty of either taking his seat in the usual manner at the opening of the session, or letting.

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  • By looking at them together we understand how much the comedy of Terence was able to do to refine and humanize the manners of Rome, but at the same time what a solvent it was of the discipline and ideas of the old republic. What makes Terence an important witness of the culture of his time is that he wrote from the centre of the Scipionic circle, in which what was most humane and liberal in Roman statesmanship was combined with the appreciation of what was most vital in the Greek thought and literature of the time.

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  • He has the interest of being the last poet of the free republic. In his life and in his art he was the precursor of those poets who used their genius as the interpreter and minister of pleasure; but he rises above them in the spirit of personal independence, in his affection for his friends, in his keen enjoyment of natural and simple pleasures, and in his power of giving vital expression to these feelings.

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  • All philosophy is philosophy of life, the development of a new culture, not mere intellectualism, but the application of a vital religious inspiration to the practical problems of society.

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  • The household is thus at once the logical starting-point of religious cult, and throughout Roman history the centre of its most real and vital activity.

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  • For, though the form of the old cults was long preserved and even Antoninus Pius was honoured in an inscription for his care of the ancient rites of religion, the vital spirit was almost gone.

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  • Manning made it clear that he regarded the matter as vital, though he did not act on this conviction until no hope remained of the decision being set aside or practically annulled by joint action of the bishops.

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  • 1357 sqq.) is that of 1672; and its confession is the most vital statement of faith made in the Greek Church during the past thousand years.

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  • Hence the regulation of the zerethra or subterranean conduits which drained away the overflow southward was a matter of vital importance both to Tegea and to Mantineia, and a cause of frequent quarrels.

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  • For a time Jehoiakim remained under the protection of Necho and paid heavy tribute; but with the rise of the new Chaldean Empire under Nebuchadrezzar and the overthrow of Egypt at the battle of Carchemish (605 B.C.) a vital change occurred.

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  • of the century; its latest word seemed to involve consequences that brought it into conflict with the vital interest the human mind has in freedom and the possibility of real initiation.

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  • On Population: Census reports, state and Federal, publications of Bureau of Statistics of Labor, Board of Health (1869-; the Annual Report of 1896 contains an exhaustive analysis of vital statistics, 1856-1895); Board of Charity (1878-), &c. On Administration: G.

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  • However, Gneisenau was very remiss in not immediately reporting this vital move and the necessity for it to the duke, as it left the Anglo-Dutch inner flank quite exposed.

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  • To send a message of such vital importance by a single orderly was a piece of bad staff work.

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  • The reports for New South Wales and Victoria are especially valuable in their statistical aspect from the analysis they contain of the vital conditions of a comparatively young community under modern conditions of progress.

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  • Hence there is no such basis as exists in nearly every other civilized state for a national system of registration, and the country depends upon the crude method of enumerators' returns for its information on vital statistics, except in the states and cities which have established a trustworthy registration system of their own.

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  • The story of the many attempts made in the interval by " forward " or advanced Puritans to secure vital religious fellowship within the queen's Church, and of the few cases in which these shaded off into practical Separatism, is still wrapped in some obscurity.

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  • The development of the diamond mines and of the gold and coal industries - of which Brand saw the beginning - had far-reaching consequences, bringing the Boer republics into vital contact with the new industrial era.

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  • It is at best an unfruitful assumption; and the tendency of students of sociology is to treat discussions as to sovereignty much as modern physiologists treat discussions as to "vital force" or "vital principle."

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  • there was nothing unsafe; it was perfectly strong and the stress in vital parts moderate.

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  • refused to give way where the discipline and vital interests of the church seemed to be threatened.

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  • Nor is this pre-literary and vital quality really absent even from the writing which is least entitled to a place among "Apostolic Fathers," the Epistle to Diognetus.

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  • 295): "The vital force of the Apostolic convictions gave to Apostolic thought a certain organic and consistent form."

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  • Before hibernating the adults grow very fat, and it is by the gradual consumption of this fat - known in commerce as bear's grease - that such vital action as is necessary to the continuance of life is sustained.

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  • To make room for these we have to remember that the atomic nucleus has remained entirely undefined and beyond our problem; so that what may occur, say when two molecules come into close relations, is outside physical science - not, however, altogether outside, for we know that when the vital nexus in any portion of matter is dissolved, the atoms will remain, in their number, and their atmospheres, and all inorganic relations, as they were before vitality supervened.

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  • It was the fall of Constantinople that first weakened the vital force of the Eastern Church.

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  • During his long reign of forty-nine years Poland had gradually risen to the rank of a great power, a result due in no small measure to the insight and sagacity of the first Jagiello, who sacrificed every other consideration to the vital necessity of welding the central Sla y s into a compact and homogeneous state.

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  • He instinctively recognized not only the vital necessity of the maintenance of the union between the two states, but also the fact that the chief source of danger to the union lay Gas;m11 IV., g y in Lithuania, in those days a maelstrom of conflicting political currents.

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  • The acquisition of the Prussian lands was vital to the existence of Poland.

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  • Nothing, perhaps, illustrates so forcibly the casual character of the Polish government in the most vital matters as this single incident.

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  • The apathy of Poland in such a vital matter as the Livonian question must have convinced so statesmanlike a prince as Sigismund II.

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  • For Austria Saxony was really of more vital interest than Poland, but Castlereagh, despite a vigorous resistance from a section of the Austrian court, was able to win Metternich over to his views.

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  • In the centre, the valleys of the Ohio, the Cumberland and the Tennessee were the battle-ground of large armies attacking and defending the south and south-eastern states of the Confederacy, while on and beyond the great waterway of the Mississippi was carried on the struggle for those interests, vital to either party, which depended on the mighty river and its affluents.

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  • With all his efforts, Schelling does not succeed in bringing his conceptions of nature and spirit into any vital connexion with the primal identity, the absolute indifference of reason.

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  • The French admiral, having rendered this vital service to his ally, now returned to the West Indies, whither he was followed by Hood, and resumed the attacks on the British islands.

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  • Although the soul is often distinguished from the vital principle, there are many cases in which a state of unconsciousness is explained as due to the absence of the soul; in South Australia wilyamarraba (without soul) is the word used for insensible.

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  • For animism in philosophy, Stahl, Theoria; Bouillier, Du Principe vital.

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  • 2) showed that one at least of the fundamental myths of Mani was borrowed from the Avesta, namely, that which recounts how through the manifestation of the virgin of light and of the messenger of salvation to the libidinous princes of darkness the vital substance or light held captive in their limbs was liberated and recovered for the realm of light.

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  • Vital Statistics, 1900.The median age of the aggregate population of 1900that is, the age that divides the population into halveswas 22.85 years.

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  • The assumption explicitly made by General Walker that among the immigrants no influence was yet excited in restriction of population, is also not only gratuitous, but inherently weak; the European peasant who landed (where the great majority have stayed) in the eastern industrial states was thrown suddenly under the influence of the forces just referred to; forces possibly of stronger influence upon him than upon native classes, which are in general economically and socially more stable, On the whole, the better opinion is probably that of a later authority on the vital statistics of the country, Dr John Shaw Billings,i that though the characteristics of modern life doubtless influence the birth-rate somewhat, by raising the average age of marriage, lessening unions, and increasing divorce and prostitution, their great influence is through the transmutation into necessities of the luxuries of simpler times; not automatically, but in the direction of an increased resort to means for the prevention of child-bearing.

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  • Each side had now begun to see that the vital point was control of the interior, which time was to prove the most extensive fertile area in the world.

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  • The tales that grains of wheat found in the cerements of Egyptian mummies have been planted and come to maturity are no longer credited, for the vital principle in the wheat berry is extremely evanescent; indeed, it is doubtful whether wheat twenty years old is capable of reproduction.

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  • Finally, in the spirit of Plato's Phaedo and the dialogue Eudemus, the Protrepticus holds that the soul is bound to the sentient members of the body as prisoners in Etruria are bound face to face with corpses; whereas the later view of the De Anima is that the soul is the vital principle of the body and the body the necessary organ of the soul.

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  • Still a man is not the only organism; and every organism has a soul, whose immediate organ is the spirit (7rvEwµa), a body which - analogous to a body diviner than the four so-called elements, namely the aether, the element of the stars - gives to the organism its nonterrestrial vital heat, whether it be a plant or an animal.

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  • It was at once resolved to proceed against him in convocation, but this was prevented by the king proroguing the assembly, a step which had consequences of vital bearing on the history of the Church of England, since from that period the great Anglican council ceased to transact business of a more than formal nature.

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  • This treaty made arbitration applicable to all matters not affecting " national honour or vital interests."

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  • Since then a network of similar treaties, adopted by different nations with each other and based on the AngloFrench model, has made reference to the Hague Court of Arbitration practically compulsory for all matters which can be settled by an award of damages or do not affect any vital national interest.

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  • Language has played a vital part in the formation of Germany and Italy.

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  • Fourthly, the convention recommends that in disputes of an international nature, involving neither national honour nor vital interests, and arising from a difference of opinion on points of fact, the parties who have not been able to come to an agreement by means of diplomacy should institute an international commission of inquiry to facilitate a solution of these disputes by an investigation of the facts.

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  • of matter from the inorganic to the organic world, moleschott and back again, and he urged this metabolism against the hypothesis of vital force.

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  • Aristotle had imputed to all living beings a soul, though to plants only in the sense of a vegetative, not a sensitive, activity, and in Moleschott's time many scientific men still accepted some sort of vital principle, not exactly soul, yet over and above bodily forces in organisms. Moleschott, like Lotze, not only resisted the whole hypothesis of a vital principle, but also, on the basis of Lavoisier's discovery that respiration is combustion, argued that the heat so produced is the only force developed in the organism, and that matter therefore rules man.

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  • Passing from Moleschott to Lyell's view of the evolution of the earth's crust and later to Darwin's theory of natural selection and environment, he reached the general inference that, not God but evolution of matter, is the cause of the order of the world; that life is a combination of matter which in favourable circumstances is spontaneously generated; that there is no vital principle, because all forces, non-vital and vital, are movements; that movement and evolution proceed from life to consciousness; that it is foolish for man to believe that the earth was made for him, in the face of the difficulties he encounters in inhabiting it; that there is no God, no final cause, no immortality, no freedom, no substance of the soul; and that mind, like light or heat, electricity or magnetism, or any other physical fact, is a movement of matter.

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  • This division of values brings us to the second point in his philosophy, his theory of what he called " vital series," by which he assayed to explain all life, action and thought.

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  • A vital series he supposed to be always a reaction of C against disturbance by R, consisting in first a vital difference, or diminution by R of the maintenance-value of C, and then the recovery by C of its maintenance-value, in accordance with the principle of least action.

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  • He further supposed that, while this independent vital series of C is sometimes of this simple kind, at other times it is complicated by the addition of a dependent vital series in E, by which, in his fondness for too general and farfetched explanations, he endeavoured to explain conscious action and thought.

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  • (Thus, if a pain is an E-value directly dependent on a disturbance in C, and a pleasure another E-value directly dependent on a recovery of C, it will follow that a transition from pain to pleasure will be a vital series in E directly dependent on an independent vital series in C, recovering from a vital difference to its maintenance-maximum.) Lastly, supposing that all human processes can in this way be reduced to vital series in an essential co-ordination of oneself and environment, Avenarius held that this empirio-critical supposition, which according to him is also the natural view of pure experiences, contains no opposition of physical and psychical, of an outer physical and an inner psychical world - an opposition which seemed to him to be a division of the inseparable.

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  • But the preaching of the papal legates, even when supported by military demonstrations, had no effect; and the Albigensian question, together with other questions vital for the future of the papacy, remained unsettled and more formidable than ever when Innocent III.

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  • The department of internal affairs consists of six bureaus: the land office, vital statistics, weather service, assessments, industrial statistics, and railroads, canals, telegraphs and telephones.

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  • Two or three other deities may be mentioned here: Eshmun, the god of vital force and healing, worshipped at Sidon especially, but also at Carthage and in the colonies, identified by the Greeks with Asclepius; Melqarth, the patron deity of Tyre, identified with Heracles; Reshef or Reshuf, the " flame " or " lightning " god, especially popular in Cyprus and derived originally from Syria, whom the Greeks called Apollo.

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  • DEATH, the permanent cessation of the vital functions in the bodies of animals and plants, the end of life or act of dying.

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  • The question of freedom of trade with the Indies had become no less vital to the Dutch people than freedom of religious worship. To both these concessions Spanish policy was irreconcilably opposed.

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  • But it was the achievement of Wailer alone, in 1828, to break down the barrier held to exist between organic and inorganic chemistry by artificially preparing urea, one of those substances which up to that time it had been thought could only be produced through the agency of "vital force."

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  • The solution of this problem is of vital importance in connexion with the early history of man's development in the Babylonian region.

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  • Mixed farming and the raising of live stock is becoming more and more the rule, so that the failure of any one crop becomes of less vital importance.

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  • This was the vital part of the whole rite.

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  • What the attitude of the New People should be to it, whether it was all bad, or whether there were good things in it which Christians should appropriate, was a vital question that always confronted them.

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  • By the exercise of the most rigid economy in all branches this end was attained, though budgetary equilibrium was only secured by a variety of financial expedients, justified by the vital importance of saving Egypt from further international interference.

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  • The elements are right enough, but there was not the vital sense to combine them properly.

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  • He was a Scot by descent, and retained the vital energy of his ancestors as a birthright.

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  • His various works still retain their freshness and vital attraction.

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  • His religion also is ultimately a vital attitude which rests on his interests and on his choices between alternatives which are real for him.

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  • 2.2 Vital Statistics

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  • By this he understood: (r) " the recognition and support on the part of the state of the religious expression of the faith of the community," and (2) " that this religious expression of the faith of the community on the most sacred and most vital of all its interests should be controlled and guided by the whole community through the supremacy of law."

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  • In this respect, Schiller's Rduber is one of the most vital German dramas of the 18th century.

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  • He would therefore have risked the failure of his own mission in order to take part in a battle where his intervention was not, so far as he could tell, of vital importance.

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  • On what is perhaps the vital problem of modern education, the question of ancient versus modern languages, he pronounced that the latter "are indispensable accomplishments, but they do not form a high mental training" - an opinion entitled to peculiar respect as coming from a president of the Modern Language Association.

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  • It differs in character from the Galilean ministry: for among the simple, unsophisticated folk of Galilee Jesus presents Himself as a healer and helper and teacher, keeping in the background as far as possible His claim to be the Messiah; whereas in Jerusalem His authority is challenged at His first appearance, the element of controversy is never absent, His relation to God is from the outset the vital issue, and consequently His Divine claim is of necessity made explicit.

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  • Ultimate issues are quickly raised: keen critics see at once the claims which underlie deeds and words, and the claims in consequence become explicit: the relation of the teacher to God Himself is the vital interest.

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  • It is rather due to an overpowering sense of the value of organization - a sense that liberty can never be dissevered from order, that a vital interconnexion between all the parts of the body politic is the source of all good, so that while he can find nothing but brute weight in an organized public, he can compare the royal person in his ideal form of constitutional monarchy to the dot upon the letter i.

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  • The stage of Geist reveals the consciousness no longer as critical and antagonistic but as the indwelling spirit of a community, as no longer isolated from its surroundings but the union of the single and real consciousness with the vital feeling that animates the community.

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  • For example, the seed of the plant is an initial unity of life, which when placed in its proper soil suffers disintegration into its constitutents, and yet in virtue of its vital unity keeps these divergent elements together, and reappears as the plant with its members in organic union.

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  • The lectures on the Philosophy of Religion, though unequal in their composition and belonging to different dates, serve to exhibit the vital connexion of the system with Christianity.

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  • With the death of Christ this union, ceasing to be a mere fact, becomes a vital idea - the Spirit of God which dwells in the Christian community.

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  • The men who design and work in metals have to take account of these vital differences and characteristics, and must be careful not to apply treatment suitable to one kind to another of a dissimilar character.

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  • The vital point being transport, means had been taken to provide three alternatives to man-haulage.

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  • withstood repeated attempts to break through at this vital point.

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  • This distinction is, moreover, vital to the whole logic of inference, because we always think all the judgments of which our inference consists, but seldom state all the propositions by which it is expressed.

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  • No distinction is more vital in the logic of inference in general and of scientific inference in particular; and yet none has been so little understood, because, though analysis is the more usual order of discovery, synthesis is that of instruction, and therefore, by becoming more familiar, tends to replace and obscure the previous analysis.

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  • The controversy as to the selfevidence of perception in which the New Academy effected some sort of conversion of the younger Stoics, and in which the Sceptics opposed both, is one of the really vital issues of the decadence.

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  • There was scope for diversity of view and there was diversity of view, according as the vital issue of the formula was held to lie in the relation of intellectual function to organic function or in the not quite equivalent relation of thinking to being.

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  • While then membership in this organization is not primary, it assumes a higher and even a vital importance, since a true experience recognizes the common faith and the common fellowship. Were it to refuse assent to these, doubt would be thrown upon its own trustworthiness.

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  • A gallant resistance was still being made at various points, notably at Luico and Globocak, but the enemy had broken through at several positions of vital importance, and, as has been said, the reserves were becoming entangled in the crowds of fugitives, and some of them were becoming infected.

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  • The question was, however, a vital one not only for Sweden but for Great Britain, whose trade in the Baltic was threatened.

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  • A hurried outline of each of these vital branches of our civilization will at once reveal the falseness of the usual periodizing.

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  • The religion thus founded, however, having no vital force, never spread beyond the limits of the court, and died with Akbar himself.

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  • Where, as is generally the case, detail of sex, age, conjugal condition and birthplace is included in the return, the census results can be co-ordinated with those of the parallel registration of marriages, births, deaths and migration, thus forming the basis of what are summarily termed vital statistics, the source of our information regarding the nature and causes of the process of "peopling," i.e.

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  • Conversely, the traces left by a casual set-back, such as famine, war, or an epidemic disease, remain long after it has been succeeded by a period of recuperation, and are to be found in the ageconstitution and the current vital statistics.

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  • The quotient thus obtained decreases as the conditions are more favourable, and, on the whole, it seems to form a good index to the merit of the respective countries from the standpoint of vital forces.

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  • 1871); Newsholme, Elements of Vital Statistics (ed.

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  • Farr, Vital Statistics (1885); Coghlan, Report on Decline in Birthrate, New South Wales (1903), and report of Royal Commission on that decline (1904); Bonar, Malthus and his Work (1885); Bertillon, Elements de demographie; Gamier, Du Principe de population; de Molinari, Ralentissement du mouvement de la population; Bertheau, Essai sur les lois de la population; Starkenburg, Die BevolkerungsWissenschaft; Stieda, Das sexual Verhdltniss der Geborenen; Rubin and Westergaard, Statistik der Ehen; Westergaard, Die Lehre von der Mortalitdt and Morbilitdt, and Die Grundaage der Theorie der Statistik; Gonnard, L'Emigration europeenne.

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  • Consequently, he fails to understand the essential magnitude of the task, or to appreciate the vital vigour of the forces contending in Europe for mastery.

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  • The Revival of Learning must be regarded as a function of that vital energy, an organ of that mental evolution, which brought into existence the modern world, with its new conceptions of philosophy and religion, its reawakened arts and sciences, its firmer grasp on the realities of human nature and the world, its manifold inventions and discoveries, its altered political systems, its expansive and progressive forces.

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  • Real force was not in it, but rather in that counterpart to its unlimited pretensions, the church, which had evolved it from barbarian night, and which used her own more vital energies for undermining the rival of her creation.

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  • For humanism, which was the vital element in the Revival of Learning, consists mainly of a just perception of the dignity of man as a rational, volitional and sentient being, born upon this earth with a right to use it and enjoy it.

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  • Wickliffe's teaching was a vital moment in the latter.

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  • He shows how morality can be viewed physically, as evolving from an indefinite incoherent homogeneity to a definite, coherent heterogeneity; biologically, as evolving from a less to a more complete performance of vital functions, so that the perfectly moral man is one whose life is physiologically perfect and therefore perfectly pleasant; psychologically, as evolving from a.

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  • The congregation elect the minister; in no other way can he enter on his functions; but once elected and admitted he is recognized as a free organ of the divine spirit, not subject in spiritual things to any earthly authority but that of his fellowministers; the word of God is the supreme authority, and the spoken word of God the vital element of every religious act.

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  • Such was the policy of the Moderate ascendancy, or of Principal Robertson's administration, on this vital subject.

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  • Crawley interprets it by the vital instinct, and connects its first manifestations with the processes of the organic life.

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  • It is possible, however, that the savage always distinguishes in a dim way between the material medium and the indwelling principle of vital energy, examples of a pure fetishism, in the sense of the cult of the purely material, recognized as such, being hard to find.

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  • This bracing of the vital feeling takes place by means of imaginative appeal to the great forces man perceives stirring within him and about him, such appeal proving effective doubtless by reason of the psychological law that to conceive strongly is XXIII.

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  • The main divisions are as follows: Vital Statistics.-The following table institutes a comparison between the birth-rates per thousand of the population in the United Kingdom and certain other countries, at intervals (so far as possible) of five years, adding the figures for other years in specific years when there was a marked fluctuation: The number of marriages (a) and the proportion of persons married per thousand of the population (b) are thus shown: Emigration.-The following table shows the number of passengers, distinguishing English and Welsh, Scottish and Irish, who left the United Kingdom for extra-European countries in 1895, 1900 and 1905, and the total for 1909, and in certain other years in which the numbers show marked fluctuations: In 1909 the total number to British dominions was 163,594 and the total number to other extra-European countries was 125,167.

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  • Vital statistics: Reports of the registrars-general respectively for England, for Scotland (Edinburgh), for Ireland (Dublin); Census Reports (decennial, 1901, &c.), ditto; Education: Reports of the Board of Education for England and Wales; Report of the Commissioners of National Education in Ireland; Report of the Committee of Council on Education in Scotland; Electoral Statistics (London, 1905); Statistical Tables relating to Emigration and Immigration; Judicial Statistics of England and Wales, of Scotland, of Ireland; Local Government Reports, ditto; Statistical Abstract for the United Kingdom, in which the most important statistics are summarized for each of the fifteen years preceding the year of issue.

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  • In the vital matter of national defence no common understanding had been arrived at, and during the conflicts which had raged round this question, the two chambers had come into frequent collision and paralysed the action of the government.

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  • of September the delegates came to an agreement, the principal points of which were: that such disputes between the two countries which could not be settled by direct diplomatic negotiations, and which did not affect the vital interests of either country, should be referred to the permanent court of arbitration at the Hague, that on either side of the southern frontier a neutral zone of about fifteen kilometres width should be established, and that within eight months the fortifications within the Norwegian part of the zone should be destroyed.

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  • As there was no gold in the country the number of settlers was small, the loose tribal organization of the natives made it impossible to inflict a vital defeat on them, and the mountainous and thickly wooded country lent itself admirably to a warfare of surprises and ambuscades.

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  • The contrast there existing between peasant and nomad is of vital consequence for the whole position of his creed.

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  • But the vital point is that the absolute superiority of the Hellene was recognized as incontestable on both hands.

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  • How vital was the nomadic element rn the Parthian Empire is obvious from the fact that, in civil wars, the deposed kings conThe Iranian sistently took refuge among the Dahae or Scythians ~ and were restored by them.

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  • The idea of leaving England was distasteful, but pecuniary considerations had, in consequence of the failure of his father's firm in 1847, become of vital importance, and he accepted the post.

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  • Early in life, too, he met with the doctrines of Jacob Behmen, of whom, in the Biographia Literaria, he speaks with affection and gratitude as having given him vital philosophic guidance.

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  • As Lord Morley in his Life of Gladstone says, " this pregnant and far-sighted warning seems to have been little considered by English statesmen of either party at this critical time or afterwards, though it proved a vital element in any far-sighted decision.

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  • It might have succeeded but for a vital difference which arose between the Uitlanders in Johannesburg and Rhodes.

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  • Christianity is becoming more and more a "form of sound words," a crystallized creed, whose teaching is the vital point.

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  • As the patches extend in size by the growth of the fungus they at length become confluent, and so the leaves are destroyed and an end is put to one of the chief vital functions of the host plant.

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  • Of the three divisions logic is the least important; ethics is the outcome of the whole, and historically the all-important vital element; but the foundations of the whole system are best discerned in the science of nature, which deals pre-eminently with the macrocosm and the microcosm, the universe and man, including natural theology and an anthropology or psychology, the latter forming the direct introduction to ethics.

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  • The doctrine of Pneuma, vital breath or " spirit," arose in the medical schools.

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  • respiration; the disciples of Hippocrates, without much modifying this primitive belief, explained the maintenance of vital warmth to be the function of the breath within the organism.

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  • Vital spirit, inhaled from the outside air, rushes through the arteries till it reaches the various centres, especially the brain and the heart, and there causes thought and organic movement.

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  • The older authorities conceded a vital principle, but denied a soul, to the brutes: animals, they say, are re a but not E,ukxa.

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  • A certain warmth, akin to the vital heat of organic being, seems to be found in inorganic nature: vapours from the earth, hot springs, sparks from the flint, were claimed as the last remnant of Pneuma not yet utterly slackened and cold.

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  • In the rational creatures - man and the gods - Pneuma is manifested in a high degree of purity and intensity as an emanation from the world-soul, itself an emanation from the primary substance of purest ether - a spark of the celestial fire, or, more accurately, fiery breath, which is a mean between fire and air, characterized by vital warmth more than by dryness.

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  • These oxidations are brought about by the vital activity of several bacteria, of which four-- Bacterium aceti, B.

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  • but results when the washings of fresh waste are added, has led to clearer proof that the heating of hay-stacks, hops, tobacco and other vegetable products is due to the vital activity of bacteria and fungi, and is physiologically a consequence of respiratory processes like those in malting.

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  • The action of these intracellular toxins has in many instances nothing characteristic, but is merely in the direction of producing fever and interfering with the vital processes of the body generally, these disturbances often going on to a fatal result.

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  • In other words, the toxins of different bacteria are closely similar in their results on the body and the features of the corresponding diseases are largely regulated by the vital properties of the bacteria, their distribution in the tissues, &c. The distinction between the two varieties of toxins, though convenient.

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  • To this course Bute would not consent, and as his refusal was endorsed by all his colleagues save Temple, Pitt had no choice but to leave a cabinet in which his advice on a vital question had been rejected.

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  • His principal faults are his carelessness and inaccuracy in matters of chronology, his lack of artistic skill in the presentation of his material, his desultory method of treatment, and his failure to look below the surface and grasp the real significance and vital connexion of events.

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  • The twisting referred to is partly a vital and partly a mechanical act; - that is, it is occasioned in part by the action of the muscles and in part by the greater resistance experienced from the air by the tip and posterior margin of the wing as compared with the root and anterior margin, - the resistance experienced by the tip and posterior margin causing them to reverse always subsequently to the root and anterior margin, which has the effect of throwing the anterior and posterior margins of the wing into figure-of-8 curves, as shown at figs.

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  • Vital Statistics.-" The increase or decrease of population is governed by two factors: (I) the balance between births and deaths, and (2) the balance between immigration and emigration."

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  • Kochs would seem to show that a complete arrest of vital activity is compatible with viability.

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  • The Dam is the vital centre of Amsterdam.

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  • Edwards's main aim had been to revivify Calvinism, modifying it for the needs of the time, and to promote a warm and vital Christian piety.

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  • In drawing from life he had early found the way to unite precision with freedom and fire - the subtlest accuracy of expressive definition with vital movement and rhythm of line - as no draughtsman had been able to unite them before.

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  • But in the great Sala dell' Asse (or della Torre) abundant traces of Leonardo's own hand were found, in the shape of a decoration of intricate geometrical knot or plait work .combined with natural leafage; the abstract puzzle-pattern, of a kind in which Leonardo took peculiar pleasure, intermingling in cunning play and contrast with a pattern of living boughs and leaves exquisitely drawn in free and vital growth.

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  • Sometimes, indeed, he denounces fiercely enough the arts and pretensions of priests; but no one has embodied with such profound spiritual insight some of the most vital moments of the Christian story.

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  • The vital differences among the friends of the Hanover succession were not political, but ecclesiastical.

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  • In the 12th century the doge Vital Micheli II.

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  • The esprit bourru by which he was at all times distinguished, and which he now displayed in his rather arrogant Excuse a Ariste, unfitted him for controversy, and it was of vital importance to him that he should not lose the outward marks of favour which Richelieu continued to show him.

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  • He accused ministers of violating two fundamental conditions of representative government: that the Ministry should not ride roughshod over the minority, and that they should make no vital change till it was clearly desired by the majority of the people.

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  • In 1832 he wrote a paper for the Royal Society of London on the "Organs of the Human Voice," in which he gave many illustrations of the physiological action of these parts, and in 1833 a Bridgewater treatise, The Hand: its Mechanism and Vital Endowments as evincing Design.

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  • Woman suffrage became a vital political issue.

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  • Neither now nor ever had Burke any other real conception of a polity for England than government by the territorial aristocracy in the interests of the nation at large, and especially in the interests of commerce, to the vital importance of which in our economy he was always keenly and wisely alive.

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  • Burke's vital error was his inability to see that a root and branch revolution was, under the conditions, inevitable.

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  • This doubtless prevented evaporation, and retarded vital processes dependent upon oxidation.

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  • But we have still to ask whether the doctrines it made prominent are really those which are vital to the Christian Church.

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  • Still, even to the theologian the practical interest in church welfare is vital.

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  • But it may be affirmed that Dogmatic must remain the vital centre; and so far we may soften Flint's censure of the British thoughtlessness which has called that study by the name " systematic theology."

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  • With the revival of learning, however, first one and then another special study became recognized - anatomy, botany, zoology, mineralogy, until at last the great comprehensive term physiology was bereft of all its once-included subject-matter, excepting the study of vital processes pursued by the more learned members of the medical profession.

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  • Accordingly he regards pleasure as essentially motion " helping vital action," and pain as motion " hindering " it.

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  • The attempt to limit the freedom of theological inquiry and teaching in the universities is a violation of the vital principle of Protestantism.

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  • With the Babylonians the case was different, although their science lacked the vital principle of growth imparted to it by their successors.

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  • The vital heart of the matter was barely missed by W.

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  • So long as Mr. Lloyd George was Minister, Dr. Addison was his right-hand man in the strenuous labours of the office, resulting in the enormous multiplication of engines of war, and in the redeeming of many vital industries, fertilizers, tungsten and potash from German control; and when Mr. Lloyd George formed a Government himself in December 1916, he placed him at the head of the department.

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  • Their effort, as defined by Dormer, was "an attempt to effect some kind of solution of the vital unity of Christ's person, which had been so seriously proposed by monophysitism, on the basis of the now firmly-established doctrine of the two natures."

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  • The positive exposition of atomism has much that is attractive, but the hypothesis of the calor vitalis (vital heat), a species of anima mundi (world-soul) which is introduced as physical explanation of physical phenomena, does not seem to throw much light on the special problems which it is invoked to solve.

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  • But the census returns of 1851 showed a remarkable alteration - a decrease during the previous decade of over 1,500,000 - and since that date, as the following table shows, the continuous decrease in the number of its inhabitants has been the striking feature in the vital statistics of Ireland.

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  • The marked tendency which has been visible for so many years in Ireland for pasturage to increase at the expense of tillage makes the improvement of live-stock a matter of vital importance to all concerned in agriculture.

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  • The movement of the population shown in the other vital statistics-births, marriages, deaths-are mostly satisfactory, and show a steady and normal progress.

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  • The movement from the south, which seems to account for a considerable cycle of the patriarchal traditions, belongs to the age after the downfall of the Israelite and(later)the Judaean monarchies when there were vital political and social changes.

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  • Rain-making, too, is of little importance in a well-watered region, but a matter of vital interest to an agricultural people where the rainfall is slight and irregular.

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  • To attack the English through their colonies, Guienne and Flanders, was to injure them in their most vital interests cloth and claret; for England sold her wool to Bruges in order to pay Bordeaux for her wine.

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  • But if there lay in this revival of energy and character the germs of a vigorous national life, for the time being Spain was thrown hack into the state of division from which it had been drawn by the Romanswith the vital difference that the race now possessed the tradition of the Roman law, the municipalities, and one great common organization in the Christian Church.

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  • Castile ceased to be an isolated kingdom, and became an advance guard of Europe in not the least vital part of the crusades.

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  • Mandism as a vital force in the old Egyptian Sudan ceased, however, with the Anglo-Egyptian victory at Omdurman.'

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  • During the eighty-two days' discussion in the House of Commons Mr Chamberlain was the life and soul of the opposition, and his criticisms had a vital influence upon the attitude of the country when the House of Lords summarily threw out the bill.

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  • The duke was in a difficult position as president of the organization, since most of the local associations supported Mr Chamberlain, and he replied that the differences between them were vital, and he would not be responsible for dividing the association into sections, but would rather resign.

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  • It remained the fact that Mr Chamberlain staked an already established position on his refusal to compromise with his convictions on a question which appeared to him of vital and immediate importance.

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  • He won, however, the gratitude of the tsar and the support of Russia, which in the next years was to be of vital service to him.

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  • The body or barrel should be moderately deep, long and straight, the length being really in the shoulders and in the quarters; the back should be strong Waxy* (1790) Penelope (1798) the shoulders and and muscular, with Wanderer (r790) loins running well Thalestris (1809) in at each end; Chanticleer (1787) Ierne (1790) the loins themEscape (1802) Young Heroine selves should have Waxy* (,790) great breadth and Penelope (1798) Octavian (1807) substance, this Caprice (1797) Whitelock (1803) being a vital neces Coriander mare (1799) sity for weightOrville: (1709) Minstrel (1803) carrying and pro Buzzard (1787) pelling power Alexander mare (1790) Williamson's Ditto (1800) uphill.

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  • The representation of the remote past in Samuel must be viewed, therefore, in the light of that age when, after a series of vital internal and external vicissitudes in Judah and Benjamin, Judaism established itself in opposition to rival sects and renounced the Samaritans who had inherited the traditions of their land.

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  • 8 On domestic policy their differences were vital, candour, simplicity, and elegance, with which its truths are uttered and recommended."

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  • With the rise of theological controversy and the growth of heresy catechetical instruction became of vital importance to the Church, and much greater importance was attached to it.

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  • You've become a vital part of me - more vital than my limbs.

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  • Though I have no comparison to your situation, I'm smart enough to know it's vital you maintain total and absolute security.

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  • I wasn't happy we we're sneaking into police work but Howie's credibility was vital.

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  • I told him a vital part of our group had already availed themselves of the alias names and gone underground.

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  • "This is vital," I said.

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  • You … you're meant to maintain a vital balance in this world.

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  • I don't want to stick my nose in your cases but it's vital to my case that heat stays high between the mob and the suppliers.

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  • But one vital part of his anatomy expressed no interest in the proceedings.

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  • This demonstrates the council's vital role in bringing about change to facilitate productive collaboration with industry.

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  • Regional committees remain a vital part of the organization at local level, because of their ability to regularly liaise with our Central Office in London.

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  • aardvark burrows are vital resources in the bushveld too.

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  • A widely accepted, comprehensive concept of value is vital.

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  • In return the student volunteers gain vital skills and experiences which can be academically accredited to enhance future employability.

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  • Choline is transformed into the brain neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which is vital to the efficient transmission of brain signals.

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  • adapted to accommodate wheelchair users are vital to disabled people to get out and about and enjoy active lives.

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  • Not simply decorative afterthoughts, they are vital elements in the design of a comfortable, well-planned room.

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  • alleviation of suffering is a vital precept of Buddhism.

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  • ambienceuently, lighting is vital to setting the mood, tone and ambiance of each scene.

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  • To realize this ambition, however, skilled staff are the vital catalyst.

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  • This essential amino acid is vital in the make up of critical body proteins.

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  • Buried in this haystack might well be the vital clue necessary to avert an apocalypse.

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  • appendage at the tip which plays a vital role in spreading the ejaculate over the cervix at mating.

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  • magnesium ascorbate is a convenient way of obtaining both these vital nutrients.

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  • Test at the 5% level whether the data provides significant evidence that sufferers of exercise-induced asthma have reduced forced vital capacity.

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  • laboratory astrochemistry therefore has a vital role to play.

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  • Likewise, substitutionary atonement is a vital element in the gospel.

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  • Good knowledge of shallow water bathymetry is vital to a wide range of marine activities.

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  • Mung beans are an excellent source of vital nutrients.

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  • Fund Member Forum: annual beano or vital communication tool?

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  • Higher biodiversity Maintaining agricultural biodiversity is vital to ensuring long-term food security.

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  • Mitochondrial biogenesis and function are of vital importance during anther development.

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  • And even even a moderate-sized fish will easily pull around a boat small enough to be carried, so an experienced boatman is vital.

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  • The ball bobbles around almost at random and the replays are vital to see what the hell went on when anyone scores.

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  • bounce back from the disappointment of the Leeds defeat by getting a vital home win against Luton Town tonight.

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  • His vital signs were monitored and an ECG revealed a sinus bradycardia with the presence of J waves.

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  • breastplate of righteousness, without which our most vital parts are laid bare to his weapons.

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  • Establishing a mining cadastre unit is a vital step in providing a favorable climate for investment.

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  • The air cavalry can help effect vital liaison between the units.

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  • Rhythm, rhyme and playground chants are vital to early childhood.

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  • In this case, therefore, he was definitely not like Moses in one of the vital, distinguishing characteristics of his prophethood.

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  • cheapen the debate on this vital area.

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  • Turn 1 Turn 1 is a medium speed chicane where good exit speed is vital.

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  • For Jefferson, a virtuous and active citizenry was vital to the health of a republican nation.

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  • It is vital for socialists and activists in Pakistan to launch a fightback against this latest military clampdown.

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  • clan rivalry is vital to the natural flow of the storyline.

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  • vital clue to Identity of another deep wreck off Brighton.

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  • Every member of the family is a vital cog in research.

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  • This display of loyalty will be vital to the retention of team cohesion.

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  • Lambs get immunity from the eweâs colostrum so a good early feed is vital.

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  • communicateland, Nicholas became an expert in communicating in chimp language which proved vital.

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  • Education was vital both to eradicate illiteracy and to promote communism.

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  • A school uniform can also be a vital component of a strong school ethos.

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  • It is vital that we do not conflate today with tomorrow.

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  • conservation of biodiversity, including that in the soil, is vital to the functioning of the system.

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  • In the past, the vital work of museum conservators was all too often taken for granted.

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  • continues advertisement I especially enjoyed my time spent in the Vila Vita Vital, the complete center for health, beauty and well-being.

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  • You don't have to be Einstein, Newton or Socrates to know that education is a vital cornerstone in our modern lives.

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  • Furthermore, the recommendation by ORR to halve track access charges should prove a vital counterbalance to improvements in road haulage competitiveness.

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  • However, it is vital cohabiting couples have all of the information they require to reach a properly informed decision.

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  • cross-examined in court, which removes a vital safeguard for the accused.

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  • cross-training staff on crucial activities will ensure you can run vital operations.

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  • curry at least two vegetables or a salad or serve vegetable soups, pasta with fresh vegetables or vegetable curries for vital dietary fiber.

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  • daunting, most applicants understand that they are vital.

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  • deed of covenant or legacy will help to fund our vital work.

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  • demoralized the Irish people and had played a vital part in maintaining British rule in Ireland.

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  • Vegetation plays a vital role in the protection of soil structure through its effects on hydrology and therefore in preventing desertification.

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  • A credible nuclear deterrent remains vital for US security.

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  • It is vital to understand the real differences of experience within Britain's black communities.

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  • disciplined manner is vital to our success.

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  • Such losses seem disproportionate to an attack on merchant shipping not engaged in vital supply work.

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  • Please help us to continue our vital work by setting up a regular gift or making a one-off donation online now.

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  • doubleton queen for the vital ninth trick.

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  • The solution was found with the lightweight pre-insulated ductwork, which provided the vital solution without putting excess strain on the existing building.

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  • ductwork installer is vital to any ventilation or air conditioning installation.

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  • Tides have a vital role to play in the formation of embryo dunes, by depositing tidal litter.

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  • dural membrane forms a vital integral part of the cranio-sacral system.

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  • All others are merely earthly replicas, imperfect because they are bound up in our finiteness, yet illustrating a vital eternal reality.

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  • The humble earthworm also plays a vital role in Chris ' Chelsea garden.

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  • The quality of fish seed, or young fish, is a vital element for successful aquaculture production.

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  • Volunteers on this project get involved with vital conservation work to save the gravely endangered black rhino.

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  • entrusted with a vital foreign mission by the Emperor.

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  • entrusted with certain vital duties for which reasonable fitness and a knowledge of firearms is necessary.

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  • His landmark book on improvisation proved that musical experimentalism could engage a wide audience across many fields with issues of vital importance to humanity.

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  • A vital capacity breath is from maximal expiration to maximal inspiration.

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  • With a third of species facing extinction over the next fifty years your support has never been more vital.

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  • The cause supplies vital corrective eyewear to people who otherwise would have none.

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  • Three months of my life to help that cause whilst learning vital skills seems pretty fair to me.

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  • Small triumph in a world of scarce hope Agencies ' work and refugees ' resourcefulness avert famine, but aid still vital.

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  • This was vital for survival with the potato famine which affected the UK in the 1860s.

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  • They made also fascines and gabions, which were vital for siege operations.

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  • mealworm feeder Live foods are vital to young birds in their first few weeks of life hence the mealworm feeder below.

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  • Indeed without these vital ties it would be wholly impossible for the world of humanity to attain true felicity and success.

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  • fibres is where the cellulose fibers pass through a refining process which is vital in the art of papermaking.

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  • filling stations play a vital role in their communities.

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  • local fixers are also vital in ensuring you have all the required information, permissions and visas.

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  • McBride was looking lively in attack and it took an offside flag to halt his progress as both teams sought that vital early goal.

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  • flagging up the dangers to young people are vital, and I know that my hon.

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  • forage maize hectares Correct manuring Correct manuring is vital to the success of the crop.

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  • franchise holders will play a vital role in implementing any such strategy.

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  • Bohemian garnet has been helping to overcome the sorrow and bringing the vital power, spirit and the feeling of joy.

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  • vital wheat gluten has excellent visco-elasticity properties, that helps our customers put the spring into dough.

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  • In the final analysis, vital force, reason or anything are nothing but different aspects of the one and same supreme godhead.

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  • Later we shall see just how a cheese grader can assess these vital elements.

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  • His parents, who both are blood donors, remain grateful for the vital part other donors played in their son's recovery.

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  • These attacks on an almost hard-wired complacency are vital in terms of grabbing the audience and demanding that they listen.

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  • Hay is vital - all rabbits at any age need access to unlimited, good quality hay is vital - all rabbits at any age need access to unlimited, good quality hay.

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  • headway in these vital areas.

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  • Hay is absolutely vital to the health of small herbivores.

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  • hest bank was once a vital stop for the dangerous coach route across the sands prior to the railroad arriving.

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  • Burnley open a crucial festive period with a vital match against fellow playoff hopefuls Stoke City on Boxing Day.

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  • This is vital for a world-class regional university, with world-wide horizons, using all our talents to the full.

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  • The support of our members is vital to fulfilling our charitable work to encourage and promote horticulture.

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  • First, we support local hospices in their vital work on the front line of caring for people who face the end of life.

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  • This makes hyenas vital to the recycling of nutrients in their savannah ecosystem.

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  • They also analyze proposed legislation, a vital factor in early recognition of a rule that could seriously imperil our right to ride.

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  • The Center for Social Justice affirms the vital importance in politics of treating all humanity with dignity.

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  • impotence problems is vital for their recovery.

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  • Turner's vision remains as vital today, expressing as it does the often inchoate and funereal qualities of the Venetian experience.

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  • Hotels and holiday complexes, vital to the TRNC's economy, escaped the inferno virtually intact.

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  • The most vital ingredient in any club is the fans.

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  • inhalation insulin patients will have to succeed at two vital disciplines.

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  • inland waterways network is vital to the sustainable future of the Basingstoke Canal.

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  • intercultural communication is vital for success.

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  • keeping employees involved, motivated and productive is a vital part of any managerial role, and crucial to keeping the organization on track.

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  • The vital ingredients were there for all three: an underdog defeating a ruthless, intimidating and seemingly invulnerable favorite.

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  • jeopardizes vital interests, and when should security impede effectiveness?

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  • It is of course vital to cure not only the symptom but the original prob- LEM.

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  • A vital leveler provide satisfactory results at motorcycle mechanics fire insurance the.

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  • But now traders are being urged to grab a vital financial lifeline by reducing their level of business rates.

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  • For many people the helpline is a vital lifeline.

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  • Many small businesses provide a vital economic lifeline to local neighborhoods.

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  • literate workforce is vital to the UK's future success in ICTs.

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  • livable environment are the vital global tasks of our time.

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  • Its vital not to panic but equally important to be prepared for the probable short term lockdown in the autumn.

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  • The organic macromolecules are a vital component of the mineral, being involved in nucleation and growth control, and definition of mechanical properties.

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  • And already malnourished people could be deprived of food if charities cannot get in to ensure the distribution of vital supplies.

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  • It was during this time that he played a vital role in what became England's largest manhunt.

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  • Mealworm feeder Live foods are vital to young birds in their first few weeks of life hence the mealworm feeder Live foods are vital to young birds in their first few weeks of life hence the mealworm feeder below.

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  • These prohibitions convey welcome messages about the vital nature of utility services.

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  • It illustrates well how energetic and vital, and how fruitful, is much of the debate in contemporary metaphysics.

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  • To add to the mayhem, is the total neglect of vital micronutrients so essential to the release of energy from bodily stores.

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  • Crewe's left-sided midfielder David Vaughan looks set to miss the vital six-pointer against Brighton & Hove Albion this coming Saturday.

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  • mindful that the issues involved touch upon matters of vital interest to both countries.

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  • mindful approach rather than employing will power that puts pressure on vital organs.

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  • mitochondrionm bind specific sites like mitochondria in the cytoplasm in vivo, hence vital stain.

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  • lottery money has been vital in helping us to achieve this, and it is vital that the flow continues.

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  • nationality directorate Contains vital information for refugees planning to stay in the UK.

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  • nicetye the niceties of international law on this issue may not be a major concern to most people, another question truly is vital.

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  • Fungi play a vital role in decomposing dead material and recycling the nutrients to make them available for the growth of other plants.

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  • Vital Signs by Robin Blackledge assisted by Gerrard Martin 24 installations, including mirrors and flames creating optical illusions.

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  • optometry clinics form a vital role in the clinical training of Northern Ireland Optometrists.

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  • This ensures that the vital organs get the oxygen they require.

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  • Vital Local Elections, essential to get the corrupt incompetent Lib-Dem Tories ousted from Lambeth.

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  • It was vital to be clear from the start about intended outcomes.

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  • outvoted on matters concerning its vital interests.

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  • Certainly corrosion had set in because of intermittent water use, which had prevented the build-up of the vital cuprous oxide.

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  • There are various areas where biosecurity is a vital part of PRRS control.

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  • The other popular use of blackcurrants is as a vital ingredient in throat pastilles.

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  • More important, the vital shipping lane into London became infinitely less perilous.

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  • personality traits, making the Home City a vital character in the game.

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  • pervaded by a strong traditional family spirit - a vital enthusiasm for work and respect for professional competence.

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  • phatic communication is a vital part of how we maintain our relationships with others.

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  • This makes the use of molecular data vital for reconstructing louse phylogeny at this taxonomic level.

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  • For systems without a tank stat, it is vital to insulate the pipes adjacent to the tank that feed the heating coil.

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  • playground chants are vital to early childhood.

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  • Saints do have one genuine quality playmaker in Djamel Belmadi who will be a vital player for Saints to keep fit.

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  • Galen believed in a vital energy or creative force that he called pneuma similar to the Ayurvedic " prana.

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  • precision timekeeping was vital for astronomers mapping the stars.

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  • abandon preconceptions The outline brief you prepare for them is vital here.

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  • preponderater can any fair-minded observer discount the preponderating influence exerted by religion on the vital expressions of civilization.

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  • Indeed, 24 hours in, my PA entered the room clutching a briefcase, which everyone presumed contained vital documents.

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  • presumed guilty from the outset, they were deprived of vital evidence and never received fair or open hearings.

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  • It is unlikely that genetically modifying primates would ever provide that one vital difference between a treatment and none.

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  • Effective marketing is vital to any business If you are an organic producer based in England you should register online today!

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  • Good communications between healthcare professionals is vital for effective delivery of care.

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  • Their work aims to enhance prosperity and well-being in the UK by demonstrating and promoting the vital role of design in a modern economy.

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  • Increased circulation brings vital nutrients and proteins to the sub dermal layers, leaving skin radiant, cleaner and healthier looking.

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  • real-life scenarios show how vital GIS is in the modern world.

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  • rely solely on the generosity of the public to help us continue with our vital work.

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  • Off-Site Storage - The process of storing vital records in a facility that is physically remote from the normal site.

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  • rendered impotent by vital surgery.

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  • The kidneys also help produce a hormone called renin that is vital for regulating blood pressure.

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  • repetition of keywords is vital because a search-engines reputation is based on the relevance of its results.

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  • Programs and expertise Several current research programs and activities are mentioned by respondents as important and vital to continue.

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  • These activities bear the responsibility for developing intellectual skills vital to any educational process.

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  • The idea of clan rivalry is vital to the natural flow of the storyline.

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  • road pricing schemes are developed, the views of business, vital to the local economy, must be sought.

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  • There is nowhere else locally that can fulfill this vital role.

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  • Accord Energy Accord continues to play a vital role in the procurement activity for Centrica.

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  • Over a million people will attend Christingle services during the festive season, coming together to raise vital funds for child runaways.

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  • But Woozle is so scatty and absent minded he forgets to put a vital ingredient into the spell, with disastrous results.

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  • Increasing human activity in harbor could affect distribution and survival of offspring is vital during breeding season.

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  • seepage water, probably vital for the maintenance of cave populations.

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  • Southern Water Project Manager Ron Lake, said: " The spiral separator is vital for improving the quality of treatment at Motney Hill.

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  • Tommy 6 Which TV series features a boat called the Vital Spark?

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  • serve as vital catalysts for the biological reactions that take place within the body.

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  • The exact mix ratio was found to be of vital importance when balancing good conductivity against low shrinkage.

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  • shy to talk in front of others, so lose out on vital practice.

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  • From wooded slopes to the open landscapes, trees are a vital part of the picture whether from distant views or close at hand.

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  • Constructing the volatility smile is vital to backoffice revaluation.

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  • sociological perspective on issues of public concern is vital to our policy makers in tackling a whole range of social problems.

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  • sonar signal is vital.

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