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stonehenge

stonehenge

stonehenge Sentence Examples

  • At this point the oldest track went across Salisbury Plain towards Stonehenge and so on to Cornwall.

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  • 1 The ownership of Stonehenge having been questioned, Sir E.

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  • For all reasons an attempt to preserve Stonehenge was desirable; and the owner, Sir Edmund Antrobus I was willing, on certain conditions, as to limitations of access, to co-operate with the Society of Antiquaries, Wiltshire Archaeological Society and Society for the Preservation of Ancient Monuments in taking such steps as might be necessary to prevent more stones from falling, and even (if possible) to set up some which had fallen.

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  • 4, which passages may have suggested that Armenian rite of founding a church, in which we witness the transition from a stonehenge to a church building.

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  • On the other hand, the Welsh bard Aneurin states that Stonehenge existed before the time of Aurelius, whose title of Ambrosius may, as suggested by Davies, have been derived from Stonehenge.

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  • That its analogues were chiefly used as sepulchres has been fully established, and this is presumptive evidence that the sepulchral element was, at least, one of the objects for which Stonehenge was constructed: and it was probably for this reason that it was erected on Salisbury Plain, where there already existed an extensive necropolis of the Bronze Age.

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  • His principal work, an elaborate account of Stonehenge, appeared in 1740, and he wrote copiously on other supposed Druid remains, becoming familiarly known as the "Arch-Druid."

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  • Stevens, Jottings on Stonehenge (1882); Edgar Barclay, Stonehenge and its Earth Works (1895); Lockyer, Stonehenge and other British Stone Monuments, Astronomically Considered (1906).

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  • For a complete bibliography of Stonehenge see The Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine (Dec. 1901), by W.

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  • Walsh ("Stonehenge"), who did so much towards establishing the first dog shows and field trials, having never forsaken it: the work he began was carried on by its kennel editor, Rawdon B.

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  • Stonehenge, the greatest surviving megalithic work in the British Isles, is a mile and a half distant; and on a hill near the village is Vespasian's Camp or the Ramparts, a large earthwork, which is undoubtedly of British, not Roman, origin.

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  • If, as seems probable, units of length may be traced in prehistoric remains, they are of great value; at Stonehenge, for instance, the earlier parts are laid out by the Phoenician foot, and the later by the Pelasgo-Roman foot (26).

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  • Either from its Pelasgic or Etrurian use or from Romans, this foot appears to have come into prehistoric remains, as the circle of Stonehenge (26) is 100 ft.

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  • STONEHENGE (Sax.

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  • Inigo Jones, in his work on Stonehenge, published in 1655, endeavours to prove that it was a "Roman temple, inscribed to Coelus, the senior of the heathen gods, and built after the Tuscan order."

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  • Subsequent writers dropped the ophite portion of this theory, but still continued to regard Stonehenge as a temple or observatory of the Druids.

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  • This catastrophe attracted renewed attention to the state of Stonehenge, and much discussion took place as to the taking of precautions against further decay.

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  • Dr Gowland at a meeting of the Society of Antiquaries (Dec. 19, 1901), read a paper on his recent excavations on the site of Stonehenge, in which he came to the conclusion that the structure was a temple dedicated to the worship of the sun, and he assigns its erection to the end of the Neolithic period (2000 to 1800 B.C.), on the ground that no bronze implements or relics were found during his explorations.

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  • Flinders Petrie, Stonehenge: Plans, Descriptions and Theories (1880); E.

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  • Johnson, Anthony,Solving Stonehenge: The New Key to an Ancient Enigma.

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  • Stonehenge, the greatest surviving megalithic work in the British Isles, is a mile and a half distant; and on a hill near the village is Vespasian's Camp or the Ramparts, a large earthwork, which is undoubtedly of British, not Roman, origin.

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  • This catastrophe attracted renewed attention to the state of Stonehenge, and much discussion took place as to the taking of precautions against further decay.

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  • Flinders Petrie, Stonehenge: Plans, Descriptions and Theories (1880); E.

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  • Later, however, "Stonehenge" (J.

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  • Palgrave compares them with the remains at Stonehenge and Karnak.

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  • Later, however, "Stonehenge" (J.

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  • Palgrave compares them with the remains at Stonehenge and Karnak.

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  • (26) Id., Stonehenge (1880);

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  • The similarity of the megalithic temples of Malta and of Stonehenge connect along the shores of western Europe the earliest evidence of Phoenician civilization.

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  • Stonehenge >>

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  • He took an early interest in archaeological research, and between 1875 and 1880 was busily engaged in studying ancient British remains at Stonehenge and elsewhere; in 1880 he published his book on Stonehenge, with an account of his theories on this subject.

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  • Stonehenge was first mentioned by Nennius in the 9th century, who asserts that it was erected in commemoration of the 400 nobles who were treacherously slain near the spot by Hengist in 472.

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  • Geoffrey of Monmouth, in recording the death of Constantine, which took place about the middle of the 6th century (Historic britonum), states that he was buried "close by Uther Pendragon, within the structure of stones which was set up with wonderful art not far from Salisbury, and called in the English tongue, Stonehenge."

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  • The next controversialist who appeared on the scene was the famous Dr Stukely (1740) who propounded the theory that Stonehenge, the stone circle at Avebury (Abury), &c., were temples for serpent worship, "Dracontia" as he called them, the serpent worshippers being the Druids.

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  • 31 shows the state of Stonehenge at the moment preceding the fall of the trilithon on the 31st of December 1908.

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  • That the sun on midsummer day rises nearly, but not quite, in line with the "avenue" and over the Friar's Heel, has long been advanced as the chief argument in support of the theory that Stonehenge was a temple for sun-worship. On the supposition that this stone was raised to mark exactly the line of sunrise on midsummer's day when the structure was erected, it would naturally follow, owing to well-known astronomical causes, that in the course of time the direction of this line would slowly undergo a change, and that, at any subsequent date since, the amount of deviation would be commensurate with the lapse of time, thus supplying chronological data to astronomers for determining the age of the building.

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  • The solution of this problem has recently been attempted by Sir Norman Lockyer (Stonehenge and other British Stone Monuments), who calculates that on midsummer day, 1680 B.C., the sun would rise exactly over the Friar's Heel, and in a direct line with the axis of the temple and "avenue."

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  • Looking at Stonehenge from the architectural standpoint, there can be no hesitancy in regarding it as an advanced representative of the ordinary stone circles, some two hundred of which, great and small, are known within the British Isles.

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  • Nor would this by any means militate against its use as a temple for consecrating the dead, or for sun-worship, or any other religious purpose.The most recent research suggests that Stonehenge was designed to a precise geometric plan,and was largely prefabricated.

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  • i.; Browne, An Illustration of Stonehenge and Abury (1823); Fergusson, Rude Stone Monuments (1872); Long, Stonehenge and its Barrows (1876); Gidley, Stonehenge viewed in the Light of Ancient History and Modern Observation (1877); W.

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  • & Montague, R., Stonehenge in its landscape (English Heritage, London, 1995).

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  • Chippendale, Christopher Stonehenge Complete (Thames and Hudson, London, 2004) ISBN 0500284679.

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  • As Powys so confidently assures us: The builders of Stonehenge have perished; but there are those who worship its stones still.

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  • Accordingly he invited the chieftains to a banquet to be held near Stonehenge, or the Hanging Stones, on Salisbury Plains.

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  • British environmental groups, under the banner of the Stonehenge Alliance, have roundly condemned the scheme as " massively destructive " .

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  • digging a trench for a water pipe close to Stonehenge have made an amazing discovery.

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  • A cursus at Rudston, like one at Stonehenge, has a dogleg.

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  • From London This follows an old drovers ' road from Stonehenge to Bruton - no towns at all.

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  • Today, for fear of its desecration, Stonehenge is usually shut off to public access on midsummer's eve.

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  • evicted by police in riot gear from their camp at Stonehenge.

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  • The legends don't stop with people as we have our internationally famous set of stones in Wiltshire: Stonehenge.

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  • Another vortex phenomenon case involved a group of young hippies who were camped out inside Stonehenge when the stones were struck by lightning.

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  • Developed with reference to the Stonehenge Landscape means that they are equally likely to have utility and application elsewhere.

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  • midwinter solstice sunset at Stonehenge in 1976 Taken standing at the heel stone.

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  • Pillar of the sky is her one excursion into prehistory so far which sets out to explore the origins of Stonehenge.

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  • THE distinctive silhouette of Stonehenge is known the world over.

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  • solstice sunset at Stonehenge in 1976 Taken standing at the heel stone.

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  • The midwinter solstice sunset at Stonehenge in 1976 Taken standing at the heel stone.

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  • Ive spent hours getting it so when people search for Stonehenge they get to our stonehenge campaign.

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  • This axis, facing the mid-winter sunrise, is also seen at the Plain's most famous archeological site, Stonehenge.

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  • The midwinter solstice sunset at Stonehenge in 1976 Taken standing at the heel stone.

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  • To try and appease environmentalists, Mr Darling has agreed to fund a £ 200m bored tunnel under Stonehenge.

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  • The Stonehenge utilizes the same tweeter and front 10 unit from the Model One in a more conventional design.

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  • Walsh ("Stonehenge"), who did so much towards establishing the first dog shows and field trials, having never forsaken it: the work he began was carried on by its kennel editor, Rawdon B.

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  • The similarity of the megalithic temples of Malta and of Stonehenge connect along the shores of western Europe the earliest evidence of Phoenician civilization.

    0
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  • At this point the oldest track went across Salisbury Plain towards Stonehenge and so on to Cornwall.

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  • If, as seems probable, units of length may be traced in prehistoric remains, they are of great value; at Stonehenge, for instance, the earlier parts are laid out by the Phoenician foot, and the later by the Pelasgo-Roman foot (26).

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  • Either from its Pelasgic or Etrurian use or from Romans, this foot appears to have come into prehistoric remains, as the circle of Stonehenge (26) is 100 ft.

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  • (26) Id., Stonehenge (1880);

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  • 4, which passages may have suggested that Armenian rite of founding a church, in which we witness the transition from a stonehenge to a church building.

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  • Even at Stonehenge, the oldest relic of prehistoric religion in England, where we picture in imagination the worship of the rising sun, nature worship degraded to a horrible depth by human sacrifice, we find struggling for expression the idea of a corporate religious life.

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  • He took an early interest in archaeological research, and between 1875 and 1880 was busily engaged in studying ancient British remains at Stonehenge and elsewhere; in 1880 he published his book on Stonehenge, with an account of his theories on this subject.

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    0
  • STONEHENGE (Sax.

    0
    0
  • Stonehenge was first mentioned by Nennius in the 9th century, who asserts that it was erected in commemoration of the 400 nobles who were treacherously slain near the spot by Hengist in 472.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, the Welsh bard Aneurin states that Stonehenge existed before the time of Aurelius, whose title of Ambrosius may, as suggested by Davies, have been derived from Stonehenge.

    0
    0
  • Geoffrey of Monmouth, in recording the death of Constantine, which took place about the middle of the 6th century (Historic britonum), states that he was buried "close by Uther Pendragon, within the structure of stones which was set up with wonderful art not far from Salisbury, and called in the English tongue, Stonehenge."

    0
    0
  • Inigo Jones, in his work on Stonehenge, published in 1655, endeavours to prove that it was a "Roman temple, inscribed to Coelus, the senior of the heathen gods, and built after the Tuscan order."

    0
    0
  • The next controversialist who appeared on the scene was the famous Dr Stukely (1740) who propounded the theory that Stonehenge, the stone circle at Avebury (Abury), &c., were temples for serpent worship, "Dracontia" as he called them, the serpent worshippers being the Druids.

    0
    0
  • Subsequent writers dropped the ophite portion of this theory, but still continued to regard Stonehenge as a temple or observatory of the Druids.

    0
    0
  • 31 shows the state of Stonehenge at the moment preceding the fall of the trilithon on the 31st of December 1908.

    0
    0
  • For all reasons an attempt to preserve Stonehenge was desirable; and the owner, Sir Edmund Antrobus I was willing, on certain conditions, as to limitations of access, to co-operate with the Society of Antiquaries, Wiltshire Archaeological Society and Society for the Preservation of Ancient Monuments in taking such steps as might be necessary to prevent more stones from falling, and even (if possible) to set up some which had fallen.

    0
    0
  • 1 The ownership of Stonehenge having been questioned, Sir E.

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  • Dr Gowland at a meeting of the Society of Antiquaries (Dec. 19, 1901), read a paper on his recent excavations on the site of Stonehenge, in which he came to the conclusion that the structure was a temple dedicated to the worship of the sun, and he assigns its erection to the end of the Neolithic period (2000 to 1800 B.C.), on the ground that no bronze implements or relics were found during his explorations.

    0
    0
  • It does not follow, however, from the fact that only stone tools were found at the bottom of the trenches that the monument was constructed when metal tools were unknown, because none of the Stonehenge tools have the characteristic forms of Neolithic implements, so that they might have been specially improvised for the purpose of roughly hewing these huge stones, for which, indeed, they were really better adapted, and more easily procured, than the early and very costly metal tools of the Bronze Age.

    0
    0
  • That the sun on midsummer day rises nearly, but not quite, in line with the "avenue" and over the Friar's Heel, has long been advanced as the chief argument in support of the theory that Stonehenge was a temple for sun-worship. On the supposition that this stone was raised to mark exactly the line of sunrise on midsummer's day when the structure was erected, it would naturally follow, owing to well-known astronomical causes, that in the course of time the direction of this line would slowly undergo a change, and that, at any subsequent date since, the amount of deviation would be commensurate with the lapse of time, thus supplying chronological data to astronomers for determining the age of the building.

    0
    0
  • The solution of this problem has recently been attempted by Sir Norman Lockyer (Stonehenge and other British Stone Monuments), who calculates that on midsummer day, 1680 B.C., the sun would rise exactly over the Friar's Heel, and in a direct line with the axis of the temple and "avenue."

    0
    0
  • Looking at Stonehenge from the architectural standpoint, there can be no hesitancy in regarding it as an advanced representative of the ordinary stone circles, some two hundred of which, great and small, are known within the British Isles.

    0
    0
  • That its analogues were chiefly used as sepulchres has been fully established, and this is presumptive evidence that the sepulchral element was, at least, one of the objects for which Stonehenge was constructed: and it was probably for this reason that it was erected on Salisbury Plain, where there already existed an extensive necropolis of the Bronze Age.

    0
    0
  • Nor would this by any means militate against its use as a temple for consecrating the dead, or for sun-worship, or any other religious purpose.The most recent research suggests that Stonehenge was designed to a precise geometric plan,and was largely prefabricated.

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    0
  • Among numerous early writings on Stonehenge may be mentioned Stonehenge and Abury, by Dr William Stukely (1740; reprinted in 1840); Davies, Celtic Researches (1804), and Mythology of the Druids (1809) Hoare, Ancient Wiltshire (1812), vol.

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  • i.; Browne, An Illustration of Stonehenge and Abury (1823); Fergusson, Rude Stone Monuments (1872); Long, Stonehenge and its Barrows (1876); Gidley, Stonehenge viewed in the Light of Ancient History and Modern Observation (1877); W.

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  • Stevens, Jottings on Stonehenge (1882); Edgar Barclay, Stonehenge and its Earth Works (1895); Lockyer, Stonehenge and other British Stone Monuments, Astronomically Considered (1906).

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  • For a complete bibliography of Stonehenge see The Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine (Dec. 1901), by W.

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  • & Montague, R., Stonehenge in its landscape (English Heritage, London, 1995).

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  • Chippendale, Christopher Stonehenge Complete (Thames and Hudson, London, 2004) ISBN 0500284679.

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  • Johnson, Anthony,Solving Stonehenge: The New Key to an Ancient Enigma.

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  • His principal work, an elaborate account of Stonehenge, appeared in 1740, and he wrote copiously on other supposed Druid remains, becoming familiarly known as the "Arch-Druid."

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  • As in the case of Stonehenge, the purpose for which the Avebury monument was erected has been the source of much difference of opinion among antiquaries, Dr Stukely (Stonehenge a Temple restored to the British Druids, 1740) regarding it as a Druidical temple, while Fergusson (Rude Stone Monuments, 1872) believed that it, as well as Silbury Hill, marks the site of the graves of those who fell in the last Arthurian battle at Badon Hill (A.D.

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  • THE distinctive silhouette of Stonehenge is known the world over.

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  • Ive spent hours getting it so when people search for stonehenge they get to our stonehenge campaign.

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  • First published on June 15, 1985 THE High Court is being asked to allow the Stonehenge summer solstice festival to go ahead.

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  • This axis, facing the mid-winter sunrise, is also seen at the Plain 's most famous archeological site, Stonehenge.

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  • Stonehenge and its landscape survived relatively untouched for thousands of years.

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  • To try and appease environmentalists, Mr Darling has agreed to fund a £ 200m bored tunnel under Stonehenge.

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  • The Stonehenge utilizes the same tweeter and front 10 unit from the Model One in a more conventional design.

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  • Violent clashes at Stonehenge in 1988 and the undercurrent of tension in the hot summer of 1989 are still vivid memories.

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  • The ties debuted in 1992 by Stonehenge, Ltd. Currently, any new ties that are released are either rehashes of older ties or original designs not by Garcia himself, but from artists basing the new artwork on old artwork.

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  • England: Historical sites like Stonehenge and historical Universities like Oxford make England a prime honeymoon spot for those interested in sight-seeing.

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  • Visitors planning a trip overseas to the United Kingdom may be unaware of the number of great attractions to be found outside of the central confines of historical London, romantic Stratford-on-Avon and mystical Stonehenge.

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  • Although the country is most associated with sights like Big Ben and Stonehenge, there are actually plenty of amusement parks in England you can add to your itinerary.

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  • The Venues: Stonehenge, Republik Theater, Red Octane, Harmonix Arena, and Black Bar.

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  • In the Career mode, the venues you will play at are the same, with the exception of Red Octane and Stonehenge.

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  • Among Lockyer's other works are - The Dawn of Astronomy (1894), to which Stonehenge and other British Stone Monuments astronomically considered (1906) may be considered a sequel; Recent and coming Eclipses (1897); and Inorganic Evolution (1900).

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  • The question as to whether copper really was first used in Egypt is not yet resolved, and many arguments can be brought against the theory of Egyptian origin and in favour of one in Syria or further north.26 Egypt has also recently been credited with being the inceptor of the whole " megalithic (or heliolithic, as the fashionable word now is) culture " of mankind, from Britain to China and (literally) Peru or at any rate Mexico via the Pacific Isles.27 The theory is that the achievements of the Egyptians in great stone architecture at the time of the pyramid-builders so impressed their contemporaries that they were imitated in the surrounding lands, by the Libyans and Syrians, that the fame of them was carried by the Phoenicians further afield, and that early Arab and Indian traders passed on the megalithic idea to Farther India, and thence to Polynesia and so on so that both the teocalli of Teotihuacan and Stonehenge are ultimately derived through cromlechs and dolmens innumerable from the stone pyramid of Saqqara, built by Imhotep, the architect of King Zoser, about 3100 B.C. (afterwards deified as the patron of science and architecture).

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  • It does not follow, however, from the fact that only stone tools were found at the bottom of the trenches that the monument was constructed when metal tools were unknown, because none of the Stonehenge tools have the characteristic forms of Neolithic implements, so that they might have been specially improvised for the purpose of roughly hewing these huge stones, for which, indeed, they were really better adapted, and more easily procured, than the early and very costly metal tools of the Bronze Age.

    0
    1
  • Among Lockyer's other works are - The Dawn of Astronomy (1894), to which Stonehenge and other British Stone Monuments astronomically considered (1906) may be considered a sequel; Recent and coming Eclipses (1897); and Inorganic Evolution (1900).

    0
    1
  • The question as to whether copper really was first used in Egypt is not yet resolved, and many arguments can be brought against the theory of Egyptian origin and in favour of one in Syria or further north.26 Egypt has also recently been credited with being the inceptor of the whole " megalithic (or heliolithic, as the fashionable word now is) culture " of mankind, from Britain to China and (literally) Peru or at any rate Mexico via the Pacific Isles.27 The theory is that the achievements of the Egyptians in great stone architecture at the time of the pyramid-builders so impressed their contemporaries that they were imitated in the surrounding lands, by the Libyans and Syrians, that the fame of them was carried by the Phoenicians further afield, and that early Arab and Indian traders passed on the megalithic idea to Farther India, and thence to Polynesia and so on so that both the teocalli of Teotihuacan and Stonehenge are ultimately derived through cromlechs and dolmens innumerable from the stone pyramid of Saqqara, built by Imhotep, the architect of King Zoser, about 3100 B.C. (afterwards deified as the patron of science and architecture).

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