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stockholm

stockholm

stockholm Sentence Examples

  • He studied at Upsala from 1876 to 1881 and at Stockholm from 1881 to 1884, then returning to Upsala as privat-docent in physical chemistry.

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  • In 1891 he was appointed lecturer in physics at Stockholm and four years later became full professor.

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  • RENE DESCARTES (1596-1650), French philosopher, was born at La Haye, in Touraine, midway between Tours and Poitiers, on the 31st of March 1596, and died at Stockholm on the 1th of February 1650.

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  • The position on which he entered at Stockholm was unsuited for a man who wished to be his own master.

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  • Klemming (Stockholm, 1857-1884, I t vols.).

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  • von Rosen, Archaeological' Researches on the Frontier of Argentina and Bolivia 1901-1902 (Stockholm, 1904); Arturo B.

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  • The Duke of Connaught's elder daughter, Princess Margaret (1882), was married in 1905 to the Crown Prince of Sweden, and died at Stockholm May 1 1920.

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  • of Stockholm by rail.

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  • of Stockholm, and communicates with Lake Roxen (2 m.

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  • (1655-1697), king of Sweden, the only son of Charles X., and Hedwig Leonora of Holstein-Gottorp, was born in the palace at Stockholm, on the 24th of November 1655 His father, who died when the child was in his fourth year, left the care of his education to the regents whom he had appointed.

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  • See Martin Veibull, Sveriges Storhedstid (Stockholm, 1881); Frederick Ferdinand Carlson, Sveriges Historia under Konungarne af Pfalziska Huset (Stockholm, 1883-1885); Robert Nisbet Bain, Scandinavia (Cambridge, 1905); O.

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  • SjOgren, Karl den Elfte och Svenska Folket (Stockholm, 1897); S.

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  • mixture of gutta-percha, rosin and Stockholm tar).

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  • 1647 he was summoned by Queen Christina to Stockholm as court librarian and historiographer.

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  • AUTH0RITne5.General and Historical.Berkeley, Vegetable Pathology, Gardeners Chronicle (1854) p. 4; Plowright, British Uredineae and Ustilagineae (1889); Erik,sson and Henning, Die Getreideroste (Stockholm, 1896); De Bary, Comparative Morph.

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  • Five-sixths of these coins preserved at Stockholm were from the mints of the Samanian dynasty, which reigned in Khorasan and Transoxiana from about A.D.

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  • Nordenskiold's Vega-expeditionens Vetenskapliga Iakttagelser (5 vols., Stockholm, 2872-87) may be consulted for the mammals of the tundra region and marine fauna.

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  • In 1747 he was accredited to Copenhagen as Russian minister, but a few months later was transferred to Stockholm, where for the next twelve years he played a conspicuous part as the chief opponent of the French party.

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  • The then Provisional Government at Petrograd favoured an international Labour and Socialist Conference, which was being promoted by the International Socialist Bureau and was to meet at Stockholm.

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  • In 1720, by the peace of Stockholm, Swedish Pomerania was curtailed by extensive concessions to Prussia, but the district to the west of the Peene remained in the possession of Sweden until the general European settlement of 1815.

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  • Among his numerous works the following are especially worthy of note: Bidrag till svenska radets historia under medeltiden (Upsala, 1872); Sveriges Historia, 1511 -1611 (Stockholm, 1878); Bidrag till svenska statsrickets historia (Stockholm, 1884-1887); Den svensk-norsk Unionen (Stockholm, 1889-1891), the best book on the Norwego-Swedish Union question from the Swedish point of view; Fjerde Artiklen of Fredstraktaten i Kiel (Stockholm, 1899); Carl Johan och Sveriges yttre politik, 1810-1815 (Stockholm, 1899); Carl XIV.

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  • och Rikets Stdnder, 1840-1841 (Stockholm, 1893).

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  • He also edited Svenska Riksdagsakter, 1 5 21 - 1 554 (Stockholm, 1887), in conjunction with E.

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  • Hildebrand, and Sveriges Grundlagar (Stockholm, 1892).

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  • Summoned to Stockholm in 1782 by Gustavus III.

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  • Nordin published during his lifetime Handlingar till uplysning of svenska krigshistorien (Stockholm, 1787-1788).

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  • His academical addresses came out at Stockholm in 1818 under the title Minnen ofver namnkunniga svenska man.

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  • Odhner, Sveriges politiska historia under Gustaf III.'s regering (Stockholm, 1885, &c.); R.

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  • At the Riksdag assembled at Stockholm in 1697, the estates, jealous of the influence of the regents, offered full sovereignty to the young monarch, the senate acquiesced, and, after some hesitation, Charles at last declared that he could not resist the urgent appeal of his subjects and would take over the government of the realm "in God's name."

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  • (Berlin, 1894); Friedrich Ferdinand Carlson, Sveriges Historia under Konungarne of Pfalziska Huset (Stockholm, 1883-1885); Robert Nisbet Bain, Charles XII.

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  • (Budapest, 18 94); Oscar II., Nagra bidrag till Sveriges Krigshistoria aren 1711-1713 (Stockholm, 1892); Martin Weibull, Sveriges Storhedstid (Stockholm, 1881).

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  • An improvement on the old method of classification by purely external characters was introduced to the Academy of Sciences of Stockholm by C. J.

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  • out at Stockholm a Methodi naturalis avium disponendarum tentamen, two portions of which.

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  • Nordenskiiild's Periplus (Stockholm, 1869), and Th.

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  • of Stockholm by sea.

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  • The Berlin herbarium is especially rich in more recent collections, and other national herbaria sufficiently extensive to subserve the requirements of the systematic botanist exist at St Petersburg, Vienna, Leiden, Stockholm, Upsala, Copenhagen and Florence.

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  • She journeyed slowly through Russia and Finland to Sweden, making some stay at St Petersburg, spent the winter in Stockholm, and-then set out for England.

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  • Nordenskiold, Den andra Dicksonska Expeditionen til Gronland (Stockholm, 1885).

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  • 48 (1901),; Tvei Somrar i Norra Ishafvet (Stockholm, 1901).

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  • Nathorst, " Bidrag till nordostra Gronlands geologi," with map Geologiska Foreningens i Stockholm Forhandlingar, No.

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  • Having studied theology and oriental languages at the universities of Wittenberg and Göttingen, he went in 1755 as a tutor to Stockholm, and afterwards to Upsala; and while in Sweden he wrote in Swedish an Essay on the General History of Trade and of Seafaring in the most Ancient Times (1758).

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  • In 1887 Svante Arrhenius, professor of physics at Stockholm, put forward a new theory which supposed that the freedom of the opposite ions from each other was not a mere momentary freedom at the instants of molecular collision, but a more or less permanent freedom, the ions moving independently of each other through the liquid.

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  • In 1757 be became an associate of the Imperial Academy of St Petersburg, and a foreign member of the Royal Society of London, and in 1758 a member of the Academy of Berlin, in 1766 of that of Stockholm, and in 1770 of the Academies of Copenhagen and of Bern.

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  • Kjellmann, Vega Expeditionens Vetenskapliga Iakttagelser (Stockholm, 1872-1887) reckons their number at 182; 124 species were found by Middendorff on the Taymyr peninsula, 219 along the borders of the forest region of Olenek, and 344 species within the forest region of the same; 470 species were collected by Maack in the Vilui region.

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  • Iakttagelser (5 vols., Stockholm, 1872-1887); P. P. Semenov, Geogr.

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  • After studying at Berlin, he went to Stockholm to work under Berzelius, and later to Paris, where he studied for a while under Gay-Lussac and Thenard.

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  • by his eloquent preaching at the fashionable St Clara church at Stockholm.

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  • N.) with the main line of railway from Stockholm to Gellivara and Narvik on Ofoten Fjord in Norway.

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  • of Stockholm.

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  • ed., London, 1902); Historia om Axel von Fersens mord (Stockholm, 1844); R.

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  • Flach, Grefve Hans Axel von Fersen (Stockholm, 1896); E.

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  • (Stockholm, 1883-1887).

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  • Tobacco is cultivated in localities scattered over almost the whole world, ranging as far north as Quebec, Stockholm and the southern shores of Lake Baikal in one hemisphere, and as far south as Chile, the Cape of Good Hope and Victoria in the other.

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  • CHRISTINA (1626-1689), queen of Sweden, daughter of Gustavus Adolphus and Maria Eleonora of Brandenburg, was born at Stockholm on the 8th of December 1626.

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  • Bildt, Christina de Suede et le conclave de Clement X (Paris, 1906); Dronning Kristinas sista dagar (Stockholm, 1897); and J.

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  • SWEDENBORG (or [[Swedberg), Emanuel]] (1688-1772), Swedish scientist, philosopher and mystic, was born at Stockholm on the 29th of January 1688.

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  • He was buried in the Swedish church in Princes Square, in the parish of St George's-in-theEast, and on the 7th of April 1908 his remains were removed at the request of the Swedish government to Stockholm.

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  • brought him to Stockholm, giving him the title of Baron von Lowenstlern in 1693 and making him a member of the council of mines.

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  • The two great pressing national questions, war and the restitution of the alienated crown lands, were duly considered at the Riksdag which assembled at Stockholm in March 1655.

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  • SWEDEN] See Martin Veibull, Sveriges Storhedstid (Stockholm, 1881); Frederick Ferdinand Carlson, Sveriges Historia under Konungarne af Pfalziska Huset (Stockholm, 1883-1885); E.

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  • - The diplomacy of Louis had, before the outbreak of war, deprived Holland of her allies - England (treaty of Dover, 1670), Sweden (treaty of Stockholm, 1672) and the emperor, and when he declared war on the United Provinces in March 1672, it seemed that the Dutch could offer little resistance.

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  • He was transferred to Berlin, then to Stockholm, and back again to Berlin.

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  • On the authority of the first meeting of the International Conference for the Study of the Northern European Seas at Stockholm in 1899 Martin Knudsen, assisted by Karl Forch and S.

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  • He was active in the summer of 1917 in promoting the participation of representatives of the English Labour and Socialist parties in an International Socialist Conference at Stockholm, to which German representatives were coming, and he went to Paris with bIr.

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  • He himself did not get to Stockholm, as the Sailors' and Firemen's Union, whose distrust of Germany was based on practical knowledge of her crimes at sea, refused to permit him to sail.

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  • He also built Stockholm, and enriched it by making it the chief mart for the trade of Lubeck, with which city he concluded a commercial treaty.

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  • There is a fine statue of the great jarl in the Riddarholm church at Stockholm, erected by Fogelberg at the expense of the Stockholm magistracy in 1884.

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  • (Stockholm, 1879-1883).

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  • Nordenskjold, The Cliff Dwellers of the Mesa Verde, Colorado (Stockholm, 18 93); Zelia Nuttall, The Book of the Life of the Ancient Mexicans (Univ.

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  • of Stockholm by the Christiania railway.

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  • Carlstadt was published at Stockholm in 1871.

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  • See Cecilia Math-Holmberg, Carl XV., som enskild man, konung och konstncir (Stockholm, 1891); Yngvar Nielsen, Det norske og svenske Kongehus fra 1818 (Christiania, 1883).

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  • A large trade is carried on, by way of the Orebro canal and lakes Hjelmar and Molar, with Stockholm.

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  • His most important works were the Missa hispanica, which he exchanged for his diploma at Stockholm, a Mass in D minor, a Lauda Sion, a set of graduals, forty-two of which are reprinted in Diabelli's Ecclesiasticon, three symphonies (1785), and a string quintet in C major which has been erroneously attributed to Joseph Haydn.

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  • Upon the conclusion of the treaty he went to Stockholm as plenipotentiary; and in both capacities he behaved with resolution and address.

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  • of Brandenburg, and after being plundered by the Russians in 1713 was ceded to Prussia by the peace of Stockholm in 1720.

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  • Of the books published since 1890 the most important are Sven Hedin's Scientific Results of a Journey in Central Asia, 1899-1902 (Stockholm, 1905-1907, 6 vols.), with an elaborate atlas and a general map of Tibet on the scale of I: 1,000,000; H.

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  • BERNHARD VON BESKOW, Baron (1796-1868), Swedish dramatist and historian, son of a Stockholm merchant, was born on the 19th of April 1796.

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  • of Wirsen in his Lefnadsteckningar (Stockholm, 1901).

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  • On the 2nd of November Bernadotte made his solemn entry into Stockholm, and on the 5th he received the homage of the estates and was adopted by Charles XIII.

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  • He died at Stockholm on the 8th of March 1844.

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  • Sars, Norges politiske historia (Christiania, 1899) Yngvar Nielsen, Carl Johan som han virkelig var (Christiania, 1897); Johan Almen, Atten Bernadotte (Stockholm, 1893); C. Schefer, Bernadotte roi (Paris, 1899); G.

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  • Lagerhjelm, Napoleon och Carl Johan under Kriget i Tyskland, 1813 (Stockholm, 1891).

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  • It was not, however, till the 14th of April 1672 that Sweden, by the treaty of Stockholm, became a regular "mercenarius Galliae," pledging herself, in return for 400,000 ecus per annum in peace and 600,000 in war time, to attack with 16,000 men those German princes who might be disposed to assist Holland.

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  • See Martin Veibull, Sveriges Storhetstid (Stockholm, 1881); Sv.

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  • Gigas (g or gig) of the 13th century at Stockholm, in a Perpignan MS. of the 12th century (p), published by S.

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  • In 1842 he went to Stockholm Observatory in order to gain experience in practical astronomical work, and in the following year he became observer at Upsala Observatory.

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  • Becoming interested in terrestrial magnetism he made many observations of magnetic intensity and declination in various parts of Sweden, and was charged by the Stockholm Academy of Sciences with the task, not completed till shortly before his death, of working out the magnetic data obtained by the Swedish frigate "Eugenie" on her voyage round the world in 1851-1853.

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  • After spending a short time in Strassburg he was appointed lecturer in physics at Stockholm University in 1885, but in 1891 returned to Upsala, where in 1896 he became professor of physics.

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  • von Beskow, Freherre Georg Heinrich von Gertz (Stockholm, 1868).

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  • In 1765 he removed to Malmo, and in 1768 to Stockholm.

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  • Bergman somehow neglected it, and this caused for a time a reluctance on Scheele's part to become acquainted with that savant, but the paper, through the instrumentality of Anders Johann Retzius (1742-1821), was ultimately communicated to the Academy of Sciences at Stockholm.

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  • He left Stockholm in 1770 and took up his residence at Upsala, where through the agency of Johann Gottlieb Gahn (1745-1818), assessor of mines at Fahlun, he made the personal acquaintance of Bergman.

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  • In 1775, the year in which he was elected into the Stockholm Academy of Sciences, he left Stockholm for Kdping, a small place on Lake Malar, where he became provisor and subsequently proprietor of a pharmacy.

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  • AUGUST STRINDBERG (1849-), Swedish author, was born at Stockholm on the 22nd of January 1849.

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  • The "red room" was the meeting-place in a small cafe in Stockholm of a society of needy journalists and artists, whose failure and despair are shown off against the prosperity of a typical bourgeois couple.

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  • In 1874 some friends procured him a place in the Royal library at Stockholm where he was employed until 1882.

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  • He hastened back to Stockholm, after burying his father, summoned a Riksdag, which met at Arboga on the 15th of April 1561, and adopted the royal propositions known as the Arboga articles, considerably curtailing the authority of the royal dukes, John and Charles, in their respective provinces.

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  • A month later, on the 4th of July, he was solemnly married to Karin at Stockholm by the primate.

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  • Eric at first offered a stout resistance and won two victories; but on the 17th of September the dukes stood before Stockholm, and Eric, after surrendering Gdran Persson to the horrible vengeance of his enemies, himself submitted, and resigned the crown.

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  • was proclaimed king by the army and the nobility; and a Riksdag, summoned to Stockholm, confirmed the choice and formally deposed Eric on the 25th of January 1569.

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  • (Stockholm, 1880); Robert Nisbet Bain, Scandinavia, cap. 4-6 (Cambridge, 1905); Eric Tegel, Konung Eriks den XIV.

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  • historia (Stockholm, 1751).

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  • appeared at Stockholm in 1615), the best at Hanover, 1846 (by Lappenberg, in Scriptores Rerum Germanicarum; reissued by L.

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  • KARL FREDRIK PECHLIN (1720-1796), Swedish politician and demagogue, son of the Holstein minister at Stockholm, was educated in Sweden, and entered the Swedish army.

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  • During the revolution of 1772 he escaped from Stockholm and kept quietly in the background.

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  • Svedelius, Arvid Bernard Horn (Stockholm, 1879); R.

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  • Horn: hans lefnad (Stockholm, 1852).

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  • (London, 1895); Elof Tegner, Gustaf Mauritz Armfelt (Stockholm, 1883-1887).

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  • When, in August 1810, Bernadotte was elected crown prince of Sweden, Oscar and his mother removed from Paris to Stockholm (June 1811).

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  • Almen, ' Dien Bernadotte (Stockholm, 1896); and C. E.

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  • Lagar (Stockholm, 1884, 1885).

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  • of Stockholm by rail, and 360 by the Gota canalroute.

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  • At the west end of Vasa Street is the city library, the most important in the country except the royal library at Stockholm and the university libraries at Upsala and Lund.

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  • between Lakes Vener and Vetter to Stockholm, Falun and the north; E.

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  • In respect of industry and commerce as a whole Gothenburg ranks as second to Stockholm in the kingdom; but it is actually the principal centre of export trade and port of register; and as a manufacturing town it is slightly inferior to Malmo.

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  • Berg, Samlingar till Goteborgs historia (Gothenburg, 1893); Lagerberg, Goteborg i aldre och nyare tid (Gothenburg, 1902); Froding, Det forna Goteborg (Stockholm, 1903).

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  • Peace was made with Sweden in December 1719 at Stockholm after the death of Charles XII., and Augustus was recognized as king of Poland.

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  • of Sweden in 1715; and by the peace of Stockholm in November 171 9 the elector received the duchies of Bremen and Verden, which formed an important addition to the electorate.

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  • Since then numerous congresses have been held, the seventeenth having sat in London in 1908, and the eighteenth at Stockholm in 1910.

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  • The prizes shall be awarded as follows: For physical science and chemistry, by the Swedish Academy of Sciences; for physiological or medical work, by the Caroline Institution at Stockholm; for literature, by the Stockholm Academy, and for peace work, by a committee of five members elected by the Norwegian Storthing.

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  • of Stockholm by a branch from the Stockholm-Malmo railway.

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  • Its castle was the seat of the kings of Sodermanland, and after those of Stockholm and Kalmar was the strongest in Sweden.

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  • He entered the Swedish army at an early age and was already a captain when, in 1689, at the head of a deputation of Livonian gentry, he went to Stockholm to protest against the rigour with which the land-recovery project of Charles XI.

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  • To save himself from the penalties of high treason, Patkul fled from Stockholm to Switzerland, and was condemned in contumaciam to lose his right hand and his head.

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  • Sjogren, Johan Reinhold Patkul (Swed.) (Stockholm, 1882); Anton Buchholtz, Beitreige zur Lebensgeschichte J.

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  • He was honourably received at Stockholm, but neither the climate nor the tone of the court suited him, and he asked permission to leave.

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  • The submission of the whole grand duchy would be the natural consequence of such a success, and, Finland once secured, Sprengtporten proposed at the head of his Finns to embark for Sweden, meet the king and his friends near Stockholm, and surprise the capital by a night attack.

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  • On the 22nd of July 1772 Sprengtporten left Stockholm.

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  • By the 23rd of August Sprengtporten was ready to re-embark for Stockholm with 780 men, but contrary winds kept him back, and in the meantime Gustavus III.

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  • (Stockholm, 1903).

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  • There is a prelate of the order which is administered by a chapter; the chapel of the knights is in the Riddar Holmskyrka at Stockholm.

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  • He arrived at Stockholm on the 30th of September 1593 and was crowned at Upsala on the 19th of February 1594, but only after he had consented to the maintenance of the "pure evangelical religion" in Sweden.

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  • Three days later, by the compact of Linkoping, Sigismund agreed to submit all the points in dispute between himself and his uncle to a riksdag at Stockholm; but immediately afterwards took ship for Danzig, after secretly protesting to the two papal prothonotaries who accompanied him that the Linkoping agreement had been extorted from him, and was therefore invalid.

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  • (Stockholm, 1881); Julian Ursyn Niemcewicz, History of the Reign of Sigismund III.

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  • (1748-1818), king of Sweden and Norway, the second son of Adolphus Frederick, king of Sweden, and Louisa Ulrica, sister of Frederick the Great, was born at Stockholm on the 7th of October 1748.

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  • Uredineae: Eriksson and Henning, Die Getreideroste (Stockholm, 1896); Eriksson, Botan.

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  • He studied in Berzelius's laboratory at Stockholm, and there began a lifelong friendship with the Swedish chemist.

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  • long, reaching from a little north of Stockholm westerly toward the Norwegian frontier, between the latitudes 59° and 61 0 N.

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  • of Stockholm, the terminus of a branch from Ange on the northern railway.

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  • It was while hunting near Lake Mdlar that the news of the Stockholm massacre was brought to him by a peasant fresh from the capital, who told him, at the same time, that a price had been set upon his head.

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  • Sjogren, Gustaf Vasa (Stockholm, 1896); C. M.

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  • Butler, The Reformation in Sweden (New York, 1883); Sveriges Historia (Stockholm, 1877-1881); J.

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  • of Stockholm by the Malmo railway.

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  • (Stockholm, 1814-1816).

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  • But Denmark's experience of Dutch promises in the past was not reassuring; so, while negotiating at the Hague for a renewal of the Dutch alliance, he at the same time felt his way at Stockholm towards a commercial treaty with Sweden.

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  • Montelius, The Civilization of Sweden in Heathen Times (London, 1888), and Der Orient and Europa (Stockholm, 1899); E.

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  • (Stockholm, 1878); Robert Nisbet Bain, Scandinavia (Cambridge, 1905), caps.

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  • Altenstein did not immediately carry out this proposal, but he obtained for Mitscherlich a government grant to enable him to continue his studies in Berzelius's laboratory at Stockholm.

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  • Kjellman, The Algae of the Arctic Sea (Stockholm, 1883); F.

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  • and Queen Sophia Magdalena, was born at Stockholm on the 1st of November 1778.

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  • To remove a madman by force was the one remaining expedient; and this was successfully accomplished by a conspiracy of officers of the western army, headed by Adlersparre, the Anckarsvards, and Adlercreutz, who marched rapidly from Skane to Stockholm.

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  • Trolle-Wachtmeister, Anteckningar och minnen (Stockholm, 1889); B.

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  • von Beskow, Lefnadsminnen (Stockholm, 1870); K.

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  • In 1709 Charles XII., after the defeat of Poltava, collected his forces here in a camp which they called New Stockholm, and continued there till 1713.

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  • Sweden, which adopted the cellular system in 1842, has now cells sufficient for prisoners sentenced to two years and less., There are three principal central prisons, one at Langholm near Stockholm, a second at Malmo and a third at Mya Varfet near Gothenburg.

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  • See Swalin, Det danske Staatsraad (Stockholm, 1881); Madvig, Livserindringer (Copenhagen, 1887).

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  • Lucas, Nicaragua: War of the Filibusters (Richmond, Va., 1896); C. Bovallius, Nicaraguan Antiquities (Stockholm, 1886).

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  • Hence a regular steamboat service connects with Trelleborg in Sweden, thus affording direct communication between Berlin and Stockholm.

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  • In Stockholm there was a mortality of 40,000.

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  • The Aland Islands occupy a position of the greatest strategic importance, commanding as they do both the entrance to the port of Stockholm and the approaches to the Gulf of Bothnia, through which the greater part of the trade of Sweden is carried on.

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  • In 1652 Christina of Sweden invited him to Stockholm, where he studied the Arabian manuscripts in the queen's possession.

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  • Sundbarg of Stockholm.

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  • A complete Finnish Bible was published at Stockholm in 1642.

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  • STOCKHOLM, the capital of Sweden, on the east coast, not far south of the junction of the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Bothnia.

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  • The old market, still called Stortorg (great market) is now one of the smallest in Stockholm.

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  • South-west of Ltrngho( dal r Stockholm and Environs Scale, r:107,000 Stortorg (Groat Market) 2.

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  • ?_?nl - the Royal Palace is the Storkyrka (great church), dedicated to St Nicholas, the oldest church of Stockholm, though greatly altered from its original state.

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  • east of Stockholm, on Baggensfjdrd, is the nearest and most favoured seaside resort, but Dalard (20 m.

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  • Stockholm has no state university.

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  • Stockholm is the seat of the principal learned societies and royal academies (see Sweden).

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  • Several of the leading sporting clubs have their headquarters in Stockholm.

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  • The Stockholm General Skating Club (Almdnna Skridskoklubb) is the leading institution for the most favoured winter sport.

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  • The industries of Stockholm are miscellaneous.

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  • The value of the output of these is nearly thrice those of Malmo or Gothenburg, the next most important manufacturing towns, and the industries of Stockholm exceed those of every ldn (administrative division) except MalmOhus.

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  • Stockholm is the first port in Sweden for import trade, but as regards exports ranks about level with Malmo and is exceeded by Gothenburg.

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    0
  • The imports average nearly 30% of those of the whole country, but the exports only 9%, Stockholm having proportionately little share in the vast timber export trade.

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  • Stockholm is the centre of government and the usual residence of the king; in summer he generally occupiesone of the neighbouring country palaces.

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  • As regards local government, Stockholm is a lain (administrative district) in [itself, distinct from the rural kin of the same name, under a high governor (dfversteithallare) and deputy, with departments for secretarial work, taxation and police.

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  • - The population of Stockholm in 1900 was 300,624.

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    0
  • - Before the rise of Stockholm, Bjdrko, Sigtuna and Upsala were places of great importance.

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  • Stockholm was founded by Birger Jarl, it is said, in or about 1255, at a time when pirate fleets were less common than they had been, and the government was anxious to establish commercial relations with the towns which were now beginning to flourish on the southern coast of the Baltic. The city was originally founded as a fortress on the island of Stadholm.

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  • It came to be called Stockholm ("the isle of the log," Latin Holmia, German Holm); the true explanation of the name is not known.

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  • During the middle ages the city developed steadily, and grew to command all the foreign commerce of the midlands and north, but it was not until modern times that Stockholm became the capital of Sweden.

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  • Ferlin, Stockholms Stad (Stockholm, 1854-1858); C. Lundin and A.

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  • Strindberg, Gamla Stockholm (Stockholm, 1882); C. Lundin Nya Stockholm (Stockholm, 1890); G.

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  • Nordensvan, Mdlardrottningen [" the queen of Malar"] (Stockholm, 1896); E.

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  • Dahlgren, Stockholm, Sveriges hufvustad skildrad (Stockholm, 1897, issued by the municipal council on the occasion of the Stockholm Exhibition, 1897).

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    0
  • The scenery of these lakes, though never grand, is always quietly beautiful, especially in the case of Molar, the wooded shores and islands of which form a notable feature in the pleasant environs of the city of Stockholm.

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  • Typical instances occur in the cities of Stockholm (Brunkebergsasen) and Upsala (Upsala-i sen).

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    0
  • Lake Vetter drains eastward by the Motala to the Baltic, Lake Malar drains in the same direction by a short channel at Stockholm, the normal fall of which is so slight that the stream is sometimes reversed.

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  • The island belt is widest (some 45 m.) off the city of Stockholm, the approach to which from the sea is famous for its beauty.

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  • Large masses of granite are found in many parts of Sweden, in Kronoberg, Orebro, Goteborg, Stockholm, &c. Sometimes the granite graduates into gneiss; sometimes (as north of Stockholm) it encloses large angular pieces of gneiss.

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  • Intrusions of hyperite, gabbro (anorthite-gabbro at Radmanso in the province of Stockholm) and diorite are also abundant.

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    0
  • near Stockholm).

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  • Karistad (180 ft.) at the head of Lake Vener-43.3°; Orebro (102 ft.) at the west of Lake Hjelmar-41 4°: and Stockholm (144 ft.) - 42 I°.

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    0
  • At Karesuando the last frost of spring occurs on an average on the 15th of June, and the first of autumn on the 27th of August, though night frosts may occur earlier; while at Stockholm 41 months are free of frost.

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  • above sea-level the sun is seen continuously above the horizon from the 26th of May to the 18th of July; at Haparanda for 23 hours, at Stockholm for 181 hours and at Lund for 171 hours at the summer solstice.

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  • The numerous inland waters and sheltered channels within the skargard have caused the high development of sailing as a summer sport, the Royal Swedish Yacht Club having its headquarters in Stockholm.

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  • The towns with a population exceeding 15,000 in 1900 are Stockholm (300,624), Gothenburg (130,609), Malmo (60,857), Norrkoping (41,008), Gefle (29,522), Helsingborg (24,670), Karlskrona (23,955), Jonkoping (23,143), Upsala (22,855), Orebro (22,013), Lund (16,621), Boras (15,837), Halmstad (15,362).

    0
    0
  • Some of the old wooden farm-buildings, especially in Dalarne, such as are preserved in Skansen Museum at Stockholm, are extremely picturesque.

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    0
  • Marstrand near Gothenburg is one of the most fashionable; Stromstad, Lysekil and Varberg on the same coast, Ronneby on the Baltic, with its chalybeate springs, Visby the capital of Gotland, and several villages in the neighbourhood of Stockholm may also be noted.

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  • The headquarters of the Swedish Touring Club (Svenska Turistf oreningen) are in Stockholm, but its organization extends throughout the country, and is of special value to travellers in the far north.

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  • The government works the trunk lines from Stockholm to Malmo, to Gothenburg and to Christiania as far as the Norwegian frontier, and other important through routes in the south.

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  • It runs north from Stockholm roughly parallel with the east coast, throwing off branches to the chief seaports, and also a branch from Bracke to Ostersund and Storlien, where it joins a line from Trondhjem in Norway.

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    0
  • Finally, there are numerous horticultural societies, large nurseries and gardening schools at Stockholm, Alnarp and elsewhere, and botanical gardens attached to the universities of Lund and Upsala.

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    0
  • Members of the forest service undergo a preliminary course of instruction at a school of forestry, and a further course at the Institute of Forestry, Stockholm, which dates from 1828.

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    0
  • There are schools of mining at Stockholm (the higher school), Falun and Filipstad in Vermland.

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  • The great mechanical works are found at or near Malmo, Stockholm, JOnkoping, Trollhattan, Motala on Lake Vetter, Lund, Gothenburg, Karlstad, Falun and Eskilstuna, which is especially noted for its cutlery.

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  • Among other industries may be mentioned the earthenware works at Hoganas at the north end of the Sound, the cement works of Lomma in this vicinity, and the pottery works of Rorstrand in, and Gustafsberg near, Stockholm; where beautiful ware is produced.

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  • The principal ports of register are Gothenburg, Stockholm, Helsingborg and Gefle, in order; though the principal commercial ports are Stockholm; Gothenburg and Malmo.

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    0
  • The principal docks are at Gothenburg, Stockholm, Malmo, Oskarshamn and Norrkoping, besides the naval docks at Karlskrona; and the principal ports where large vessels can be accommodated on slips are Malmo, Gothenburg, Stockholm, Karlskrona and Gefle.

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  • On Kalmar Sound are Kalmar and Oskarshamn; and continuing northward, Vestervik, Soderkoping at the head of the inlet Slatbaken, Norrkoping, similarly situated on Braviken, and Stockholm, far within the skargard.

    0
    0
  • Gothenburg has two mayors, and the city of Stockholm (q.v.), a lan in itself, has a special form of government.

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  • (2) There are three higher courts (hofratter), in Stockholm, J&nkiiping and Kristianstad.

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  • There are six divisions, quartered at Helsingborg, Linkoping, Skofde, Stockholm (two), and Hernosand; in addition to the Gotland troops quartered at Visby.

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  • There are fortresses at Stockholm (Vaxholm and Oscar-Fredriksborg), Boden on the northern railway near the Russian frontier, Karlsborg on Lake Vetter, and Karlskrona; and there are forts at Gothenburg and on Gotland.

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  • The principal naval station is Karlskrona, and there is another at Stockholm.

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    0
  • Technical education is provided in higher schools at Stockholm, Gothenburg and certain other large industrial centres; and in lower schools distributed throughout the country, in which special attention is given to the prevailing local industries.

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    0
  • Owing to the high development of state public schools, private schools for boys are few; but higher schools for girls are all private, excepting the higher seminary for teachers and the state normal school at Stockholm.

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    0
  • The state universities are at Upsala and Lund, and with these ranks the Caroline Medical Institution at Stockholm.

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  • There are universities (founded by private individual benefactions, but under state control) at Stockholm and Gothenburg.

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    0
  • A fourth prize is distributed by the Caroline Institution at Stockholm.

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    0
  • The principal museums and art and other collections are in Stockholm, Upsala and Lund, and Gothenburg.

    0
    0
  • The Royal Library in the Humlegard Park at Stockholm, and the university libraries at Upsala and Lund are entitled to receive a copy of every publication printed in the kingdom.

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    0
  • vers., Stockholm, 1904); Bidrag till Sveriges officiela statistik (Stockholm, 1857 seq.); Statistisk Tidskrift, periodically from 1862; Publications (year-book, guides, &c.) of the Svenska Turistforeningen (Swedish Touring Club) Stockholm; periodical Bulletin of the Geological Institute of Upsala University, in which may be noted K.

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    0
  • (1900); Also Dahlman, Inledning til Sveriges physikalska geografi (Stockholm, 1857); Statistiskt Lexicon ofrer Sverige (Stockholm, 1859-1870); M.

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    0
  • Hojer, Konungariket Sverige (Stockholm, 1875-1883); C. Almqvist, La Suede, ses progres sociaux (Stockholm, 1879); P. B.

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    0
  • Rosenberg, Geografiskt-statistiskt handlexicon ofrer Sverige (Stockholm, 1882-1883); W.

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    0
  • Thomas, Sweden and the Swedes (Chicago and New York, 1891); Healey, Educational Systems of Sweden, Norway and Denmark (London, 1893); Nystrom, Handbok i Sveriges geografi (Stockholm, 1895), and Sveriges rike (Stockholm, 1902); G.

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    0
  • Ahlenius, Sverige, geografisk, topografisk, statistisk beskrifning (Stockholm); and for geology, A.

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    0
  • Nathorst, Sveriges geologi (Stockholm).

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    0
  • For more detailed accounts of the various districts see the publications of the Sveriges Geologiska Undersakning, and also the volumes of the Geologiska Foreningens i Stockholm Forhandlingar.

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    0
  • (Montelius & Hildebrand, Stockholm, 18 751$ 77); Thomsen, The Relations between Ancient Russia and Scandinavia and the Origin of the Russian State (Oxford and London, 1877).

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    0
  • To him is attributed the foundation of Stockholm; but he is best known as a legislator, and his wise reforms prepared the way for the abolition of serfdom.

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    0
  • On the 18th of February 1527 two bishops, the first martyrs of Catholicism in Sweden, were gibbeted at Stockholm after a trial which was a parody of justice.

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  • They threatened, more than once, to march upon and destroy Stockholm, because the Reformers had made of it " a spiritual Sodom."

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  • assembled at Stockholm to adopt certain articles framed by himself on what we should call a High Church basis.

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  • But though the Jesuit Antonio Possevino was sent to Stockholm to complete John's " conversion," John would only consent to embrace Catholicism under certain conditions which were never kept, and the only result of all these subterraneous negotiations was to incense the Protestants still more against the new liturgy, the use of which by every congregation in the realm without exception was, nevertheless, decreed by the Riksdag of 1582.

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  • Stockholm, the capital, lay in the very centre of the empire, whose second greatest city was Riga, on the other side of the sea.

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    0
  • By the Treaty of Stockholm (April 14, 1672), Sweden became, for the next ten years, a "mercenarius Galliae," pledging with France.

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  • The Riksdag which assembled in Stockholm in October 1680 begins a new era of Swedish history.

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  • The navy, of even more importance to Sweden if she were to maintain the dominion of the Baltic, was entirely remodelled; and, the recent war having demonstrated the unsuitability of Stockholm as a naval station, the construction of a new arsenal on a gigantic scale was simultaneously begun at Karlskrona.

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  • By the treaties of Treaties of Stockholm (Feb.

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  • I, 1 20 Hanover Stockholm > 7) and obtained the bishoprics of Bremen and Verden for Frederiks- herself and Stettin for her confederate Prussia.

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  • France, naturally, hailed with satisfaction the rise of a faction which was content to be her armourbearer in the north; and the golden streams which flowed from Versailles to Stockholm during the next two generations were the political life-blood of the Hat party.

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  • Still more energetic on the other side, the Russian minister, Ivan Osterman, became the treasurer as well as the counsellor of the Caps, and scattered the largesse of the Russian empress with a lavish hand; and so lost to all feeling of patriotism were the Caps that they openly threatened all who ventured to vote against them with the Muscovite vengeance, and fixed Norrkoping, instead of Stockholm, as the place of meeting for the Riksdag as being more accessible to the Russian fleet.

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  • Immediately after his return to Stockholm, Gustavus endeavoured to reconcile the jarring factions by inducing the leaders to form a composition committee to adjust their differences.

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  • Nevertheless, within three years, the king was obliged to summon another Riksdag, which met at Stockholm on the 26th of January 1789.

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  • 19, 1809) broke the spirit of the Swedish army; and peace was obtained by the sacrifice of Finland, the Aland islands, " the fore-posts of Stockholm," as Napoleon rightly described them, and Vesterbotten as far as the rivers Tornea and Muonio (treaty of Fredrikshamn, Sept.

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  • As the financial situation necessitated a large increase of taxation, there was much popular discontent, which culminated in riots in the streets of Stockholm (March 1848).

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  • To the First Chamber protectionists were almost exclusively elected, and in the Second all the twenty-two members for Stockholm were disqualified, owing to one of their number not having paid his taxes a few years previously, which prevented his being eligible.

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  • Instead, then, of twenty-two free traders representing the majority of the Stockholm electors, twenty-two protectionists, representing the minority, were elected, and Stockholm was thus represented in the Riksdag by the choice of a minority in the capital.

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  • One result of the Stockholm election came at a convenient time for the Themptauder ministry.

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  • Processions of many thousands of workmen were organized, in Stockholm and in other towns of the kingdom, just before the Riksdag began the discussion on the above-mentioned bill of the government, and when the bill was introduced in the chambers a general and wellorganized strike took place and continued during the three days the debate on the bill lasted.

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  • When in 1897 King Oscar celebrated his jubilee of twenty-five years as king, the exhibition which had been organized in Stockholm offered a convincing proof of the progress the country had made in every direction.

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  • Historiska handlingar rorande Skandinaviens historia (Stockholm, 1816-1897, &c.); Svenska Riksdagsakter,1521-1718 (ibid., 1887); Sveriges historia (ibid., 1883-1887); P. Backstrom, Svenska flottans historia (ibid., 1884); R.

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  • Carlson, Sveriges historie under konungarne af Pfalziska Huset (Stockholm, 1883-1885); A.

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  • Seraphim, Geschichte LivEstand Kurlands bis zur Einverleibung in das russische Reich (Reval, 1895) C. Silfverstolpe, Historiskt bibliothek (Stockholm, 1875); R.

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  • Setterwall, Forteckning Ofver Acta Svecica (Stockholm, 1889); J.

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  • Two years later he was pardoned, and allowed to resume his preaching in Stockholm.

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  • Afzelius (3 vols., Stockholm, 1879).

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  • Editions of these chronicles and romances have been issued by the " Svenska Fornskrift Sallskapet " (Stockholm): Ivan Lejonriddaren (ed.

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  • The French philosopher Descartes, who died at Christina's court at Stockholm in 1650, found his chief, though posthumous, disciple in Andreas Rydelius (1671-1738), bishop of Lund, who was the master of Dalin, and thus connects us with the next epoch.

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  • It was in 1744 that she settled in Stockholm and opened her famous literary salon.

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  • Journalism began to develop; the Swedish Academy was founded; the drama first learned to flourish in Stockholm; and literature began to take a characteristically national shape.

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  • In 1773 the king opened the national theatre in Stockholm, and on that occasion an opera of Thetis och Pelee was performed, written by himself.

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  • The first list of immortals, which included the survivors of a previous age and such young celebrities as Kellgren and Leopold, embraced all that was most brilliant in the best society of Stockholm; the king himself presided, and won the first prize for an oration.

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  • in six volumes were printed at Stockholm in 1802-1806.

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  • He interrupted his studies at the university by a voyage to the East Indies, and only returned to Stockholm after many adventures.

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  • Among the poets who have been mentioned above, the 2 His collected works were edited by C. Eichhorn (2 vols., Stockholm, 1867-1868).

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  • In 1811 certain young men in Stockholm founded a society for the elevation of society by means of the study of Scandinavian antiquity.

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  • After devoting himself wholly to realism of the coarsest kind, he began in 1889 his series of mystico-pathological novels about life in the archipelago of Stockholm.

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  • 5849) has described in verse the life in the islands of the Stockholm archipelago.

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  • Vannerus in Stockholm.

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  • Nyblom, Estetiska studier (Stockholm, 1873-1884).

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  • The official handbook of Sweden prepared by the Swedish Central Bureau of Statistics for the Paris Exhibition (English ed., Stockholm, 1904); Ph.

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  • Most of the so-called Stockholm tar is thus prepared, chiefly in the province of Bothnia.

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  • Before he departed, the French government undertook to pay the outstanding subsidies to Sweden unconditionally, at the rate of one and a half million livres annually; and the comte de Vergennes, one of the great names of French diplomacy, was transferred from Constantinople to Stockholm.

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  • He undertook to seize the fortress of Sveaborg by a coup de main, and, Finland once secured, Sprengtporten proposed to embark for Sweden, meet the king and his friends near Stockholm, and surprise the capital by a night attack, when the estates were to be forced, at the point of the bayonet, to accept a new constitution from the untrammelled king.

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  • But contrary winds prevented him from crossing to Stockholm, and in the meanwhile events had occurred which made his presence there unnecessary.

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  • On the 16th of August the Cap leader, Ture Rudbeck, arrived at Stockholm with the news of the insurrection in the south, and Gustavus found himself isolated in the midst of enemies.

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    0
  • Odhner, Sveriges politiska historia under Konung Gustaf III.'s regering (Stockholm, 1885-1896); B.

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  • sdsom Konung och manniska (Stockholm, 1860-1861); O.

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  • som dramatisk forfattare (Stockholm, 1894); Gustaf III.'s bref till G.

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  • Kock in the Historisk Tidskrift (Stockholm), 1895, xv.

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  • In 1678 it was taken from Sweden by Frederick William, elector of Brandenburg, but it was restored in 1679, only, however, to be ceded to Prussia in 1720 by the peace of Stockholm.

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  • by Brandenburg, and in 1720, by the peace of Stockholm, it was definitely assigned to Brandenburg-Prussia.

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  • Sodertelge, a town of Sweden, in the district (ldn) of Stockholm, 23 m.

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  • This is on the route followed by the Gdta Canal steamers between Stockholm and Gothenburg: it was opened in 1819, though a canal was begun here in the first half of the 15th century at the instigation of the patriot Engelbrecht.

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  • Here and in the neighbourhood are the residences of many of the business class of Stockholm; and the town is in favour as a summer resort, having mineral springs and baths.

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  • For many years the works of Swedenborg and his followers were proscribed, and receivers of his writings fined or deprived of office, but in 1866, when religious liberty had made progress, the cause was again taken up; in 1875 the society of " Confessors of the New Church " was formed in Stockholm, and since 1877 services have been regularly held.

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  • von Hopken (Stockholm, 1882); Carl Silfverstolpe, Grefve Hopkens Skrifter (Stockholm, 1890-1893).

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  • But Sture's widow, Dame Christina Gyllenstjerna, still held out stoutly at Stockholm, and the peasantry of central Sweden, stimulated by her patriotism, flew to arms, defeated the Danish invaders at Balundsas (March 19th), and were only with the utmost difficulty finally defeated at the bloody battle of Upsala (Good Friday, April 6th).

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  • In May the Danish fleet arrived, and Stockholm was invested by land and sea; but Dame Christina resisted valiantly for four months longer, and took care, when she surrendered on the 7th of September, to exact beforehand an amnesty of the most explicit and absolute character.

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  • On the 4th of November he was anointed by Gustavus Trolle in Stockholm cathedral, and took the usual oath to rule the realm through native-born Swedes alone, according to prescription.

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  • Fourteen noblemen,three burgomasters,fourteen town-councillors and about twenty common citizens of Stockholm were then drowned or decapitated.

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  • It has well been said that the manner of this atrocious deed (the "Stockholm Massacre" as it is generally called) was even more detestable than the deed itself.

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  • At this time Madame Kovalevsky was at Stockholm, where Gustaf Mittag Leffler, also a pupil of Weierstrass, who had been recently appointed to the chair of mathematics at the newly founded university, had procured for her a post as lecturer.

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  • by rail from St Petersburg via Tavastehus, and is in regular steamer communication with St Petersburg, Vasa, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Hull.

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  • A son was born to them at Stockholm on the 22nd of April 1906, and another son in the following year.

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  • nach den Mag'ellansleindern, 1895-1897 (Stockholm, 1898); Geological Map of the Magellan Territories (Stockholm, 1899); F.

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  • Stockholm Acad.

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  • Not merely in Spain, but in every land where Spanish is spoken, and in cities as remote from Madrid as Munich and Stockholm, he has met with an appreciation incomparably beyond that accorded to any other Spanish dramatist of recent years.

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  • of Stockholm by the railway.

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  • (Stockholm, 1906).

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  • Joined by Bernard Knipperdolling, the party reached Stockholm in the autumn of 1524.

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  • An unbroken ridge, extending from Stockholm to Hango in Finland, separates the Baltic basin proper from the depression between Sweden and the Aland Isles, to which the name Aland Haf has been given.

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  • At Stockholm the rate of elevation is approximately 0.47 metre (=1.54 ft.) in a century.

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  • Between Stockholm and Visby navigation usually ceases at the end of December and begins again about the 10th of April.

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    0
  • de Geer; Om Skandinaviens niveif orandringar under quartarperioden (Stockholm, 1888); R.

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    0
  • Ymer (Stockholm, 1899) Publications of the International Council for the Study of the Sea (Copenhagen, since 1902).

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  • In 1677 Pufendorf was called to Stockholm as historiographerroyal.

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    0
  • Malmstrc m, Sveriges politiska Historia (Stockholm, 1855-1865); R.

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    0
  • .Odhner, Sveriges politiska Historia under Gustaf III.'s Regering (Stockholm, 1885, &c.); F.

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  • Fersen, Historiska Skrifter (Stockholm, 1867-1872).

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  • - ii., Stockholm, 1905-1906), Through Asia (2 vols., London, 1898), and Central Asia and Tibet (2 vols., London, 1903).

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  • Their working is facilitated by the railway from Stockholm to Gellivara, Kirunavara and Narvik on the Norwegian coast, which also connects them with the port of Lulea, on the Gulf of Bothnia.

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  • such places as Jokkmokk and Arjepluog, but even Gefle, Upsala or Stockholm.

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  • von Diiben, Om Lappland och Lapparne (Stockholm, 1873), with list of over 200 authorities; C. Rabot, "La Laponie suedoise d'apres les recentes explorations de MM.

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    0
  • On the occasion of outbreaks the fine ashes are scattered over a large portion of the island, and sometimes carried far across the Atlantic. After the eruption of Katla in 1625 the ashes were blown as far as Bergen in Norway, and when Askja was in eruption in 1875 a rain of ashes fell on the west coast of Norway II hours 40 minutes, and at Stockholm 15 hours, afterwards.

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  • Snorri (1179-1241) wrote the Lives of the Kings (Heimskringla), from Olaf Tryggvason to Sigurd the Crusader inclusive; and we have them substantially as they came from his hand in the Great King Olaf's Saga; St Olaf's Saga, as in Heimskringla and the Stockholm MS.; and the succeeding Kings' Lives, as in Hulda and Hrokkinskinna, in which, however, a few episodes have been inserted.

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  • of great value at Upsala, at Stockholm, and in the old royal collection at Copenhagen.

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    0
  • After Choiseul's death he was sent to Stockholm with instructions to help the aristocratic party of the "Hats" with advice and money.

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    0
  • He died in New York on the 8th of March 1889, and in the following year, on the request of the Swedish government, his body was sent to Stockholm and thence into Wermland, where, at Filipstad, it was buried on the 15th of September.

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  • On the 24th of February 1389, Albert, who had returned from Mecklenburg with an army of mercenaries, was routed and taken prisoner at Aasle near Falk ping, and Margaret was now the omnipotent mistress of three kingdoms. Stockholm then almost entirely a German city, still held out; fear of Margaret induced both the Mecklenburg princes and the Wendish towns to hasten to its assistance; and the Baltic and the North Sea speedily swarmed with the privateers of the Viktualien brodre or Vitalianer, so called because their professed object was to revictual Stockholm.

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  • Finally the Hansa intervened, and by the compact of Lindholm (1395) Albert was released by Margaret on promising to pay 60,000 marks within three years, the Hansa in the meantime to hold Stockholm in pawn.

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  • Albert failing to pay his ransom within the stipulated time, the Hansa surrendered Stockholm to Margaret in September 1398, in exchange for very considerable commercial privileges.

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    0
  • Dasent's Prose or Younger Edda (Stockholm, 1842); the Corpus Septentrionale already referred to; C. F.

    0
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  • In the following year Samuel Bochart, being invited by Queen Christina to her court at Stockholm, took his friend Huet with him.

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  • This journey, in which he saw Leiden, Amsterdam and Copenhagen, as well .as Stockholm, resulted chiefly in the discovery, in the Swedish royal library, of some fragments of Origen's Commentary on St Matthew, which gave Huet the idea of editing Origen, a task he completed in 1668.

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  • The first unfavourable rumours with reference to him arose in connexion with an interview with Herr Max Warburg, the German financier at Stockholm.

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  • On his return journey he privately met at Stockholm Herr Warburg, the head of the Scandinavian section of the German Committee on Food Supplies.

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  • Schneidewind, Prinz Eugen, Herzog von Leuchtenberg in den Feldzitigen seiner Zeit (Stockholm, 1857); A.

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  • Important additions to our knowledge of the fertile leaves and rhizomes of certain Rhaetic species of Dictyophylium and other genera have recently been made by Professor Nathorst of Stockholm, and Professor Richter of Quedlinburg has made a thorough investigation of the vegetative organs of Hausmannia,.

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  • Malmo is second to Stockholm as an industrial centre.

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  • and of Christina, daughter of Adolphus, duke of Holstein-Gottorp, was born at Stockholm castle on the 9th of December 1594.

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  • By this peace Gustavus succeeded in excluding Muscovy from the Baltic. "I hope to God," he declared to the Stockholm diet in 1617, when he announced the conclusion of peace, "that the Russians will feel it a bit difficult to skip over that little brook."

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  • On the 19th of May 1630 Gustavus solemnly took leave of the estates of the realm assembled at Stockholm.

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  • See Sveriges Historia (Stockholm, 1877, 81), vol.

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  • Oxenstjerna, Skrifter och Brefvexling (Stockholm, 1900, &c.); G.

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  • Bjorlen, Gustaf Adolf (Stockholm, 1890); R.

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  • Adolfs politik (Stockholm, 1881); E.

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  • When he arrived in America he joined with other Swedish dissenters to establish a settlement called Stockholm in Crawford County.

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  • In actual fact, cruising round the streets of a cold, sunny Stockholm afternoon, the Cadillac XLR looks vaguely futuristic in design.

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  • ninetylabel states that: The Stockholm duo Eurosport plays joyful tunes with inspiration from the early nineties dance floors.

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  • tam jacket we're trying to knit in our local SNB group in Stockholm.

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  • From Belgium, we travel to Stockholm, Sweden, where the high-powered ensemble Calle Real is bringing a thaw to their native city.

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  • He studied at Upsala from 1876 to 1881 and at Stockholm from 1881 to 1884, then returning to Upsala as privat-docent in physical chemistry.

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  • In 1891 he was appointed lecturer in physics at Stockholm and four years later became full professor.

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  • Arrhenius is specially associated with the development of the theory of electrolytic dissociation, and his great paper on the subject, Recherches sur la conductibilite galvanique des electrolytes - (1) conductibilite galvanique des solutions aqueuses extremement diluees, (2) theorie chimique des electrolytes, was presented to the Stockholm Academy of Sciences in 1883.

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  • RENE DESCARTES (1596-1650), French philosopher, was born at La Haye, in Touraine, midway between Tours and Poitiers, on the 31st of March 1596, and died at Stockholm on the 1th of February 1650.

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  • The position on which he entered at Stockholm was unsuited for a man who wished to be his own master.

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  • A monument was raised to his memory at Stockholm by Gustavus III.; and a modern statue has been erected to him at Tours, with an inscription on the pedestal: " Je pense, donc je suis."

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  • Klemming (Stockholm, 1857-1884, I t vols.).

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  • von Rosen, Archaeological' Researches on the Frontier of Argentina and Bolivia 1901-1902 (Stockholm, 1904); Arturo B.

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  • The Duke of Connaught's elder daughter, Princess Margaret (1882), was married in 1905 to the Crown Prince of Sweden, and died at Stockholm May 1 1920.

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  • of Stockholm by rail.

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  • of Stockholm, and communicates with Lake Roxen (2 m.

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  • (1655-1697), king of Sweden, the only son of Charles X., and Hedwig Leonora of Holstein-Gottorp, was born in the palace at Stockholm, on the 24th of November 1655 His father, who died when the child was in his fourth year, left the care of his education to the regents whom he had appointed.

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  • See Martin Veibull, Sveriges Storhedstid (Stockholm, 1881); Frederick Ferdinand Carlson, Sveriges Historia under Konungarne af Pfalziska Huset (Stockholm, 1883-1885); Robert Nisbet Bain, Scandinavia (Cambridge, 1905); O.

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  • SjOgren, Karl den Elfte och Svenska Folket (Stockholm, 1897); S.

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  • mixture of gutta-percha, rosin and Stockholm tar).

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  • 1647 he was summoned by Queen Christina to Stockholm as court librarian and historiographer.

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  • AUTH0RITne5.General and Historical.Berkeley, Vegetable Pathology, Gardeners Chronicle (1854) p. 4; Plowright, British Uredineae and Ustilagineae (1889); Erik,sson and Henning, Die Getreideroste (Stockholm, 1896); De Bary, Comparative Morph.

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  • Five-sixths of these coins preserved at Stockholm were from the mints of the Samanian dynasty, which reigned in Khorasan and Transoxiana from about A.D.

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  • Retzius, Das Gehororgan der Wirbelthiere (Stockholm, 1884), ii.

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  • Nordenskiold's Vega-expeditionens Vetenskapliga Iakttagelser (5 vols., Stockholm, 2872-87) may be consulted for the mammals of the tundra region and marine fauna.

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  • In 1747 he was accredited to Copenhagen as Russian minister, but a few months later was transferred to Stockholm, where for the next twelve years he played a conspicuous part as the chief opponent of the French party.

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  • The then Provisional Government at Petrograd favoured an international Labour and Socialist Conference, which was being promoted by the International Socialist Bureau and was to meet at Stockholm.

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  • In 1720, by the peace of Stockholm, Swedish Pomerania was curtailed by extensive concessions to Prussia, but the district to the west of the Peene remained in the possession of Sweden until the general European settlement of 1815.

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  • Among his numerous works the following are especially worthy of note: Bidrag till svenska radets historia under medeltiden (Upsala, 1872); Sveriges Historia, 1511 -1611 (Stockholm, 1878); Bidrag till svenska statsrickets historia (Stockholm, 1884-1887); Den svensk-norsk Unionen (Stockholm, 1889-1891), the best book on the Norwego-Swedish Union question from the Swedish point of view; Fjerde Artiklen of Fredstraktaten i Kiel (Stockholm, 1899); Carl Johan och Sveriges yttre politik, 1810-1815 (Stockholm, 1899); Carl XIV.

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  • och Rikets Stdnder, 1840-1841 (Stockholm, 1893).

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  • He also edited Svenska Riksdagsakter, 1 5 21 - 1 554 (Stockholm, 1887), in conjunction with E.

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  • Hildebrand, and Sveriges Grundlagar (Stockholm, 1892).

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  • Summoned to Stockholm in 1782 by Gustavus III.

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  • Nordin published during his lifetime Handlingar till uplysning of svenska krigshistorien (Stockholm, 1787-1788).

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  • His academical addresses came out at Stockholm in 1818 under the title Minnen ofver namnkunniga svenska man.

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  • See Sveriges historia (Stockholm, 1877, &c.), vol.

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  • Odhner, Sveriges politiska historia under Gustaf III.'s regering (Stockholm, 1885, &c.); R.

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  • At the Riksdag assembled at Stockholm in 1697, the estates, jealous of the influence of the regents, offered full sovereignty to the young monarch, the senate acquiesced, and, after some hesitation, Charles at last declared that he could not resist the urgent appeal of his subjects and would take over the government of the realm "in God's name."

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  • (Berlin, 1894); Friedrich Ferdinand Carlson, Sveriges Historia under Konungarne of Pfalziska Huset (Stockholm, 1883-1885); Robert Nisbet Bain, Charles XII.

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  • (Budapest, 18 94); Oscar II., Nagra bidrag till Sveriges Krigshistoria aren 1711-1713 (Stockholm, 1892); Martin Weibull, Sveriges Storhedstid (Stockholm, 1881).

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  • Among others may be mentioned the Genera of Birds by Thomas Pennant, first printed at Edinburgh in 1773, but best known by the edition which appeared in London in 1781; the Elementa Ornithologica and Museum Ornithologicum of Schaffer, published at Ratisbon in 2774 and 1784 respectively; Peter Brown's New Illustrations of Zoology in London in 1776; Hermann's Tabular Affinitatum Animalium at Strasburg in 1783, followed posthumously in 1804 by his Observationes Zoologicae; Jacquin's Beytraege zur Geschichte der Voegel at Vienna in 1784, and in 1790 at the same place the larger work of Spalowsky with nearly the same title; Sparrman's Museum Carlsonianum at Stockholm from 1786 to 1789; and in 1794 Hayes's Portraits of rare and curious Birds from the menagery of Child the banker at Osterley near London.

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  • An improvement on the old method of classification by purely external characters was introduced to the Academy of Sciences of Stockholm by C. J.

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  • out at Stockholm a Methodi naturalis avium disponendarum tentamen, two portions of which.

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  • Nordenskiold's Facsimile Atlas (Stockholm, 1889), Gabriel Marcell, Choix de cartes et de mappemondes X I V et X V siecles (Paris, 1896).

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  • Nordenskiiild's Periplus (Stockholm, 1869), and Th.

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  • of Stockholm by sea.

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  • The Berlin herbarium is especially rich in more recent collections, and other national herbaria sufficiently extensive to subserve the requirements of the systematic botanist exist at St Petersburg, Vienna, Leiden, Stockholm, Upsala, Copenhagen and Florence.

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  • She journeyed slowly through Russia and Finland to Sweden, making some stay at St Petersburg, spent the winter in Stockholm, and-then set out for England.

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  • Nordenskiold, Den andra Dicksonska Expeditionen til Gronland (Stockholm, 1885).

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  • 48 (1901),; Tvei Somrar i Norra Ishafvet (Stockholm, 1901).

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  • Nathorst, " Bidrag till nordostra Gronlands geologi," with map Geologiska Foreningens i Stockholm Forhandlingar, No.

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  • (Stockholm, 1884); " Kritische Bemerkungen fiber die Geschichte der Vegetation Gronlands," Botanische Jahrbiicher, vol.

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  • Having studied theology and oriental languages at the universities of Wittenberg and Göttingen, he went in 1755 as a tutor to Stockholm, and afterwards to Upsala; and while in Sweden he wrote in Swedish an Essay on the General History of Trade and of Seafaring in the most Ancient Times (1758).

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  • In 1887 Svante Arrhenius, professor of physics at Stockholm, put forward a new theory which supposed that the freedom of the opposite ions from each other was not a mere momentary freedom at the instants of molecular collision, but a more or less permanent freedom, the ions moving independently of each other through the liquid.

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  • In 1757 be became an associate of the Imperial Academy of St Petersburg, and a foreign member of the Royal Society of London, and in 1758 a member of the Academy of Berlin, in 1766 of that of Stockholm, and in 1770 of the Academies of Copenhagen and of Bern.

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  • Kjellmann, Vega Expeditionens Vetenskapliga Iakttagelser (Stockholm, 1872-1887) reckons their number at 182; 124 species were found by Middendorff on the Taymyr peninsula, 219 along the borders of the forest region of Olenek, and 344 species within the forest region of the same; 470 species were collected by Maack in the Vilui region.

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  • Iakttagelser (5 vols., Stockholm, 1872-1887); P. P. Semenov, Geogr.

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  • After studying at Berlin, he went to Stockholm to work under Berzelius, and later to Paris, where he studied for a while under Gay-Lussac and Thenard.

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  • by his eloquent preaching at the fashionable St Clara church at Stockholm.

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  • Montan (Stockholm, 1878), is one of the most trustworthy and circumstantial documents relating to the Gustavian era of Swedish history.

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  • N.) with the main line of railway from Stockholm to Gellivara and Narvik on Ofoten Fjord in Norway.

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  • of Stockholm.

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  • When, then, on the 10th of June 1810, the prince's body was conveyed to Stockholm, and Fersen, in his official capacity as Riksnzarskalk, received it at the barrier and led the funeral cortege into the city, his fine carriage and his splendid robes seemed to the people an open derision of the general grief.

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  • ed., London, 1902); Historia om Axel von Fersens mord (Stockholm, 1844); R.

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  • Flach, Grefve Hans Axel von Fersen (Stockholm, 1896); E.

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  • (Stockholm, 1883-1887).

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  • Tobacco is cultivated in localities scattered over almost the whole world, ranging as far north as Quebec, Stockholm and the southern shores of Lake Baikal in one hemisphere, and as far south as Chile, the Cape of Good Hope and Victoria in the other.

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  • CHRISTINA (1626-1689), queen of Sweden, daughter of Gustavus Adolphus and Maria Eleonora of Brandenburg, was born at Stockholm on the 8th of December 1626.

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  • Bildt, Christina de Suede et le conclave de Clement X (Paris, 1906); Dronning Kristinas sista dagar (Stockholm, 1897); and J.

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  • SWEDENBORG (or [[Swedberg), Emanuel]] (1688-1772), Swedish scientist, philosopher and mystic, was born at Stockholm on the 29th of January 1688.

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  • He was buried in the Swedish church in Princes Square, in the parish of St George's-in-theEast, and on the 7th of April 1908 his remains were removed at the request of the Swedish government to Stockholm.

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  • He died of surfeit at Stockholm on the 12th of February 1771.

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  • brought him to Stockholm, giving him the title of Baron von Lowenstlern in 1693 and making him a member of the council of mines.

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  • The two great pressing national questions, war and the restitution of the alienated crown lands, were duly considered at the Riksdag which assembled at Stockholm in March 1655.

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  • SWEDEN] See Martin Veibull, Sveriges Storhedstid (Stockholm, 1881); Frederick Ferdinand Carlson, Sveriges Historia under Konungarne af Pfalziska Huset (Stockholm, 1883-1885); E.

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  • - The diplomacy of Louis had, before the outbreak of war, deprived Holland of her allies - England (treaty of Dover, 1670), Sweden (treaty of Stockholm, 1672) and the emperor, and when he declared war on the United Provinces in March 1672, it seemed that the Dutch could offer little resistance.

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  • He was transferred to Berlin, then to Stockholm, and back again to Berlin.

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  • Odhner's brief sketch, Kolonien Nya Sveriges Grundldggning, 1637-1642 (Stockholm, 1876; English translation in the Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, vol.

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  • On the authority of the first meeting of the International Conference for the Study of the Northern European Seas at Stockholm in 1899 Martin Knudsen, assisted by Karl Forch and S.

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  • He was active in the summer of 1917 in promoting the participation of representatives of the English Labour and Socialist parties in an International Socialist Conference at Stockholm, to which German representatives were coming, and he went to Paris with bIr.

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  • He himself did not get to Stockholm, as the Sailors' and Firemen's Union, whose distrust of Germany was based on practical knowledge of her crimes at sea, refused to permit him to sail.

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  • He also built Stockholm, and enriched it by making it the chief mart for the trade of Lubeck, with which city he concluded a commercial treaty.

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  • There is a fine statue of the great jarl in the Riddarholm church at Stockholm, erected by Fogelberg at the expense of the Stockholm magistracy in 1884.

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  • (Stockholm, 1879-1883).

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  • Nordenskjold, The Cliff Dwellers of the Mesa Verde, Colorado (Stockholm, 18 93); Zelia Nuttall, The Book of the Life of the Ancient Mexicans (Univ.

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  • of Stockholm by the Christiania railway.

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  • Carlstadt was published at Stockholm in 1871.

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  • See Cecilia Math-Holmberg, Carl XV., som enskild man, konung och konstncir (Stockholm, 1891); Yngvar Nielsen, Det norske og svenske Kongehus fra 1818 (Christiania, 1883).

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  • A large trade is carried on, by way of the Orebro canal and lakes Hjelmar and Molar, with Stockholm.

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  • His most important works were the Missa hispanica, which he exchanged for his diploma at Stockholm, a Mass in D minor, a Lauda Sion, a set of graduals, forty-two of which are reprinted in Diabelli's Ecclesiasticon, three symphonies (1785), and a string quintet in C major which has been erroneously attributed to Joseph Haydn.

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  • Upon the conclusion of the treaty he went to Stockholm as plenipotentiary; and in both capacities he behaved with resolution and address.

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  • of Brandenburg, and after being plundered by the Russians in 1713 was ceded to Prussia by the peace of Stockholm in 1720.

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  • Of the books published since 1890 the most important are Sven Hedin's Scientific Results of a Journey in Central Asia, 1899-1902 (Stockholm, 1905-1907, 6 vols.), with an elaborate atlas and a general map of Tibet on the scale of I: 1,000,000; H.

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  • BERNHARD VON BESKOW, Baron (1796-1868), Swedish dramatist and historian, son of a Stockholm merchant, was born on the 19th of April 1796.

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  • of Wirsen in his Lefnadsteckningar (Stockholm, 1901).

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  • On the 2nd of November Bernadotte made his solemn entry into Stockholm, and on the 5th he received the homage of the estates and was adopted by Charles XIII.

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  • He died at Stockholm on the 8th of March 1844.

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  • Sars, Norges politiske historia (Christiania, 1899) Yngvar Nielsen, Carl Johan som han virkelig var (Christiania, 1897); Johan Almen, Atten Bernadotte (Stockholm, 1893); C. Schefer, Bernadotte roi (Paris, 1899); G.

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  • Lagerhjelm, Napoleon och Carl Johan under Kriget i Tyskland, 1813 (Stockholm, 1891).

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  • It was not, however, till the 14th of April 1672 that Sweden, by the treaty of Stockholm, became a regular "mercenarius Galliae," pledging herself, in return for 400,000 ecus per annum in peace and 600,000 in war time, to attack with 16,000 men those German princes who might be disposed to assist Holland.

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  • See Martin Veibull, Sveriges Storhetstid (Stockholm, 1881); Sv.

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  • Gigas (g or gig) of the 13th century at Stockholm, in a Perpignan MS. of the 12th century (p), published by S.

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  • In 1842 he went to Stockholm Observatory in order to gain experience in practical astronomical work, and in the following year he became observer at Upsala Observatory.

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  • Becoming interested in terrestrial magnetism he made many observations of magnetic intensity and declination in various parts of Sweden, and was charged by the Stockholm Academy of Sciences with the task, not completed till shortly before his death, of working out the magnetic data obtained by the Swedish frigate "Eugenie" on her voyage round the world in 1851-1853.

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  • In his optical researches, Optiska Undersiikningar, presented to the Stockholm Academy in 1853, he not only pointed out that the electric spark yields two superposed spectra, one from the metal of the electrode and the other from the gas in which it passes, but deduced from Euler's theory of resonance that an incandescent gas emits luminous rays of the same refrangibility as those which it can absorb.

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  • After spending a short time in Strassburg he was appointed lecturer in physics at Stockholm University in 1885, but in 1891 returned to Upsala, where in 1896 he became professor of physics.

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  • von Beskow, Freherre Georg Heinrich von Gertz (Stockholm, 1868).

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  • In 1765 he removed to Malmo, and in 1768 to Stockholm.

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  • Bergman somehow neglected it, and this caused for a time a reluctance on Scheele's part to become acquainted with that savant, but the paper, through the instrumentality of Anders Johann Retzius (1742-1821), was ultimately communicated to the Academy of Sciences at Stockholm.

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  • He left Stockholm in 1770 and took up his residence at Upsala, where through the agency of Johann Gottlieb Gahn (1745-1818), assessor of mines at Fahlun, he made the personal acquaintance of Bergman.

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  • In 1775, the year in which he was elected into the Stockholm Academy of Sciences, he left Stockholm for Kdping, a small place on Lake Malar, where he became provisor and subsequently proprietor of a pharmacy.

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  • AUGUST STRINDBERG (1849-), Swedish author, was born at Stockholm on the 22nd of January 1849.

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  • The " red room " was the meeting-place in a small cafe in Stockholm of a society of needy journalists and artists, whose failure and despair are shown off against the prosperity of a typical bourgeois couple.

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  • In 1874 some friends procured him a place in the Royal library at Stockholm where he was employed until 1882.

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  • He hastened back to Stockholm, after burying his father, summoned a Riksdag, which met at Arboga on the 15th of April 1561, and adopted the royal propositions known as the Arboga articles, considerably curtailing the authority of the royal dukes, John and Charles, in their respective provinces.

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  • On the 15th of June 1.566 the unfortunate youth, bruised and bleeding from shocking ill-treatment, was placed upon a wretched hack, with a crown of straw on his head, and led in derision through the streets of Stockholm.

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  • A month later, on the 4th of July, he was solemnly married to Karin at Stockholm by the primate.

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  • Eric at first offered a stout resistance and won two victories; but on the 17th of September the dukes stood before Stockholm, and Eric, after surrendering Gdran Persson to the horrible vengeance of his enemies, himself submitted, and resigned the crown.

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  • was proclaimed king by the army and the nobility; and a Riksdag, summoned to Stockholm, confirmed the choice and formally deposed Eric on the 25th of January 1569.

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  • (Stockholm, 1880); Robert Nisbet Bain, Scandinavia, cap. 4-6 (Cambridge, 1905); Eric Tegel, Konung Eriks den XIV.

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  • historia (Stockholm, 1751).

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  • appeared at Stockholm in 1615), the best at Hanover, 1846 (by Lappenberg, in Scriptores Rerum Germanicarum; reissued by L.

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  • KARL FREDRIK PECHLIN (1720-1796), Swedish politician and demagogue, son of the Holstein minister at Stockholm, was educated in Sweden, and entered the Swedish army.

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  • During the revolution of 1772 he escaped from Stockholm and kept quietly in the background.

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  • Svedelius, Arvid Bernard Horn (Stockholm, 1879); R.

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  • Horn: hans lefnad (Stockholm, 1852).

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  • (London, 1895); Elof Tegner, Gustaf Mauritz Armfelt (Stockholm, 1883-1887).

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  • When, in August 1810, Bernadotte was elected crown prince of Sweden, Oscar and his mother removed from Paris to Stockholm (June 1811).

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  • Almen, ' Dien Bernadotte (Stockholm, 1896); and C. E.

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  • Lagar (Stockholm, 1884, 1885).

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  • of Stockholm by rail, and 360 by the Gota canalroute.

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  • At the west end of Vasa Street is the city library, the most important in the country except the royal library at Stockholm and the university libraries at Upsala and Lund.

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  • between Lakes Vener and Vetter to Stockholm, Falun and the north; E.

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  • In respect of industry and commerce as a whole Gothenburg ranks as second to Stockholm in the kingdom; but it is actually the principal centre of export trade and port of register; and as a manufacturing town it is slightly inferior to Malmo.

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  • Berg, Samlingar till Goteborgs historia (Gothenburg, 1893); Lagerberg, Goteborg i aldre och nyare tid (Gothenburg, 1902); Froding, Det forna Goteborg (Stockholm, 1903).

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  • Peace was made with Sweden in December 1719 at Stockholm after the death of Charles XII., and Augustus was recognized as king of Poland.

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  • of Sweden in 1715; and by the peace of Stockholm in November 171 9 the elector received the duchies of Bremen and Verden, which formed an important addition to the electorate.

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  • Since then numerous congresses have been held, the seventeenth having sat in London in 1908, and the eighteenth at Stockholm in 1910.

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  • The prizes shall be awarded as follows: For physical science and chemistry, by the Swedish Academy of Sciences; for physiological or medical work, by the Caroline Institution at Stockholm; for literature, by the Stockholm Academy, and for peace work, by a committee of five members elected by the Norwegian Storthing.

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  • of Stockholm by a branch from the Stockholm-Malmo railway.

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  • Its castle was the seat of the kings of Sodermanland, and after those of Stockholm and Kalmar was the strongest in Sweden.

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  • JOHANN REINHOLD PATKUL (,660-1707), Livonian politician and agitator, was born in prison at Stockholm, where his father lay under suspicion of treason.

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  • He entered the Swedish army at an early age and was already a captain when, in 1689, at the head of a deputation of Livonian gentry, he went to Stockholm to protest against the rigour with which the land-recovery project of Charles XI.

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  • To save himself from the penalties of high treason, Patkul fled from Stockholm to Switzerland, and was condemned in contumaciam to lose his right hand and his head.

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  • Sjogren, Johan Reinhold Patkul (Swed.) (Stockholm, 1882); Anton Buchholtz, Beitreige zur Lebensgeschichte J.

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  • He was honourably received at Stockholm, but neither the climate nor the tone of the court suited him, and he asked permission to leave.

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  • Nordenskiold, Periplus (Stockholm, 1897); The Story of Africa, vol.

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  • The submission of the whole grand duchy would be the natural consequence of such a success, and, Finland once secured, Sprengtporten proposed at the head of his Finns to embark for Sweden, meet the king and his friends near Stockholm, and surprise the capital by a night attack.

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  • On the 22nd of July 1772 Sprengtporten left Stockholm.

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  • By the 23rd of August Sprengtporten was ready to re-embark for Stockholm with 780 men, but contrary winds kept him back, and in the meantime Gustavus III.

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  • (Stockholm, 1903).

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  • There is a prelate of the order which is administered by a chapter; the chapel of the knights is in the Riddar Holmskyrka at Stockholm.

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  • He arrived at Stockholm on the 30th of September 1593 and was crowned at Upsala on the 19th of February 1594, but only after he had consented to the maintenance of the "pure evangelical religion" in Sweden.

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  • Three days later, by the compact of Linkoping, Sigismund agreed to submit all the points in dispute between himself and his uncle to a riksdag at Stockholm; but immediately afterwards took ship for Danzig, after secretly protesting to the two papal prothonotaries who accompanied him that the Linkoping agreement had been extorted from him, and was therefore invalid.

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  • (Stockholm, 1881); Julian Ursyn Niemcewicz, History of the Reign of Sigismund III.

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  • (1748-1818), king of Sweden and Norway, the second son of Adolphus Frederick, king of Sweden, and Louisa Ulrica, sister of Frederick the Great, was born at Stockholm on the 7th of October 1748.

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  • (Stockholm, 1884); Drottning Hedwig Charlottes Dagbokshandteckningar (Stockholm, 1898) Robert Nisbet Bain, Gustavus III.

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