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stettin

stettin

stettin Sentence Examples

  • Stralsund entertains passengerboat communications with Barth, Stettin, Rostock and Lubeck as well as with various small ports on the isle of Riigen.

  • Wisotzki, Hauptfluss and Nebenfluss (Stettin, 1889).

  • JOHANN BUGENHAGEN (1485-1558), surnamed Pomeranus, German Protestant reformer, was born at Wollin near Stettin on the 24th of June 1485.

  • There is steamer communication with Stettin, about 40 m.

  • The province is officially divided into the three districts of Stralsund, Stettin and Koslin, but more historical interest attaches to the names of Vorpommern and Hinterpommern, or Hither and Farther Pomerania, the former being applied to the territory to the west, and the latter to that to the east of the Oder.

  • Ship-building is carried on at Stettin and at several places along the coast.

  • The commerce of Pomerania is in a flourishing condition, its principal ports being Stettin, Stralsund and Swinemiinde.

  • Heinemann (Stettin, 1900); von Bohlen, Die Erwerbung Pommerns durch die Hohenzollern (Berlin, 1865); H.

  • Klempin and others (Stettin, 1868-1896); W.

  • Mass, Pommersche Geschichte (Stettin, 1899); M.

  • Wehrmann, Geschichte von Pommern (Gotha, 1904-1906); and Uecker, Pommern in Wort and Bild (Stettin, 1904).

  • Friis died on the 5th of December 1570, a few days before the peace of Stettin, which put an end to the exhausting and unnecessary struggle.

  • of Stettin by rail.

  • of Stettin, with which it has communication by rail and steamer.

  • With the latter he determined to strike the first blow, by a concentric advance on Berlin (which he calculated he would reach on the 4th or 5th day), the movement being continued thence to extricate the French garrisons in Kustrin, Stettin and Danzig.

  • The crown prince of Sweden (Bernadotte), with his Swedes and various Prussian levies, 135,000 in all, lay in and around Berlin and Stettin; and knowing his former marshal well, Napoleon considered Oudinot a match for him.

  • GRUNBERG, a town of Germany, in Prussian Silesia, beautifully situated between two hills on an affluent of the Oder, and on the railway from Breslau to Stettin via Kiistrin, 36 m.

  • BREDOW, a village of Germany, in the kingdom of Prussia, immediately north of Stettin, of which it forms a suburb.

  • A speech, denouncing the projected incorporation of Schleswig and Holstein with Denmark, delivered in the Chamber of Baden on the 6th of February 1845, spread his fame beyond the limits of his own state, and his popularity was increased by his expulsion from Prussia on the occasion of a journey to Stettin.

  • The most important towns on its banks are Ratibor, Oppeln, Brieg, Breslau, Glogau, Frankfort, Custrin and Stettin, with the seaport of Swinemiinde at its mouth.

  • long, constituting the immediate approach to Stettin.

  • are now able to go right up to Stettin.

  • In 1905 a project was sanctioned for improving the communication between Berlin and Stettin by widening and deepening the lower course of the river and then connecting this by a canal with Berlin.

  • of Stettin, at the junction of railways to Belgard, Posen and Stolpmiinde.

  • Neu-Stettin was founded in 1313 by Wratislaus, duke of Pomerania, on the model of Stettin.

  • As a child young Droysen witnessed some of the military operations during the War of Liberation, for his father was pastor at Greifenhagen, in the immediate neighbourhood of Stettin, which was held by the French during the greater part of 1813.

  • He was educated at the gymnasium of Stettin and at the university of Berlin; in 1829 he became a master at the Graue Kloster (or Grey Friars), one of the oldest schools in Berlin; besides his work there he gave lectures at the university, from 1833 as privat-dozent, and from 1835 as professor, without a salary.

  • of Stettin, by the railway to Stralsund.

  • to save the rest of his German domains by ceding Stettin to Prussia.

  • of Stettin, on the railway Ruhnow-Neustettin.

  • (1729-1796), empress of Russia, was the daughter of Christian Augustus, prince of Anhalt-Zerbst, and his wife, Johanna Elizabeth of Holstein-Gottorp. The exact date and place of her birth have been disputed, but there appears to be no reason to doubt that she was right in saying that she was born at Stettin on the 2nd of May 1729.

  • Her father, who succeeded to the principality of Anhalt-Zerbst in 1746 and died in 1747, was a general in the Prussian service, and, at the time of her birth, was military commandant at Stettin.

  • The elector, full of grievances against Prussia, threw in his lot with Austria; the electorate was at once overrun with Prussian troops; Cassel was occupied (June 20); and the elector was carried a prisoner to Stettin.

  • of Stettin, on the Berlin-Stralsund railway.

  • With the exception of those on the east coast of Schleswig-Holstein, all the important trading ports of Germany are river ports, such as Emden,Bremen, Hamburg, LUbeck, Stettin, Danzig, Konigsberg, Memel.

  • Stettin, , 224,078

  • The chief ports are Hamburg, Stettin, Bremen, Kiel, Lbeck, Flensburg, Bremerhaven, Danzig (Neufahrwasser), Geestemunde and Emden; and the number and tonnage of vessels of foreign nationality entering and clearing the ports of the empire, as compared with national shipping, were in 1906:

  • Saale, Hanover, Cassel, Kattowitz, Cologne, Konigsberg, Magdeburg, Munster, Posen, Saarbrucken and Stettin.

  • The Baltic ports, such as Lubeck, Stettin, Danzig (Neufahrwasser) and Konigsberg, principally provide communication with the coast towns of the adjacent countries, Russia and Sweden.

  • size between Berlin and Stettin; for improving the waterwal betweell the Oder and the Vistula, so as to render it capabb of accommodating vessels of 400 tons; and for the canalization of the upper Oder.

  • Stettin (Pomerania); III.

  • To the Swedes were granted Western Pomerania, with Stettin, and the archbishopric of Bremen and the bishopric of Verden.

  • The ~.aw, which had obviously failed, was renewed in 1881; the state if siege was applied to Hamburg, Leipzig and Stettin, but all to no purpose; and though the law was twice more renewed, ~n 1886 arid in 1888, the feeling began to gro~w that the Socialists were more dangerous under it than they had been before.

  • In 1904 it was once more introduced in the modified form of a proposal of a canal from the Rhine to Leine in Hanover, with a branch from Datteln to Ham, and also of a canal from Berlin to Stettin.

  • In youth he had musical ambitions, studied under Mendelssohn and Weinlig at Leipzig, under Loewe at Stettin, and afterwards at Vienna.

  • In 1569 Barnim handed over his duchy to his grand-nephew, John Frederick, and died at Stettin on the 2nd of June 1573.

  • Its position as the first German emporium of the west end of the Baltic has been to some extent impaired by Hamburg and Bremen since the construction of the North Sea and Baltic Canal, and by the rapid growth and enterprise of Stettin.

  • Eine Inselstudie (Stuttgart, 1893); Edwin Muller, Die Insel Rugen (17th ed., Berlin, 1900); Schuster, Fuhrer durch die Insel Rugen (7th ed., Stettin, 1901); Boll, Die Insel Rugen (Schwerin, 1858); O.

  • John, Volkssagen aus Hagen (Stettin, 1886); and E.

  • His son Hermann (1828-1890), who was appointed Consistorialrath in Stettin in 1877, was the author of Deutsches Leben in Nordamerika (1874).

  • What she actually got was (1) Upper Pomerania, with the islands of Riigen and Usedom, and a strip of Lower Pomerania on the right side of the Oder, including the towns of Stettin, Garz, Damm and Gollnow, and the isle of Wollin, with the right of succession to the rest of Lower Pomerania in the case of the extinction of the Brandenburg Hohenzollerns; (2) the town of Wismar with the districts of Poel and Neukloster; (3) the secularized bishoprics of Bremen and Verden; and (4) 5,000,000 rix-dollars.

  • In December 1677 the elector of Brandenburg captured Stettin.

  • I, 1 20 Hanover Stockholm > 7) and obtained the bishoprics of Bremen and Verden for Frederiks- herself and Stettin for her confederate Prussia.

  • of Stettin on the railway to Kolberg.

  • from Hamburg and 84 from Stettin, its situation, so far from being prejudicial to its growth and prosperity, as was formerly often asserted, has been, in fact, the principal determining factor in its rapid rise to the position of the greatest industrial and commercial city on the continent of Europe.

  • STETTIN, a seaport of Germany, capital of the Prussian province of Pomerania, on the Oder, 17 m.

  • line of defence and these now combine with Stettin to form one industrial and commercial centre.

  • Apart from its commerce Stettin is comparatively an uninteresting city, although its appearance, owing to its numerous promenades and open spaces, is very pleasant.

  • As a prosperous commerical town Stettin has numerous scientific, educational and benevolent institutions.

  • Stettin, regarded as the port of Berlin, is one of the principal ship-building centres of Germany and a place of much commercial and industrial activity.

  • The sea-borne commerce of Stettin is of scarcely less importance than her industry and a larger number of vessels enter and clear here than at any other German port, except Hamburg and Bremerhaven.

  • It has two basins, with the necessary accompaniment of cranes, storehouses, &c., and the deepening of the Oder from Stettin to the Haff to 24 ft.

  • With the view of still further increasing the commercial importance of Stettin, it is proposed to construct a ship canal giving the town direct communication with Berlin.

  • A feature in the mercantile life of Stettin is the large number of insurance companies which have their headquarters in the town.

  • The forest and river scenery of the neighbourhood of Stettin is picturesque, but the low level and swampy nature of the soil render the climate bleak and unhealthy.

  • Stettin is said to have existed as a Wendish settlement in the 9th century, but its first authentic appearance in history was in the 12th century, when it was known as Stedyn.

  • The Pomeranian dynasty became extinct in 1637, when the country was suffering from the ravages of the Thirty Years' War, and by the settlement of 1648 Stettin, the fortifications of which had been improved by Gustavus Adolphus, was ceded to Sweden.

  • Stettin was the birthplace of the empress Catherine II.

  • See Berghaus, Geschichte der Stadt Stettin (Wi rzen, 1875-1876); W.

  • Meyer, Stettin in alter and newer Zeit (Stettin, 1887); T.

  • Schmidt, Zur Geschichte des Handels and der Schiffahrt Stettins 1786-1846 (Stettin, 1815); and C. F.

  • Meyer, Stettin zur Schwedenzeit (Stettin, 1886).

  • Gilbert's principal work is his treatise on magnetism, entitled De magnete, magneticisque corporibus, et de magno magnete tellure (London, 1600; later editions - Stettin, 1628, 1633; Frankfort, 1629, 1638).

  • from Stettin by the railway to Strassburg.

  • The possession of a seaboard enabled them to maintain fleets and build relatively large towns such as Stettin and Kolberg, whilst they ravaged at will the territories of their southern neighbours the Poles.

  • In 1120-1124 the rebellion of his vassal Prince Warceslaus of Stettin again brought Boleslaus into the country, but the resistance was as stout as ever, and only after 18,000 of his followers had fallen and 8000 more had been expatriated did Warceslaus submit to his conqueror.

  • In 1124 the southern portions of the land were converted by St Otto, but it was only under the threat of extermination if they persisted in their evil ways that the people of Stettin accepted the faith in the following year.

  • GUSTROW, a town of Germany, in the grand duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, on the Nebel and the railway from Lubeck to Stettin, 20 m.

  • It serves as the outer port of Stettin, 42 m.

  • The connexion between Swinemiinde and Stettin is kept open in winter by ice breakers.

  • Formerly ships of heavy burden bound for Stettin discharged or lightened their cargo at Swinemiinde, but since the recent deepening of the river Oder they can proceed direct to the larger port.

  • Aided by the imperialists and the Danes, he followed up this success, and cleared Brandenburg and Pomerania of the Swedes, capturing Stettin in 1677 and Stralsund in 1678, while an attack made by Sweden on Prussia was successfully repelled.

  • Stettin, the capital of Pomerania, and the key of the Oder line, was occupied and converted into a.

  • Stralsund entertains passengerboat communications with Barth, Stettin, Rostock and Lubeck as well as with various small ports on the isle of Riigen.

  • Wisotzki, Hauptfluss and Nebenfluss (Stettin, 1889).

  • JOHANN BUGENHAGEN (1485-1558), surnamed Pomeranus, German Protestant reformer, was born at Wollin near Stettin on the 24th of June 1485.

  • There is steamer communication with Stettin, about 40 m.

  • The province is officially divided into the three districts of Stralsund, Stettin and Koslin, but more historical interest attaches to the names of Vorpommern and Hinterpommern, or Hither and Farther Pomerania, the former being applied to the territory to the west, and the latter to that to the east of the Oder.

  • Ship-building is carried on at Stettin and at several places along the coast.

  • The commerce of Pomerania is in a flourishing condition, its principal ports being Stettin, Stralsund and Swinemiinde.

  • Heinemann (Stettin, 1900); von Bohlen, Die Erwerbung Pommerns durch die Hohenzollern (Berlin, 1865); H.

  • Klempin and others (Stettin, 1868-1896); W.

  • Mass, Pommersche Geschichte (Stettin, 1899); M.

  • Wehrmann, Geschichte von Pommern (Gotha, 1904-1906); and Uecker, Pommern in Wort and Bild (Stettin, 1904).

  • Friis died on the 5th of December 1570, a few days before the peace of Stettin, which put an end to the exhausting and unnecessary struggle.

  • of Stettin by rail.

  • of Stettin, with which it has communication by rail and steamer.

  • With the latter he determined to strike the first blow, by a concentric advance on Berlin (which he calculated he would reach on the 4th or 5th day), the movement being continued thence to extricate the French garrisons in Kustrin, Stettin and Danzig.

  • The crown prince of Sweden (Bernadotte), with his Swedes and various Prussian levies, 135,000 in all, lay in and around Berlin and Stettin; and knowing his former marshal well, Napoleon considered Oudinot a match for him.

  • GRUNBERG, a town of Germany, in Prussian Silesia, beautifully situated between two hills on an affluent of the Oder, and on the railway from Breslau to Stettin via Kiistrin, 36 m.

  • BREDOW, a village of Germany, in the kingdom of Prussia, immediately north of Stettin, of which it forms a suburb.

  • A speech, denouncing the projected incorporation of Schleswig and Holstein with Denmark, delivered in the Chamber of Baden on the 6th of February 1845, spread his fame beyond the limits of his own state, and his popularity was increased by his expulsion from Prussia on the occasion of a journey to Stettin.

  • By 1570 the strife had degenerated into a barbarous devastation of border provinces; and in July of the same year both countries accepted the mediation of the Emperor, and peace was finally concluded at Stettin on Dec. 13, 1570.

  • On New Year's Day 1570 Frederick's difficulties seemed so overwhelming that he threatened to abdicate; but the peace of Stettin came in time to reconcile all parties, and though Frederick had now to relinquish his ambitious dream of re-establishing the Union of Kalmar, he had at least succeeded in maintaining the supremacy of Denmark in the north.

  • During the 19th century the opening of a railway system in East Prussia and Russia gave a new impetus to its commerce, making it the principal outlet for the Russian staples - grain, seeds, flax and hemp. It has now regular steam communication with Memel, Stettin, Kiel, Amsterdam and Hull.

  • The most important towns on its banks are Ratibor, Oppeln, Brieg, Breslau, Glogau, Frankfort, Custrin and Stettin, with the seaport of Swinemiinde at its mouth.

  • long, constituting the immediate approach to Stettin.

  • are now able to go right up to Stettin.

  • In 1905 a project was sanctioned for improving the communication between Berlin and Stettin by widening and deepening the lower course of the river and then connecting this by a canal with Berlin.

  • of Stettin, at the junction of railways to Belgard, Posen and Stolpmiinde.

  • Neu-Stettin was founded in 1313 by Wratislaus, duke of Pomerania, on the model of Stettin.

  • As a child young Droysen witnessed some of the military operations during the War of Liberation, for his father was pastor at Greifenhagen, in the immediate neighbourhood of Stettin, which was held by the French during the greater part of 1813.

  • He was educated at the gymnasium of Stettin and at the university of Berlin; in 1829 he became a master at the Graue Kloster (or Grey Friars), one of the oldest schools in Berlin; besides his work there he gave lectures at the university, from 1833 as privat-dozent, and from 1835 as professor, without a salary.

  • of Stettin, by the railway to Stralsund.

  • to save the rest of his German domains by ceding Stettin to Prussia.

  • Nicolai, Gedeichtnisschrift auf J.A.Eberhard(Berlin and Stettin, 1810); also K.

  • of Stettin, on the railway Ruhnow-Neustettin.

  • (1729-1796), empress of Russia, was the daughter of Christian Augustus, prince of Anhalt-Zerbst, and his wife, Johanna Elizabeth of Holstein-Gottorp. The exact date and place of her birth have been disputed, but there appears to be no reason to doubt that she was right in saying that she was born at Stettin on the 2nd of May 1729.

  • Her father, who succeeded to the principality of Anhalt-Zerbst in 1746 and died in 1747, was a general in the Prussian service, and, at the time of her birth, was military commandant at Stettin.

  • The elector, full of grievances against Prussia, threw in his lot with Austria; the electorate was at once overrun with Prussian troops; Cassel was occupied (June 20); and the elector was carried a prisoner to Stettin.

  • of Stettin, on the Berlin-Stralsund railway.

  • With the exception of those on the east coast of Schleswig-Holstein, all the important trading ports of Germany are river ports, such as Emden,Bremen, Hamburg, LUbeck, Stettin, Danzig, Konigsberg, Memel.

  • Stettin, , 224,078

  • The chief ports are Hamburg, Stettin, Bremen, Kiel, Lbeck, Flensburg, Bremerhaven, Danzig (Neufahrwasser), Geestemunde and Emden; and the number and tonnage of vessels of foreign nationality entering and clearing the ports of the empire, as compared with national shipping, were in 1906:

  • Saale, Hanover, Cassel, Kattowitz, Cologne, Konigsberg, Magdeburg, Munster, Posen, Saarbrucken and Stettin.

  • The Baltic ports, such as Lubeck, Stettin, Danzig (Neufahrwasser) and Konigsberg, principally provide communication with the coast towns of the adjacent countries, Russia and Sweden.

  • size between Berlin and Stettin; for improving the waterwal betweell the Oder and the Vistula, so as to render it capabb of accommodating vessels of 400 tons; and for the canalization of the upper Oder.

  • Stettin (Pomerania); III.

  • To the Swedes were granted Western Pomerania, with Stettin, and the archbishopric of Bremen and the bishopric of Verden.

  • The ~.aw, which had obviously failed, was renewed in 1881; the state if siege was applied to Hamburg, Leipzig and Stettin, but all to no purpose; and though the law was twice more renewed, ~n 1886 arid in 1888, the feeling began to gro~w that the Socialists were more dangerous under it than they had been before.

  • In 1904 it was once more introduced in the modified form of a proposal of a canal from the Rhine to Leine in Hanover, with a branch from Datteln to Ham, and also of a canal from Berlin to Stettin.

  • In youth he had musical ambitions, studied under Mendelssohn and Weinlig at Leipzig, under Loewe at Stettin, and afterwards at Vienna.

  • In 1569 Barnim handed over his duchy to his grand-nephew, John Frederick, and died at Stettin on the 2nd of June 1573.

  • Its position as the first German emporium of the west end of the Baltic has been to some extent impaired by Hamburg and Bremen since the construction of the North Sea and Baltic Canal, and by the rapid growth and enterprise of Stettin.

  • Eine Inselstudie (Stuttgart, 1893); Edwin Muller, Die Insel Rugen (17th ed., Berlin, 1900); Schuster, Fuhrer durch die Insel Rugen (7th ed., Stettin, 1901); Boll, Die Insel Rugen (Schwerin, 1858); O.

  • John, Volkssagen aus Hagen (Stettin, 1886); and E.

  • His son Hermann (1828-1890), who was appointed Consistorialrath in Stettin in 1877, was the author of Deutsches Leben in Nordamerika (1874).

  • To accomplish this effectually she required to have her hands free, and the composition' of her longoutstanding differences with Denmark by the Treaty of Stettin on the 13th of December 1570 (see Denmark: History), which put an end to the Dano-Swedish war of 1563-1570, the chief political event of the reign of Eric XIV.

  • What she actually got was (1) Upper Pomerania, with the islands of Riigen and Usedom, and a strip of Lower Pomerania on the right side of the Oder, including the towns of Stettin, Garz, Damm and Gollnow, and the isle of Wollin, with the right of succession to the rest of Lower Pomerania in the case of the extinction of the Brandenburg Hohenzollerns; (2) the town of Wismar with the districts of Poel and Neukloster; (3) the secularized bishoprics of Bremen and Verden; and (4) 5,000,000 rix-dollars.

  • In December 1677 the elector of Brandenburg captured Stettin.

  • I, 1 20 Hanover Stockholm > 7) and obtained the bishoprics of Bremen and Verden for Frederiks- herself and Stettin for her confederate Prussia.

  • of Stettin on the railway to Kolberg.

  • from Hamburg and 84 from Stettin, its situation, so far from being prejudicial to its growth and prosperity, as was formerly often asserted, has been, in fact, the principal determining factor in its rapid rise to the position of the greatest industrial and commercial city on the continent of Europe.

  • STETTIN, a seaport of Germany, capital of the Prussian province of Pomerania, on the Oder, 17 m.

  • Until 1874 Stettin was closely girdled by very extensive and strong fortifications, which prevented the expansion of the town, but the steady growth of its commerce and manufactures encouraged the foundation of numerous industrial suburbs beyond the ' The tabula Iliaca, a stucco bas-relief found in the ruins of an ancient temple on the site of the ancient Bovillae and so called because it represents the chief events of the Trojan War, is a sort of commentary upon this (see O.

  • line of defence and these now combine with Stettin to form one industrial and commercial centre.

  • Apart from its commerce Stettin is comparatively an uninteresting city, although its appearance, owing to its numerous promenades and open spaces, is very pleasant.

  • As a prosperous commerical town Stettin has numerous scientific, educational and benevolent institutions.

  • Stettin, regarded as the port of Berlin, is one of the principal ship-building centres of Germany and a place of much commercial and industrial activity.

  • The sea-borne commerce of Stettin is of scarcely less importance than her industry and a larger number of vessels enter and clear here than at any other German port, except Hamburg and Bremerhaven.

  • It has two basins, with the necessary accompaniment of cranes, storehouses, &c., and the deepening of the Oder from Stettin to the Haff to 24 ft.

  • With the view of still further increasing the commercial importance of Stettin, it is proposed to construct a ship canal giving the town direct communication with Berlin.

  • A feature in the mercantile life of Stettin is the large number of insurance companies which have their headquarters in the town.

  • The forest and river scenery of the neighbourhood of Stettin is picturesque, but the low level and swampy nature of the soil render the climate bleak and unhealthy.

  • Stettin is said to have existed as a Wendish settlement in the 9th century, but its first authentic appearance in history was in the 12th century, when it was known as Stedyn.

  • The Pomeranian dynasty became extinct in 1637, when the country was suffering from the ravages of the Thirty Years' War, and by the settlement of 1648 Stettin, the fortifications of which had been improved by Gustavus Adolphus, was ceded to Sweden.

  • Stettin was the birthplace of the empress Catherine II.

  • See Berghaus, Geschichte der Stadt Stettin (Wi rzen, 1875-1876); W.

  • Meyer, Stettin in alter and newer Zeit (Stettin, 1887); T.

  • Schmidt, Zur Geschichte des Handels and der Schiffahrt Stettins 1786-1846 (Stettin, 1815); and C. F.

  • Meyer, Stettin zur Schwedenzeit (Stettin, 1886).

  • Gilbert's principal work is his treatise on magnetism, entitled De magnete, magneticisque corporibus, et de magno magnete tellure (London, 1600; later editions - Stettin, 1628, 1633; Frankfort, 1629, 1638).

  • from Stettin by the railway to Strassburg.

  • The possession of a seaboard enabled them to maintain fleets and build relatively large towns such as Stettin and Kolberg, whilst they ravaged at will the territories of their southern neighbours the Poles.

  • In 1120-1124 the rebellion of his vassal Prince Warceslaus of Stettin again brought Boleslaus into the country, but the resistance was as stout as ever, and only after 18,000 of his followers had fallen and 8000 more had been expatriated did Warceslaus submit to his conqueror.

  • In 1124 the southern portions of the land were converted by St Otto, but it was only under the threat of extermination if they persisted in their evil ways that the people of Stettin accepted the faith in the following year.

  • GUSTROW, a town of Germany, in the grand duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, on the Nebel and the railway from Lubeck to Stettin, 20 m.

  • It serves as the outer port of Stettin, 42 m.

  • The connexion between Swinemiinde and Stettin is kept open in winter by ice breakers.

  • Formerly ships of heavy burden bound for Stettin discharged or lightened their cargo at Swinemiinde, but since the recent deepening of the river Oder they can proceed direct to the larger port.

  • Aided by the imperialists and the Danes, he followed up this success, and cleared Brandenburg and Pomerania of the Swedes, capturing Stettin in 1677 and Stralsund in 1678, while an attack made by Sweden on Prussia was successfully repelled.

  • Stettin, the capital of Pomerania, and the key of the Oder line, was occupied and converted into a.

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