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sentence

sentence

sentence Sentence Examples

  • Ahead of him was the possibility of a jail sentence.

  • I don't know what the sentence for rape was back then.

  • "Balls," he finished my sentence.

  • It was a death sentence, and Damian saw the realization in Jake's eyes before the newbie left for the weapons room.

  • That's a dangling something—an unfinished sentence.

  • He typed a short sentence, and then stopped.

  • He'd watched Rhyn and Katie's relationship unfold from its rocky beginning, when Katie inadvertently rescued Rhyn from his sentence in Hell.

  • One of the portals beckoned him before he'd finished the sentence.

  • The portal formed before she'd finished the sentence.

  • She repeated the sentence over and over to try to block out what her senses told her about the size of the monster.

  • He always peeked at his friend, whom he'd dropped off in Hell to serve an undeserved sentence.

  • She took it and read the single sentence.

  • She frowned without finishing the sentence.

  • Claire took a seat offered by one of the climbers and proceeded to add to the sainthood by correcting every other sentence poor Effie tried to offer.

  • Besides, the long day had blurred both their minds to the point of uselessness and Fred punctuated every sentence with a yawn.

  • Killing one human, before my command, will bring a death sentence.

  • He bristled at the mention of Rhyn in the same sentence as Andre.  One half-brother had been noble, courageous, honorable, willing to sacrifice himself for their cause.  Rhyn was the opposite.

  • He left the sentence hanging and winked at her.

  • He left the sentence hanging, as if it were too horrible to put into words.

  • She glanced around to see if anyone was looking and then read the rest of the sentence.

  • He left the sentence hanging.

  • I know, she said, not allowing him to complete the sentence.

  • "That phrase usually comes out of your mouth right before you do something really st…" He cut the sentence short and turned to Ed.

  • It was a good way to introduce them, and leave it to Alex to take care of it all in one sentence.

  • She easily obtained pardon, and the sentence of death against the other two was commuted into perpetual imprisonment.

  • This shameful sentence was the outcome of mingled terror and obsequiousness.

  • But in 1696 for his boldness in granting absolution on the scaffold to Sir John Friend and Sir William Parkyns, who had attempted the assassination of William, he was obliged to flee, and for the rest of his life continued under sentence of outlawry.

  • Finally, in the trial of the king he demanded, with the Girondists, that the sentence should be pronounced by a vote of the whole people, and not simply by the Convention.

  • It may not be used except when actually ordered in the sentence, and must be of a pattern approved by a secretary of state.

  • 2 The stem of David is superseded by the house of Zadok, the kingship has yielded to the priesthood, and the extinction of national hopes gives new importance to that strict organization of the hierarchy for which Ezekiel had prepared the way by his sentence of disfranchisement against the nonZadokite priests.

  • He was tried and condemned to death for being a heretic, but the sentence was commuted to perpetual imprisonment, while his wife was immured in a convent.

  • The president had made up his mind that the sentence must be carried out; the congress by a great majority were resolved not to permit the death penalty to be inflicted.

  • He notified Louis of the sentence of death, and was present at the execution.

  • This court has the supreme power in all questions of legality of a sentence, jurisdiction or competency.

  • Certain types of dangerous individuals are relegated after serving a sentence in the ordinary convict prisons, and by administrative, not by judicial process, to special penal colonies known as domicilii coatti or forced residences.

  • military considerations, but the sentence deplored that in such difficult circumstances the command should have been given to a general so inferior to the exigencies of the situation.

  • The sentence was grotesquely legal and unjust.

  • Renard thought he would be executed, but so true a Romanist as Mary could scarcely have an ecclesiastic put to death in consequence of a sentence by a secular court, and Cranmer was reserved for treatment as a heretic by the highest of clerical tribunals, which could not act until parliament had restored the papal jurisdiction.

  • Brooks had no power to give sentence, but reported to Rome, where Cranmer was summoned, but not permitted, to attend.

  • We find it substantially revived in the opening sentence and general scheme of a useful book, A.

  • (" the natural and moral proofs of a future life commonly insisted upon "); last sentence of part i., Conclusion (" the proper proofs of [natural] religion from our moral nature," &c.); part ii.

  • His party fell before the Mountain; sentence of arrest was passed against the leading members of it on the 2nd of June 1793.

  • There is to be no " stay of execution "; the episcopal sentence is to prevail until the provincial synod otherwise decide.

  • and intervene to supplement the spiritual sentence by administrative penalties.

  • Deposition of a bishop by a synod, or of a priest or deacon by his bishop, is to take effect even pending an appeal, and a cleric continuing his functions after sentence in first instance is to lose all right of appeal.

  • The pope received the appeal, absolved him and restored him to the rank of priest, and sent a bishop and two priests as legates to Africa with instructions to them to hear the cause of Apiarius anew and for execution of their sentence to crave the prefect's aid; moreover, they were to summon the bishop of Sicca to Rome and to excommunicate him, unless he should amend those things which the legates deemed wrong.

  • The sixth oecumenical synod decreed that the dead pope Honorius should be " cast out from the holy Catholic Church of God " and anathematized, a sentence approved by the reigning pope Leo II.

  • The canon provides that any clerk having a complaint against another clerk must not pass by his own bishop and turn to secular tribunals, but first lay b a re his cause before him, so that by the sentence of the bishop himself the dispute may be settled by arbitrators acceptable to both parties.

  • A royal writ of the 16th century cited by Covarruvias (c. xxxv.) prohibits execution of the sentence of a Spanish court Christian pending an appeal to the pope.

  • The sentence of the court Christian had in all other cases to be enforced by the secular arm.

  • Early in Henry II.'s time it had become the custom of England for the court Christian: to "signify" its sentence of excommunication to the king and to demand from him a writ of significavit to the sheriff, to imprison the person excommunicated.

  • set aside) the sentence and award damages to the party aggrieved.

  • They report their opinions to the bishop, who passes final sentence (ib.

  • In some " missionary" dioceses, the metropolitan, qua metropolitan, has a separate commission of investigation, to try the criminal causes of clerks, sentence being passed by himself of his vicar-general (ib.

  • The king or the ministry do not, however, rehear the cause by way of appeal, but merely restrain severity of sentence (ib.).

  • This royal bride died of consumption, leaving no living child, and her husband took in 1513, as his second wife, Elizabeth Stafford, daughter of that duke of Buckingham upon whom the old duke of Norfolk, the tears upon his cheeks, was forced to pass sentence of death.

  • The trial occupied two days and resulted in a verdict of guilty, and a sentence of imprisonment for a year with a small fine.

  • For days the whole mechanism of civilized existence in Russia was at a standstill, all intercourse 4 Sazonov's sentence of twenty years' hard labour was commuted by Nicholas II.

  • Manuel was expelled, but he refused to accept this sentence, and force was employed to remove him.

  • He was subsequently exiled to Chatellerault as a Jansenist, but the sentence of banishment was repealed on a new retractation.

  • Amidst the vituperations of the adherents of the papacy and the later Elizabethan eulogies, and in the absence of the records on which her sentence was pronounced, Anne Boleyn's guilt remains unproved.

  • juries, a petty jury, and a tribunal consisting of nearly all the lay peers of England, with the evidence before them which we do not now possess, should have all unanimously passed a sentence of guilt contrary to the facts and their convictions, and that such a sentence should have been supported by Anne's own father and uncle.

  • Gibbon's verdict on the history of the middle ages is contained in the famous sentence, " I have described the triumph of barbarism and religion."

  • His prefect Rictiovarus endeavoured to carry out the sentence, but they emerged unharmed from all the ordeals to which he subjected them, and the weapons he used recoiled against the executioners.

  • He was found guilty and was condemned to death, but his sentence was commuted to life imprisonment in Van Diemen's Land, whither he was transported in the summer of 1849.

  • The Sanhedrin had its police and powers to safeguard the Jewish religion; but the procurator had the appointment of the high priests, and no capital sentence could be executed without his sanction.

  • As the sentence is about to be carried into execution Lancelot and his kinsmen come to her rescue, but in the fight that ensues many of Arthur's knights, including three of Gawain's brothers, are slain.

  • Mirabeau first set to work to get the sentence of death still hanging over him reversed, and by his eloquence not only succeeded in this but got M.

  • For a time, indeed, the Order lay under papal sentence of excommunication; but the transference of his seat to Marienburg at this time (1308) gave the grand master a basis from which he was able to make easy terms with the pope.

  • The witan was also a court of justice, Earl Godwine and many other offenders receiving sentence of outlawry therein.

  • Dissected sentence by sentence, the book may be shown to be a mass of inconsistencies.

  • The sentence was approved by most of the churches, in particular by that of Rome.

  • Sentence of death was passed on the royalist conspirators.

  • On Josephine's entreaties, the emperor commuted the sentence for eight of the well-connected men among them; Cadoudal and others of lower extraction were executed on the 24th of June.

  • In that sentence lay the secret of all the disagreements between the two brothers.

  • Armed with this and the false report of a spy, who charged the wife of Desmoulins with conspiring for the escape of her husband and the ruin of the republic, Fouquier-Tinville by threats and entreaties obtained from the jury a sentence of death.

  • Unfortunately, in so doing, he used phrases savouring of aristocracy which offended many of his countrymen, - as in the sentence in which he suggested that " the rich, the well-born and the able " should be set apart from other men in a senate.

  • When the trial of Servetus was in progress (1553), Calvin was anxious for Farel's presence, but he did not arrive till sentence had been passed.

  • The right to deal with the property of a convict while he is undergoing sentence (but not while he is out of prison on leave) is, by the Forfeiture Act 1870, vested in his administrator.

  • He has no power to modify a sentence, a power which is reserved to the admiralty by � 53 (1) of the Naval Discipline Act 1866, except in the case of a death sentence, which can only be remitted by the crown.

  • His duties are described in detail by the king's regulations, but may be summed up as consisting of seeing that the charges are in order, pointing out any informalities or defects in the charges or in the constitution of the court, seeing that any witness required by prosecutor or prisoner is summoned, keeping the minutes of the proceedings, advising on matters of law which arise at any time after the warrant for the courtmartial is issued, drawing up the findings and sentence, and forwarding the minutes when completed to the admiralty.

  • The two main rules by which the order of the words in a sentence is regulated are - subject, verb, object; and qualifying words follow those which they qualify.

  • Nevertheless, when the trial proceeded, he voted with the majority which declared Louis to be guilty, but recommended that the penalty should be postponed until the cessation of hostilities, and that the sentence should then be ratified by the Convention or by some other legislative body.

  • While merely a prior of Bec he led the opposition to the uncanonical marriage of Duke William with Matilda of Flanders (1053) and carried matters so far that he incurred a sentence of exile.

  • After twenty-two days they were called up to receive sentence.

  • It was necessary for his own good repute and the future of his work that a definitive sentence should be pronounced and his name cleared once and for all.

  • The legate demurred; but on the pope's return sentence was formally given in his favour.

  • The cardinal was brought to trial at Westminster (17th of June 1535) on the charge that he did "openly declare in English that the king, our sovereign lord, is not supreme head on earth of the Church of England," and was condemned to a traitor's death at Tyburn, a sentence afterwards changed.

  • The court of cassation quashed the sentence, through defect of form, but sent Babeuf for a new trial before the Aisne tribunal, by which he was acquitted on the 18th of July.

  • From the 11th Paris was placarded with posters headed Analyse de la doctrine do Babceuf (sic), tribun du peuple, of which the opening sentence ran: "Nature has given to every man the right to the enjoyment of an equal share in all property," and which ended with a call to restore the constitution of 1793.

  • 3, we have the following impossible sentence, where Esau is referred t0: vEKpbs i v iipet /Lap, Kai 7ropevbµEVOS 'Avovipa,u airiaavev.

  • His radical scepticism is seen in the first sentence of his IIEpi 01)o€ws, quoted by Cicero in the Academics ii.

  • After a time the sentence was partially recalled on the petition of her friends, and she was permitted to pass the closing years of her life on her own estate near Moscow, where she died on the 4th of January 1810.

  • These were unknown to Bosio, and are both covered with frescoes, the vault being in one case decorated with the scene which represents Christ seated among the apostles and pronouncing sentence upon the defunct.

  • This board may allow commutation or diminution of sentence for good behaviour, meritorious services or exemplary conduct.

  • Such is the intentional obscurity in many of the compositions of these two authors that every sentence becomes a puzzle, over which even a scholarly Ottoman must pause before he can be sure he has found its true meaning.

  • Nevertheless, John, who had been abandoned by the duke of Austria and imprisoned in the castle of Radolfzell, near Constance, was arraigned, suspended and deposed (May 29th), and himself ratified the sentence of the council.

  • In this sentence it is to be noted that the council of Constance was careful not to base itself upon the former decision of the council of Pisa.

  • The grounds for an absolute divorce in Minnesota are adultery, impotence, cruel and inhuman treatment, sentence to state prison or state reformatory subsequent to the marriage, desertion or habitual drunkenness for one year next preceding the application for a divorce.

  • which he showed to the archbishop. At this juncture a sentence of excommunication would have been a dangerous blow to Henry's power in England.

  • The severity with which Henry treated the last rebels was regarded as a blot upon his fame; but the only case of merely vindictive punishment was that of the poet Luke de la Barre, who was sentenced to lose his eyes for a lampoon upon the king, and only escaped the sentence by committing suicide.

  • The bishops denounced sentence of excommunication against all transgressors, and soon after Howel himself went to Rome attended by the archbishop of St David's, the bishops of Bangor and St Asaph and thirteen other personages.

  • Throughout these years he declined to remove the sentence of excommunication which he had passed upon Michael, and after his death, when the new patriarch Josephus gave absolution to the emperor, the quarrel was carried on between the "Arsenites" and the "Josephists."

  • The death of Paul by the sentence of Nero at Rome forms the close of the Acts of Paul.

  • of England, ii.), that he joined in opposing the indulgence shown to Lord Strafford by Charles in dispensing with the more horrible parts of the sentence of death - an indulgence afterwards shown to Russell himself - is entirely unworthy of credence.

  • The sentence was forthwith executed, his body being thrown into the cloaca, where, however, it was found by another pious matron, Lucina, whom Sebastian visited in a dream, directing her to bury him ad Catacombas juxta vestigia apostolorum.

  • Together with the kings and ephors it formed the supreme executive committee of the state, and it exercised also a considerable criminal and political jurisdiction, including the trial of kings; its competence extended to the infliction of a sentence of exile or even of death.

  • The judges are appointed for life and can be removed only by judicial sentence and impeachment.

  • Nineteen were sentenced to death, but in the case of seven of the prisoners the sentence was commuted.

  • On the day before that fixed for the execution Lord Elgin, then Secretary of State for the Colonies, intervened and directed the governor to postpone the execution of the sentence.

  • After a day's delay, during which Sir Henry McCallum reiterated his concurrence, already made known in London, in the justice of the sentence passed on the natives, Lord Elgin gave way (March 30).

  • A single sentence in Porphyry's Isagoge or " introduc tion " to the Categories of Aristotle furnished the i o, s text of the discussion.

  • In the Latin translation of Boetius, in which alone the Isagoge was then known, the sentence runs as follows: " Mox de generibus et speciebus illud quidem sive subsistant, sive in solis nudis intellectibus posita sint, sive subsistentia corporalia sint an incorporalia, et utrum separata a sensibilibus an in sensibilibus posita et circa haec consistentia, dicere recusabo; altissimum enim negotium est hujusmodi et majoris egens inquisitionis."

  • We have hitherto supposed that the light is incident perpen 1 The last sentence is repeated from the writer's article " Wave Theory " in the 9th edition of this work, but A.

  • The commission appointed to try his case condemned him (iith of April 1741) to death by quartering, but this sentence was commuted by the clemency of the new regent, Anna Leopoldovna, the mother of Ivan VI., to banishment for life at Pelin in Siberia.

  • Hammond and George Farrar, who in conjunction with Charles Leonard had made the arrangements with Jameson - were sentenced to death, the sentence being after some months' imprisonment commuted to a fine of £25,000 each.

  • This sentence, after a month's incarceration, was also commuted.

  • Messrs Sampson and Davies, refusing to appeal to the executive for a reconsideration of their sentence, were retained for over a year.

  • To the Prophecy of Restoration we may fitly apply the words, too gracious and too subtly chosen to be translated, of Renan, "ce second Isaie, dont Fame lumineuse semble comme impregnee, six cent ans d'avance, de toutes les rosees, de tous les parfums de l'avenir" (L'Antechrist, p. 464); though, indeed, the common verdict of sympathetic readers sums up the sentence in a single phrase - "the Evangelical Prophet."

  • Under these influences Hermocrates was banished in 409; he submitted to the sentence, notwithstanding the wishes of his army.

  • In 1739 the General Assembly, without any application from him, removed the sentence of deposition which had been passed against him, and restored him to the character and function of a minister of the gospel of Christ, but not that of a minister of the Established Church of Scotland, declaring that he was not eligible for a charge until he should have renounced principles inconsistent with the constitution of the church.

  • The latter portion of the sentence was carried out on the 7th of May, and the rest of his punishment inflicted except the exaction of the fine.

  • On the 30th of June a fresh sentence, that had been delivered on the 14th, was executed.

  • The latter penalty was also attached to theft of sacred things by night, but stealing by day from a temple objects of little value brought only sentence to the mines.

  • The Munich MS., formerly at Bamberg, begins at line 85, and has many lacunae, but continues the history down to the last verse of St Luke's Gospel, ending, however, in the middle of a sentence.

  • The next step was the introduction of metre into the body of the sentence and the restriction of the passages to a definite length.

  • A conditional pardon most commonly occurs where an offender sentenced to death has his sentence commuted to penal servitude or any less punishment.

  • Thus by the New York Code of Criminal Procedure the governor of the state of New York has power to grant reprieves, commutations and pardons, except in the case of treason, where he can only suspend the execution of the sentence until the case can be reported to the legislature, with whom the power of pardon in this case rests.

  • On the 17th of July Innocent formally renewed the sentence of excommunication on the emperor, and declared him deposed from the imperial throne and that of Naples.

  • Frederick retorted by announcing his intention of reducing "the clergy, especially the highest, to a state of apostolic poverty," and by ordaining the severest punishments for those priests who should obey the papal sentence.

  • As if we who are judges of angels are not to give sentence on earthly things..

  • President Lincoln commuted this sentence to banishment, and Vallandigham was sent into the Confederate lines, whence he made his way to Canada.

  • Yet he too seized the supreme power, and perished by an iniquitous sentence on the 18th of February 1836.1 Andres Santa Cruz was an Indian statesman.

  • The sentence was null and void, he said.

  • On the evening of the 22nd of May sentence of death was pronounced on him and his two disciples.

  • Through the machinations of enemies he was again expelled from the royal presence; but shortly afterwards Edmund revoked the sentence and made him abbot of Glastonbury.

  • When he had thoroughly meditated every sentence, he sat down to write, and then, such was the grip of his memory, the exact order of his thoughts came back to him as if without an effort, and he wrote down precisely what he had intended to write, without the aid of a note or a memorandum, and without check or pause.

  • She wrote a little piece which Comte rated so pre- v posterously as to talk about George Sand in the same sentence; it is in truth a flimsy performance, though it contains one or two gracious thoughts.

  • It will be observed that in the above sentence there are two untranslated words, wo and Wa.

  • Three of the leaders were sentenced to death by military commissions, but sentence was suspended until 1866, when they were released under the decision of the United States Supreme Court in the famous case Ex parte Milligan.

  • enabled the diocesan alone, without the co-operation of a synod, to pronounce sentence of heresy, and required the sheriff to execute it by burning the offender, without waiting for the consent of the crown.'

  • Apparently, if a proper case could be made out, an ecclesiastical court might still sentence a layman to excommunication for heresy, but by no other means could his opinions be brought under censure.

  • These proceedings were challenged in the House of Lords by Lord Houghton, and the lord chancellor (Westbury), speaking on behalf of the government, stated that if there was any ' `synodical judgment" it would be a violation of the law, subjecting those concerned in it to the penalties of a praemunire, but that the sentence in question was "simply nothing, literally no sentence at all."

  • It is, therefore, as regards both the potestas ordinis and jurisdiction, substantially the same as other offences, the legality of the sentence being finally confirmed by the House of Lords on the 25th of January 1705.

  • Among his many publications, written, it is only fair to admit, amidst the urgent pressure of practical work, there is barely a page or even a sentence that bears the stamp of immortality.

  • His creed, and the whole gist of his argument, is expressed in a single sentence, "I am fully assured that God does not, and therefore that men ought not to, require any more of any man than this, to believe the Scripture to be God's word, and to endeavour to find the true sense of it, and to live according to it."

  • The whipping-post was in 1908 still maintained in Delaware, and whipping continued to be prescribed as a punishment for a variety of offences, although in 1889 a law was passed which prescribed that " hereafter no female convicted of any crime in this state shall be whipped or made to stand in the pillory," and a law passed in 1883 prescribed that " in case of conviction of larceny, when the prisoner is of tender years, or is charged for the first time (being shown to have before had a good character), the court may in its discretion omit from the sentence the infliction of lashes."

  • In 1899 a county workhouse was established in New Castle county, in which persons under sentence must labour eight hours a day, pay being allowed for extra hours, and a diminution of sentence for good behaviour.

  • The process against him (Nicholas de la Fontaine being in the first instance the nominal prosecutor) lasted from 14th August to 26th October, when sentence " estre brusle tout vyfz " was passed, and carried out next day at Champel (Oct.

  • Meanwhile the civil tribunal at Vienne had ordered (17th June) that he be fined and burned alive; the sentence of the ecclesiastical tribunal at Vienne was delayed till 23rd December.

  • The fifteen condemnatory clauses, prefacing the sentence at Geneva, set forth in detail that he was guilty of heresies, blasphemously expressed, against the foundation of the Christian religion.

  • No law, current in Geneva, has ever been adduced as enacting the capital sentence.

  • This arbitrary sentence was obeyed in the first instance by both parties, and Norfolk never returned.

  • But Henry, duke of Hereford, whose milder sentence was doubtless owing to the fact that he was the popular favourite, came back within a year, having been furnished with a very fair pretext for doing so by a new act of injustice on the part of Richard.

  • This decree, as soon as it was published in Prague (March 9, 1410), led to much popular agitation, and provoked an appeal by Huss to the pope's better informed judgment; the archbishop, however, resolutely insisted on carrying out his instructions, and in the following July caused to be publicly burned, in the courtyard of his own palace, upwards of 200 volumes of the writings of Wycliffe, while he pronounced solemn sentence of excommunication against Huss and certain of his friends, who had in the meantime again protested and appealed to the new pope (John XXIII.).

  • The sentence he expected was pronounced on the 6th of July in the presence of Sigismund and a full sitting of the council; once and again he attempted to remonstrate, but in vain, and finally he betook himself to silent prayer.

  • he supported an appeal to the people, but voted for the death sentence.

  • In 1907 the General Assembly passed a law under which the indeterminate sentence was established in the state, and the governor appoints a Board of Parole of three members, of whom one must be an attorney and not more than two are to belong to the same political party.

  • In the time of Ezra the Jewish "magistrates and judges" among their ecclesiastico-civil functions have the right of pronouncing sentence whether it be unto death, or to "rooting out," or to confiscation of goods, or to imprisonment (Ezra vii.

  • For some sins, such as adultery, the sentence of excommunication was in the 2nd century regarded as iravr€X)s in the sense of being irrevocable.

  • (2) While it had been held as an undoubted principle by the ancient church that this sentence could only be passed on living individuals whose fault had been distinctly stated and fully proved, we find the medieval church on the one hand sanctioning the practice of excommunication of the dead (Morinus, De poenit.

  • In the Anglican Church the bishops (subject to appeal to the sovereign) have the right of excommunicating, and their sentence, if sustained, may in certain cases carry with it civil consequences.

  • In the law of England sentence of excommunication, upon being properly certified by the bishop, was followed by the writ de excommunicato capiendo for the arrest of the offender.

  • No persons so excommunicated shall incur any civil penalty or incapacity whatever, save such sentence of imprisonment, not exceeding six months, as the court shall direct and certify to the king in chancery.

  • 3, pp. 33-4 6) four necessary conditions for the execution of a sentence involving church discipline.

  • Further, the praetorian praefect acquired, in addition to his military functions, a criminal jurisdiction, which he exercised not as the delegate but as the representative of the emperor, and hence it was decreed by Constantine (331) that from the sentence of the praetorian praefect there should be no appeal.

  • reprendre), in English law, a term which originally meant remand to prison: later and more usually, the suspension for a time of the execution of a sentence passed on conviction of crime.

  • The court which can award a sentence is said to possess as of common right a discretionary power of granting a reprieve.

  • In the 13th century, though with squeamish phrases, it pronounced sentence of death.

  • 1457) showed the Donation of Constantine to be a forgery, denied that Dionysius the Areopagite wrote the works ascribed to him, and refuted the commonly accepted notion that each of the apostles had contributed a sentence to the Apostles' Creed.

  • In his more important works almost every sentence is alive with that autochthonic quality which makes it unmistakably his.

  • This sentence the emperor, all the Christian princes and the king's own subjects were summoned to carry out by force of arms if necessary.

  • As in all other languages, so in those of aboriginal America, the sentence is the unit.

  • Words and phrases are the organic parts of the sentence, on which, therefore, the languages are classified.

  • Arthur Smith Woodward sums up the question in Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, closing with this sentence: "If we accept the confirmatory evidence afforded by Mr Spencer Moore, we can hardly refuse to believe that this ground-sloth was kept and fed by an early race of men."

  • his Wohlgemeinte Erinnerungen, 1788), led the Prussian government to pass upon him the sentence of suspension for three months, with forfeiture of his stipend.

  • The whole work was in the hands of the writer of the seventh book of the Apostolic Constitutions, who embodies almost every sentence of it, interspersing it with passages of Scripture, and modifying the precepts of the second part to suit a later (4th-century) stage of church development; this writer was also the interpolator of the Epistles of Ignatius, and belonged to the Syrian Church.

  • After this sentence had been carried out he was again banished to Lazica, where he died on the 13th of August 662.

  • 410) On the Apostles' Creed, composed that formula by contributing each a single sentence.

  • The bishop, or count, on whose lands the peace was violated was vested with judicial power, and was directed, in case he was himself unable to execute sentence, to summon to his assistance the laymen and even the clerics of the diocese, all of whom were required to take a solemn oath to observe and enforce the peace.

  • He appealed from Morgan's sentence to Pole as papal legate, but in vain, and was burnt at Caermarthen on the 30th of March 1555.

  • He had already begun his labours as a historian, but after serving his sentence in 1837, found himself debarred till 1839 from completing his course at Halle, where in 1842 he obtained a professorship. Elected to the National Assembly at Frankfort in 1848, he joined the Right Centre party, and was chosen reporter of the projected constitution.

  • This sentence from Browne's spiritual autobiography contains the root of the whole matter, and explains the title of his other chief work, also of 1582, A Treatise of Reformation without tarrying for any, and of the wickedness of those Preachers which will not reform till the Magistrate command or compel them.

  • In the state reformatory at Elmira (which, like that at Napanoch, is for men between sixteen and thirty years of age who have been convicted of a state prison offence for the first time only), the plan of committing adult felons on an indeterminate sentence to be determined by their behaviour was first tested in America in 1877, and it has proved so satisfactory that it has been in part adopted for the state prisons.

  • A sentence in his first address to the electors strikes the dominant note of his public career: "I therefore need scarcely state my firm belief that the prosperity of Canada depends upon its permanent connexion with the mother country, and that I shall resist to the utmost any attempt (from whatever quarter it may come) which may tend to weaken that union."

  • He took an active part in the levee-en-masse, and in November 1793 was given the task of establishing the revolutionary government in the departments of Meuse and Moselle, where he gained an unenviable notoriety by ordering the execution of the sentence of death decreed by the revolutionary tribunal on some young girls at Verdun who had offered flowers to the Prussians when they entered the town.

  • The sentence of death pronounced on him in February 1822 was finally commuted to fifteen years carcere duro, and in the following April he was placed in the Spielberg at BrUnn.

  • Finally, he was condemned to degradation and decapitation; though one of the ten judges not only refused to sign the sentence, but remonstrated in private with the king against its injustice.

  • On hearing that the sentence was commuted to life-long imprisonment, he declared that the pardon was harder than the punishment, and vainly petitioned for leave to serve his king for the rest of his life as a common soldier.

  • The political impotence of the prime minister was plainly evident in the military proceedings against Kramarz, in which Stiirgkh shook hands with the accused and gave evidence in his favour, but without being able to avert the death sentence passed by the military court, though he did at least prevent the execution of the sentence.

  • On his return he took strong parliamentary measures against Presbyterians, and consequently, at a provincial synod held at St Andrews in April 1586, he was accused of heresy and excommunicated, but at the next General Assembly the sentence was remitted as illegal.

  • In 1587 and 1588, however, fresh accusations were brought against him, and he was again excommunicated, though afterwards on the inducement of his old opponent, Andrew Melville, the sentence was again remitted.

  • In the trial of Louis XVI., Buzot voted for death, but with appeal to the people and postponement of sentence.

  • The capital sentence was commuted on the scaffold to banishment, first to Siberia and then to Novgorod.

  • The construction of the sentence in Siamese is straightforward and simple.

  • The subject of the sentence precedes the verb and the object follows it.

  • He was nominated one of the commissioners to try Charles I., but took no part in the trial, retiring to Penshurst until sentence was pronounced.

  • That Sidney approved of the trial, though not of the sentence, there can, however, be little doubt, for in Copenhagen he publicly and vigorously expressed his concurrence.

  • Upon hearing his sentence he gave vent to his feelings in a few noble and beautiful words.

  • The sentence was executed with gratuitous harshness.

  • 26, 2), but it is first clearly set forth by Cyprian, and receives from him its classical expression in the famous sentence " Salus extra ecclesiam non est" (Ep. 73, 21; cf.

  • (1243-1254), did not result in victory; no papal sentence, but only death itself, deprived the emperor of his dominions; and when Boniface VIII.

  • as secondary to that of declaring the sentence of God, but they were no longer insignificant.

  • Whenever opinions did happen to be expressed which could be construed as criticism of Austria or Germany the offenders were speedily punished, and it was not long before the political leaders of the Czechs and Slovaks found themselves in confinement, some of them under sentence of death, while the Czech and Slovak press was subjected to a rigorous censorship and many of its organs prohibited from appearing.

  • A hundred years afterwards a certain Katharina Malcher, on account of her Utraquist opinions, was condemned by Gamrat, the bishop of Cracow, to be burnt, which sentence was accordingly carried out in the ragmarket at Cracow.

  • According to a well-known story, a young woman in humble circumstances, whose father (or mother) was lying in prison under sentence of death, without food, managed to gain admittance, and fed her parent with milk from her breast.

  • It was, however, generally regarded as a mockery, and on the intercession of the British government the sentence was commuted to banishment.

  • He was far less great as a ruler in the state, showing as a judge a tyrannical spirit both in the star chamber and highcommission court, threatening Felton, the assassin of Buckingham, with the rack, and showing special activity in procuring a cruel sentence in the former court against Alexander Leighton in June 1630 and against Henry Sherfield in 1634.

  • In 1637 he took part in the sentence of the star chamber on Prynne, Bostwick and Burton, and in the same year in the prosecution of Bishop Williams. He urged Strafford in Ireland to carry out the same reforms and severities.

  • Falling into the hands of the Spaniards he was recognized as having had a hand in the Antwerp disturbance, and was under sentence to be executed as a spy when he was saved by the intervention of a noble lady.

  • read Os ok p ?WV, a clumsy sentence which is clearly made up out of two earlier readings, auTOY ?

  • Pesigta (" section ") or P. de-Rab Kahana, contains 33 or 34 homilies (on the principal festivals), the first of which opens with a sentence of R.

  • A plausible excuse was found in the next year for issuing a sentence of confiscation and banishment against Falkes de Breaute.

  • 47), there occurs the sentence: " Nihil autem supra Neperianam rationem esse puto: etsi quidem Scotus quidam literis ad Tychonem 1594 scriptis jam spem fecit Canonis illius Mirifici."

  • Now Mark Napier found in the library of the university of Edinburgh a mathematical work bearing a sentence in Latin which he translates, " To Doctor John Craig of Edinburgh, in Scotland, a most illustrious man, highly gifted with various and excellent learning, professor of medicine, and exceedingly skilled in the mathematics, Tycho Brahe bath sent this gift, and with his own hand written this at Uraniburg, 2d November 1588."

  • The laws and records of suits were set down in picture-writings, of which some are still to be seen; sentence of death was recorded by drawing a line with an arrow across the portrait of the condemned, and the chronicles describe the barbaric solemnity with which the king passed sentence sitting on a golden and jewelled throne in the divine tribunal, with one hand on an ornamented skull and the golden arrow in the other.

  • First, this symple creature hadde myche trauaile, with diuerse felawis and helperis, to gedere manie elde biblis, and othere doctouris, and comune glosis, and to make oo Latyn bible sumdel trewe; and thanne to studie it of the newe, the text with the glose, and othere doctouris, as he m13te gete, and speciali Lire on the elde testament, that helpide ful myche in this werk; the thridde tyme to counseile with elde gramv riens, and elde dyuynis, of harde wordis, and harde sentenci, , hou tho m13ten best be vndurstonden and translatid; the iiij tyme to translate as cleerli as he coude to the sentence, anr: to haue manie gode felawis and kunnynge at the correcting of th,2 translacioun.

  • The well-known sentence of Carlyle, that it is "as far as possible from meriting its high reputation," is in strictness justified, for all Thiers's historical work is marked by extreme inaccuracy, by prejudice which passes the limits of accidental unfairness, and by an almost complete indifference to the merits as compared with the successes of his heroes.

  • The sentence was an excerpt from the letter.

  • On the 10th of March 1575, an assembly of notables, lay and clerical, at John's request, pronounced a formal sentence of death upon him.

  • But it is probable that, in the developed procedure, where it was known that the judgment pronounced might legally give rise to the appeal, the magistrate pronounced no sentence, but brought the case at once before the people.

  • is only noted now for the opening sentence: "Dieu seul est grand."

  • It was enriched by Charles the Bald with two castles, and a Benedictine abbey dedicated to Saint Corneille, the monks of which retained down to the 18th century the privilege of acting for three days as lords of Compiegne, with full power to release prisoners, condemn the guilty, and even inflict sentence of death.

  • Sentence of excommunication was passed on Friedrich in April 1871, but he refused to acknowledge it and was upheld by the Bavarian government.

  • The short discourse on the expression of thought by language (irEpi `Epjs vElas, De Interpretatione) is based on the Platonic division of the sentence (X6yos) into noun and verb (ivoµa and Am).

  • Its point is to separate the enunciative sentence, or that in which there is truth or falsity, from other sentences; and then, dismissing the rest to rhetoric or poetry (where we should say grammar), to discuss the enunciative sentence(it r04avTLKOs X6yos), or enunciation (air04avvts), or what we should call the proposition (De Int.

  • Here Aristotle, starting from the previous grammar of sentences in general, proceeded, for the first time in philosophical literature, to disengage the logic of the proposition, or that sentence which can alone be true or false, whereby it alone enters into reasoning.

  • But in spite of this great logical achievement, he continued throughout the discourse to accept Plato's grammatical analysis of all sentences into noun and verb, which indeed applies to the proposition as a sentence but does not give its particular elements.

  • In analysing the syllogism, he first says that a premiss is an affirmative or negative sentence, and then that a term is that into which a premiss is dissolved, i.e.

  • It is nearer to Plato's analysis of the sentence, and no logician would have gone back to it, after the Prior Analytics.

  • Moreover we can make a history of Aristotle's thought and gradual composition thus: (s) Earlier acceptance in the De Interpretatione of Plato's grammatical analysis of the sentence into noun and verb (secundi adjacentis) but gradually disengaging the proposition, and after wards introducing the verb of being as a third thing added (tertium adjacens) to the predicated verb, for the purpose of opposition.

  • This brief sentence is enough to prove the work genuine, because it was Aristotle who first distinguished the three genera (cf.

  • the Categories earlier than some parts of the Metaphysics, because under the influence of Platonic forms it talks of inherent attributes, and allows secondary substances which are universal; the De Interpretatione earlier than the Analytics, because in it the Platonic analysis of the sentence into noun and verb is retained for the proposition; the Eudemian Ethics and the Magna Moralia earlier than the Nicomachean Ethics, because they are rudimentary sketches of it, and the one written rather in the theological spirit, the other rather in the dialectical style, of Plato; and the Rhetoric to Alexander earlier than the Rhetoric, because it contains a rudimentary theory of the rational evidences afterwards developed into a logic of rhetoric in the Rhetoric and Analytics.

  • Secondly, he made no division of logic. In the Categories he distinguished names and propositions for the sake of the classification of names; in the De Interpretatione he distinguished nouns and verbs from sentences with a view to the enunciative sentence: in the Analytics he analysed the syllogism into premisses and premisses into terms and copula, for the purpose of syllogism.

  • By his divorce from Isabella of Gloucester he offended the English baronage (1200); by his marriage with Isabella of Angouleme, the betrothed of Hugh of Lusignan, he gave an opportunity to the discontented Poitevins for invoking French assistance and to Philip Augustus for pronouncing against him a sentence of forfeiture.

  • In September 1620 its author was compelled to take refuge in Geneva, where he found a secure retreat for the last ten years of his life, though the hatred of the French court showed itself in procuring a sentence of death to be recorded against him more than once.

  • Further, a special commission was to be appointed to try and sentence all judices guilty of taking bribes.

  • The execution of the sentence followed within the week, on the 7th of July 1535.

  • After using all means of persuasion to restore peace between the king and queen, Campeggio had to resist the pressure brought upon him to give sentence.

  • Campeggio could not by the terms of his commission give sentence; so his only escape was to prorogue the court on the 23rd of July on the plea of the Roman vacation.

  • He was deprived by Henry of the English protectorate; and when sentence was finally given against the divorce, Campeggio was deprived of the see of Salisbury as a non-resident alien, by act of parliament (11th of March 1535); but his rich benefices in the Spanish dominions made ample amends.

  • Wundt, starting from a psychology of unitary experience, deduces a consistent metaphysics of no inference of things transcending experience throughout - or rather until he came to the very last sentence of his System der Philosophie (1889), where he suddenly passes from a necessity of " ideals " (Ideen), to a necessity of " faith " (Glauben), without " knowledge " (Wissen).

  • Thus, as the sentence of Pisa found recognition in France and England, as well as in many parts of Germany and Italy, the synod, which was to secure the restoration of unity, proved only the cause for worse confusion - instead of two, there were now three popes.

  • Appeal is sometimes allowed from one "turn" to another; if the second sentence of the Rota confirms the first, it is definitive; if not, a third may be obtained.

  • When several words are connected in a sentence they seldom require more than one case element, and that comes last.

  • He was found guilty, however, and his body was ordered to be exhumed and burned; but a friend had secretly removed it, and the Inquisition had, therefore, to content itself with the public proclamation of its sentence and the burning of Abano in effigy.

  • A court, largely composed of his antagonists, condemned him to death, but the empress reduced the sentence to lifelong imprisonment in Schliisselburg and confiscation of all his estates.

  • The rhythmical and artistic form of the sentence is sacrificed to a passion for emphasis that delights in deferring the point to the close of the period.

  • The structure of the sentence is also apt to be loose and straggling.

  • (1) The Messianic is executed by the Messiah or the saints by victory in war, or by judicial sentence.

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