This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

sympathy

sympathy

sympathy Sentence Examples

  • I've received too much sympathy in the last few weeks.

    2K
    181
  • His sympathy only made matters worse and she hiccupped.

    2K
    69
  • He expressed sympathy for the bomb victims.

    288
    141
  • I realize in most ways Edith isn't deserving of too much sympathy, but I still think of her as a tragic figure.

    149
    43
  • "You look it," suggested the young man, in a voice made anxious by an ever-ready sympathy.

    134
    92
  • She has a large, generous sympathy and absolute fairness of temper.

    113
    43
  • I offer my deepest sympathy to his family, also to the band which I hope will carry on, given time to reflect.

    113
    56
  • The committee was in sympathy with the aspirations of Every Child Matters.

    97
    50
  • Pierre did not answer, but looked cordially into the Frenchman's eyes whose expression of sympathy was pleasing to him.

    74
    30
  • The teachers were in sympathy with the aims and ethos of the school.

    71
    35
  • No one expressed any sympathy for Billie and Willie, not even Baratto.

    46
    26
  • At a personal level, therefore, I have the utmost sympathy for staff employed by British Waterways facing a reorganization.

    44
    26
  • Those attending a conference abroad tend to be the envy of their colleagues so complaints about such trials and tribulations elicit little sympathy.

    42
    20
  • Perhaps we feel some sympathy with the elder son.

    41
    31
  • Please accept my sincere sympathy in the loss of your Pepper.

    36
    35
  • It wasn't her intent to solicit sympathy from anyone, much less her paying guests.

    35
    21
  • Every little pine needle expanded and swelled with sympathy and befriended me.

    29
    26
  • If you want to discuss sympathy, think about poor me, pining away for a hot time and getting nada.

    28
    20
  • He was anxiously sensitive about the opinion of others, eager for their sympathy and regard, and, in general, impressionable to their influence.

    27
    19
  • We can't expect a sympathy vote from the Russians.

    27
    27
  • They require guidance and sympathy far more than instruction.

    27
    27
  • The funeral was an excellent forum for sympathy tributes.

    27
    28
  • His mother was a woman of sturdy character and with a keen sense of humor and tender sympathy.

    26
    22
  • When you can point out why this set of donors deserve some sympathy, I might agree with you.

    25
    24
  • What they have in common is an instinctive sympathy for the characters.

    24
    32
  • Their personal sympathy for each other continued to the end, though at the outset at least their political views differed.

    23
    20
  • The Prime Minister began the event by expressing sympathy with the people of Russia following last week's school siege.

    23
    26
  • My heartfelt sympathy is extended to the family circle.

    22
    52
  • Designed to protect heretics from the secret and summary methods of the Inquisition, it certainly had his sympathy and approval.

    20
    17
  • He looked around, and in the direct, respectful, wondering gaze fixed upon him he read sympathy with what he had said.

    19
    17
  • Her logic and her sympathy are in excellent balance.

    18
    16
  • He failed to engender enough sympathy for Phillip Gellburg, a mistake which cannot be blamed on the script.

    18
    21
  • I extend sympathy on behalf of all members of the company to Norma and David at this sad time.

    18
    21
  • But apparently the coachman's sympathy was not enough for Peter, and he turned on the box toward his master.

    17
    19
  • A pregnant woman can evoke sympathy, even when they are criminals.

    16
    27
  • "I had come so near to you... and to all your family that I thought you would not consider my sympathy misplaced, but I was mistaken," and suddenly her voice trembled.

    16
    34
  • Her sympathy is of the swift and ministering sort which, fortunately, she has found so often in other people.

    15
    12
  • I cannot explain the peculiar sympathy Miss Sullivan had with my pleasures and desires.

    15
    14
  • As a thinker, he shows little sympathy with that strain of medieval mysticism which is to be observed in all the poetry of his contemporaries.

    15
    22
  • To them and to a few friends with whom she is in closest sympathy she writes with intimate frankness whatever she is thinking about.

    14
    13
  • In sympathy with this Platonism, the medieval church began by assuming the entire mutual harmony of faith and reason.

    13
    17
  • The princess looked at him, not grasping what he was saying, but cheered by the expression of regretful sympathy on his face.

    12
    18
  • Child as I was, I at once felt the tenderness and sympathy which endeared Dr. Bell to so many hearts, as his wonderful achievements enlist their admiration.

    12
    22
  • I also knew Mr. Charles Dudley Warner, the most delightful of story-tellers and the most beloved friend, whose sympathy was so broad that it may be truly said of him, he loved all living things and his neighbour as himself.

    11
    16
  • Sometimes when she recalled his looks, his sympathy, and his words, happiness did not appear impossible to her.

    10
    19
  • Berg hurriedly jumped up, kissed her hand, asked about her health, and, swaying his head from side to side to express sympathy, remained standing beside her.

    8
    17
  • It was, for instance, asserted that he caused women who showed any sympathy with the insurgents to be whipped.

    8
    22
  • We think of you so, so often! and our hearts go out to you in tenderest sympathy; and you know better than this poor letter can tell you how happy we always are to have you with us!

    7
    13
  • Ramballe, with genuine distress and sympathy in his face, went up to Pierre and bent over him.

    7
    17
  • It was my teacher's genius, her quick sympathy, her loving tact which made the first years of my education so beautiful.

    7
    18
  • Helen expressed a great deal of sympathy, and at every opportunity during the day she would find Pearl and carry the burden from place to place.

    6
    18
  • Yet he retained a strong sympathy with the Roman Catholic religion, and at one time spent several weeks in a Catholic monastery..

    2
    1
  • After a solid hour of the child crying, I wondered if the mother read about the abandoned child, perhaps with a fleeting hint of sympathy.

    1
    0
  • Don't vote for me out of sympathy.

    1
    0
  • The kind man's face held a hint of sympathy.

    1
    0
  • He expressed a qualified sympathy with some of the writers of Essays and Reviews, and then joined in the censure of it by the bishops (1861).

    1
    1
  • Unlike her father, this creature was capable of sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Westlake's eyes met Dean's in knowing sympathy.

    0
    0
  • She waved back, wondering how the most damning of them all was also the only who seemed anywhere able to feel sympathy.

    0
    0
  • His fierceness took her breath away, and the dark circles beneath his eyes drew her sympathy.

    0
    0
  • "Hey," Weller said, his tone conveyed a surprising note of sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Dean's multiplication table of 44, the number of rented apartments, wasn't perfect, but that num­ber times even a reasonable monthly rental lessened any sympathy he might have felt for the woman's financial plight.

    0
    0
  • When the world wasn't expressing sympathy for the old man, they were looking for details on Billie Wassermann, his butt-brand, and all the gory details of the fat twin's execution.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes it was easier to accept his disappointment than sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Hortensius, and he had the sympathy and support of several of the leading Roman nobles.

    0
    0
  • Much influenced by Melchior Hofman, he had no sympathy with the fanatic violence of the Minster faction.

    0
    0
  • Wherever we were wounded and stricken her heart bled in sympathy, and all our maladies and miseries evoked from her a lyric wail."

    0
    0
  • Assured by Sir James Hudson of the sympathy of England, he began active preparations for the expedition to Marsala.

    0
    0
  • Liberated by an amnesty, Garibaldi returned once more to Caprera amidst general sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Her .own predilections led her to literature; and in her society Propertius found the intellectual sympathy and encouragement which were essential for the development of his powers.

    0
    0
  • About the same time, having shown too open sympathy with the revolutionary or reforming tendencies of 1848, he was for; olitical reasons obliged to leave Berlin and retire to the seclusion of Wiirzburg, the medical school of which profited enormously by his labours as professor of pathological anatomy, and secured a wide extension of its reputation.

    0
    0
  • Henry More, who had given it a modified sympathy in the lifetime of the author, became its opponent in later years; and Cudworth differed from it in most essential points.

    0
    0
  • Thucydides alone shows sympathy with Pericles, though, as J.

    0
    0
  • The Annales, which are in seven books, deal with the history of Bavaria in conjunction with general history from the earliest times to 1460, and the author shows a strong sympathy for the Empire in its struggle with the Papacy.

    0
    0
  • Like another Socrates, he taught them to know themselves, repressing vanity, encouraging the despondent, and attaching all alike by his unobtrusive sympathy.

    0
    0
  • As an indication of sympathy with Presbyterianism,.

    0
    0
  • In 1808 Moratin was involved in the fall of Godoy, but in 1811 accepted the office of royal librarian under Joseph Bonaparte - a false step, which alienated from him all sympathy and compelled him to spend his last years in exile.

    0
    0
  • In 1863 he moved in the House of Commons a resolution of sympathy with the Poles, and two months later was made a junior lord of the admiralty.

    0
    0
  • Here, too, he published, in 1531, his most important work, the Chronica, Zeitbuch and Geschichtsbibel, largely a compilation on the basis of the Nuremberg Chronicle (1493), and in its treatment of social and religious questions connected with the Reformation, exhibiting a strong sympathy with heretics, and an unexampled fairness to all kinds of freedom in opinion.

    0
    0
  • His breadth of human sympathy led him to positions which the comparative study of religions has made familiar, but for which his age was unprepared.

    0
    0
  • When reason rises to the conception of universal order, when actions are submitted, by the exercise of a sympathy working necessarily and intuitively to the idea of the universal order, the good has been reached, the true good, good in itself, absolute good.

    0
    0
  • The heroism of the prisoners, and Silvio Pellicos account of his imprisonment (Le mie Prigioni), did much to enlist the sympathy of Europe for the Italian cause.

    0
    0
  • He had little sympathy with Liberalism and abhorred revolution, but his hatred of Austria and his resentment at the galling tutelage to which she subjected him had gained strength year by year.

    0
    0
  • Many of the republicans and Mazzinians joined it, but Mazzini himself regarded it with no sympathy.

    0
    0
  • The king, too, was in close sympathy with the societys aims, but for the present it was necessary to hide this attitude from the eyes of the Powers, whose sympathy Cavour could only hope to gain by professing hostility to everything that savoured of revolution.

    0
    0
  • But, in spite of the sympathy of the king, Dl e attempt to raise armed bands in Venetia had no success, and wa became clear that the foreigner could only be driven from the of ninsula by regular war.

    0
    0
  • Whereas in the past the strikes had been purely local and due to local conditions, they now appeared of more general and political character, and the sympathy strike came to be a frequent and undesirable addition to the ordinary economic agitation.

    0
    0
  • Then the Turin gas men struck, and a general sympathy strike broke out in that city in consequence, which resulted in scenes of violence, lasting two days.

    0
    0
  • But Osiander's house had another attraction of a different kind from theological sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Mill's Logic, and with fuller sympathy in W.

    0
    0
  • When the port of Boston was closed by Great Britain in 1774 the bell of the old First Parish Church (Unitarian) of Portland (built 1740; the present building dates from 1825) was muffled and rung from morning till night, and in other ways the town showed its sympathy for the patriot cause.

    0
    0
  • He was also out of sympathy with the meeting at Annapolis in 1786.

    0
    0
  • Reports of territorial encroachments aroused much sympathy with Liberia in America and led in February 1909 to the appointment by President Roosevelt of a commission which visited Liberia in the summer of that year to investigate the condition of the country.

    0
    0
  • This may be called the rationalistic solution; with sympathy in Christ's ethical teaching, there is relief at minimizing his great claim.

    0
    0
  • Finally, a band of loo marched from Basel to Avignon to the court of Pope Clement VI., who, in spite of the sympathy shown them by several of his cardinals, condemned the sect as constituting a menace to the priesthood.

    0
    0
  • This different treatment shows the feeling of the poet - the feeling for which he seeks to evoke our inmost sympathy - to oscillate between the belief that an awful crime brings with it its awful punishment (and it is sickening to observe how the argument by which the Friar persuades Annabella to forsake her evil courses mainly appeals to the physical terrors of retribution), and the notion that there is something fatal, something irresistible, and therefore in a sense self-justified, in so dominant a passion.

    0
    0
  • During the first years of the French Revolution Catherine's sympathy with philosophic liberalism rapidly evaporated, and the European sovereigns to the democratic movement; but she carefully abstained from joining the Coalition, and waited patiently for the moment when the complications in western Europe would give her an opportunity of solving independently the Eastern Question in accordance with Russian interests.

    0
    0
  • The mutual assurances of unbounded confidence, admiration and sympathy, if there was any genuine sincerity in them, represented merely a transient state of feeling.

    0
    0
  • Thus, in spite of his academic sympathy with liberal ideas, he became, together with Metternich, a champion of political stagnation, and co-operated willingly in the reactionary measures against the revolutionary movements in Germany, Italy and Spain.

    0
    0
  • Nicholas was a blunt soldier incapable of comprehending his brother's sentimental sympathy with liberalism.

    0
    0
  • All these undertakings, in which the humane, liberal-minded autocrat received the sympathy, support and co-operation of the more enlightened of his subjects, were successfully accomplished.

    0
    0
  • The assassination of the minister of the interior Plehve, on the 14th of July, by the revolutionist Sazonov was remarkable as a of the symptom mainly owing to the widespread sympathy of the European press of all shades of opinion with War.

    0
    0
  • Even the remnant of the " Cadets " had by this time renounced their sympathy with Polish aspirations, and in the matter of Finland the Duma proved itself even more imperial than the emperor himself.

    0
    0
  • Barclay had, however, no sympathy with the anti-clerical diatribes of John Skelton, whom he more than once attacks.

    0
    0
  • He was a son of the 18th century; he had studied with sympathy Locke and Montesquieu; no one appreciated more keenly than he did political liberty and the freedom of an Englishman.

    0
    0
  • In the following gubernatorial campaign this was made an issue by his Democratic opponent, who appealed to those in sympathy with the strikers.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile the Anabaptists obtained a footing in Silesia, and suspicions of Schwenkfeld's sympathy with them were aroused.

    0
    0
  • The Albigenses have received much sympathy, as being a kind of pre-Reformation Protestants; but it is now recognized that their tenets were an extreme form of Manichaeism.

    0
    0
  • He was by nature soft-hearted, so that he often shed tears through warm sympathy....

    0
    0
  • The people were presumably out of sympathy with hellenizers, whether they belonged to the house of Onias or that of Tobiah.

    0
    0
  • But there was an outstanding feud between him and them; and his first act as ethnarch was to remove the high priest on the ground of his sympathy with the rebels.

    0
    0
  • Exception has been taken to a certain lack of sympathy with the Jews, especially the rabbis, which has been detected in the author.

    0
    0
  • The English Jews " gradually substituted for the personal protection of the crown, the sympathy and confidence of the nation " (L.

    0
    0
  • His reply, while stating that his government would safeguard the interests of the Mussulmans, left open the question of the attitude of the powers, complicated now by sympathy with reformed Turkey.

    0
    0
  • Stolypin was for some time in sympathy with that programme, and even contemplated the formation of a Ministry strengthened by leaders of public opinion, of whom Guchkov, Count Heyden and N.

    0
    0
  • The rebellion of the colonies was making rapid progress, and Howe was known to be in sympathy with the colonists.

    0
    0
  • Though in sympathy with the Covenanters, the town was the scene of few incidents comparable to those which took place in the northern parts of the shire.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile Shamyl had roused the Lesghian tribes farther east and begun his twenty years' struggle for freedom, a struggle which called forth the sympathy and admiration of nearly the whole of Europe.

    0
    0
  • The utter exhaustion of his people in the course of a hopeless struggle with Holland, France and England was seen by him with sympathy, but he considered it an unavoidable misfortune and not the result of his own errors, since he could not be expected to renounce his rights or to desert the cause of God and the Church.

    0
    0
  • Derby, however, was always royalist in sympathy, and did not finally surrender till 1646; in 1659 it rebelled against Richard Cromwell, and in 1745 entertained the young Pretender.

    0
    0
  • He was so affected by this proof of universal sympathy with his misfortunes that he went home, fell sick and died.

    0
    0
  • The plea of the last named on behalf of Corsica served to enlist the sympathy of Napoleon in his wider speculations, and so helped to bring about that mental transformation which merged Buonaparte the Corsican in Bonaparte the Jacobin and Napoleon the First Consul and Emperor.

    0
    0
  • Encouraged by the sympathy of all patriotic Germans and the newly found energy of its own subjects, the House of Habsburg now began to prepare for war.

    0
    0
  • He turned his attention to the lagoon of Venice, which had been steadily growing in commercial and maritime importance, and had, on the whole, shown a sympathy for Byzantium rather than for the Franks.

    0
    0
  • God for him is the creator and ruler of the world, but hardly more; he is the master of a vast machine that grinds out human destinies without sympathy with man and without visible regard for what man deems justice - a being to be acknowledged as lord, not one to be loved.

    0
    0
  • Even to those who are in sympathy with III.

    0
    0
  • The most noticeable feature of recent Moravian history has been the active sympathy of its inhabitants with the anti-Teutonic home-rule agitation of the Bohemian Czechs.

    0
    0
  • This symbol harmonizes with the fact that the two rings are in complete sympathy, the one responding to every change made in the other.

    0
    0
  • Beethoven, we know, lost sympathy with his early works as he grew older; but that was because his later works absorbed his interest, not because his early works misrepresented his ideals.

    0
    0
  • A great friend of Erasmus, whom he invited to Cambridge, whilst earnestly working for a reformation of abuses, he had no sympathy with those who attacked doctrine; and he preached at Paul's Cross (12th of May 1521) at the burning of Luther's books.

    0
    0
  • Sympathy was, however, soon aroused for the emperor, who was treated as a prisoner, and a second assembly was held at Nimwegen in October 830 when, with the concurrence of his sons Pippin and Louis, he was restored to power and Judith returned to court.

    0
    0
  • Sympathy was again felt for Louis, and when the younger Louis had failed to induce Lothair to treat the emperor in a more becoming fashion, he and Pippin took up arms on behalf of their father.

    0
    0
  • Voltaire (Dictionnaire Philosoplzique, " Quaker," " Toleration ") described the body, which attracted his curiosity, his sympathy and his sneers, with all his brilliance.

    0
    0
  • As Paley says, he loves " to record their fidelity to their masters, their sympathy in the trials of life, their gratitude for kindness and considerate treatment, and their pride in bearing the character of honourable men..

    0
    0
  • Whilst the fathers agree with the Stoics of the 2nd century in representing slavery as an indifferent circumstance in the eye of religion and morality, the contempt for the class which the Stoics too often exhibited is in them replaced by a genuine sympathy.

    0
    0
  • He had no sympathy with the Old Lutherans and their strict orthodoxy - on the contrary he was friendly with the Reformed congregations, and with George Whitefield and the Tennents.

    0
    0
  • Lassalle, a democrat of the most advanced type, saw that an opportunity had come for asserting a third great cause - that of the working men - which would outflank the liberalism of the middle classes, and might even command the sympathy of the government.

    0
    0
  • Even Bishop Ketteler of Mainz had declared his sympathy for the cause he advocated.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, the Porte was thrown into a suspicious mood by the contrast between the friendly language of the western powers and the active sympathy of the western peoples for the Greeks, who were supported by volunteers and money drawn from all Europe.

    0
    0
  • Nicholas even hoped for the active sympathy of Britain.

    0
    0
  • Between mother and daughter there was, however, little sympathy.

    0
    0
  • He took up the cause of the deposed king Mataafa with extreme ardour, and he wrote a book, A Footnote to History: Eight Years of Trouble in Samoa (1892), in the endeavour to win over British sympathy to his native friends.

    0
    0
  • This is a consequence of the false stability of portraiture, since in life the unceasing movement of light in the eyes, the mobility of the mouth, and the sympathy and sweetness which radiated from all the features, precluded the faintest notion of want of sincerity.

    0
    0
  • His earliest publications, beginning with A Syllabus of Plane Algebraical Geometry (1860) and The Formulae of Plane Trigonometry (1861), were exclusively mathematical; but late in the year 1865 he published, under the pseudonym of "Lewis Carroll," Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, a work that was the outcome of his keen sympathy with the imagination of children and their sense of fun.

    0
    0
  • Men of Pinckney's type were not in sympathy with the progressive democratic spirit of America, and they began to withdraw from politics after about 1800.

    0
    0
  • When the struggle between the colonies and the mother country began, although he felt much sympathy for the former, his opposition to any form of obstruction to the Stamp Act and other measures, and his denunciation of a resort to force created a breach between him and his parish, and in a fiery farewell discourse preached after the opening of hostilities he declared that no power on earth should prevent him from praying and shouting "God save the King."

    0
    0
  • As far as purity of diction, fine wit, crushing satire against a debased and ignorant clergy, and a general sympathy with suffering humanity are concerned, Omar certainly reminds us of the great Frenchman; but there the comparison ceases.

    0
    0
  • The little book promptly aroused widespread interest, some cordial sympathy and much vehement opposition; whilst its large companion the Etudes evangeliques, containing the course on the parables and four sections of his coming commentary on the Fourth Gospel, passed almost unnoticed.

    0
    0
  • Though patrician in sympathy, he saw the necessity of making concessions to the plebeians and was instrumental in passing the Licinian laws.

    0
    0
  • Literature - modern as well as ancient - occupied his attention; one of his works was a translation of four parts of Clarissa; and translations of some of the then current English paraphrases on biblical books manifested his sympathy with a school which, if not very learned, attracted him by its freer air.

    0
    0
  • The experiment of republican government had proved so discreditable, and had so wearied the country of cabals, that men hitherto known for their sympathy with democratic principles became more monarchical than the regent himself; and under this influence a movement to give the regency into the hands of the princess Donna Januaria, now in her 18th year, was set on foot.

    0
    0
  • This policy received the approval and sympathy of the majority of Brazilians, but naturally met with bitter opposition from the military element.

    0
    0
  • It was one of the first universities to admit women students to its classes and degrees, and its alumni are brought into close bonds of sympathy and activity by a students' union.

    0
    0
  • Intended to evolve a history of jurisprudence from the truthful portraits of England's greatest lawyers, it merely exhibits the ill-digested results of desultory learning, without a trace of scientific symmetry or literary taste, without a spark of that divine imaginative sympathy which alone can give flesh and spirit to the dead bones of the past, and without which the present 1 See thereon J.

    0
    0
  • Gladstone, in the early days of English sympathy with the South, said that he had "made a nation" - bore himself in his most responsible position during the gigantic conflict which ensued, cannot here be related in detail.

    0
    0
  • Such treatment aroused the sympathy of the Southern people, who regarded him as a martyr to their cause, and in a great measure restored him to that place in their esteem which by the close of the war he had lost.

    0
    0
  • In the period of national poverty and depression that followed this event, a puritanical spirit came into vogue which was little in sympathy with Holberg's dramatic or satiric genius.

    0
    0
  • In 1780 he began the study of law under Thomas Jefferson, then governor of Virginia, and between the two there developed an intimacy and a sympathy that had a powerful influence upon Monroe's later career.

    0
    0
  • Drouyn de Lhuys, the French minister of foreign affairs, made his death the subject of a special despatch, desiring the French ambassador to express to the government "the mournful sympathy and truly national regret which the death, as lamented as premature, of Richard Cobden had excited on that side of the Channel."

    0
    0
  • During his primacy (1616-1637), when he had the whole influence of the court, and the sympathy and the assistance of the Catholic world behind him, he put the finishing touches to his life's labour by founding a great Catholic university at Nagyszombat (1635), and publishing a Hungarian translation of the Bible to counteract the influence of Gaspar Karoli's widely spread Protestant version.

    0
    0
  • From henceforth the military and civil authorities, as represented by Kossuth and Gdrgei, were hopelessly out of sympathy with each other, and the breach widened till all effective co-operation became impossible.

    0
    0
  • Knatchbull-Hugessen, The Political Evolution of the Hungarian Nation (2 vols., London, 1908), strongly Magyar in sympathy; R.

    0
    0
  • Moritz Cantor has suggested that at one time there existed two schools, one in sympathy with the Greeks, the other with the Hindus; and that, although the writings of the latter were first studied, they were rapidly discarded for the more perspicuous Grecian methods, so that, among the later Arabian writers, the Indian methods were practically forgotten and their mathematics became essentially Greek in character.

    0
    0
  • Their first public pronouncement was an appeal to the British Parliament and nation (May 1915) for sympathy with the cause of Yugoslav unity and the dissolution of Austria-Hungary.

    0
    0
  • Finding himself out of sympathy with monastic life, he fled in 1783 to North Germany, and settled in Weimar, where he became Wieland's collaborateur on the German Mercury, and eventually his son-in-law.

    0
    0
  • Viljoen's commando, with which Pretorius was in sympathy, was known as the Volksleger, or Army of the People.

    0
    0
  • On the following day, the 7th of January, Sir Hercules telegraphed again through the British agent, who was then at Johannesburg, saying: " That if the Uitlanders do not comply with my request they will forfeit all claims to sympathy from Her Majesty's government and from British subjects throughout the world, as the lives of Jameson and the prisoners are now practically in their hands."

    0
    0
  • The author is in sympathy with Christianity, but is himself an adherent of the stoic philosophy.

    0
    0
  • To the official support, which never failed him, Damasus endeavoured to join the popular sympathy.

    0
    0
  • In October 1848 Cibrario was made senator, and after the battle of Novara (March 1849), when Charles Albert abdicated and retired to a monastery near Oporto, Cibrario and Count Giacinto di Collegno were sent as representatives of the senate to express the sympathy of that body with the fallen king.

    0
    0
  • In Scotland, Brown so far won the sympathy of the students that riotous conflicts took place between his partisans and opponents.

    0
    0
  • Yet on the whole, even from the beginning, the revolt was useful in that it shook the position of the "learned physician," who took a literary, fastidious and meditative rather than an experimental interest in his profession, and, as in great part a descendant of the humanists, was never in full sympathy with experimental science.

    0
    0
  • But bodily defect is largely a result of evil circumstances, in the prevention of which the physician is not unsuccessfully engaged, and the growth of sympathy means a stronger cement of the social structure.

    0
    0
  • Once prime minister, his personal popularity proved to be a powerful unifying influence in a somewhat heterogeneous party; and though the illness and death (August 30, 1906) of his wife (daughter of General Sir Charles Bruce), whom he had married in 1860, made his constant attendance in the House of Commons impossible, his domestic sorrow excited widespread sympathy and appealed afresh to the affection of his political followers.

    0
    0
  • He addresses him as an equal; he expresses sympathy with the prominent part he played in public life, and admiration for his varied accomplishments, but on his own subject claims to speak to him with authority.

    0
    0
  • But his poetical sympathy was not limited to the poets of Greece.

    0
    0
  • No one shows a truer humanity and a more tender sympathy with natural sorrow.

    0
    0
  • His knowledge, his sympathy, his enthusiasm soon made themselves felt everywhere; the ruridecanal conferences of clergy became a real force, and the church in Cornwall was inspired with a vitality that had never been possible when it was part of the unwieldy diocese of Exeter.

    0
    0
  • Marguerite Arouet, of whom her younger brother was very fond, married early, her husband's name being Mignot; the elder brother, Armand, was a strong Jansenist, and there never was any kind of sympathy between him and Francois.

    0
    0
  • His peculiar fashion of attacking the popular beliefs of his time has also failed to secure the approval of some who had very little sympathy with those beliefs.

    0
    0
  • Most judgments:of Voltaire have been unduly coloured by sympathy with or dislike of what may be briefly called his polemical side.

    0
    0
  • When sympathy and dislike are both discarded or allowed for, he remains one of the most astonishing, if not exactly one of the most admirable, figures of letters.

    0
    0
  • Zumalacarregui had no sympathy with the liberal principles which were spreading in Spain, and became noted as what was called a Servil or strong Royalist.

    0
    0
  • With the breadth and depth of the Saviour's sympathy, which are so fully exhibited in this Gospel, we may connect the clearness with which His true humanity is here portrayed.

    0
    0
  • The principle of perfection is a new one, at once more rational and comprehensive than benevolence and sympathy, which in our view places Ferguson as a moralist above all his predecessors."

    0
    0
  • Hutcheson's theory of universal benevolence and Smith's idea of sympathy he combines under the law of society.

    0
    0
  • The opposition and ridicule with which Booth's work was for many years received gave way, towards the end of the 19th century, to very widespread sympathy as his genius and its results were more fully realized.

    0
    0
  • He was Puritan to the core, with a tenacious memory, a strength of will bordering upon obstinacy, and a want of sympathy with human nature.

    0
    0
  • y the district of Iquitos met with small sympathy, and was speedily crushed.

    0
    0
  • Such sympathy with youthful hope, in union with industry and intelligence, shows that Comte's dry and austere manner veiled the fires of a generous social emotion.

    0
    0
  • Although this Great Being evidently exceeds the utmost strength of any, even of any collective, human force, its necessary constitution and its peculiar function endow it with the truest sympathy towards all its servants.

    0
    0
  • Looking at the problem in this way, even a moralist who does not expect theology to be the instrument of social revival, might still ask whether the sympathetic instincts will not necessarily be already developed to their highest point, before people will be persuaded to accept the religion, which is at the bottom hardly more than sympathy under a more imposing name.

    0
    0
  • And there is no more extraordinary thing in the history of opinion than the perversity with which Comte has succeeded in clothing a philosophic doctrine, so intrinsically conciliatory as his, in a shape that excites so little sympathy and gives so much provocation.

    0
    0
  • It is odd that this irregular poem, with its copious and varied music, its splendid sweep of emotion, its unfailing richness of texture - this poem in which Tennyson rises to heights of human sympathy and intuition which he reached nowhere else, should have been received with bitter hostility, have been styled "the dead level of prose run mad," and have been reproved more absurdly still for its "rampant and rabid bloodthirstiness of soul."

    0
    0
  • At Darmstadt he made the acquaintance of Caroline Flachsland, to whom he soon became betrothed, and who for the rest of his life supplied him with that abundance of consolatory sympathy which his sensitive and rather querulous nature appeared to require.

    0
    0
  • In reply to a question in the House of Commons, Lord Palmerston accepted and adopted Gladstone's statement, expressed keen sympathy with the cause which he had espoused, and sent a copy of his letter to the queen's representative at every court of Europe.

    0
    0
  • He received an address of sympathy from the consistory of Anduze, and a provision was voted for him by the Union Protestante Liberale, to enable him to continue his preaching.

    0
    0
  • Within the English Church men with whom he had both personal and religious sympathy rose - Whately, of whom he said, " We know no living writer who has proved so little and disproved so much ";2 and Thomas Arnold, " a man who could be a hero without romance ";3 F.

    0
    0
  • These students, confronted by i strong reaction in favor of pure Japanese art, have fought manfully to win public sympathy, and though their success is not yet crowned, it is not impossible that an Occidental school may ultimately be established.

    0
    0
  • Yet as a high-minded patriot Dlugosz had no sympathy whatever with Olesnicki's opposition to Casimir's Prussian policy, and steadily supported the king during the whole course of the war with the Teutonic knights.

    0
    0
  • Both of these are original and indispensable, but egoism has the priority, since there must be egoistic pleasure somewhere before there can be altruistic sympathy with it.

    0
    0
  • The Monophysites had the sympathy of the emperor Anastasius, and were finally successful in ousting Flavian in 512 and replacing him by their partisan Severus.

    0
    0
  • But he was insubordinate; his sympathy: with the American colonies, which were now beginning to resist the claims of the mother country to tax them, made him intolerable to the king and he was dismissed in February 1 774.

    0
    0
  • To Harley himself he was bound by gratitude and by a substantial agreement in principle, but with the rest of the Tory ministry he had no sympathy.

    0
    0
  • The two latter pictures were marked by the rhythm of line and luxury of colour which are among the most constant attributes of his art, and may be regarded as his first dreams of Oriental beauty, with which he afterwards showed so great a sympathy.

    0
    0
  • This was Andre, who had come on a visit of sympathy.

    0
    0
  • In 1744 he had been very busy assisting in the negotiations for the establishment of the new "broad bottom" administration, and showed no sympathy for the Jacobite expedition in 1745.

    0
    0
  • He lived and wrote only to amuse his contemporaries, and thus, although more popular in his lifetime and more fortunate than any of the older authors in the ultimate survival of a large number of his works, he is less than any of the great writers of Rome in sympathy with either the serious or the caustic spirit in Latin literature.

    0
    0
  • Latin literature ceased to be in close sympathy with the popular spirit, either politically or as a form of amusement, but became the expression of the ideas, sentiment and culture of the aristocratic governing class.

    0
    0
  • The higher poetical imagination had appeared only in Ennius, and had been called forth in him by sympathy with the grandeur of the national life and the great personal qualities of its representative men.

    0
    0
  • The Sabellian races of central and eastern Italy and the Italo-Celtic and Venetian races of the north, in whom the poetic susceptibility of Italy was most manifest two generations later, were not, until after the Social war, sufficiently in sympathy with Rome, and were probably not as yet sufficiently educated to induce them to contribute their share to the national literature.

    0
    0
  • He avoids not only every unusual but every superfluous word; and, although no writing can be more free from rhetorical colouring, yet there may from time to time be detected a glow of sympathy, like the glow of generous passion in Thucydides, the more effective from the reserve with which it betrays itself whenever he is called on to record any act of personal heroism or of devotion to military duty.

    0
    0
  • For that work the Augustan age, as the end of one great cycle of events and the beginning of another, was eminently suited, and a writer who, by his gifts of imagination and sympathy, was perhaps better fitted than any other man of antiquity for the task, and who through the whole of this period lived a life of literary leisure, was found to do justice to the subject.

    0
    0
  • The homeliest details of the farmer's work are transfigured through the poet's love of nature; through his religious feeling and his pious sympathy with the sanctities of human affection; through his patriotic sympathy with the national greatness; and through the rich allusiveness of his art to everything in poetry and legend which can illustrate and glorify his theme.

    0
    0
  • And, though he cannot unroll before us the page of heroic action with the power and majesty of Homer, yet by the sympathy with which he realizes the idea of Rome, and by the power with which he has used the details of tradition, of local scenes, of religious usage, to embody it, he has built up in the form of an epic poem the most enduring and the most artistically constructed monument of national grandeur.

    0
    0
  • He had not only become reconciled to the new order of things, but was moved by his intimate friendship with Maecenas to aid in raising the world to sympathy with the imperial rule through the medium of his lyrical inspiration, as Virgil had through the glory of his epic art.

    0
    0
  • In his sympathy with the life and beliefs of the country people he shows an affinity both to the idyllic spirit and to the piety of Virgil.

    0
    0
  • The value of the work consists not in any power of critical investigation or weighing of historical evidence but in the intense sympathy of the writer with the national ideal, and the vivid imagination with which under the influence of this sympathy he gives life to the events and personages, the wars and political struggles, of times remote from his own.

    0
    0
  • His appreciation of Grant, and his sympathy with the chagrin he suffered after this battle, cemented the friendship between the two.

    0
    0
  • He was one of the greatest of Scottish religious leaders, a man of wide sympathy and high ideals.

    0
    0
  • Booth was assisted by his wife, Catherine Booth, a woman of remarkable gifts, who won for the new movement the sympathy of many among the cultured classes.

    0
    0
  • With him, however, Manning found less sympathy than with his predecessor, though Manning's advocacy of the claims of labour attracted Leo's attention, and influenced the encyclical which he issued on the subject.

    0
    0
  • The very intensity of that phase of modern thought which declaims fervently against all creeds, and would maintain what George Eliot called " the right of the individual to general haziness," is likely to draw all Christian thinkers nearer to one another in sympathy through acceptance of the Apostles' Creed as the common basis of Christian thought.

    0
    0
  • How shall we state his point of departure from the middle ages, his sympathy with prevalent classical enthusiasms, his divination of a new period?

    0
    0
  • The Austrians had long tried to obtain influence in the town, especially when its support of the Protestant cause attracted the sympathy of the Swiss.

    0
    0
  • Edward, The History of Texas (Cincinnati, 1836), slightly pro-Mexican in sympathy; H.

    0
    0
  • This newly-formed sympathy with the English reformer did not, in the first instance at least, involve Huss in any conscious opposition to the established doctrines of Catholicism, or in any direct conflict with the authorities of the church; and for 1 From which the name Huss, or more properly Hus, an abbreviation adopted by himself about 1396, is derived.

    0
    0
  • This newly-formed sympathy with the English reformer did not, in the first instance at least, involve Hus in any conscious opposition to the established doctrines of Catholicism, or in any direct conflict with the authorities of the church; and for several years he continued to act in full accord with his archbishop (Sbynjek, or Sbynko, of Hasenburg).

    0
    0
  • But it was only slowly that the growing sympathy of Huss with Wycliffe unfavourably affected his relations with his colleagues in the priesthood.

    0
    0
  • The journey, which appears to have been undertaken with the usual passport, and under the protection of several powerful Bohemian friends (John of Chlum, Wenceslaus of Duba, Henry of Chlum) who accompanied him, was a very prosperous one; and at almost all the halting-places he was received with a consideration and enthusiastic sympathy which he had hardly expected to meet with anywhere in Germany.

    0
    0
  • In the subsequent years Mantineia still found opportunity to give the Athenians covert help, and during the Corinthian War (394387) scarcely disguised its sympathy with the anti-Spartan league.

    0
    0
  • In this manner Martin Luther, with the hearty sympathy of a considerable number of his countrymen, publicly proclaimed and illustrated his repudiation of the papal government under which western Europe had lived for centuries.

    0
    0
  • The extraordinary popularity of Erasmus is a sufficient (1464- indication that his attitude of mind was viewed with sympathy by the learned, whether in France, England, Germany, Spain or Italy.

    0
    0
  • g vinism finally triumphed in the Confession of Dordrecht, 1572, since Calvin's system of church government did not, like Luther's, imply the sympathy of the civil authorities.

    0
    0
  • This large class of " dissenters " found themselves as little at home under a Protestant as under a Catholic regime, and have until recently been treated with scant sympathy by historians of the Church.

    0
    0
  • Parliament in retaliation closed the port of Boston (1774), a proceeding which only aroused more bitter feeling in the country towns and enlisted the sympathy of the other colonies.

    0
    0
  • Her leading politicians were out of sympathy with the conduct of national affairs (in the conduct of foreign relations, the distribution of political patronage, naval policy, the question of public debt) from 1804 - when Jefferson's party showed its complete supremacy - onward; and particularly after the passage of the Embargo Act of 1807, which caused great losses to Massachusetts commerce, and, so far from being accepted by her leaders as a proper diplomatic weapon, seemed to them designed in the interests of the Democratic party.

    0
    0
  • Though the vast ultimate consequences of this sudden appearance of the great western republic in the arena of international politics were not realized even by those in sympathy with Monroe's action, the weight of the United States thrown into the scale on the side of Great Britain made any effective protest by the European powers impossible; Russia, Austria and Prussia contented themselves with joining in a mild expression of regret that the action of Great Britain "tended to encourage that revolutionary spirit it had been found so difficult to control in Europe."

    0
    0
  • In ethics Diihring follows Comte in making sympathy the foundation of morality.

    0
    0
  • A strong writer and thinker, his spirit was essentially unifying and sympathetic, in an age when these qualities won little sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Especially from England did they receive sympathy and help. An English clergyman, Dr Gilly, visited the valleys in 1823, and by his writings on the Vaudois church attracted considerable attention, so that he was enabled to build a college at La Torre.

    0
    0
  • St Paul anxiously promoted friendly intercourse and sympathy between the scattered Ecclesiae; but the unity of the universal Ecclesia as he contemplated it does not belong to this region: it is a bulk of theology and religion, not a fact of what we call ecclesiastical politics."

    0
    0
  • Their weakness as a denomination has lain latterly in their very catholicity of sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Herzl was stirred by sympathy for the misery of Jews under persecution, but he was even more powerfully moved by the difficulties experienced under conditions of assimilation.

    0
    0
  • He remained in opposition from 1848 till 1854, holding together under difficult circumstances an unpopular party with which he was not entirely in sympathy.

    0
    0
  • After this disaster he issued a third Mississippi Valley novel, The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson, in 1894, and in 1896 another historical romance, Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc, wherein the maid is treated with the utmost sympathy and reverence.

    0
    0
  • And Origen is still full of spontaneous sympathy with its pervading allegorism.

    0
    0
  • Warned by the sympathy excited in Saxony by the revolutionary events at Paris in 1848, the king dismissed his reactionary ministry, and a Liberal cabinet took its place in March 1848.

    0
    0
  • "If the sovereign power is to be understood in this fuller, less abstract sense, if we mean by it the real determinant of the habitual obedience of the people, we must look for its sources much more widely and deeply than the analytical jurists do; it can no longer be said to reside in a determinate person or persons, but in that impalpable congeries of the hopes and fears of a people bound together by common interest and sympathy, which we call the common will" (Green's Works, 2.404).

    0
    0
  • Abt Vogler, however, makes reservations in his praise, condemning his philosophical principles as too much in sympathy with those of Fox, which had already been expressed by P. Vallotti.

    0
    0
  • He appears, however, to have set himself honestly to carry out reforms. The economical condition of Italy evidently excited his alarm and sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Peckham's zeal was not tempered by discernment, and he had little gift of sympathy or imagination.

    0
    0
  • She reviewed the departing regiments; she entertained the wives and children of the Windsor soldiers who had gone to the war; she showed by frequent messages her watchful interest in the course of the campaign and in the efforts which were being made throughout the whole empire; and her Christmas gift of a box of chocolate to every soldier in South Africa was a touching proof of her sympathy and interest.

    0
    0
  • But, although characterized by learning and acuteness, as well as by considerable breadth of spiritual sympathy, it cannot be said to have been accepted by Catholics themselves as embodying an accurate objective view of the actual doctrine of their church.

    0
    0
  • With the later High Church movement, usually described as Ritualism, he had less sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Y Y ing Himself with the sinner in perfect sympathy, and feeling for him an " equivalent repentance " for his sin.

    0
    0
  • On the ground that after the virtues of courage and valour and fearlessness have been taught in the lower stages of evolution, the virtue of gentle humane ness and extended sympathy for all that can suffer should be taught in the higher cycles of the evolutionary spiral.

    0
    0
  • During the Wars of the Roses he showed his sympathy with the Lancastrian party after the defeat of Henry VI.

    0
    0
  • Historical and religious sentiment combined with his destestation of all that was tyrannical to inspire him with hatred of the Turk and sympathy with the smaller and subject nationalities of eastern Europe.

    0
    0
  • The perpetrators of the crime were sentenced to five years' rigorous imprisonment, but they had the sympathy of the people on their side.

    0
    0
  • Through his ready sympathy with all forms of life and character,, his attention was always alive.

    0
    0
  • He was here in sympathy with the secret sore of his age, and gave utterance to what all felt but none dared to whisper but he.

    0
    0
  • Many of the latter had already come under the influence of Judaism, and were more or less completely in sympathy with Jewish religious principles.

    0
    0
  • Anniceris, in whose thought the school reached its highest perfection, declared that true pleasure consists sometimes in self-sacrifice and that sympathy in enjoyment is a real source of happiness.

    0
    0
  • At the same time the fact that the lovers are the helpless victims of the fatal force of a magic spell is insisted upon, in order that their career of falsehood and deception may not deprive them of sympathy.

    0
    0
  • At the time of the Civil War the city was strongly in sympathy with the North.

    0
    0
  • Hall presents the policy of this king in a very favourable light and shows his own sympathy with the Protestants.

    0
    0
  • In 1832 Lamennais, with his friends Lacordaire and Montalembert, visited Germany, and obtained considerable sympathy in their attempts to bring about a modification of the Roman Catholic attitude to modern problems. Dbllinger seems to have regarded favourably the removal, by the Bavarian government, in 1841, of Professor Kaiser from his chair, because he had taught the infallibility of the pope.

    0
    0
  • Easy-going, luxurious, worldly-minded, Paul was not in full sympathy with the prevailing influences about him.

    0
    0
  • His writings are marked by vigour and vitality of style, as well as by the highest qualities of the historian who recreates the past from the original sources; he had no sympathy with either legal or historical pedantry; and his death at Grand Canary on the, 9th of December 1906 deprived English law and letters of one of their most scholarly and most inspiring representatives, notable alike for sweetness of character, acuteness in criticism, and wisdom in counsel.

    0
    0
  • - At the portal of the middle ages stands Gregory the Great (c. 540-604), who had little (if any) knowledge of Greek and had no sympathy with the secular side of the study of Latin.

    0
    0
  • It may be added that this belt narrows greatly towards the east, mainly from the south, in sympathy with the northward flow of cold water off the coast of South America.

    0
    0
  • But the essential narrowness and timidity of his general outlook prevented him from detecting and estimating latent forces, either in politics or in matters strictly intellectual and moral; and this lack of understanding and sympathy accounts for his distrust and dislike of the passion and fancy of Shelley and Keats, and for his praise of the half-hearted and elegant romanticism of Rogers and Campbell.

    0
    0
  • he could have had no sympathy, his dignified domestic life and his serious attention to religion standing in the strongest contrast with the profligacy of the royal surroundings.

    0
    0
  • Boniface, though a man of violent temper and too often absent from his see, showed some sympathy with the reforming party in the English church.

    0
    0
  • This doctrine is that all our moral sentiments arise from sympathy, that is, from the principle of our nature "which leads us to enter into the situations of other men and to partake with them in the passions which those situations have a tendency to excite."

    0
    0
  • Our direct sympathy with the agent in the circumstances in which he is placed gives rise, according to this view, to our notion of the propriety of his action, whilst our indirect sympathy with those whom his actions have benefited or injured gives rise to our notions of merit and demerit in the agent himself.

    0
    0
  • It seems justly alleged against this system by Dr Thomas Brown that "the moral sentiments, the origin of which it ascribes to our secondary feelings of mere sympathy, are assumed as previously existing in the original emotions with which the secondary feelings are said to be in unison."

    0
    0
  • Antonius Gnipho, a native of Gaul (by which Cisalpine Gaul may be meant), who is said to have been equally learned in Greek and Latin literature, and to have set up in later years a school of rhetoric which was attended by Cicero in his praetorship 66 B.C. It is possible that Caesar may have derived from him his interest in Gaul and its people and his sympathy with the claims of the Romanized Gauls of northern Italy to political rights.

    0
    0
  • The general's object may probably have been to accentuate the harshness with which the fathers had been treated, and so to increase public sympathy, 1 but the actual result of his policy was blame for the cruelty with which he enhanced their misfortunes, for the poverty of Corsica made even a bare subsistence scarcely procurable for them there.

    0
    0
  • It is said that the people wept as they passed by; but if so this may have been a customary formality, for the religion of these nations must have quenched all human sympathy.

    0
    0
  • At the various congresses, from Aix-la-Chapelle (1818) to Verona (1822), therefore, he showed himself heartily in sympathy with the repressive policy formulated in the Troppau Protocol.

    0
    0
  • These idiosyncrasies met with no sympathy from either of his parents, whose ambitious plans for his future career they threatened to disappoint.

    0
    0
  • and no sympathy with the passionate fervour, or adequate.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at Oxford, where he adopted Lollard opinions, and had graduated as a master of arts before the 6th of October 1406, when he was concerned in the irregular proceedings through which a letter declaring the sympathy of the university was addressed to the Bohemian reformers.

    0
    0
  • His declared sympathy with Brutus and Cassius occasioned his banishment in 66.

    0
    0
  • He had a kindling sympathy with everything lofty and generous, and framed his own conduct upon the highest principles.

    0
    0
  • The facts being reported to the Convention, little sympathy was shown to Gorsas, and a resolution (which was evaded) was passed forbidding representatives to occupy themselves with journalism.

    0
    0
  • His relations with the imperial house, however, never became cordial; and he was also unsuccessful in winning the sympathy of the Roman nobles.

    0
    0
  • By a mysterious sympathy the bread and wine over which the words, " This is my body which is for you," and " This cup is the new covenant in my blood," had been uttered, became Christ's body and blood; so that by partaking of these the faithful were united with each other and with Christ into one kinship. They became the body of Christ, and his blood or life was in them, and they were members of him.

    0
    0
  • Barillas (1845-1907) proclaimed his intention of establishing a silver currency, and gained, to a great extent, the sympathy of the German and British residents; he had been the sole Guatemalan president who had not sought to prolong his own tenure of office.

    0
    0
  • He contributed a large amount of money to the scheme, and his unfailing sympathy and practical business advice were of the greatest value.

    0
    0
  • He received a liberal education, and, when he left school, became an officer in the artillery; but his sympathy with the peasants, among whom he had lived during his boyhood in the country, developed in him at first democratic and, later, revolutionary opinions.

    0
    0
  • In United retaliation for the supposed sympathy of Canadians with the South in this struggle the victorious North took steps to abrogate in 1866 the reciprocity treaty of 18J4, which had conferred such great advantages on both countries.

    0
    0
  • The balance of power between parties in parliament was held by the province of Quebec, and there racial and religious feeling evoked no slight sympathy for Riel.

    0
    0
  • This, like so many of his later utterances, closed with an appeal for sympathy and union between the French and English races as the secret of the future of Canada.

    0
    0
  • Although he was classed in Canada as a Liberal, his tendencies would in England have been considered strongly conservative; an individualist rather than a collectivist, he opposed the intrusion of the state into the sphere of private enterprise, and showed no sympathy with the movement for state operation of railways, telegraphs and telephones, or with any kindred proposal looking to the extension of the obligations of the central government.

    0
    0
  • Aristotle had no sympathy with the unwritten dogmas of Plato.

    0
    0
  • [Ascribed to the school of Theophrastus and Strabo by Zeller.] 234 4,vacoyvw,uovtci: Physiognomonica: On physiognomy, and the sympathy of body and soul.

    0
    0
  • The people were led to revolt against the mother country through sympathy with the other colonies rather than through any grievance of their own.

    0
    0
  • He describes himself when he says, "The student of Christian doctrine, because he strives after exactness of phrase, because he is conscious of the inadequacy of any one human formula to exhaust the truth, will be filled with sympathy for every genuine endeavour towards the embodiment of right opinion.

    0
    0
  • He championed popular education and recommended the homestead policy to the national government, and from his sympathy with the working classes and his oft-avowed pride in his former calling he became known as the " mechanic governor."

    0
    0
  • A lifelong Southern Democrat, he was forced to lead (nominally at least) a party of Northern Republicans, with whom he had no bond of sympathy save a common opposition to secession; and his ardent, aggressive convictions and character, above all his complete lack of tact, unfitted him to deal successfully with the passionate partisanship of Congress.

    0
    0
  • With the radical "Eider-Dane" party he was utterly out of sympathy; and when, in 1862, this party gained the upper hand, he was recalled from Frankfort.

    0
    0
  • In 1873 Bismarck, who was in thorough sympathy with his views, persuaded him to enter the service of Prussia as secretary of state for foreign affairs, and from this time till his death he was the chancellor's most faithful henchman.

    0
    0
  • If he had no sympathy with revolutionary disturbers of the peace, he had even less with the fatuous extravagances of the comte d'Artois and his reactionary entourage, and his influence was thrown into the scale of the moderate constitutional policy of which Richelieu and Decazes were the most conspicuous exponents.

    0
    0
  • He had indeed none of the sympathy with national causes which began to influence British policy under Canning, and which became so powerful under Palmerston; but the rule which he followed in foreign affairs, so far as he considered it possible, was that of non-intervention.

    0
    0
  • Acting on this verdict, not only was a ministry formed to restore the constitution of 1840, but after some trouble a body of members fully in sympathy with this object was returned to parliament in 1857.

    0
    0
  • The society spread in the eastern counties, in spite of repressive measures; it revived under the Commonwealth, and lingered into the early years of the 18th century; the leading idea of its "service of love" was a reliance on sympathy and tenderness for the moral and spiritual edification of its members.

    0
    0
  • Not the least important of these influences is the sentimental sympathy felt for those who are supposed to be deprived of the use of their mother-tongue, and who are subjected to the hardship of learning an alien one.

    0
    0
  • Scottish nationality was another source of enthusiasm with him; and in this connexion he displayed real sympathy with Highland home life and the grievances of the crofters.

    0
    0
  • Both ministers and people entered with interest and sympathy into the scheme for union between themselves, the Methodist New Connexion and the United Methodist Free Church, which was successfully accomplished in 1906.

    0
    0
  • At the same time, as he could not be suspected of any sympathy with Lutheran or Wickliffite heretics, he might fairly be regarded as qualified to lead the party which aimed at reform in State and Church within the limits of Catholic orthodoxy.

    0
    0
  • Her devotion to her father is historical; she gave him not only the tender affection of a daughter but the high-minded sympathy of a soul great as his own.

    0
    0
  • The preaching of John the Baptist was thus in sympathy with the ideals of his generation, though the sternness of the repentance which he set forth as the necessary preparation for entrance into the new kingdom of heaven, which was to be made visible on earth, was not less repugnant to the men of his day than of later times.

    0
    0
  • He had much practical common-sense, and keen sympathy for all who were in distress and for animals.

    0
    0
  • At the same time, in spite of his sympathy with the whole development of idealism since Kant, which leads him to reject the thing in itself, to modify a priorism, and to stop at transcendent " ideals," without postulates of practical reason, he nevertheless has so much sympathy with Kant's Kritik as on its theories of sense and understanding to build up a system of phenomenalism, according to which knowledge begins and ends with ideas, and finally on its theory of pure reason to accord to reason a power of logically forming an " ideal " of God as ground of the moral " ideal " of humanity - though without any power of logically inferring any corresponding reality.

    0
    0
  • But his main sympathy was with Fechner, the gist of whose " inner psychophysics " he adopted, without, however, the hypothesis that what is conscious in us is conscious in the all-embracing spirit of God.

    0
    0
  • The speech was enthusiastically received by the National Union of Conservative Associations, who had year by year flirted with protectionist resolutions, and who were known to be predominantly in sympathy with Mr Chamberlain.

    0
    0
  • (1) The Son has the qualifications of all priesthood, especially sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Though their prevailing tendency was practical, and the tenets of the society were kept a profound secret, it is perfectly clear from the concurrent testimony of Philo and Josephus that they cultivated a kind of speculation, which not only accounts for their spiritual asceticism, but indicates a great deviation from the normal development of Judaism, and a profound sympathy with Greek philosophy, and probably also with Oriental ideas.

    0
    0
  • His successor, Leo XI., undisguisedly French in sympathy, reigned but twenty-seven days - a sorry return for the 300,000 ducats which his election is rumoured to have cost Henry IV.

    0
    0
  • The " atheistic " Republic did not for one moment think of putting on sackcloth, or even of giving the Church a single proof of esteem and sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Since this party in the course of years came more and more into sympathy with the representatives of the Nicene party, the Homoousians, and notably with Athanasius, the much-disputed formula became more and more popular, till the council summoned in 38L at Constantinople, under the auspices of Theodosius the Great, recognized the Nicene doctrine as the only orthodox one.

    0
    0
  • During the second half of this missionary period of his life he superintended as bisho p the churches of Pennsylvania, defended the Moravian colonies against the Indians at the time of war between France and England, became the apologist of his body against the attacks of the Lutherans and the Pietists, and did much to moderate the mystical extravagances pf Zinzendorf, with which his simple, practical and healthy nature was out of sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Robertson he was in strong sympathy.

    0
    0
  • In character he was pure, simple, endowed with excellent judgment and a keen sense of humour, and quick to respond to any call for sympathy.

    0
    0
  • His sympathy with men of other ways and thought, and with the truth in other ecclesiastical systems gained for him the confidence and affection of men of varied habits of mind and religious traditions, and was thus a great factor in gaining increasing support for the Episcopal Church.

    0
    0
  • His sympathy with the revolutionary ideas of 1830, expressed in his paper the Zeitgeist, cost him his appointment in 1834, and he made his way to Switzerland, where he contributed to the Jeune Suisse directed by Mazzini.

    0
    0
  • As a foreigner he was from the first out of sympathy with the majority of his subjects.

    0
    0
  • Gradually, however, he grew out of sympathy with the Republican leaders and policy, and in 1892 advocated the election of the Democratic candidate, Grover Cleveland, for the presidency.

    0
    0
  • He had no sympathy with the new men and the new ideas, and the malcontents in Poland often insulted the aged king with impunity.

    0
    0
  • Her first thought on her return to Chartley was one of loyal gratitude and womanly sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Lola Montez, created Countess Landsfeld, was supreme in the state; and the new minister, Prince Ludwig von Oettingen-Wallerstein (1791-1870), in spite of his efforts to enlist Liberal sympathy by appeals to pan-German patriotism, was powerless to form a stable government.

    0
    0
  • As a preacher, though he was not eloquent, he was distinguished by good sense, earnestness and breadth of sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Of all the European nations France was the one on which Jacobite hopes mainly rested, and the warm sympathy which Cardinal Tencin, who had succeeded Fleury as French minister, felt for the Old Pretender resulted in a definite scheme for an invasion of England to be timed simultaneously with a prearranged Scottish rebellion.

    0
    0
  • The outbreak of the Boer War in 1899 led to a strong outburst of sympathy among the Dutch on behalf of their kinsmen in South Africa, and there were times during the war, especially after President Kruger had fled from the Transvaal in a Dutch war vessel and had settled in Holland, when it was a task of some difficulty for the Dutch government to prevent the relations between Great Britain and the Netherlands from becoming strained.

    0
    0
  • The story is well told; the digressions are few; and there are many touches of domestic life and natural sympathy.

    0
    0
  • In the year after the battle of the Navas de Tolosa he took up arms against the crusaders of Simon of Montfort, moved not by sympathy with the Albigenses, but by the natural political hostility of the southern princes to the conquering intervention of the north under pretence of religious zeal.

    0
    0
  • The extreme democratic and socialistic party made with French aid some spasmodic efforts to stir up a revolutionary movement, but they met with no popular sympathy; the throne of Leopold stood firmly based upon the trust and respect of the Belgian nation for the wisdom and moderation of their king.

    0
    0
  • Avoid vulgar errors; cherish universal sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Indian family who had been slaveholders for generations, he had a keen love of sport and a genuine sympathy with country-folk, but he had at the same time something of the scorn for lower races to be found in the members of a dominant race.

    0
    0
  • His politics might therefore have been described as Toryism tempered by sympathy, or as Radicalism tempered by hereditary scorn of subject races.

    0
    0
  • The more orthodox and conservative elements in his character gained the upper hand as time went on, but careful students of him and his writings will find a deep conservatism underlying the most radical utterances of his earlier years, while a passionate sympathy for the poor, the afflicted and the weak held possession of him till the last hour of his life.

    0
    0
  • His sympathy for children taught him how to secure their interests.

    0
    0
  • Next, the writer claims the sympathy of his readers 1 The religious pragmatism lacking in the original is in part supplied by the Targum (i.

    0
    0
  • Bernstorff's sympathy with England grew stronger still when in 1779 Spain joined her enemies; and he was much inclined, the same winter, to join a triple alliance between Great Britain, Russia and Denmark-Norway, proposed by England for the purpose of compelling the Bourbon powers to accept reasonable terms of peace.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile, in the heated atmosphere of the reaction, his sympathy with the Liberal opposition brought him again under suspicion.

    0
    0
  • With Wycliffe's religious opinions he had no sympathy.

    0
    0
  • If he never had any sympathy with Herbert's intuitionalist principles in philosophy, he was no less eager, as he afterwards showed, than Herbert to rationalize in matters of religious doctrine, so that he may be called the second of the English deists, as Herbert has been called the first.

    0
    0
  • Between him and the clergy, indeed, there was a strong religious and political sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Money was collected, and a few men-of-war were fitted out; but these were subsequently sold, the German Bundeslag (federal council) not being in sympathy with the aspirations of the nation.

    0
    0
  • It had shown some sympathy with the reformers and had declined to put the edict of Worms into immediate execution.

    0
    0
  • After this Frederick and the Calvinists looked for sympathy more and more to the Protestants in France and the Netherlands, whom they assisted with troops, while the Lutherans, whose chief prince was Augustus, elector of Saxony, adopted a more cautious policy and were anxious not to offend the emperor.

    0
    0
  • Above all it evolved the Customs-Union (Zollverein), which gradually attached the smaller states, by material interests if The not by sympathy, to the Prussian system.

    0
    0
  • But the new king was a child of the romantic movement, with no real understanding of, and still less sympathy with, the modern Liberal pGint of view.

    0
    0
  • Prussia thus made a bid for the sympathy of the democracy at the same time as she declared war against the dynasties; and her power was revealed by the fact that her veto was sufficient to wreck a proposal seconded by the all but unanimous vote of the German sovereigns.

    0
    0
  • the sympathy expressed for the Communards, had offended the strongest feelings of the nation, especially as the language used was often very violent; the soldiers were spoken of as murderers, the generals as cur-throats.

    0
    0
  • Their only hope was in the time when the crown prince, who had shown great sympathy with them, should succeed.

    0
    0
  • The resignation of Falk in July 1879 was a sign of the change of policy; he was succeeded by Puttkammer, who belonged to the old-fashioned Prussian Conservatives and had no sympathy with the Liberal legislation.

    0
    0
  • The Conservatives distrusted the financial activity which centred round the Exchanges of Berlin and other towns, and in this they had the sympathy of Agrarians and Anti-S emites, as well as of the Centre.

    0
    0
  • The sympathy which the events of 1896 and 1899 awakened for the Pro-Boer Boers caused all these feelings, which had long been ~ growing, to break out in a popular agitation more widespread than any since the foundation of the empire.

    0
    0
  • It was notably the part played by Austria in supporting the German point of view throughout at the conference that strengthened the position of Germany in Europe, by drawing closer the bonds of sympathy between the two empires.

    0
    0
  • He had no sympathy with political liberalism, but throughout his long reign of forty-two years, with a constant interchange of ministries and many ministerial crises, he never had a serious conflict with the states-general, and his ministers could always count upon his fair-mindedness and an earnest desire to help them to further the national welfare.

    0
    0
  • Like Schleiermacher he combined with the keenest logical faculty an intensely religious spirit, while his philosophical tendencies were in sympathy rather with Hegel than with Schleiermacher, and theosophic mysticism was more congenial to him than the abstractions of Spinoza, to whom Schleiermacher owed so much.

    0
    0
  • The isolated revolts in Italy were easily suppressed; and the insurrection of Poland, though it provoked the lively sympathy of the Magyars and Czechs, led to no actual movement in the Habsburg states.

    0
    0
  • and his followers were evidently aiming at the complete separation of Hungary from Austria; they were in sympathy, if not in alliance, with the German radicals in Vienna and Frankfort; they were less than half-hearted in their support of the imperial arms in Italy.

    0
    0
  • The sympathy of the Slav inhabitants of the empire made it impossible for the government of Vienna to regard with indifference the sufferings of Christians in Turkey.

    0
    0
  • Active support was impossible, because the Hungarians, among whom the events of 1848 had obliterated the remembrance of the earlier days of Turkish conquest, were full of sympathy for the Turks.

    0
    0
  • by Beust, probably with the sympathy of the emperor; the others determined to cripple the opposition by taking away the elections for the Reichsrath from the diets.

    0
    0
  • They continued to support him, even if they did not get from him all that they could have wished, and the Czechs acquiesced in a foreign policy with which they had little sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Though never an advanced critic, his article on Daniel in the second edition of Herzog's Realencyklopeidie, his New Commentary on Genesis and the fourth edition of his Isaiah show that as years went on his sympathy with higher criticism increased-so much so indeed that Prof. Cheyne has included him among its founders.

    0
    0
  • At a banquet to Lord Spencer he accused the Irish members of having "exhibited a boundless sympathy for criminals and murderers."

    0
    0
  • He was full of enthusiasm for liberty; the struggle of the Greeks to throw off the Turkish yoke enlisted his warmest sympathy, and at one time he seriously thought of entering the West Point Academy and fitting himself for a soldier's career.

    0
    0
  • He also received assurances of the cordial sympathy of British Abolitionists with him in his efforts to abolish American slavery.

    0
    0
  • His chief defects are a somewhat pretentious and at the same time monotonous style, and a want of sympathy and intensity.

    0
    0
  • 691) to have claimed descent from one of the legendary kings of his native district, Messapus the eponymous hero of Messapia, and this consciousness of ancient lineage is in accordance with the high self-confident tone of his mind, with his sympathy with the dominant genius of the Roman republic, and with his personal relations to the members of her great families.

    0
    0
  • Ennius, on the other hand, was by temperament in thorough sympathy with the dominant aristocratic element in Roman life and institutions.

    0
    0
  • In these remains of the tragedies of Ennius we can trace indications of strong sympathy with the nobler and bolder elements of character, of vivid realization of impassioned situations, and of sagacious observation of life.

    0
    0
  • Of the great Roman writers Horace had least sympathy with him; yet he testifies to the high esteem in which he was held during the Augustan age.

    0
    0
  • His intellect was strong rather than broad, his position being that of the traditional High Churchman, with little sympathy either with the Evangelicals or with the Tractarians.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile prose imaginative literature was ably supported by Sophus Schandorph (1836-1901), who had been entirely out of sympathy with the idealists, and had taken no step while that school was in the ascendant.

    0
    0
  • He had no sympathy with John's high-church tendencies on the one hand, and he sturdily resisted all the king's endeavours to restrict his authority as duke of Sodermanland (Sudermania) on the other.

    0
    0
  • On reaching manhood Moses openly displays his sympathy with his brethren by slaying an Egyptian, and has, in consequence, to flee to Midian, where he marries Zipporah, the daughter of the priest of Midian (ii.

    0
    0
  • no movement; and when on the 11th of June Monmouth's three ships, having eluded the royal fleet, arrived off Lyme Regis, he landed amid the curiosity rather than the sympathy of the inhabitants.

    0
    0
  • It was represented to the emperor, who was still pursued by the desire to bring back the schismatics, that a great step would have been taken towards reconciliation if a condemnation of these teachers, or rather of such of their books as were complained of, could be brought about, since then the Chalcedonian party would be purged from any appearance of sympathy with the errors of Nestorius.

    0
    0
  • Justinian was occupied by the ecclesiastical controversy of the Three Chapters, and had not the money to fit out a proper army and fleet; indeed, it may be doubted whether he would ever have roused himself to the necessary exertions but for the presence at Constantinople of a knot of Roman exiles, who kept urging him to reconquer Italy, representing that with their help and the sympathy of the people it would not be a difficult enterprise.

    0
    0
  • He was again in Paris after the return of Napoleon from Elba, and showed his dislike of the Bourbons and his sympathy with Bonaparte by writing in 1816 a pamphlet entitled The substance of some letter s written by an Englishman resident in Paris during the last reign of the emperor Napoleon.

    0
    0
  • He struck the name of Alexander Ypsilanti from the Russian army list, and directed his foreign minister, Count Capo d'Istria, himself a Greek, to disavow all sympathy of Russia with his enterprise; and, next year, a deputation of the Greeks of the Morea on its way to the congress of Verona was turned back by his orders on the road.

    0
    0
  • In 1493 he had gone as a pilgrim to Jerusalem, and had been made a knight of the Holy Sepulchre; but, although he remained throughout life an adherent of the older faith, he seems to have been drawn into sympathy with the reformers, probably through his connexion with the university of Wittenberg.

    0
    0
  • A still more striking contrast is the passionate outburst of sympathy and indignation with which, in the same diary, he comments on the supposed kidnapping of Luther by foul play on his return from the diet of Worms. Without being one of those who in his city took an avowed part against the old ecclesiastical system, and probably without seeing clearly whither the religious ferment of the time was tending - without, that is, being properly speaking a Reformer - Diirer in his art and his thoughts was the incarnation of those qualities of the German character and conscience which resulted in the Reformation; and, personally, with the fathers of the Reformation he lived in the warmest sympathy.

    0
    0
  • The sympathy which he expressed for the Agrarians increased his unpopularity among Liberals and industrials; but he pointed out that the state, which for half a century had done everything to help manufactures, might now attempt to support the failing industry of agriculture.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, in his profound sympathy with the Reformers, he too frequently becomes their apologist.

    0
    0
  • He had, however, been led, by whatever process, to abandon the dogmatic system of his forefathers, though he was and always remained in profound sympathy with the spirit of their teaching.

    0
    0
  • Though Jeffrey had no intellectual sympathy with Carlyle, he accepted some articles for the Review and became warmly attached to Mrs Carlyle.

    0
    0
  • Jeffrey, stimulated perhaps by his sympathy for Mrs Carlyle, was characteristically generous.

    0
    0
  • The effort to fuse the masses of raw material into a well-proportioned whole is perhaps not quite successful; and Carlyle had not the full sympathy with Frederick which had given interest to the Cromwell.

    0
    0
  • Nobody could be more in sympathy with aspirations for a spiritual religion and for a lofty idealism in political and social life.

    0
    0
  • The letters and autobiographical writings, whether they attract or repel sympathy, are at least a series of documents of profound interest for any one who cares to study character, and display an almost unique idiosyncrasy.

    0
    0
  • During the great sailors' strike at Marseilles in 1904 he showed pronounced sympathy with the socialistic aims and methods of the strikers, and a strong feeling was aroused that his Radical sympathies tended to a serious weakening of the navy and to destruction of discipline.

    0
    0
  • And the sympathy of Christendom soon led them beyond this immediate circle.

    0
    0
  • On the establishment of the Commonwealth, though out of sympathy with the government, he was nominated to the council of state and a commissioner of the new Great Seal.

    0
    0
  • The necessity of carrying on the government of the country somehow or other had been the chief motive of his adherence to Cromwell rather than any sympathy for a republic or a military dictatorship, and his advice to Cromwell to accept the title of king was doubtless tendered with the object of giving the administration greater stability and of protecting its adherents under the Statute of Henry VII.

    0
    0
  • The unwieldiness of the plot and its inconsistencies show, too, that Schiller had not yet mastered the new form of drama; but Don Carlos at least provided him with an opportunity of expressing ideas of political and intellectual freedom with which, as the disciple of Rousseau, he was in warm sympathy.

    0
    0
  • In the Musenalmanach were also published the "Xenien" (1797), a collection of distichs by Goethe and Schiller, in which the two friends avenged themselves on the cavilling critics who were not in sympathy with them.

    0
    0
  • These facts explain the considerable sympathy in Illinois for the colonial cause in the War of Independence.

    0
    0
  • Douglas was elected, but the vote showed that Illinois was becoming more Northern in sympathy, and two years later Lincoln, then candidate for the presidency, carried the state.

    0
    0
  • part of the state, where there was a strong feeling against national interference with slavery, the majority of the people had no sympathy with the pro-slavery men in their efforts to dissolve the Union.

    0
    0
  • Thus he never lost his sympathy with humanism and with its great German representative, Erasmus.

    0
    0
  • With his exegetical skill (he was inferior in pure dogma to Theodore of Mopsuestia) he united a wide sympathy and a marvellous power of oratory.

    0
    0
  • His liberality of view and breadth of ecclesiastical sympathy entitle him to rank on questions of Nonconformity among the most distinguished of the school of Richard Baxter; and he maintained friendly relations with many of the dignitaries of the Established Church.

    0
    0
  • Their effect was considerable; and at Pusey's request Newman reviewed them in the British Critic (December 1836), treating them for the most part with sympathy as a triumph over popular Protestantism.

    0
    0
  • His speeches, sermons and lectures, delivered during his tour, were printed in a volume of 400 pages, and show an extraordinary power of rising to the occasion and of speaking with sympathy and tact.

    0
    0
  • Thus he had to condemn the Association for the Promotion of the Unity of Christendom, with which he had shown some sympathy in its inception in 1857; and to forbid Catholic parents to send their sons to Oxford or Cambridge, though at an earlier date he had hoped (with Newman) that at Oxford at least a college or hall might be assigned to them.

    0
    0
  • From his known sympathy with Greek independence, it was their expectation that he would support their pretensions.

    0
    0
  • The next shows us that this great strength is united to a most tender sympathy.

    0
    0
  • We may note, as we pass on, that He has again, in the exercise of His power and His sympathy, come into conflict with the established religious tradition.

    0
    0
  • " The gentle answer of Jesus showed His sympathy even with those who opposed Him: " The doctor," He said, " must go to the sick."

    0
    0
  • fastening attention on Himself by speaking with authority and attaching a few followers to His person, exhibiting wonderful powers of healing as a sign that He has come to fulfil all needs, manifesting at the same time an unparalleled sympathy, and setting quietly aside every religious convention which limited the outflow of this sympathy; and as the result of all this arousing the enthusiasm of astonished multitudes and evoking the opposition and even the murderous resentment of the religious guides of the nation.

    0
    0
  • This, then, in brief summary, is what we have seen: the natural development of an historical situation, a march of events leading rapidly to a climax; an unexampled strength and an unexampled sympathy issuing inevitably in an unexampled liberty; and then the forces of orthodox religion combining with the forces of worldly indifference in order to suppress a dangerous innovator.

    0
    0
  • It shows us the Lord Jesus entering on the mission predicted by the Baptist without declaring Himself to be the Messiah; attracting the multitudes in Galilee by His healing power and His unbounded sympathy, and at the same time awakening the envy and suspicion of the leaders of religion; training a few disciples till they reach the conviction that He is the Christ, and then, but not till then, admitting them into the secret of His coming sufferings, and preparing them for a mission in which they also must sacrifice themselves; then journeying to Jerusalem to fulfil the destiny which He foresaw, accepting the responsibility of the Messianic title, only to be condemned by the religious authorities as a blasphemer and handed over to the Roman power as a pretender to the Jewish throne.

    0
    0
  • The first portrays Him chiefly by a record of His actions, and illustrates His strength, His sympathy, and His freedom from conventional restraints.

    0
    0
  • There is the same strength, the same tender sympathy, the same freedom from convention: there is the same promise to fulfil the highest hopes, the same surrender of life, and the same imperious demand on the lives of others.

    0
    0
  • We trace a natural development in it: we seem to see why with such power and such sympathy He necessarily came into conflict with the religious leaders of the people, who were jealous of the influence which He gained and were scandalized by His refusal to be hindered in His mission of mercy by rules and conventions to which they attached the highest importance.

    0
    0
  • Away from the atmosphere of contention we find Him manifesting the same broad sympathy and freedom from convention which we have noted in the other Gospels, especially in that of St Luke.

    0
    0
  • There is no atmosphere of simplicity and teachableness which rejoices in the manifestation of power and sympathy and liberty.

    0
    0
  • This, however, was not the lesson which was drawn from it by Goethe's contemporaries; they shed tears of sympathy over the lovelorn youth whose burden becomes too great for him to bear.

    0
    0
  • In Weimar he had felt that he was no longer in sympathy with the Sturm and Drang, but it was Italy which first taught him clearly what might take the place of that movement in Germanoetry.

    0
    0
  • Thus Goethe had no great sympathy for the war of liberation which kindled young hearts from one end of Germany to the other; and when the national enthusiasm rose to its highest pitch he buried himself in those optical and morphological studies, which, with increasing years, occupied more and more of his time and interest.

    0
    0
  • Since the beginning of the century the conviction had been gaining ground that Goethe's mission was accomplished, that the day of his leadership was over; but here were two works which not merely re-established his ascendancy, but proved that the old poet was in sympathy with the movement of letters, and keenly alive to the change of ideas which the new century had brought in its train.

    0
    0
  • He was the last of those universal minds which have been able to compass all domains of human activity and knowledge; for he stood on the brink of an era of rapidly expanding knowledge which has made for ever impossible the universality of interest and sympathy which distinguished him.

    0
    0
  • The relations of friendship and sympathy between St Clara and St Francis were very close, and there can be no doubt that she was one of the truest heirs of Francis's inmost spirit.

    0
    0
  • He showed, moreover, as a Liverpool man, his strong sympathy with Ulster, threatened by the Home Rule bill; he went over to Ireland and constituted himself Sir Edward Carson's principal lieutenant in the resistance which he was organizing in North-East Ulster against Home Rule.

    0
    0
  • The publication greatly increased the sympathy of almost all classes in Germany for Luther.

    0
    0
  • He actually opposed the Irish Poor Law, as encouraging a communistic spirit; he declared a movement against rent a crime; and, though he had a strong sympathy with the Irish peasant, and advocated a reform of his precarious tenure, it is difficult to imagine that he could have approved the cardinal principle of the Irish Land Act of 1881, the judicial adjustment of rent by the state.

    0
    0
  • (a) As regards the former, he was himself not a little in sympathy with it.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, independently of special incentives to the alarmist and the man of property, the opinions of many Americans turned again, after the war, into a current of sympathy for England, as naturally as American commerce returned to English ports.

    0
    0
  • There was grace, nevertheless, in his manners; and his frank and earnest address, his quick sympathy (yet he seemed cold to strangers), his vivacious, desultory, informing talk, gave him an engaging charm.

    0
    0
  • He looked on Unitarianism with much sympathy and desired its growth.

    0
    0
  • At the same time the operation of the revenue sale law had introduced a new race of zamindars, who were bound to their tenants by no traditions of hereditary sympathy, but whose sole object was to make a profit out of their newly purchased property.

    0
    0
  • To suppress the Pindari hordes, who were supported by the sympathy, more or less open, of all the Mahratta chiefs, Lord Hastings (1817) collected the strongest British army that had been seen in India, numbering nearly 1 20,000 men, half to operate from the north, half from the south.

    0
    0
  • The same quality, combined with sympathy and firmness, stood him in good stead in all his dealings both with native chiefs and European officials.

    0
    0
  • Lord Ripon's good intentions and personal sympathy were recognized by the natives, and on leaving Bombay he received the greatest ovation ever accorded to an Indian viceroy.

    0
    0
  • They are often brilliant, and sometimes very penetrating in their judgment of men and books; but the most constant element is a pervasive humour, and this humour, by turns playful and sentimental, is largely characteristic of his poetry, which sprang from a genial temper, quick in its sympathy with nature and humanity.

    0
    0
  • Although the picturesque figures of Manfred and Conradin awakened sympathy among the people of the kingdom, their authority was never really consolidated and their German knights were hated; which facts rendered the enterprise of another foreigner like the Angevin comparatively easy.

    0
    0
  • The following year the Venetian brothers Bandiera, acting in concert with Mazzini, landed in Calabria, believing the whole country to be in a state of revolt; they met with little local support and were quickly captured and shot, but their death aroused much sympathy, and the whole episode was highly significant as being the first attempt made by north Italians to promote revolution in the south.

    0
    0
  • Lord Lee's second son, Sir George Lockhart (c. 1630-1689), was lord-advocate in Cromwell's time, and was celebrated for his persuasive eloquence; in 1674, when he was disbarred for alleged disrespect to the court of session in advising an appeal to parliament, fifty barristers showed their sympathy for him by withdrawing from practice.

    0
    0
  • Great Britain hastened to re-knit the bonds of her ancient friendship with Turkey; the powers, without exception, professed their sympathy with the new regime.

    0
    0
  • Their religious sympathy with the West was seriously impaired by dogmatic controversies; from Islam they might at any rate hope for toleration, even though their views were not in accordance with the theology of the emperor of the day.

    0
    0
  • He found in Washington's attitude - as in Hamilton's failure to pay an instalment of the moneys due France - an "Anglified complexion," in direct opposition to the popular sympathy with France and French Republicanism.

    0
    0
  • What follows is inevitably, whether directly or indirectly, by sympathy or by antagonism, affected by the Aristotelian tradition.

    0
    0
  • 3, is somewhat dimmed by a lack of sympathy due to extreme difference in the point of view adopted.

    0
    0
  • His father, who had made a large fortune as the inventor and proprietor of "Morison's Pills," settled in Paris till his death in 1840, and Cotter Morison thus acquired not only an acquaintance with the French language, but a profound sympathy with France and French institutions.

    0
    0
  • He was bold enough to speak and vote for the "detention of Louis during the war and his perpetual banishment afterwards," and he pointed out that the execution of the king would alienate American sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Story was a staunch supporter of his Church, and had little sympathy for schemes of reunion with the other Presbyterian communities.

    0
    0
  • Ward) of Henry Ward Beecher, mounted on a granite pedestal with a figure at each side to commemorate Beecher's sympathy for the slave.

    0
    0
  • A revolt headed by Procopius in the second year of his reign, and backed up by the public opinion of Constantinople and the sympathy of the Gothic princes and chiefs on the Danube, seemed so alarming to him that he thought of negotiation; but in the following year the revolt collapsed before the firmness of his ministers and generals.

    0
    0
  • The Franciscans had no sympathy for profane knowledge, even among the Mexicans, - sometimes publicly burning quantities of books of a scientific or miscellaneous nature; and the reading of Fenelon's Telemaque brought excommunications on a layman.

    0
    0
  • Finally there was a real growth of republicanism, and some rulers - notably Victoria - were wholly out of sympathy with anything but personal, military rule.

    0
    0
  • Larkin (1802-1858), was instructed to work for the secession of California from Mexico, without overt aid from the United States, but with their good-will and sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Jesus has already been termed unique, one of the common people yet separated from them, and this description applies to the breadth, depth and reality of his sympathy.

    0
    0
  • This was not a mere sentiment, nor was his sympathy superficial, for it constituted the essential characteristic of his personality - " He went about doing good."

    0
    0
  • It is those who fail to recognize the spirit of sympathy and self-sacrificing service as divine and blaspheme redeeming love, who are in danger of eternal sin (Mark iii.

    0
    0
  • He wrought miracles, it is true, because of his divine sympathy and compassion, but he refused to show miraculous signs as a proof of his Messianic character (Mark viii.

    0
    0
  • She refused to show any sympathy with the king after William had landed in November, and wrote, with the advice of the Churchills, to the prince, ' See also Hist.

    0
    0
  • But filial feeling and established custom secured a measure of kindly sympathy, shown by precedence yielded at public games, and by the almost invariable abstinence of the colony from a hostile share in wars in which the mother city was engaged.

    0
    0
  • Johann von Henneberg, who was abbot from 5529 to 1541, showed some sympathy with the teaching of the reformers, but the Counter-Reformation made great progress here under Abbot Balthasar von Dernbach.

    0
    0
  • In Paris Ruge tried to act with Karl Marx as co-editor of the Deutsch-Franzosische JahrNicher, but had little sympathy with Marx's socialistic theories, and soon left him.

    0
    0
  • On the whole, then, the most tenable theory is that the writer of the " we " sections was also the author of Acts; and that he was Luke, Paul's companion during most of his later ministry, and also his " counterpart," "as a Hellene, who yet had personal sympathy with Jewish primitive Christianity " (Harnack, op. cit.

    0
    0
  • The active part he took in advocating the abolition of the slave-trade is evidence of a wider power of sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Counter - In Italy, though declared Protestants were few, there was widespread sympathy with some of Luther's ideas; a committee of cardinals at Rome was accordingly organized into an Inquisition, with branches at the chief Italian towns.

    0
    0
  • be orderly and systematic; and the Modernists accordingly show little sympathy with Protestantism.

    0
    0
  • Their place was filled by Poppaea, and the infamous Tigellinus, whose sympathy with Nero's sensual tastes had gained him the command of the praetorian guards in succession to Burrus.

    0
    0
  • Conspicuous among them was Paetus Thrasea, whose unbending virtue had long made him distasteful to Nero, and who was now suspected, possibly with reason, of sympathy with the conspirators.

    0
    0
  • The four main instruments of the reaction were the papacy, which had done so much by its sympathy with the revival to promote the humanistic spirit it now dreaded, the strength of Spain, and two Spanish institutions planted on Roman soil - the Inquisition and the Order of Jesus.

    0
    0
  • In his reign was begun the reckless system of foreign loans, carried to excess in the ensuing reign, and culminating in default, which led to the alienation of European sympathy from Turkey and, indirectly, to the dethronement and death of Abd-ul-Aziz.

    0
    0
  • Both as leader of Union Chapel and in denominational affairs his courage and discretion, his simple faith, combined with a broadminded sympathy with the intellectual movements of the time, made his ministry a widespread influence for good.

    0
    0
  • Clay's quick intelligence and sympathy, and his irreproachable conduct in youth, explain his precocious prominence in public affairs.

    0
    0
  • Mill belonged to a generation in which the most remarkable feature was the growth of sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, it is in sympathy that he finds the obligation and sanction of morality.

    0
    0
  • To understand the genesis of human morality we must study the ways of sociable animals such as horses and monkeys, which give each other assistance in trouble, feel mutual affection and sympathy, and experience pleasure in doing actions that benefit the society to which they belong.

    0
    0
  • Thus, in man, do sentiments of love and mutual sympathy become instinctive and, when transmitted by inheritance, innate.

    0
    0
  • The Popular party, regarding the church less from the side of the government, had less sympathy with the progressive movements of the age, and desired greater strictness in discipline.

    0
    0
  • In this dispute, which made a great sensation in the country, the popular party successfully defended Leslie, and thus obtained the sympathy of the enlightened portion of the community.

    0
    0
  • The whole party were more or less in sympathy with the Commonwealth, and Cudworth was consulted by John Thurloe, Cromwell's secretary of state, in regard to university and government appointments.

    0
    0
  • The offence was clear; the law was undoubted; no particular sympathy was excited for the culprit; the sentence was not carried out; and Bacon did only what any one in his place would naturally and necessarily have done.

    0
    0
  • As a teacher, he showed remarkable sympathy and won great success.

    0
    0
  • As a dignitary of the Roman Catholic Church, Cardinal HergenrOther is inevitably biased against Photius as an ecclesiastic, but his natural candour and sympathy with intellectual eminence have made him just to the man.

    0
    0
  • A natural result of this partial treatment of the towns by the king and his vassals was that the English tongue and also English customs became prevalent if not universal in all the towns of Wales, whilst the rural districts remained strongly Cymric in character, language and sympathy.

    0
    0
  • The Yorkist faction seems to have been strongest in the eastern portion of the Principality, where the Mortimers were all-powerful, but later the close connexion of the house of Lancaster with Owen Tudor, a gentleman of Anglesea (beheaded in 1461) who had married Catherine of France, widow of Henry V., did much to invite Welsh sympathy on behalf of the claims of Henry Tudor his grandson, who claimed the English throne by right of his grandmother.

    0
    0
  • 1918 he was reprieved, and, on his release, at once put himself at the head of the Spartacists, the extreme revolutionary section in sympathy with Russian Bolshevism.

    0
    0
  • He was the only Socialist who was elected to the Reichstag in 1871, but he used his position to protest against the annexation of Alsace-Lorraine and to express his full sympathy with the Paris Commune.

    0
    0
  • The adherents of this sect, unlike the Pharisees and Sadducees, were never denounced by Christ, who seems on the contrary to have had real sympathy with the voluntary celibacy of an exceptional few (Matt.

    0
    0
  • Henry, who had some sympathy with the Huguenots, died at Pau on the 25th of May 1555.

    0
    0
  • As the west became more radically opposed to slavery after the troubles in Kansas, Cass was soon out of sympathy with his section, and when the Republicans secured control of the legislature in 1857 they refused to return him to the Senate.

    0
    0
  • Whether from sympathy with the persecuted or aversion to the persecutors, he cast in his lot with the former and after two unsuccessful attempts at settlement assisted the fugitives in forming a colony on the island of Aquidnek (Rhode Island), procured from the Indians through.

    0
    0
  • The First Church, Newport, had been rent asunder by Arminianism, and the nominally Calvinistic remnant had itself become divided on the question of the laying on of hands and showed no sympathy with the Great Awakening.

    0
    0
  • He had a keen sympathy with the difficulties experienced by the ordinary lay mind in trying to reconcile the conservative element in Catholicism with the principle of development and growth, and in The Faith of Millions, Hard Sayings and Nova et vetera he attempted to clear them away.

    0
    0
  • For at least eight years before this he had been more or less in conflict with the authorities of his order, through his sympathy with "modernist" views, but the publication of this letter (afterwards issued by Tyrrell as A Much Abused Letter) brought about his expulsion from the order in February 1906.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →