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review

review

review Sentence Examples

  • Shall we review what you've learned?

  • He ticked off the items he had learned about Jeffrey Byrne during the course of the day, as much for his own review as to answer Fred's rapid-fire questions.

  • Review Xander's day with him.

  • "So we need to review your day," she began again.

  • He soon, however, turned his attention to metaphysics and psychology, and for the North American Review and later for the National he wrote philosophical essays on the lines of Mill, Darwin and Spencer.

  • A Republican convention in his district demanded his resignation, and re-election seemed impossible; but he defended himself in two pamphlets, "Increase of Salaries" and "Review of the Transactions of the Credit Mobilier Company," made a village-to-village canvass, and was victorious.

  • Cook in Classical Review, xvi.

  • In 1855 Hutton and Bagehot became joint-editors of the National Review, a new monthly, and conducted it for ten years.

  • See Lord Acton, English Historical Review, i.

  • Cook in Classical Review, xvii.

  • He also contributed largely to the Internationale theologische Zeitschrift, a review started in 1893 by the Old Catholics to promote the union of National Churches on the basis of the councils of the Undivided Church, and admitting articles in German, French and English.

  • He contributed to the Antologia, a celebrated Florentine review, and in 1847 founded a newspaper called L' Italia, the programme of which, was "Reform and Nationality."

  • The strictures of a critic in the Monthly Review of July 1763 drew from him a pamphlet called Man in Quest of Himself, by Cuthbert Comment (reprinted in Parr's Metaphysical Tracts, 1837), "a defence of the individuality of the human mind or self."

  • Examining next what immediately follows the knowledge of pure intellect, he will pass in review all the other means of knowledge, and will find that they are two (or three), the imagination and the senses (and the memory).

  • A useful sketch of recent biographies is to be found in The Edinburgh Review (July 1906).

  • The cour de cassation can review the decision of any other tribunal, except administrative courts.

  • For a popular but authentic account of some of Lord Rayleigh's scientific work and discoveries, see an article by Sir Oliver Lodge in the National Review for September 1898.

  • Leviten seit den Tagen Ezechiels, with Kuenen's review in his Gesammelte Abhandlungen (ed.

  • Review, iii.

  • Frazer, " The Beginnings of Religion and Totemism among the Australian Aborigines," Fortnightly Review, July 1905; N.

  • Harley, F.R.S., is to be found in the British Quarterly Review for July 1866, No.

  • Smith, in Theological Review (April 1874); E.

  • But he does not follow his idea into the details of human duty, though he passes in review fatalism, mysticism, pantheism, scepticism, egotism, sentimentalism and rationalism.

  • He was editor of the Yale Review, 1896-1910.

  • Military School (1908) on " Submarine Cable Laying and Repairing," and articles in Quarterly Review (April 1903) on " Imperial Telegraphs," and in Edinburgh Review (April 1908) on " The International RadioTelegraphic Convention."

  • Sir William Crookes had already suggested in 1892 in the Fortnightly Review (February 1892) that such an application might be 1 Nuovo cimento, series iii.

  • A full account of the development of his system was given by him in an article published in the Fortnightly Review for June 1902; see also a paper by him in the Journ.

  • Since in all cases of From the Electrical Review, by permission of the Editors.

  • The oil film prevented 1 See Electrical Review, 1902, 51, p. 968.

  • Pierce, The Physical Review, July 1907, March 1909, on crystal rectifiers for electric oscillations.

  • It may help us if we rapidly review at this point the leading types of philosophy in their application to the theistic problem.

  • Bradley (Ethical Studies, p. 2) quotes an even plainer attack on the conceptions as well as the terminology of ethics in a Westminster Review article (Oct.

  • Henderson in Classical Review (April, May, June, 1901); in general D.

  • Systematic Review Of The Hydromedusae Order I.

  • He founded an oriental institute at Woking, and for some years edited the Asiatic Quarterly Review.

  • Rendall); Classical Review, xix.

  • See Ignacz Badeni, Necrology of Hugo Kollontaj (Pol.) (Cracow, 1819); Henryk Schmitt, Review of the Life and Works of Kollontaj (Pol.) (Lemberg, 1860); Wojciek Grochowski, "Life of Kollontaj" (Pol.) in Tygod Illus.

  • They are not put forward as the result of an independent review of the evidence.

  • In 1827, with Stephen Elliott (1771-1830), the naturalist, he founded the Southern Review, of which he was the sole editor after Elliott's death until 1834, when it was discontinued, and to which he contributed articles on law, travel, and modern and classical literature.

  • state ownership and operation), see an article by Edgar Crammond in the Quarterly Review (London) for October 1909, which cites, among other works on the subject, Clement Edwards's Railway Nationalization (1898); Edwin A.

  • Brown in the Scottish Historical Review (January 1904).

  • He still continued his yearly experimental contributions to the North American Review, elaborating them with a view as much to ultimate historical proficiency as to immediate literary effect, the essays on Scottish Song (1826), Novel-Writing (1827), Moliere (1828), and Irving's Granada (1829)) belonging to this preparatory period.

  • Review, viii.

  • It is interesting, however, to know, that in the first volume is a review by Gibbon of Lord Lyttelton's History of Henry II., and that the second volume contains a contribution by Hume on Walpole's Historic Doubts.

  • In a series of masterly papers in the Contemporary Review, between December 1874 and May 1877, Lightfoot successfully undertook the defence of the New Testament canon.

  • 288 (the latter a very inadequate review of Anzlesey's character and career); also Bibliotheca Anglesiana .

  • He wrote articles on free will, the philosophy of theism, on science, prayer and miracles for the Dublin Review.

  • In 1868 he became editor of the Dublin Review.

  • In 5878 he founded a weekly economic review, La Rassegna Settimanale, which four years later he converted into a political daily journal.

  • Some account of these MSS., with extracts from them, was given in the Quarterly Review, October 1875.

  • Gray, Contemporary Review (July 1907); A.

  • 4 For the sections which follow the present writer may be permitted to refer to his introductory contributions in the Expositor (June, 1906; " The Criticism of the 0.T."); the Jewish Quarterly Review (July 1905-January 1907 = Critical Notes on 0.T.

  • (For the period under review, as it appears in the light of existing external evidence, see Palestine: History.) 9.

  • The period under review, with its relations between Judah and Egypt, can be illustrated by prophecies ascribed to a similar situation in the time of Hezekiah.

  • Although the records preserve complete silence upon the period now under review, it is necessary to free oneself from the narrow outlook of the later Judaean compilers.

  • of the Jewish Quarterly Review; Scherer, Rechtsverhdltnisse der Juden (1901); M.

  • Bourchier, " The Stronghold of the Sphakiotes," Fortnightly Review (August 1890); E.

  • Dillon, " Crete and the Cretans," Fortnightly Review (May 1897).

  • (1875, &c.); Haverfield, " The Abolition of the Dictatorship," in Classical Review, iii.

  • A review of the historical appearances of mysticism will serve to show how far the above characteristics are to be found, separately or in combination, in its different phases.

  • The systematic theosophy of Plotinus and his successors does not belong to the present article, except so far as it is the presupposition of their mysticism; but, inasmuch as the mysticism of the medieval Church is directly derived from Neoplatonism through the speculations of the pseudo-Dionysius, Neoplatonic mysticism fills an important section in any historical review of the subject.

  • The foregoing brief review of the principal territorial divisions according to which the forms of life are distributed in Asia, indicates how close is the dependence of this distribution on climatic conditions, and this will be made more apparent by a somewhat fuller account of the main features of the flora and fauna.

  • 4 Kuenen, " The Critical Method," Modern Review, 1880, p. 701 (Gesammelte Abhandlungen, Germ.

  • Moreover, he wrote an article in the Edinburgh Review of July 1805 criticizing Sir William Gill's Topography of Troy, and these circumstances led Lord Byron to refer to him in English Bards and Scotch Reviewers as "the travell'd thane, Athenian Aberdeen."

  • In the North British Review alone seventy-five articles of his appeared.

  • In an article in the Quarterly Review he threw out a suggestion for "an association of our nobility, clergy, gentry and philosophers," which was taken up by others and found speedy realization in the British Association for the Advancement of Name.

  • Higgs's review of the latter in the Economic Journal, Dec. 1896.

  • In 182 3 he established the Westminster Review.

  • C. Montague (1891); The Law Quarterly Review (1895), two articles on Bentham's influence in Spain; A.

  • The letters written by Sir James Caird to The Times during 1850, and republished in 1852 under the title English Agriculture in 1850-1851, give a general review of English agriculture at the time.

  • Another outlet was opened up for him (April 1824) by the starting of the Westminster Review, and still another in the following year in the Parliamentary History and Review.

  • He had become convinced that his comrades in the Utilitarian Society, never more than ten, had not the stuff in them for a world-shaking propaganda; the society itself was dissolved; the Parliamentary Review was a failure; the Westminster did not pay its expenses; Bentham's Judicial Evidence produced little effect on the reviewers.

  • The same thought appears in a review of Herschel's Natural Philosophy, written about the same time.

  • In his Westminster review of Whately's Logic in 1828 (invaluable to all students of the genesis of Mill's logic) he appears, curiously enough, as an ardent and brilliant champion of the syllogistic logic against highfliers such as the Scottish philosophers who talk of "superseding" it by "a supposed system of inductive logic."

  • In 1835 Sir William Molesworth founded the London Review with Mill as editor; it was amalgamated with the Wesminster (as the London and Westminster Review) in 1836, and Mill continued editor (latterly proprietor also) till 1840.

  • In the autumn of the same year he turned to psychology, reviewing Bain's works in the Edinburgh Review.

  • The essays in the fourth volume of his Dissertations - on endowments, on land, on labour, on metaphysical and psychological questions - were written for the Fortnightly Review at intervals after his short parliamentary career.

  • (1875); Ornsby, "Origen against Celsus," Dublin Review (July 1879), p. 58; Pelagaud, E tude sur Celse (1878); Lebedeff, Origen's Book against Celsus (Moscow, 1878) (Russian); Overbeck in the Theolog.

  • On Monday, July 20, at Spithead, there was a great review by the King of the most powerful fleet ever assembled, numbering some 200 vessels in all, manned by 70,000 officers and men.

  • Alexander, and in the Philosophical Review (vi., 1897) by S.

  • It is now, in fact, generally admitted that metamorphosis has been acquired comparatively recently, and Scudder in his review of the earliest fossil insects states that " their metamorphoses were simple and incomplete, the young leaving the egg with the form of the parent, but without wings, the assumption of which required no quiescent stage before maturity."

  • Fleming, Fleming already the author of a harmless and extremely orthodox Philosophy of Zoology, pointed out in 1829 in the Quarterly Review (xli.

  • Owen's researches of its ornithic affinity saw that it must belong to a type of birds wholly unknown before, and one that in any future for the arrangement of the class must have a special rank reserved for it.2 It behoves us next to mention the " Outlines of a Systematic Review of the Class of Birds," communicated by W.

  • Fairlie, "The Municipal Crisis in Ohio," in the Michigan Law Review for February 1903; and Thomas L.

  • Sidlo, "Centralization in Ohio Municipal Government," in the American Political Science Review for November 1909.

  • Two Boston periodicals (one no longer so) that still hold an exceptional position in periodical literature, the North American Review (1815) and the Atlantic Monthly (1857), date from this period.

  • xiv., and another in the Edinburgh Review, January 1879.

  • At New Haven also are published several weekly English, German and Italian papers, and a number of periodicals, including the American Journal of Science (1818), the Yale Law Journal (1890) and the Yale Review (1892), a quarterly.

  • Review (January 1886); T.

  • In 1866 he wrote in the Fortnightly Review (April and May) an essay on "Kinship in Ancient Greece," in which he proposed to test by early Greek facts the theory of the history of kinship set forth in Primitive Marriage; and three years later appeared a series of essays on "Totemism" in the same periodical for 1869-1870 (the germ of which had been contained in the paper just named), which mark the second great step in his systematic study of early society.

  • Papers on "The Levirate and Polyandry," following up the line of his previous investigations (Fortnightly Review, 1877), were the last work he was able to publish.

  • Lepsius, Briefe aus A gypten (1852); "The Voice of Memnon" in Edinburgh Review (July 1886); article by R.

  • Review, April, 1910.

  • In the second he passes in brief review the history of Britain from its invasion by the Romans till his own times.

  • It is noteworthy that while modern books commonly speak of the surnames as assumed, the explanations given by our ancient authorities almost invariably suppose them to be given as marks of homage or gratitude (English Historical Review, xvi.

  • For the Oxyrhynchus fragment see Classical Review (January 1898), and C. van Jan in Bursian's Jahresbericht, civ.

  • Brown wrote a criticism of Darwin's Zoonomia (1798), and was one of the first contributors to the Edinburgh Review, in the second number of which he published a criticism of the Kantian philosophy, based entirely on Villers's French account of it.

  • They read the Greek Testament and the classics; fasted on Wednesday and Friday; received the Lord's Supper every week; and brought all their life under review.

  • He contributed largely to the seventh edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, and also wrote several scientific papers for the Edinburgh Review and various scientific journals.

  • Mommsen, in the Contemporary Review, May 1871.

  • But all interference is subject to review of claims by the courts.

  • In March 1897 the floating debt was calculated by a financial authority in the Fortnightly Review to amount to upwards of £TJ5,000,000, which might be compressed to £T25,000,000 since a large proportion was certainly composed of salaries in arrear and other items of a similar kind which the government would never, under any circumstances, make good.

  • A review held by him in 1387 at Yeni Shehr was attended by the emperor, who, moreover, gave one of his daughters in marriage to Murad and the other two to his sons Bayezid and Yakub Chelebi.

  • Of course only a few of the most prominent, either through the intrinsic merit of their work or through the influence they have had on that of their contemporaries, can be mentioned in a brief review like the present.

  • On the 4th of October he again drew up a review of the situation, in which he apparently contemplated giving up his communications with France and wintering in and around Dresden, though at the same time he is aware of the distress amongst his men for want of food.

  • Sullivan, American Historical Review, vol.

  • (1896-1897), and English Historical Review for April 1905; Histoire litteraire de la France (1906), xxxiii.

  • Scott, "The Life and Works of John Home" in the Quarterly Review (June, 1827).

  • This club began the publication of a monthly magazine, The Monthly Anthology, which gave way in 1815 to The North American Review.

  • Harrison, Classical Review, April 1880).

  • Harrison in Classical Review (June 1894), Athena Ergane is the goddess of the fruits of the field and the procreation of children.

  • In October 1867 his article on "The Talmud," published in the Quarterly Review, made him known.

  • In the former review, a striking paper upon development of doctrine (Dec. 1st, 1898) headed a series of studies apparently taken from an already extant large apologetic work.

  • Loisy's developmental defence of Catholicism; Professor Harnack's review of L'Evangile et l'Eglise in the Theol.

  • 1, and his review of "Les Evangiles synoptiques" in Das zwanzigste Jahrhundert (Munich, May 3, 1908) are full of facts and of deep thought; Fr.

  • Review, Jan.

  • et Belles Lettres, 1907, P. 466; Classical Review, 1907, December, p. 255).

  • Valuable reviews of Parker's theological position and of his character and work have appeared - by James Martineau, in the National Review (April 1860), and J.

  • Thom, in the Theological Review (March 1864).

  • Fowler in Classical Review, July 1896).

  • Thus, Dionysius of Halicarnassus mentions 5000 equites as taking part in a review at which he himself was present.

  • We have now passed in review the principal structural features in which Limulus agrees with Scorpio and differs from other Arthropoda.

  • We have now to offer a classification of the Arachnida and to pass in review the larger groups, with a brief statement of their structural characteristics.

  • - Though the Latin version of this book was thrice printed in the 16th century (in 1527, 1550 and 1599), it was practically unknown to modern scholars till it was recognized by Conybeare and discussed by Cohn in the Jewish Quarterly Review, 1898, pp. 2 79-33 2.

  • This work is found also in Armenian, and has been published by the Mechitharist community in Venice in their Collection of Uncanonical Writings of the Old Testament, and translated by Conybeare (Jewish Quarterly Review, vii.

  • Review, xiii.

  • It has authority, however, to review the acts and laws of state governments and to decide upon their constitutionality.

  • Each state has its own local laws and courts, independent of federal control, but subject to the review of the supreme tribunal, and with rights of appeal to that tribunal in specified cases.

  • The Witness, edited by Hugh Miller, the Daily Review, edited first by J.

  • Then succeeded the era of Scott's Marmion and The Lady of the Lake, followed by the Waverley novels and the foundation of Blackwood's Magazine and the Edinburgh Review.

  • Craigie's article in The Scottish Review (July 1903), a comparative estimate of the Brus and Wallace, in favour of the latter.

  • a kind of clover (Classical Review, December 1906, p. 435).

  • The notice in the Quarterly Review, June 1812, of W.

  • documents, mainly concerned with the Slovaks; Rene Gonnard, La Hongrie au XX e siecle (Paris, 1908), an admirable description of the country and its people, mainly from the point of view of economic development and social conditions; Geoffrey Drage, Austria-Hungary (London, 1909), a very useful book of reference; P. Alden (editor), Hungary of To-day, by members of the Hungarian Government (London, 1909); see also " The Problem of Hungary " in the Edinburgh Review (No.

  • After the school of Comte, yet to a large extent original, is the Az ember es vildga (" Man and his World ") of Charles Bohm, who in 1881 started a philosophical review (Magyar Filozofiai Szemle), subsequently edited by Joseph Bokor, a vigorous thinker.

  • On a Thomistic basis John Kiss edits a philosophical review (BOlcseleti Folyoirat); on similar lines have been working Akos Mihalyfi, Repassy, Augustin Lubrich and others.

  • See also Cheyne, Jewish Quarterly Review, July and October 1891; Introd.

  • Myres, Classical Review, x.

  • Gaullieur in the same review in 1857, and all the available material is utilized in a monograph on her and her work by P. Godet, Madame de Charriere et ses amis (2 vols., Geneva, 1906).

  • The first volume was attacked in 1733 for unfairness and inaccuracy by Isaac Maddox, afterwards bishop of St Asaph and of Worcester, to whom Neal replied in a pamphlet, A Review of the principal facts objected to in the first volume of the History of the Puritans; and the remaining volumes by Zachary Grey (1688-1766), to whom the author made no reply.

  • Dibdin in The Quarterly Review, October 1897.

  • See also John Britton, Memoir of John Aubrey (1845); David Masson, in the British Quarterly Review, July 1856; Emile Montegut, Heures de lecture d'un critique (1891); and a catalogue of Aubrey's collections in The Life and Times of Anthony Wood..

  • McCosh, The Scottish Philosophy (1875); articles in Dictionary of National Biography and Edinburgh Review (January 1867); Lord Henry Cockburn, Memorials of his Time (1856).

  • See the Quarterly Review (April 1892).

  • Chadwick, Studies on Anglo-Saxon Institutions (1905); P. Vinogradoff, "Folcland" in the English Historical Review, 1893; "Romanistische Einflasse im Angelsachsischen Recht: Das Buchland" in the Mélanges Fitting, 1907; "The Transfer of Land in Old English Law" in the Harvard Law Review, 1907.

  • From 1870 to 1877 he was assistant professor of history at Harvard and from 1870 to 1876 was editor of the North American Review.

  • In the work of this review his chief collaborator was Giovanni Gentile, but Croce contributed most of the literary and much of the philosophic criticisms.

  • In1834-1837he edited the newly-established Literary and Theological Review, in which he opposed the "New Haven" theology.

  • P. Ker, in the Fortnightly Review (July, 1904); M.

  • i.), which contained his defence of St John's gospel, and arose out of a review of J.

  • Review (January, 1862), pp. 11-18; Brandis, Forest Flora of North-west and Central India, pp. 516-525 (London, 1874); Veitch, Manual of Coniferae (2nd ed., London, 1900).

  • An article by Thomas Carlyle in the Edinburgh Review (July 1832) is the best criticism on Elliott.

  • Pelham, "Arrian as Legate of Cappadocia," in English Historical Review, October 1896; article GREECE: History, ancient, " Authorities."

  • In the same year Duff took part in founding the Calcutta Review, of which from 1845 to 1849 he was editor.

  • For a review of recent criticism see Cheyne, introduction to W.

  • Comte's special object is a study of social physics, a science that before his advent was still to be formed; his second object is a review of the methods and leading generalities of all the positive sciences already formed, so that we may know both what system of inquiry to follow in our new science, and also where the new science will stand in relation to other knowledge.

  • If Tennyson had died of the savage article which presently appeared in the Quarterly Review, literature would have sustained terrible losses, but his name would have lived for ever among those of the great English poets.

  • At first his literary activity was limited to sectional publications, and he addressed his public, now as editor and now as leading contributor, in the Monthly Repository, the Christian Reformer, the Prospective, the Westminster and the National Review.

  • Maitland in the Law Quarterly Review, xiii.

  • Lieberman, in the English Historical Review, xi.

  • From about this time to 1860 he contributed a large number of articles to the Westminster Review, which contain the first sketches of his philosophic doctrines.

  • 1858, Essays (containing most of his contributions to the Westminster Review; 1863, vol.

  • 135 of the North American Review entitled "An Undeserved Stigma."

  • The Memoirs of Literature, the first English review consisting entirely of original matter, published in London from 1710 to 1714, had for editor Michel de la Roche, a French Protestant refugee, who also edited at Amsterdam the Bibliotheque angloise (1717-1719), and subsequently Memoires litte'raires de la Grande Bretagne (1720-1724).

  • The last named was continued in 1737 as the History of the Works of the Learned, and was carried on without intermission until 1 743, when its place was taken by A Literary Journal (Dublin, 1 744 - 1 749), the first review published in Ireland.

  • Dodsley united the character of a review of books with that of a literary magazine.

  • From its commencement the Review dealt with science and literature, as well as with literary criticism.

  • The Tory party and the established church were defended in the Critical Review (1756-1817), founded by Archibald Hamilton and supported by Smollett, Dr Johnson and Robertson.

  • As far back as 1755 Adam Smith, Blair and others had produced an Edinburgh Review which only ran to two numbers, and in 1773 Gilbert Stuart and William Smellie issued during three years an Edinburgh Magazine and Review.

  • To Edinburgh is also due the first high-class critical journal, the Edinburgh Review, established in October 1802 by Jeffrey, Scott, Horner, Brougham and Sydney Smith.

  • Scott, being dissatisfied with the new review, persuaded John Murray, his London publisher, to start its brilliant Tory competitor, the Quarterly Review (Feb.

  • The Westminster Review (1824), established by the followers of Jeremy Bentham, advocated radical reforms in church, state and legislation.

  • In 1836 it was joined to the London Review (1829), founded by Sir William Molesworth, and then bore the name of the London and Westminster Review till 1851, when it returned to the original title.

  • The Fortnightly Review (1865), edited successively by G.

  • The Contemporary Review (1866), long edited by Sir Percy Bunting, and the Nineteenth Century (1877), founded and edited by Sir James Knowles, and renamed Nineteenth Century and After in 1900, are similar in character, consisting of signed articles by men of mark of all opinions upon questions of the day.

  • The National Review (1883), edited successively by Alfred Austin, W.

  • Modern Thought (1879-1884), for the free discussion of political, religious and social subjects, and the Modern Review (1892-1894) may also be mentioned.

  • Other monthlies are the Indian Magazine (1871); the Irish Monthly (Dublin, 1873); the Gaelic Journal (Dublin, 1882); the African Review (1892) and the Empire Review (1900).

  • The Monthly Review (1900-1908), edited till 1904 by Henry Newbolt, was for some years a notable addition to the high class literary monthlies.

  • Among those which also include political and social topics, and are more particularly dealt with under Newspapers, may be mentioned, the Examiner (1808-1881), the Spectator (1828), the Saturday Review (1855), the Scots or National Observer (1888-1897), Outlook (1898), Pilot (1900-1903), and Speaker (1890), which became the Nation.

  • Defoe's Review (1704-1713) dealt chiefly with politics and commerce, but the introduction in it of what its editor fittingly termed the "scandalous club " was another step nearer the papers of Steele and the periodical essayists, the first attempts to create an organized popular opinion in matters of taste and manners.

  • These little papers, rapidly thrown off for a temporary purpose, were destined to form a very important ' The centenary of the Edinburgh Review was celebrated in an article in October 1902, and that of the Quarterly Review in two articles April and July 1909.

  • See also On the Authorship of the First Hundred Numbers of the Edinburgh Review (1895), by W.

  • As from the " pamphlet of news " arose the weekly paper wholly devoted to the circulation of news, so from the general newspaper was specialized the weekly or monthly review of literaModern ture, antigrities and science, which, when it included Magazines.

  • The rivalry was not without benefit to the literary public, as the conductors of each used every effort to improve their own review.

  • One of the most characteristic developments of later journalism was the establishment in 1890 of the Review of Reviews by W.

  • Professions and trades now have not only their general class-periodicals, but a special review or magazine for every section.

  • Review (1897), xii.

  • Among the other magazines which ran out a brief existence before the end of the century was the Philadelphia Political Censor or Monthly Review (1796-1797) edited by William Cobbett.

  • Charles Brockden Brown established the New York Monthly Magazine (1799), which, changing its title to The American Review, was continued to 1802.

  • Ticknor, Everett and Bigelow were among the members, and were contributors to the organ of the club, the monthly Anthology and Boston Review (1803-1811), the forerunner of the North American Review.

  • New York possessed no periodical worthy of the city until 1824, when the Atlantic Magazine appeared, which changed its name shortly afterwards to the New York Monthly Review, and was supported by R.

  • These were followed by Scribner's Magazine (1887), the New England Magazine (1889), the Illustrated Review of Reviews (1890), McClure's Magazine (1893), the Bookman (1895), the World's Work (1902), the American Magazine (1906) succeeding Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly, and Munsey's Magazine (1889).

  • The first attempt to carry on an American review was made by Robert Walsh in 1811 at Philadelphia with the quarterly American Review of History and Politics, which lasted only a couple of years.

  • Still more brief was the existence of the General Repository and Review (1812), brought out at Cambridge by Andrews Norton with the help of the professors of the university, but of which only four numbers appeared.

  • The North American Review, the oldest and most famous of all the American reviews, dates from 1815, and was founded by William Tudor, a member of the previously mentioned Anthology Club.

  • After two years' control Tudor handed over the review to the club, then styled the North American Club, whose most active members were E.

  • The American Quarterly Review (1827-1837), established at Philadelphia by Robert Walsh, came to an end on his departure for Europe.

  • The Southern Quarterly Review (1828-1832), conducted by H.

  • These two were followed by the Democratic Review (1838-1852), the American Review (1845-1849), afterwards the American Whig Review (1850-1852), the Massachusetts Quarterly Review (1847-1850), and a few more.

  • The New Englander (1843-1892), the Biblical Repertory and Princeton Review (1825), the Ncitional Quarterly Review (1860) and the New York International Review (1874-1883), may also be mentioned.

  • The critical weeklies of the past include the New York Literary Gazette (1834-1835, 1839), De Bow's Review (1846), the Literary World (1847-1853), the Criterion (1855-1856), the Round Table (1863-1864), the Citizen (1864-1873), and Appleton' s Journal (1869).

  • Brownson's Quarterly Review began as the Boston Quarterly Review in 1838, and did much to introduce to American readers the works of the modern French philosophical school.

  • Other serials of this class are the Protestant Episcopal Quarterly Review (1854), the Presbyterian Magazine (1851-1860), the Catholic World (1865), the Southern Review (1867), the New' Jerusalem Magazine (1827), American Baptist Magazine (1817), the Church Review (1848), the Christian Review (1836), the Universalist Quarterly (1844).

  • There is also the Lancaster, Pennsylvania, American Historical Review, issued quarterly.

  • Among the most representative are: the Popular Science Monthly, New York; the monthly Boston Journal of Education; the quarterly American Journal of Mathematics, Baltimore; the monthly Cassier's Magazine (1891), New York; the monthly American Engineer (1893), New York; the monthly House and Garden, Philadelphia; the monthly Astrophysical Journal, commenced as Sidereal Messenger (1882), Chicago; the monthly American Chemical Journal, Baltimore; the monthly American Naturalist, Boston; the monthly American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Philadelphia; the monthly Outing, New York; the weekly American Agriculturist, New York; the quarterly Metaphysical Magazine (1895) New York; the bi-monthly American Journal of Sociology, Chicago; the bi-monthly American Law Review, St Louis; the monthly Banker's Magazine, New York; the quarterly American Journal of Philology (1880), Baltimore; the monthly Library Journal (1876), New York; the monthly Public Libraries, Chicago; Harper's.

  • Bowker (New York, to vols., 1892-1907); "Index of Periodicals for 1890," &c. (Review of Reviews), by Miss Hetherington (13 vols., 1891-1902); Q.

  • The first Canadian review, the Quebec Magazine (1791-1793), was published quarterly in French and English.

  • Meziere, the Canadian Magazine (Montreal, 1823-1825), the (Canadian Review (Montreal, 1824-1826), La Bibliotheque canadienne (Montreal, 1825-1830), continued as L'Observateur (1830-1831), and the Magasin du Bas-Canada (Montreal, 1832).

  • The Sydney University Magazine (1855), again published in 1878-1879, and continued as the Sydney University Review, is the first magazine of a high literary standard.

  • Of contemporary magazines Dalgety's Review is mainly agricultural, the Australian Magazine (1909) and the Lone Hand (1907) are popular, and the Science of Man is an anthropological review.

  • The Journal of Australasia (1856-1858), the Australian Monthly Magazine (1865-1867), which contained contributions from Marcus Clarke and was continued as the Colonial Monthly (1867-1869), the Melbourne Review (1876-1885) and the Victorian Review (1879-1886) may also be mentioned.

  • The Imperial Review, apparently the work of one pen, has been published since 1879; the Pastoralists' Review appeals more especially to the agricultural community.

  • An Australian edition of the Review of Reviews is published at Melbourne.

  • The South Australian Twopenny Magazine was published at Plymouth, England, in 1839, and the South Australian Miscellany and New Zealand Review at London in the same year.

  • Tasmania.-The first magazine was Murray's Austral-Asiatic Review, published at Hobart in 1828.

  • In 1857 appeared the New Zealand Quarterly Review, of little local interest, followed by Chapman's New Zealand Monthly Magazine (1862), the Southern Monthly Magazine (1863), the Delphic Oracle (1866-1870), the Stoic (1871), the Dunedin Review (1885), the Literary Magazine (1885), the four latter being written by J.

  • Grant, an eccentric genius, the Monthly Review (1888-1890), the New Zealand Illustrated Magazine (1899-1905), chiefly devoted to the light literature of New Zealand subjects, the Maori Record (1905-1907), and the Red Funnel, published since 1905.

  • The Calcutta Literary Gazette was published in 1830-1834, and the Calcutta Review, still the most important serial of the Indian Empire, first appeared in 1846 under the editorship of Sir J.

  • The Bombay Quarterly Magazine (1851-1853) gave place to the Bombay Quarterly Review, issued in 1855.

  • Of other contemporary magazines the Hindustan Review (Allahabad), the Modern Review (Calcutta), the Indian Review (Madras), the Madras Review, a quarterly first published in 1895, and the Calcutta University Magazine (1894), are important.

  • Of contemporary magazines the Tropical Agriculturist was started in 1881, the Ceylon Literary Register (1886-1896), afterwards the Monthly Literary Register and the Ceylon National Review in 1893.

  • The prospectus promised to give an account of the chief books published throughout Europe, obituary notices, a review of the progress of science, besides legal and ecclesiastical information and other matters of interest to cultivated persons.

  • It has always seemed impossible to carry on successfully in France a review upon the lines of those which have become so numerous and important in England.

  • - Revue philosophique (1876), monthly; Annales des sciences psychiques (1891); L'Annee philosophique (1890), critical and analytical review of all philosophical works appearing during the year; L'Annee psychologique (1894); Journal de psychologie normale et pathologie (1904); Bulletin de l'institut general de psychologie (1903); Revue de l'hypnotisme et de la psychologie physiologique (1900); Revue de metaphysique et de morale (1893); Revue de philosophie (1900); Revue de psychiatrie (1897).

  • At the beginning of the 19th century we find the Erlanger Literaturzeitung (1799-1810), which had replaced a Gelehrte Zeitung (1746); the Leipziger Literaturzeitung (1800-1834); the Heidelbergische Jahrbucher der Literatur (1808-1872); and the Wiener Literaturzeitung (1813-1816), followed by the Wiener Jahrbucher der Literatur (1818-1848), both of which received government support and resembled the English Quarterly Review in their conservative politics and high literary tone.

  • The Nuova antologia (1866) soon acquired a well-deserved reputation as a high-class review and magazine; its rival, the Rivista europea, being the special organ of the Florentine men of letters.

  • The Rassegna settimanale was a weekly political and literary review, which after eight years of existence gave place to a daily newspaper, the Rassegna.

  • The Algemeene Kunst en Letterbode (1788) was long the leading review of Holland; in 1860 it was joined to the Nederlandsch Spectator (1855).

  • Of those founded in the 19th century may be mentioned the Recensent (1803), and Nieuwe Recensent; the Nederlandsch Museum (1835); the Tijdstroom (1857); the Tijdspiegel, a literary journal of Protestant tendency; the Theologisch Tijdschrift (1867), the organ of the Leiden school of theology; and the Dietsche Warande, a Roman Catholic review devoted to the national antiquities.

  • These two were followed by Politik og Historie (1807-1810); Saga (1816-1820), a quarterly review edited by J.

  • Among later periodicals we may mention Skandia (1833-1837); Literaturbladet (1838-1840); Stallningar och Forhallanden (1838) of Crusenstolpe, a monthly review of Scandinavian history; Tidskrift for Litteratur (1850); Norsk Tidsskrift (1852), weekly, Forr och Nu; and the Revue suedoise (1858) of Kramer, written in French.

  • Portugal Portugal could long boast of only one review, the Jornal enciclopedico (1779-1806), which had many interruptions; then came the Jornal de Coimbra (1812-1820); the Panorama (1836-1857), founded by Herculano; the Revista universal lisbonense (1841-1853), established by Castilho; the Instituto (1853) of Coimbra; the Archivo pittoresco (1857) of Lisbon; and the Jornal do sociedade dos amigos das letteras.

  • In 1868 a review called Vox femenina, and conducted by women, was established at Lisbon.

  • After the return of King Otho in 1833 a literary review called 'Ipcs was commenced.

  • Karamsin brought out in 1802 the V'yestnik Evropi, an important review with Liberal tendencies.

  • Danforth (1902-1903); Book Review Digest (1906), &c.; H.

  • Church in the Church Quarterly Review, x.

  • Baynes in the English Historical Review (1904), pp. 694-702.

  • He also wrote in prison many short pamphlets, chiefly controversial, published a curious work on the famous storm of the 26th of November 1703, and started in February 1704 perhaps the most remarkable of all his projects, The Review.

  • After his release Defoe went to Bury St Edmunds, though he did not interrupt either his Review or his occasional pamphlets.

  • In this year Henry Sacheverell delivered his famous sermons, and Defoe wrote several tracts about them and attacked the preacher in his Review.

  • Aitken in The Contemporary Review (February 1890), and The Athenaeum (April 30, 1889; August 31, 1890).

  • This was printed in the English Historical Review, and afterwards separately.

  • They illustrate the right of review or recognitio which the Romans retained, at least in capital causes; the charge brought in this case of acting adversus majestatem populi romani; the claim made by Jesus to be a king; and the result that his judge became convinced that the claimant was opposed neither to the public peace nor to the civil supremacy of Rome.

  • 419-421, with Quarterly Review, No.

  • He had previously been called on to clear himself from charges of heterodoxy brought against him in the Quarterly Review (1851), and had been acquitted by a committee of inquiry.

  • 1642, " who led the way to a more strict and critical inquiry," Waterland passed in review all the known MSS.

  • Two articles in the Westminster Review, one on the Italian question, which procured him the special thanks of Cavour, the other on Essays and Reviews, which had the probably undesigned effect of stimulating the attack on the book, attracted especial notice.

  • Hallam's earliest literary work was undertaken in connexion with the great organ of the Whig party, the Edinburgh Review, where his review of Scott's Dryden attracted much notice.

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