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press

press

press Sentence Examples

  • One side of her wanted to press on until she got some answers.

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  • Dean didn't press the point.

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  • I was surprised the FBI didn't press us on some of these more prominent cases.

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  • He was about to press her to make an actual vow when she sighed.

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  • The wall at her back gave her support to press closer to him, and when he freed one hand, she used it to grasp his neck and pull his lips down harder on her own.

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  • She let him press her head to his chest.

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  • She put the heel of her hand on the place where blood was coming out and used her other hand to press down hard.

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  • Did the press make the connection with her death and her position at the call center?

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  • She moved down to press her face to his.

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  • Assistant Director Summerfield announced to the press at the height of the search, more than two hundred officers and volunteers were involved.

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  • Despite being able to bench press two of her, the men actually listened.

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  • Cynthia held the door handle, looking ready to jump while Dean contorted around the shift stick, barely able to press the pedal with his toe.

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  • Jennifer didn't press them on the specifics of the evidence.

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  • Dean agreed she was probably right and didn't press the sub­ject.

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  • Cynthia held the door handle, looking ready to jump while Dean contorted around the shift stick, barely able to press the pedal with his toe.

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  • As much as Dean wanted to press his guest on the possibility that the bones were those of her father, he realized such a question was tasteless and inappropriate.

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  • I'm not afraid of him, just because he's twelve feet tall and can bench press me with his toes.

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  • He didn't press her to leave again.

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  • The modern cheap and fertile press, with all its translations, has done little to bring us nearer to the heroic writers of antiquity.

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  • Should I press him?

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  • Natasha's grief began to be overlaid by the impressions of daily life, it ceased to press so painfully on her heart, it gradually faded into the past, and she began to recover physically.

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  • Sarah almost started to press the issue, but thought better of it.

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  • Much general comment on Moses Mendelssohn appeared in the press of the world on occasion of the centenary of the birth of the composer Mendelssohn in 1909.

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  • We have eliminated debtors prisons, developed the idea of "women and children first," stigmatized child labor, made accommodations for conscientious objectors, widely adopted freedom of speech and the press and freedom of assembly, and a hundred more.

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  • "Drop it!" a voice shouted from behind the light as I felt the knife press tighter against me!

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  • He smelled like a heady mix of male musk and something so faint and sweet, it made her want to press her face to the skin of his chest for a better smell.

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  • Jackson wanted to press her, yet thought better of it.

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  • An Edinburgh edition was issued from the press of Thomas Ruddiman in 1710.

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  • Though written before the Descriptio it had not been prepared for press at the time of his death, but was published by his son Robert in 1619 under the title Mirifici Logarithmorum Canonis Constructio.

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  • Press, Vasilich, press hard! she cried.

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  • The million dollar hunt for the Psychic Tipster was flooding the press; I suppose as intended.

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  • As promised, he did not drink long, and she felt him press another finger to the wound to seal the seepage.

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  • He mentioned the term kidnapping, but of course being the saint he is he wouldn't press charges against his wife who according to him was just temporarily disturbed.

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  • Winston didn't press for details—thankful­ly—and Dean made no mention of taking time for an off-duty trip to Scranton.

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  • That is all I have to say, and concealing his unvarying emotion he would press his cheek against his daughter's and move away.

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  • She packed, repacked, pressed, made the butler's assistant and Petya--whom she had drawn into the business of packing--press on the lid, and made desperate efforts herself.

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  • "Board them!" yelled the tipsy man, trying to press the trigger.

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  • Suddenly she sat up with unaccustomed swiftness, glanced vacantly around her, and seeing Natasha began to press her daughter's head with all her strength.

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  • When she saw the count, she stretched out her arms to him, embraced his bald head, over which she again looked at the letter and the portrait, and in order to press them again to her lips, she slightly pushed away the bald head.

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  • I didn't press her as we entered Lauritzen Gardens, and strolled the paths of public Botanical Park.

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  • I'm sure Ethel Reagan had a thousand more questions but she didn't press me.

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  • I prayed she'd take my warning seriously and maybe give us some helpful press in the bargin.

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  • I was culpable in contributing openly to the memory of Miss Washington and I was listed in some press accounts as the well-known grandfather of Eric when he was kidnapped last fall.

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  • We've been asked a number of times, by the press and everyone else if we're an adjunct to the tipster person.

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  • Dean was directed to spend all available weekend time on a door to door smiling and handshaking crusade, the first of many Fred had mapped out for his full-court press for making David Dean the sheriff of Ouray County, Colorado.

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  • He seemed at first inclined to press a quarrel with France over the Burgundian frontier, but the refusal of Pope Boniface VIII.

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  • In 1760 the elder Rousseau established here the famous press of the Encyclopaedists.

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  • He did not press the pursuit far, although the great king's camp with his harem fell into his hands.

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  • He also defended the privileges of the Irish Protestants in the press, and especially in the Freeman's Journal, founded in 1763.

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  • His contributions to the press, and his Addresses to the Lord Mayor and other political pamphlets made him one of the most popular writers in Ireland of his time, although he was anticatholic in his prejudices, and although, as Lecky observes,.

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  • The way in which the taxes press on the poor may be shown by the number of small proprietors sold up owing to inability to pay the,.

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  • In 1760 the elder Rousseau established here the famous press of the Encyclopaedists.

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  • He also defended the privileges of the Irish Protestants in the press, and especially in the Freeman's Journal, founded in 1763.

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  • If the aim was the dissemination of ideas, the printing press could have accomplished that much better than warfare.

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  • The building the restaurant now occupies was once a printing press, so the ceilings are high and the dining area is bricked lined.

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  • Just to make amends, I won't even press you on why you were worried in the first place.

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  • Dean didn't press the old man for whatever he knew nor did Fred offer any information.

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  • Ryland didn't press him and the boy fell asleep before they had turned down the canyon toward the town of Placerville.

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  • Cynthia didn't press him on the point but continued to act very nervous.

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  • The young man said he understood but sounded confused at Dean's sudden absence from their lives, though he didn't press for an explanation.

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  • I had to be cozy-like—didn't want to press the guy.

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  • Burgess didn't press him.

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  • I didn't press her.

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  • Damian ignored his hint, and Lon didn't press.

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  • Cynthia finished her wedding pronouncement by tossing out a comment about her foolish son considering delaying the final year of his education to play professional baseball, a decision against which she and Rose Calvia planned to exert a full court press.

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  • My guess is our skeleton friend wasn't important enough to even make the press.

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  • She won't even tell you how much she can bench press.

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  • "Back to the palace," Rhyn said with a glance towards the dark sky.  It was the last day he could press Death for a favor.

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  • He didn't offer any more and she didn't press.

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  • Two spiral springs underneath press the plate Br with its agate end-bearing against the rounded end of the screw S.

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  • The Courrier de Lyon contained articles the success of which reached even to the capital and attracted the attention of the Parisian press.

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  • His manual on Graphical Statics and his Elements of Projective Geometry (translated by C. Leudesdorf), have been published in English by the Clarendon Press.

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  • Photo, Topical Press Agency.

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  • Photo, Topical Press Asrncy.

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  • Buenos Aires has some excellent daily journals, but the tone of the press in general is sensational.

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  • chiefly through the press, in many of the religious controversies of the time.

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  • He commenced his work as a writer for the London newspaper press in connexion with the Morning Chronicle, and he afterwards became a leading contributor to the Examiner and the Daily News.

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  • He seems, however, to have pleased his patron, Cromwell, and perhaps Henry, by his energy in seeing the king's "Great" Bible in English through the press in Paris.

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  • This compromise was refused by the parliament, which proceeded on the 10th to press through its last stages the "bill for a new representation."

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  • Rumford then turned up a hollow cylinder which was cast in one piece with a brass six-pounder, and having reduced the connexion between the cylinder and cannon to a narrow neck of metal, he caused a blunt borer to press against the hollow of the cylinder with a force equal to the weight of about ro,000 lb, while the casting was made to rotate in a lathe.

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  • Suppose, for instance, the paper ribbon to be soaked in a solution of iodide of potassium and a light contact spring made to press continuously on its surface as it is pulled forward by the mechanism.

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  • In 1856 the Edinburgh Chamber of Commerce began an agitation for the purchase by the government of the telegraphs, and other chambers of commerce in Great Britain joined the agitation, which was strongly supported by the Press.

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  • Another reason assigned by the committee appointed by the Treasury in 1875 " to investigate the causes of the increased cost of the telegraphic service since the acquisition of the telegraphs by the state " is the loss on the business of transmitting Press messages, which has been estimated as at least £300,000 a year.

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  • 6d., and Press telegrams one of from is.

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  • In 1904 a regular system of communication of press news and private messages from the Poldhu and Cape Breton stations to Atlantic liners in mid-Atlantic was inaugurated, and daily newspapers were thenceforth printed on board these vessels, news being supplied to them daily by electric wave telegraphy.

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  • It was completed in the summer of 1907, and on the 17th of October 1907 press messages and private messages were sent across the Atlantic in both directions.

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  • Press, 1897).

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  • The cable is then placed in an oven, and, after all moisture has been driven off, it is passed through a lead press whence it emerges protected by a continuous lead pipe.

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  • Subscribers to exchanges may also make arrangements to have all telegrams (except Press telegrams) ad - dressed to them delivered by telephone instead of messenger.

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  • The Inquisition was established with almost unlimited powers in Italy, and the press was placed under its jurisdiction.

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  • The peace of Tilsit (July 7, 1807) enabled Napoleon to press on his projects for securing the command of the Mediterranean, thenceforth a fundamental axiom of his policy.

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  • In September 1847, Leopold gave way to .the popular agitation for a national guard, n spite of Metternichs threats, and allowed greater freedom of Lhe press; every concession made by the pope was followed by Semands for a similar measure in Tuscany.

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  • ~ but al troops, under General Lamoricire, were I~reparing to too press it.

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  • On more than one occasion Bismarck had maintained direct relations with the chiefs of the Left, and had in I87o worked to prevent a FrancoItalian alliance by encouraging the party of action to press for the occupation of Rome.

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  • At the beginning of August 1881 the Austrian press mooted the idea of a visit from King Humbert to the emperor Francis Joseph.

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  • Count di Robilant, anxious that Italy should not seem to beg a smile from the central Powers, advised Mancini to receive with caution the suggestions of the Austrian press.

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  • Seeing the hesitation of the Italian government, the Austrian and German semi-official press redoubled their efforts to bring about the visit.

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  • He not only re-established the Prussian legation to the Vatican, suppressed since 1874, and omitted from the imperial message to the Reichstag (17th November 1881) all reference to King Humberts visit to Vienna, but took occasion on the n9th of November to refer to Italy as a country tottering on the verge of revolution, and opened in the German semi-official press ~ campaign in favor of an international guarantee for the independence of the papacy.

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  • But the effect of the German press campaign could not be effaced in a day.

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  • At the request of Kalnky, Mancini defined his proposal in a memorandum, but the illness of himself and Depretis, combined with an untoward discussion in the Italian press on the failure of the Austrian emperor to return in Rome King Humberts visit to Vienna, caused negotiations to drag.

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  • Kalnky desired that both the terms of the treaty and the fact of its conclusion should remain secret, but Bismarck and Mancini hastened to hint at its existence, the former in the Reichstag on the 12th of June 1882, and the latter in the Italian semi-official press.

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  • It established that all Italian cabinets since 1880 had grossly neglected the state banks; that the two preceding cabinets had been aware of the irregularities committed by Tanlongo; that Tanlongo had heavily subsidized the press, paying as much as 20,000 for that purpose in 1888 alone; that a number of deputies, including several ex-ministers, had received from him loans of a considerable amount, which they had apparently made no effort to refund; that Giolitti had deceived the Chamber with regard to the state banks, and was open tosuspicion of having,after the arrest of Tanlongo, abstracted a number of documents from the latters papers before placing the remainder in the hands of the judicial authorities.

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  • Crispis methods aroused great outcry in the Radical press, but the severe sentences of the military courts were in time tempered by the Royal prerogative of amnesty.

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  • The new premiers first act was one which cannot be sufficiently praised: he suppressed all subsidies to journalists, and although this resulted in bitter attacks against him in the columns of the reptile press it commanded the approval of all right-thinking men..

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  • We may be helped in assigning him his proper place if we observe that, almost invariably, he accepts certain beliefs which he forbears to press.

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  • The Three Sermons also point to a moral argument for theism, but forbear to press it (Sermon ii.; when the third sense of the word " Nature " is being explained).

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  • The root is made to press its way into the darker cracks and crannies of the soil, so bringing its root-hairs into better contact with the particles round which the hygroscopic water hangs.

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  • Schimper, Plant-Geography (Clarendon Press, Oxford); Goebel, Organography (Clarendon Press, Oxford); Bower, The Origin of a Land-Flora (Macmillan); Beyerinck, Ueher Cecidien, (Bot.

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  • In the first state the prints have been taken off with the roller, or even by handpressing, and they are weak in tint; in the second state the printing press has been used, and the ink is stronger.

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  • In 1816 he was elected deputy, and spoke in favour of liberty of the press and extension of the franchise.

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  • For the same purpose they made great use of the press.

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  • His chief public activity at Oxford was in connexion with the hebdomadal council, and with the Clarendon Press, of which he was for many years secretary.

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  • Other important buildings are the Sobranye, or parliament house, the palace of the synod, the ministries of war and commerce, the university with the national printing press, the national library, the officers' club and several large military structures.

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  • The ministries are as follows: (1) of the Imperial Court, to which the administration of the apanages, the chapter of the imperial orders, the imperial palaces and theatres, and the Academy of Fine Arts are subordinated; (2) Foreign Affairs; (3) War and Marine; (4) Finance; (5) Commerce and Industry (created in 1905); (6) Interior (including police, health, censorship and press, posts and telegraphs, foreign religions, statistics); (7) Agriculture; (8) Ways and Communications; (9) Justice; (10) Public Instruction.

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  • The liberty of the press not unfrequently degenerated into licence, and sane liberalism was often replaced by socialistic dreaming.

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  • Finding that the walls of autocracy could not be overturned by blasts of revolutionary trumpets in the periodical press and in clandestinely printed seditious proclamations, the young enthusiasts determined to seek the support of the masses, or, as they termed it, " to go in among the people " (idti v narod).

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  • The assassination of the minister of the interior Plehve, on the 14th of July, by the revolutionist Sazonov was remarkable as a of the symptom mainly owing to the widespread sympathy of the European press of all shades of opinion with War.

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  • Finnish diet ought to refer to the imperial legislature not only all military matters - as the tsar demanded (Rescript of October 14) - but the question of the use of the Russian language in the grand-duchy, the principles of the Finnish administration, police, justice, education, formation of business companies and of associations, public meetings, the press, the customs tariff, the monetary system, means of communication, and the pilot and lighthouse system.

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  • The usual mode of publishing such reports is to forward them to railway companies concerned, as well as to the press, and on application to any one else who is interested.

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  • When a train is running round a curve the centrifugal force which comes into play tends to make its wheel-flanges press against the outer rail, or even to capsize it.

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  • It was largely by his efforts, both in the press and in tours through the country, that the Age of Consent Act was passed in 1891.

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  • were issued from the press, their sale eclipsing that of any of his earlier books.

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  • Press); on the Fucino-Bronze, ib.

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  • He immediately set about introducing certain urgent reforms, suppressed all subsidies to the press, and declared his intention of governing according to law and justice.

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  • During the progress of the campaign he kept away from public affairs, although he assumed a Cassandra-like attitude in all his utterances, and his henchmen in the press were frankly defeatist."

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  • that he would rather continue in his service than be ten popes, that did not prevent him from secretly instructing his agents at Rome to press his claims to the utmost.

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  • He considered that he had not been properly supported in America, and was embittered both by the supersession of himself and his brother as peace commissioners, and by attacks made on him by the ministerial writers in the press.

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  • Caiman's introduction to Smith's Lectures on Justice, &c. (Clarendon Press, 1896); and H.

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  • at the Clarendon Press, Oxford, between 1812 (Cranmer) and 1824 (Annals).

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  • Many other inquiries conducted by him might be mentioned, and some idea may be gained of his scientific activity from the fact that a selection only from his papers, published by the Cambridge University Press, fills three large volumes.

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  • In 1892, at Warwick, the competitions related to ploughs - single furrow (a) for light land, (b) for strong land, (c) for press drill and broad-cast sowing; two-furrow; three-furrow; digging (a) for light land, (b) for heavy land; and one-way ploughs.

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  • One of his first tasks was to send his treatise on the Subjection of Women (written 1861, published 1869, many editions) through the press.

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  • John Strype's Life of Parker, originally published in 1711, and' re-edited for the Clarendon Press in 1821 (3 vols.), is the principal source for Parker's life.

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  • The opposition in the Tribunate was sharp, but was paralysed by the knowledge of the fact just named and by the lack of a free press.

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  • Napoleon desired to press on the partition of Prussia, Alexander that of Turkey.

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  • In the same year and from the same press was issued a Dialogus de Avibus by Gybertus Longolius, and in 1570 Caius brought out in London his treatise De rariorum animalium atque stirpium historic. In this last work, small though it be, ornithology has a good share; and all three may still be consulted with interest and advantage by its votaries.

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  • Moreover, whatever the lovers of the fine arts may say, it is nearly certain that the " Bewick Collector " is mistaken in attaching so high a value to these old editions, for owing to the want of skill in printing - indifferent ink being especially assigned as one cause - many of the earlier issues fail to show the most delicate touches of the engraver, which the increased care bestowed upon the edition of 1847 (published under the supervision of John Hancock) has revealed - though it must be admitted that certain blocks have suffered from wear of the press so as to be incapable of any more producing the effect intended.

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  • The accompanying letter press is in some places copious, and useful lists of the species of various genera are occasionally subjoined, adding to the definite value of the work, which, forming one volume, was completed in 1869.

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  • In 1692 the first permanent and successful printing press was established; in 170 4 the first newspaper in America, the Boston News-Letter, which was published weekly until 1776.

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  • About the middle of the century restrictions upon the press began to disappear.

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  • For current information the following may be added: Nield's, Ellison's and Tattersall's circulars; Cotton (the publication of the Manchester Cotton Association); and daily reports and articles in the local press.

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  • For a time Ranke was now engaged in an occupation of a different nature, for he was appointed editor of a periodical in which Friedrich Perthes designed to defend the Prussian government against the democratic press.

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  • The mission of the American Presbyterian Church, which has had its centre in Beirut for the last sixty years, has done much for Syria, especially in the spread of popular education; numerous publications issue from its press, and its medical school has been extremely beneficial.

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  • Here he filled the post of editor till his death, and had also the supervision of all works issued from the Caxton Press.

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  • He was chief of the Socialist left, which then mustered sixty members, and edited until 1896 their organ in the press, La Petite Republique.

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  • After his death, some alleged extracts from his private journals, dealing with French policy, were published in the Paris press.

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  • Owing to the great weight of stones, their cost and their liability of being fractured in the press, zinc plates, and more recently aluminium plates, have largely taken the place of stone.

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  • 1 In the early decades of the Christian era the text was current in two forms, which are denoted by H a and H R in this article and in the edition of the text published by the Oxford University Press.

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  • Patriarchs (Oxford University Press, 1908).

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  • With the government of Italy his general policy was to be as conciliatory as was consistent with his oath as pope never to surrender the "patrimony of St Peter"; but a moderate attitude was rendered difficult by partisans on either side in the press, each of whom claimed to represent his views.

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  • A similar counsel of moderation was given to the Canadian press in connexion with the Manitoba school question in December 1897.

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  • The government continued to hesitate and to press for mitigations of the existing system.

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  • - The above sketch is largely based on the present writer's essay on Bede's Life and Works,prefixed to his edition of Bede's Historia Ecclesiastica, &c. (2 vols., Clarendon Press, 1896).

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  • Dr William Bright's Chapters of Early English Church History (3rd ed., Clarendon Press, 1897) is indispensable.

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  • At last the book appeared in 1482, the expenses of the press being defrayed by the noble Florentine, Filippo Valori.

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  • Another mode of drying is to keep the specimens in a box of dry sand in a warm place for ten or twelve hours, and then press them in drying paper.

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  • Personal liberty, liberty of conscience, speech, assembly, petition, association, press, liberty of movement and security of home, were without real guarantee even within the extremely small limits in which they nominally existed.

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  • The Turks continued to press the Venetians by land and sea; Albania, which under Scanderberg had for twenty-five years resisted the Ottoman arms, was overrun; and Venice was forced to agree to a treaty by which she ceded to Turkey Scutari and KroIa, and consented to pay an indemnity of ioo,000 ducats (Jan.

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  • Russia, driven from Azov in 1695, succeeded in capturing it in the following year; Venice continued to press the Turks; in this condition of affairs Hussein Kuprili (q.v.) was called to office; England and Holland urged Turkey to Ibrahim, Ahmed II., 1691-1695.

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  • The troops had got much mixed up, but as the French did not immediately press the pursuit home, order was soon re-established and a combined retreat was begun towards the mouth of the Elbe and Lubeck.

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  • At the same time Lefebvre was ordered to press the siege of Danzig with all vigour, and on the 5th of May, after a most gallant resistance, Kalckreuth, who redeemed here his failure of Auerstadt, surrendered.

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  • The shallow water on the coast made it impossible for the British line-of-battle ships, or even large frigates, to press the attack on them home.

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  • The principal newspapers of the city are the Plain Dealer (1841, independent), the Press (1878, independent), the Leader (1847, Republican), and the News (1889, Republican).

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  • In September 1894 was published The Ebb Tide, the latest of his books which he saw through the press.

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  • The acid employed may be hydrochloric, which gives the best results, or sulphuric, which is used in Germany; sulphuric acid is more readily separated from the product than hydrochloric, since the addition of powdered chalk precipitates it as calcium sulphate, which may be removed by a filter press.

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  • Belting intended for driving machinery is built up of canvas which has been thoroughly frictioned with the soft mixed rubber, and is cured by placing it in a kind of press kept by means of steam at a dry heat of about 140° C. Packing for the stuffing boxes of steam engines is similarly prepared from strips of rubber and friotioned canvas, as also are the so-called insertion sheets, in which layers of rubber alternate with canvas or even wire gauze.

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  • Indiarubber stereotypes are now extensively made use of as hand stamps, and attempts have been made to introduce them for press and machine printing.

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  • But his assent to this was only extracted from him in 1540 by the importunities of his friends, especially of his enthusiastic disciple George Joachim Rheticus (1514-1576), who printed, in the Narratio prima (Danzig, 1540), a preliminary account of the Copernican theory, and simultaneously sent to the press at Nuremberg his master's complete exposition of it in the treatise entitled De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (1543).

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  • As editor of the Omaha World-Herald he then championed the cause of bimetallism in the press as vigorously as he had in Congress and on the platform, his articles being widely quoted and discussed.

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  • In the Democratic national convention at Chicago in 1896, during a long and heated debate with regard to the party platform, Bryan, in advocating the "plank" declaring for the free coinage of silver, of which he was the author, delivered a celebrated speech containing the passage, "You shall not press down upon the brow of labour this crown of thorns; you shall not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold."

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  • The force acting on the magnetism of one of the faces, and urging this face towards the other, will be less than B by 27r1, the part of the total force due to the first face itself; hence the force per unit of area with which the faces would press against each other if in contact is P = (B-27rI)I =27rT 2 +HI = (B 2 -H 2) =/81r.

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  • To the south-east of Kbszeg, at the confluence of the Giins with the Raab, is situated the town of Sarvar (pop. 3158), formerly fortified, where in 1526 the first printing press in Hungary was established.

    0
    0
  • Its obligation rests on the good faith of the parties to the reference, and on the fact that, with the help of a world-wide press, public opinion can always be brought to bear on any state that seeks to evade its moral duty.

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    0
  • in 1808 broke down some of these restrictions, and the first year of his residence in Rio de Janeiro saw the establishment of the first printing press in Brazil and the publication of an official gazette.

    0
    0
  • There was no freedom of the press, however, until 1821, when the abolition of the censorship and the constitutional struggle in Portugal gave rise to a politicaldiscussion that marked the opening of a new era in the development of the nation, and aroused an intellectual activity that has been highly productive in journalistic and polemical writings.

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    0
  • In no country, perhaps, has the press exercised a more direct and powerful influence upon government than in Brazil, and in no other country can there be found so high a percentage of journalists in official life.

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    0
  • From 1507, when Walter Chapman, the Scottish Caxton, set up the first press, to the present day, printing has enjoyed a career of almost continuous vitality, and the great houses of R.

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    0
  • Constable, the Ballantyne Press, Morrison & Gibb, Turnbull & Spears, and others, admirably maintain the traditional reputation of the Edinburgh press.

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    0
  • The poem appears, on the authority of Laing, to have been printed at the press of Chepman & Myllar about 1508, but the fragments which Laing saw are not extant.

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    0
  • Herculano was denounced from the pulpit and the press for his lack of patriotism and piety, and after bearing the attack for some time his pride drove him to reply.

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    0
  • However, though he conducted a political propaganda in the newspaper press in his early days, Herculano never exercised much influence in politics.

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  • Taken strictly his words state the position of extreme Nominalism; but even if we were not forbidden to do so by other passages, in which the doctrine of moderate Realism is adopted (under cover of the current distinction between the singular as felt and the pure universal as understood), it would still be unfair to press any passage in the writings of this period.

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    0
  • He devoted about three months to this tour, passing rapidly through the seaboard states and the adjacent portion of Canada, and collecting as he went large stores of information respecting the condition, resources and prospects of the great western republic. Soon after his return to England he began to prepare another work for the press, which appeared towards the end of 1836, under the title of Russia.

    0
    0
  • While this pamphlet was in the press, delicate health obliged him to leave England, and for several months, at the end of 1836 and the beginning of 1837, he travelled in Spain, Turkey and Egypt.

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    0
  • The press promulgated the wildest alarms as to the intentions of Louis Napoleon, who was represented as contemplating a sudden and piratical descent upon the English coast without pretext or provocation.

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  • He was, moreover, assailed with great violence by a powerful section of the English press, while the large number of minute details with which he had to deal in connexion with proposed changes in the French tariff, involved a tax on his patience and industry which would have daunted a less resolute man But there was one source of embarrassment greater than all the rest.

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    0
  • He was therefore deeply disappointed and distressed to find the old feeling of distrust still actively fomented by the press and some of the leading politicians of the country.

    0
    0
  • A characteristic feature of cancer is the carrying of the epithelial cells (which are the essential element of the growth) to the nearest lymphatic glands, and in cancer of the stomach the secondary implication of the glands may cause the formation of large masses between the stomach and the liver, which may press upon the large veins and give rise to dropsy.

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  • Their importance is out of all proportion to their number, since they monopolize a large portion of the trade, are with the Germans the chief employers of labour, and control not only the finances but to a great extent the government and press of the country.

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    0
  • The judicial authorities in Hungary are: (1) the district courts with single judges (458 in 1905); (2) the county courts with collegiate judgeships (76 in number); to these are attached 15 jury courts for press offences.

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    0
  • The Andrassy's old abuses continued: the muzzling of the press in the universal interests of Magyar nationalism, the imprisonment Suffrage of non-Magyar deputies for " incitement against Bill.

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    0
  • Baron Paul Rauch, the Magyar nominee as Ban, failed, with all his official apparatus, to secure a single seat for his creatures at the general election of 1908, and therefore proceeded to govern without Parliament, by an elaborate system of administrative pressure, press persecution and espionage.

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    0
  • 19 1912 was replaced as Ban by a little known official Mr. Cuvaj, who promptly dissolved the Diet before it had even met, and proceeded to muzzle the press, to close the university and to arrest several prominent politicians.

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  • The Austrian Government committed the grave blunder of answering these demonstrations by press confiscations and by the dissolution of the town councils of Spalato and Sebenico.

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    0
  • Press censorship was of course very rigid throughout the Dual Monarchy, but many Yugoslav newspapers were suppressed altogether.

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  • The Zagreb press could only comment indirectly, but conveyed its meaning by insisting that the Reichsrat programme of May 30 was an absolute minimum.

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    0
  • - During 1916-7 Italian public opinion, encouraged by Sonnino and his press organs, had been definitely hostile to the Yugosla y s, whom it denounced as mere Austrian agents.

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  • Meanwhile the whole Nationalist press of Italy, actively, encouraged by Sonnino and his entourage, opened a fierce campaign against the Yugosla y s and their western supporters, which rapidly developed into agitation against the Allies.

    0
    0
  • The Aliens Expulsion After and Aliens Immigration Laws, as well as the new Press Law, were passed in the latter part of 1896.

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    0
  • (Clarendon Press, 1896), the same hostility to Peter is expressed.

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    0
  • Zyrowski, Lamartine (1896); and perhaps best of all in the Preface to Emile Legouis' Clarendon Press edition of Jocelyn (1906), where a vigorous effort is made to combat the idea of Lamartine's sentimentality and femininity as a poet.

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    0
  • The great Aldine Press made an important contribution to the work, by editiones principes of Hippocrates and Galen in the original.

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    0
  • Among the achievements of the medicine of the 19th century the growth of the medical press must not be forgotten.

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  • Nor is there any great difficulty in believing that Cicero edited it; the word "emendavit," need not mean more than what we call "preparing for press."

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    0
  • Colenso (a daughter of Bishop Colenso) constituted herself his champion in the press of Natal and Great Britain.

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    0
  • A complete transcript, Brief Lives chiefly of Contemporaries set down by John Aubrey between the Years 1669 and 1696, was edited for the Clarendon Press in 1898 by the Rev. Andrew Clark from the MSS.

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  • He then passed the laws on the press, suppressing the censorship. By reorganization of the finances, the protection of industry and the carrying out of great public works, France regained its economic prosperity, and the ministry became popular.

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    0
  • Elected deputy, he attached himself to the moderate party, and defended the liberty of the press.

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    0
  • on his accession (1797), in which, inter alia, he urged upon the king the necessity for granting freedom to the press and to commerce.

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    0
  • It was the hand of the author of that offensive Missive to Frederick William III., on the liberty of the press, that drafted the Carlsbad decrees; it was he who inspired the policy of repressing the freedom of the universities; and he noted in his diary as "a day more important than that of Leipzig" the session of the Vienna conference of 1819, in which it was decided to make the convocation of representative assemblies in the German states impossible, by enforcing the letter of Article XIII.

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  • The Burmese are supposed by modern philologists to have come, as joint members of a vast Indo-Chinese immigration swarm, from western China to the head waters of the Irrawaddy and then separated, some to people Tibet and Assam, the others to press southwards into the 1 See also, for geology, W.

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    0
  • By an hydraulic press a pressure of 100,000 kilos was made to act upon the disks, when the metal was seen to "flow" out of the hole like a viscid liquid.

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  • applied by him to the invention of the hydraulic press.

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  • ih shows also a modern form of the hydraulic press, applied to the operation of covering an electric cable with a lead coating.

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  • But it was eagerly taken up by the antiGustavian press, and popular suspicion was especially aroused by a fable called "The Foxes" directed against the Fersens, which appeared in Nya Posten.

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    0
  • The matter temporarily dropped, but certain Liberal members of parliament continued to press for the withdrawal of Great Britain from the convention, it being stated that a promise had been privately given by Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman that the government would withdraw as soon as practicable.

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  • He presented a measure in favour of full liberty for the press, which at that time was almost unanimously reactionary, protested against the outlawry of returned emigres, spoke in favour of the deported priests and attacked the Directory.

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    0
  • In the chamber he still sought to obtain liberty for the press - a theme upon which he published a volume of his speeches (Paris, 1817).

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    0
  • In this form a large number, after being cooked or stoved in moist heat for about twenty-four hours, are piled between plates in an hydraulic press, and subjected to great pressure for a month or six weeks, during which time a slow fermentation takes place, and a considerable exudation of juice results from the severe pressure.

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  • in an hydraulic press, by which they are moulded into Tobacco solid cakes.

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  • The service-books were wholly in MS. until the press of the archbishop of Canterbury's mission at Urmia issued the Takhsa (containing the liturgies, baptismal office, &c.) and several other liturgical texts.

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    0
  • The aims of the Cogers were "the promotion of the liberty of the subject and the freedom of the Press, the maintenance of loyalty to the laws, the rights and claims of humanity and the practice of public and private virtue."

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    0
  • Kremers, Milwaukee Press, 1900).

    0
    0
  • power was not displayed through the press, Candlish made a number of contributions to theological literature.

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    0
  • Whatever we may think of the political sagacity of such a judgment, it is due to Comte to say that he did not expect to see his dictatorial republic transformed into a dynastic empire, and, next, that he did expect from the Man of December freedom of the press and of public meeting.

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  • In arresting haemorrhage temporarily the chief thing is to press directly on the bleeding part.

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  • At public meetings, in the press, and in parliament he denounced the Turkish government and its champion, Disraeli, who had now become Lord Beaconsfield.

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  • Gladstone was implored to withdraw them, or substitute a resolution in favour of Irish autonomy; but he resolved to press at least the Home Rule Bill to a second reading.

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    0
  • But besides the vocation he had freely selected and assiduously laboured to fulfil, two more external influences helped to shape Martineau's mind and define his problem and his work; the awakening of English thought to the problems which underlie both philosophy and religion, and the new and higher opportunities offered for their discussion in the periodical press.

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  • In the discussion of these questions the periodical press supplied him with the opportunity of taking an effective part.

    0
    0
  • The newspaper press being almost entirely in the hands of men whose interests suggested wider opening of the door to official preferment, nearly all editorial pens were directed against the governme~nt.

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    0
  • So strenuous did this campaign become that, in 1875, a press law was enacted empowering the minister of home affairs and the police to suspend or suppress a journal and to fine or imprison its editor without public trial.

    0
    0
  • Many suffered under this law, but the ultimate effect was to invest the press with new popularity, and very soon the newspapers conceived a device which effectually protected their literary staff, for they employed dummy editors whose sole function was to go to prison in lieu of the true editor.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, freedom of the press was at length secured.

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    0
  • A much more moderate tone pervades the writings of the press since restrictions were entirely removed, and although there are now 1 775 journals and periodicals published throughout the empire, with a total annual circulation of some 700 million copies, intemperance of language, such as in former times would, have provoked official interference, is practically unknown to-day.

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  • A new phase of the art now lives in the pages of the newspaper press.

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    0
  • In 1867, on the accession to the premiership of Julius von Jolly (1823-1891), several constitutional changes in a Liberal direction were made; responsibility of ministers, freedom of the press, compulsory education.

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    0
  • Anec. (1842); C. Knight, The Old Printer and the Modern Press (1854), and Passages of a Working Life (1864-1865); Memoir of Robert Chambers (1872); the London Cat.

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    0
  • i.; " The Periodical Press, 1865-1895," by T.

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    0
  • 49; " Bibliography of the British Periodical Press," by D.

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    0
  • Complete lists of current British periodicals are included in Mitchell's Newspaper Press Directory, Street's Newspaper Directory, and Willing's Press Guide, and a select list and other information are given in the Literary Year Book.

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    0
  • -The eighth volume of the Tenth Report of the United States Census (1884) contains a statistical report on the newspaper and periodical press of America by S.

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    0
  • Louis Auguste de Bourbon, sovereign prince of Dombes, having transferred his parliament to Trevoux, set up a printing press, and was persuaded by two Jesuits, Michel le Tellier and Philippe Lalleman, to establish the Me-moires pour servir d l'histoire des sciences et des arts (1701-1767), more familiarly known as the Journal des Trevoux, long the best-informed and best-written journal in France.

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    0
  • This was the origin of the clandestine press of Holland, and it was that country which for the next hundred years supplied the ablest periodical criticism from the pens of French Protestant refugees.

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    0
  • In June 1863, however, he publicly dissociated himself from the press ordinances which had just been published.

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  • Opening their jaws to their fullest extent, they seize the animal generally by the head, and pushing alternately the right and left sides of the jaws forward, they press the body through their elastic gullet into the stomach, its outlines being visible for some time through the distended walls of the abdomen.

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  • Bolingbroke's conversation, described by Lord Chesterfield as "such a flowing happiness of expression that even his most familiar conversations if taken down in writing would have borne the press without the least correction," his delightful companionship, his wit, good looks, and social qualities which charmed during his lifetime and made firm friendships with men of the most opposite character, can now only be faintly imagined.

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  • He immediately proceeded to muzzle opposition by stringent press laws, and the discovery of minor liberal conspiracies afforded an excuse for further repression.

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    0
  • These measures roused violent opposition in the country, which a new and stringent press law, nicknamed the "law of justice and love," failed to put down.

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    0
  • The peers rejected the law of inheritance and the press law; it was found necessary to disband the National Guard; and in November 1827 seventy-six new peers were created, and recourse was had to a general election.

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    0
  • Maurice was a man of peace, yet his life was spent in a series of conflicts; of deep humility, yet so polemical that he often seemed biased; of large charity, yet bitter in his attack upon the religious press of his time; a loyal churchman who detested the label "Broad," yet poured out criticism upon the leaders of the Church.

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    0
  • His last activity as a statesman was to spur the sultan on to press the war against Hungary.

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    0
  • Stewart, Croall Lectures (in the press); S.

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    0
  • His principal occupation at this time must have consisted in preparing for the press a second edition of the Characteristics, which appeared in 1713, soon after his death.

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    0
  • These foreigners introduced new life into politics and the press, and made it fashionable for educated Maltese to delude themselves with the idea that the Maltese were Italians, because a few of them could speak the language of the peninsula.

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    0
  • His was the mildest and least reactionary of all the Italian despotisms of the day, and although always subject to Austrian influence he refused to adopt the Austrian methods of government, allowed a fair measure of liberty to the press, and permitted many political exiles from other states to dwell in Tuscany undisturbed.

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  • Marlborough, who personally directed the operations on his left wing, not only formed his line of battle successfully, but also began seriously to press the forces that had been sent to check his deployment.

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  • Nor did the failure of King Charles's government to press the war with vigour end here.

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  • On the other hand, it was Tirpitz who not only conducted the practical advocacy of these schemes in the Reichstag, but also organized the service of propaganda in the German press and on the platform, putting popular pressure on the parliamentary representatives of the nation and constraining them to agree to the enormous expenditure which these schemes entailed.

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  • It consists of a small hydraulic press, which forces a set of expanding bits or wedges into a bore-hole previously bored by a long screw augur or drill, worked by hand, the action of the press being continued until a sufficient strain is obtained to bring down the coal.

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    0
  • The arrangement is, in fact, a modification of the plug and feather system used in stone quarrying for obtaining large blocks, but with the substitution of the powerful rending force of the hydraulic press for handpower in driving up the wedges.

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    0
  • It was not possible that having reached this point he should not press forward and leave the Kantian position.

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    0
  • In 1856 and 1857 he published two letters to Mr Gladstone on Italian affairs, which created a sensation, while he continued to propagate his views in the Italian press.

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    0
  • In 1818 he saved Paris from a financial crisis by buying a large amount of stock, but next year, in consequence of his heated defence of the liberty of the press and the electoral law of 1867, the governorship of the Bank was taken from him.

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    0
  • In 1733 he had established a press in Charleston, South Carolina, and soon after did the same in Lancaster, Pa., in New Haven, Conn., in New York, in Antigua, in Kingston, Jamaica, and in other places.

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    0
  • But in 1753 he was eagerly engaged in having several of his improvements incorporated in a new press, and more than twenty years after was actively interested in John Walter's scheme of " logography."

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    0
  • In France he had a private press in his house in Passy, on which he printed " bagatelles."

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    0
  • On the fall of Robespierre, Beauchamp was transferred to the bureau of the minister of police, and charged with the superintendence of the press.

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    0
  • Supported by the estates of the electorate, and relying upon the recess of the diet of Regensburg in 1541, he encouraged Bucer to press on with the work of reform, and in 1543 invited Melanchthon to his.

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    0
  • The first regular newspaper of Boston, the Boston Newsletter, was the pioneer of the American newspaper press.

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    0
  • When the oxidation is complete, the anthraquinone is separated in a filter press, washed and heated to 120° C. with commercial oil of vitriol, using about 22 parts of vitriol to i of anthraquinone.

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    0
  • The school was denounced in the press, was not pecuniarily successful, and in 1839 was given up, although Alcott had won the affection of his pupils, and his educational experiments had challenged the attention of students of pedagogy.

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    0
  • Thereafter, whatever befell, the allied armies would resolutely press forward towards Paris, affording each other mutual support, and with the tremendous weight of troops at their disposal thrust back Napoleon upon his capital, force him to fight in front of it, and drive him when defeated within its works.

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  • After the revolution of 1830 he came to Paris, formed connexions with numerous political personages, even with King Louis Philippe, and became a brilliant defender of Liberal ideas in the law courts and in the press, - witness his :loge funebre of the bishop Gregoire (1830), his Memoire for the political rehabilitation of Marshal Ney (1833), and his plea for the accused of April (1835).

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    0
  • Schultens helped him to private teaching and reading for the press, by which he was able to live.

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    0
  • Reiske's first years in Leiden were not unhappy, till he got into serious trouble by introducing emendations of his own into the second edition of Burmann's Petronius, which he had to see through the press.

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    0
  • He acquiesced in the fall of Robespierre in 1794, but later defended Barere and others among his colleagues, declaring that he himself had constantly signed papers without reading them, as it was physically impossible to do so in the press of business.

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    0
  • Minting by means of a falling weight (monkey press) intervened between the hand hammers and the screw press in many places.

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    0
  • Boulton and Watt's screw press, invented in 1788 and used at the Royal Mint until 1881, was worked by atmospheric pressure applied to a piston.

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    0
  • The coining presses now used are all modifications of the lever press invented by Uhlhorn of Grevenbroich near Cologne in 1839.

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    0
  • press in use at the Royal Mint since 1882 is shown in figs.

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  • The forceps are then opened and the beam released, but at this moment the levelling bar F is allowed to drop momentarily by a bent lever G acting on the pin G', until the ends of F press down on a stirrup in each hanger at H, H.

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  • The blank is then again passed through the automatic balance and is sent forward to the coining press if the correctness of the weight is confirmed.

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    0
  • In 1733 a popular organ, the New York Weekly Journal, was established under John Peter Zenger (1697-1746), and in 1735 both the freedom of the press and a great advance toward the independence of the judiciary were the outcome of a famous libel suit against Zenger.

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    0
  • In 1827 he was prime mover in the protest made by the French Academy against the minister Peyronnet's law on the press, which led to the failure of that measure, but this step cost him, as it did Villemain, his post as censeur royal.

    0
    0
  • During 1911 various matters had created friction between the two countries and caused the exchange of bitter articles in the press, but war had appeared unlikely.

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    0
  • His first literary attempt was a pamphlet on the liberty of the press, published in 1789.

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    0
  • In the last days of 1789 Gorsas in the Courrier de Paris accused Sanson of harbouring a Royalist press in his house.

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    0
  • By the end of the fourth week it had run up a circulation of 6000, and by the seventh reached rr,000, which was then the full capacity of its press.

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    0
  • On the occasion of Dickens's second visit to America, Greeley presided at the great banquet given him by the press of the country.

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    0
  • But Oku's 2nd Army was now at a standstill at Kaiping, and until he was further advanced the 1st Army could not press forward.

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    0
  • By his speeches and messages, and by his frank use of one of the greatest of modern social engines - the newspaper press - he created a public opinion which heartily supported him.

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    0
  • The volume of his letters and his writings in books, articles for the press and speeches and official messages, is enormous, and yet this work was done in the midst of the executive labours of a long political career.

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    0
  • But when she had got this to press she sent the proofs to Bordeaux, where a poet of some note, Pierre de Brach, revised them with the other annotated copy.

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    0
  • An active opposition began to make itself evident in the diet and in the press, and in 1830, under the influence of the July revolution in Paris, riots broke out in Leipzig and Dresden.

    0
    0
  • The burning questions were the publicity of legal proceedings and the freedom of the press; and on these the government sustained its first crushing defeat in the lower chamber in 1842.

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    0
  • The privileges of the nobles were curtailed; the administration of justice was put on a better footing; the press was unshackled; publicity in legal proceedings was granted; trial by jury was introduced for some special cases; and the German Catholics were recognized.

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    0
  • At Sunderland, the bridge is first lifted by a hydraulic press so as to clear the roadway behind, and is then rolled back.

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    0
  • The pamphlets were printed at a secret press established by John Penry, a Welsh puritan, with the help of the printer Robert Waldegrave, about midsummer 1588, for the issue of puritan literature forbidden by the authorities.

    0
    0
  • Shortly after this, More Work for Cooper, a sequel to Hay any Worke, was begun at Manchester, but while it was in progress the press was seized.

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    0
  • Biography; and for the history of the press, Bibliographica, ii.

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    0
  • In a communication to the press on Sept.

    0
    0
  • The costs of the war were in the first place met by loans and the assistance of the noteprinting press.

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    0
  • In 1909 there were eleven daily newspapers, as follows: Evening Wisconsin (1847; Republican), Free Press (1901; Independent Republican), Journal (1882; Independent Democrat), News (1886; Independent), and Sentinel (18 37; Republican), the oldest paper in continuous publication, Daily Commercial Letter (Commercial), Reporter (legal and commercial), Dziennik Milwaucki (Polish), Kuryer Polski (1888; Republican; Polish); Germania Abendpost (1872; Independent; German); and Der Herold (1854; Independent; German).

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  • It has shown extreme activity in _ the creation of a press devoted to its interests, and has consolidated its influence by the formation of an extensive leaguesystem.

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    0
  • Van der Weyer, the Belgian minister, that the prince should come to England and press his suit.

    0
    0
  • The relations between the court and the country formed matter in 1889 for a somewhat sharp discussion in parliament and in the press.

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    0
  • In 1827 he obtained a seat in the supreme council, and in March 1835, after he had acted as the first governor of the proposed new presidency of Agra, he provisionally succeeded Lord William Bentinck in the governor-generalship. During his brief tenure of office (it lasted only for one year) he carried out several important measures, including that for the liberation of the press, which, while almost universally popular, complicated his relations with the directors at home to such an extent that he resigned the service of the Company in 1838.

    0
    0
  • His restless and dissatisfied nature led him to press or intrigue for other posts, and to embark in risky business enterprises which compromised the fortune of his family for many years to come.

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    0
  • This crime greatly excited the republican press, which demanded his trial.

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    0
  • Occasionally it is still stated in the press that wolves have been seen in the Ardennes, but this is a mere fiction.

    0
    0
  • He often had occasion, on his own business, or on that of Froben's press, to send special couriers to a distance, employing them by the way in collecting the free gifts of his tributaries.

    0
    0
  • Erasmus declined all, and in November 1521 settled permanently at Basel, in the capacity of general editor and literary adviser of Froben's press.

    0
    0
  • Froben's enterprise, united with Erasmus's editorial skill, raised the press of Basel, for a time, to be the most important in Europe.

    0
    0
  • But during the years of Erasmus's co-operation the Froben press took the lead of all the presses in Europe, both in the standard value of the works published and in style of typographical execution.

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    0
  • A desire for change of air - he fancied Freiburg was damp - rumours of a new war with France, and the necessity of seeing his Ecclesiastes through the press, took him back to Basel in 1535.

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    0
  • Though thus afflicted he never ceased his literary activity, dictating his tract On the Purity of the Church, and revising the sheets of a translation of Origen which was passing through the Froben press.

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    0
  • It must be remembered that the commercial interests of Froben's press led to the introduction of Erasmus's name on many a title page when he had little to do with the book, e.g.

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    0
  • He had at hand a few late Basel MSS., one of which he sent straight to press, correcting them in places by collations of others which had been sent to him by Colet in England.

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    0
  • But his courage, though impugned, was sufficient to make him press for a court-martial, and a court at last assembled in 1760.

    0
    0
  • Whenever opinions did happen to be expressed which could be construed as criticism of Austria or Germany the offenders were speedily punished, and it was not long before the political leaders of the Czechs and Slovaks found themselves in confinement, some of them under sentence of death, while the Czech and Slovak press was subjected to a rigorous censorship and many of its organs prohibited from appearing.

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    0
  • The Latin stipendium (for stipipendium) is derived from slips, a gift, contribution (originally a heap of coins, stipare, to press; mass together) and pendere, to weigh out, pay.

    0
    0
  • Liberty of the Press was promised subject to the passing of a law to restrain its abuses.

    0
    0
  • In the year 1474 a press was set up in the latter city, where Gunther Zainer printed the first book.

    0
    0
  • The first press from which books in the Polish language appeared was that of Hieronymus Wietor, a Silesian, who commenced publishing in 1515.

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  • A few fragments printed in Polish had appeared before this, as the Lord's Prayer in the statutes of the bishops of Breslau in 1475, the story of Pope Urban in Latin, German and Polish in 1505, &c.; but the first complete work in the Polish language appeared from the press of this printer at Cracow in 1521, under the title, Speeches of the Wise King Solomon.

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  • In 1522, a Polish translation of Ecclesiastes appeared from that press, and before the conclusion of that year The Life of Christ, with woodcuts, translated into Polish by Balthasar Opec. Many other presses were soon established.

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  • At Lemberg, the capital of Austrian Galicia, there is an active Polish press.

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    0
  • At Warsaw, since the last insurrection, the university has become entirly Russianized, and its Transactions are published in Russian; but Polish works of merit still issue from the press - among others the leading Polish literary journal, Biblioteka warszawska.

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  • The monastery contains a school of picturemakers of ancient origin, whose productions are widely diffused throughout the empire, and a printing press, from which have issued liturgical and religious works, the oldest known examples bearing the date 1616.

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  • He founded or endowed various professorships, including those of Hebrew and Arabic, and the office of public orator, encouraged English and foreign scholars, such as Voss, Selden and Jeremy Taylor, founded the university printing press, procuring in 1633 the royal patent for Oxford, and obtained for the Bodleian library over 1300 MSS., adding a new wing to the building to contain his gifts.

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  • A combatant in the volunteer corps during the war of 1848, he returned to Brescia after the defeat of Novara, and for a time earned a livelihood by teaching law, but was molested by the Austrian police and forbidden to teach in consequence of his refusal to contribute pro-Austrian articles to the press.

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  • An increasing number of workers in this field of plant biology in England, on the Continent and in America has produced a great mass of observations, which have recently been brought together in Dr Paul Knuth's classic work, Handbook of Flower Pollination, an English translation of which has been published (1908) by the Clarendon Press.

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  • The former includes electrodes, lamp carbons, &c. Coke, or some other form of amorphous carbon, is mixed with a little tar, and the required article moulded in a press or by a die.

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  • iv.,1862), and separately in his Novum Testamentum Sinaiticum (1863); in 1909 it was published in collotype by the Clarendon Press, Oxford.

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  • 52, implies that Felix had been in some position where the Jewish authorities could judge of his fitness when he tells us that the high priest Jonathan used to press on Felix, as a reason for urging him to govern well, the fact he that had asked for his appointment to the procuratorship (Ant.

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  • The responsibilities of administration have, however, often converted a political free-lance into a steady-going official, and the Unionist press did its best to encourage such a tendency by continual praise of the departmental action of the new minister.

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  • He had also prepared for the press an elaborate.

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  • Perrin, The Pioneer Press of Kentucky (1888); G.

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  • In Italy, by a departure from the traditional policy of the Roman Church, the newly formed "Pious Society of St Jerome for the Dissemination of the Holy Gospels" issued in 1901 from the Vatican press a new Italian version of the Four Gospels and Acts.

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  • With Abel Remusat he was joint founder of the Societe asiatique, and was inspector of oriental types at the royal printing press.

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  • But Guidiccioni, on a careful study of the papers, changed his mind; it is supposed that the cause of this change was in large measure the strong interest in the new scheme exhibited by John III., king of Portugal, who instructed his ambassador to press it on the pope and to ask Ignatius to send some priests of his Society for mission work in Portugal and its Indian possessions.

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  • At all events there is no doubt that in 1525 he was in Cologne, engaged in printing at the press of Peter Quentel a quarto edition of the New Testament.

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  • P g 4 535 is evident that Coverdale must have been engaged on the preparation of the work for the press at almost as early a date as Tyndale.

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  • At the request of Henry VIII., a licence was granted to Regnault for this purpose by Francis I., while Coverdale and Grafton were sent over in 1538 to superintend the work as it passed through the press.

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  • This was the first of seven editions of this noble Bible which issued from the press during the years 1539-1541, - the second of them, that of 1540, called Cranmer's Bible from the fact that it contained a long Preface by Archbishop Cranmer, having the important addition " This is the Byble apoynted to the vse of the churches " on the titlepage.

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  • From the above it appears that the actual work of revision occupied about two years and nine months, an additional nine months being required for the final preparation for press.

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  • Harold Browne (1811-1891), bishop of Ely; Christopher Wordsworth, bishop of Lincoln; and Lord Arthur Hervey (1808 1 A reprint of this edition has been published by the Clarendon Press (Oxford, 1833).

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    0
  • The delegates of the Clarendon Press in Oxford, and the syndics of the Pitt Press in Cambridge, entered into a liberal arrangement with the revisers, by which the necessary funds were provided for all their expenses.

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  • The Greek Text of the New Testament adopted by the Revisers was edited for the Clarendon Press by Archdeacon Palmer (Oxford, 1881).

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  • The news of his father's death reached Eric as he was on the point of embarking for England to press in person his suit for the hand of Queen Elizabeth.

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  • Meanwhile Mayhew had recognized the jurisdiction of Maine; 2 and though the officials of that province showed no disposition to press their claim, it seems that this technical suzerainty continued until 1664, when the Duke of York received from his brother, Charles II., the charter for governing New York, New Jersey, and other territory, including Martha's Vineyard.

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  • Tchertkoff (The Free Age Press, Christchurch, Hants); Aylmer Maude, A Peculiar People, the Doukhobors.

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  • His Liberalism found expression in the extension of press freedom, the repeal of imprisonment for debt, and the abolition of ecclesiastical tithes.

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  • His outlook upon the west was thus summarized by him in a letter published in the Indian press at the close of 1919: " The bulk of English people can never be in a normal state of mind with regard to us, our situation being unnatural, and I am impelled to think that it is best for us to do our own work quietly in our own surroundings."

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  • To trot, press the legs to the saddle, and raise the bridle hand a little, and, after a moment's sitting close, begin to rise ("pose") in cadence with the action of the horse.

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  • For the consideration of some classes of business the Senate goes into executive or secret session, although what is done at this session usually leaks out, and finds its way to the public through the press.

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  • The ordinary duties of these committees are to raise and spend money for electioneering and otherwise in the interests of the party, to organize meetings, to look after the press, to attend to the admission of immigrants or new-comers as voters; and generally to attract and enrol recruits in the party forces.

    0
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  • The straight, upper paddles form the weir, and can be raised against the stream by making the water from the upper pool press upon the upper faces of the slightly larger lower paddles, .

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  • S., April 1904) was in the press in 1910.

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  • The new viceroy was also called upon to decide grave questions between the native population and the resident British, and he resolved upon a liberal policy towards the former, among his measures being the repeal of the Vernacular Press Act, the extension of local government and the appointment of an Education Commission.

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  • In 1869 the government of Canada sent a deputation to England to press upon the imperial government the necessity of asserting Canada's position in regard to the fisheries, and the desirability of settling other questions in dispute with the republic. The outcome of this application was the appointment of a commission to consider and if possible settle outstanding differences between the three countries.

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  • But one of his earliest measures was to establish freedom of the press.

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  • From the Serampore press there issued in his lifetime over 200,000 Bibles and portions in nearly forty different languages and dialects, Carey himself undertaking most of the literary work.

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  • A provision intended to prevent lobbying is that no one except legislators and the representatives of the press may be admitted to the floor of the House except by unanimous vote.

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    0
  • The Federal authorities, as soon as the existence of peonage became known, took active measures to stamp it out, and were supported by the press and by the leading citizens of the state.

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  • Life, Letters and Dissertation) published by the Clarendon Press (1871); this edition, revised throughout and largely re-written, was re-published by the same author (1901).

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  • His last work, Chronicon Paschale a mundo condito ad Heraclii imperatoris annum vigesimum (Paris, 1689), was passing through the press when Du Cange died, and consequently it was edited by Etienne Baluze, and published with an eloge of the author prefixed.

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  • The American press contained many notices of the propaganda and its success.

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  • This became the text of a violent press campaign which he carried on, against the policy of the Supreme Council in general and of Mr. Lloyd George in particular (see France: History).

    0
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  • The Conquest of Ireland was republished in 1892 by Goddard Henry Orpen, under the title of The Song of Dermot and the Earl (Oxford, Clarendon Press).

    0
    0
  • Thus, while armaments are increasing, and wars are being fought out in the press and in public discussion, the great powers are steadily working out a system of written law and establishing a judiciary to adjust their differences in accordance with it.'

    0
    0
  • The utility of the diplomatic service has been considerably diminished through the increasing efficiency of the public press as a medium of information.

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  • On this are the post office, Free Press office, Y.M.C.A.

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    0
  • Lumby for the Pitt Press in 1883.

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  • Lumby for the Pitt Press (1879), by William Morris at the Kelmscott Press (1893), by J.

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  • Churton Collins for the Clarendon Press (1904), by R.

    0
    0
  • It was not given to the press till 1626, with the date of Paris.

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    0
  • Ba was composed; and soon after Charles had allied himself with a Catholic, the Life by Cresacre More issued from the press.

    0
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  • A treatise on the analysis of thought (Sur la decomposition de la pensee), although sent to press, was never printed.

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  • An exact transcript of the Journal has been issued by the Cambridge University Press.

    0
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  • But instead of returning to the concrete fact of the equivalence of momentum, by which each body moving makes the other move oppositely, he denied that bodies do reciprocally act on one another, and even that bodies as mutually resisting substances press one another apart in collision.

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  • From 1880 until his death he was editor and part proprietor of the Philadelphia Press.

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  • From the middle of May, when Mr Chamberlain began to press the matter, Mr Balfour had a difficult hand to play, so long as it was uncertain how the party would follow the new lead.

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  • His dialectical dexterity in evading the necessity of expressing his fiscal opinions further than he had already done became a daily subject for contemptuous criticism in the Liberal press; but he insisted that in any case no definite action could be taken till the next parliament; and while he declined to go the "whole hog" - as the phrase went - with Mr Chamberlain, he did nothing to discourage Mr Chamberlain's campaign.

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  • This conflict, moreover, brought Ultra montanism the enormous advantage that, even after the abolition of the May Laws, it had still left to it a well-disciplined press, an admirable organization, and a network of interests and interested parties; and all these combined to make the Centrum the strongest and the most influential political party in Germany for the remainder of the 19th century.

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  • Having founded in London his "Free Russian Press," of the fortunes of which, during ten years, he gave an interesting account in a book published (in Russian) in 1863, he issued from it a great number of Russian works, all levelled against the system of government prevailing in Russia.

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  • For three years, it is true, the founders of the "Free Press" went on printing, "not only without selling a single copy, but scarcely being able to get a single copy introduced into Russia"; so that when at last a bookseller bought ten shillings' worth of Baptized Property, the half-sovereign was set aside by the surprised editors in a special place of honour.

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  • liberty was to a great extent conceded to the press.

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  • In a series of pamphlets he advocated the principles of a Liberal monarchy and the freedom of the press.

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  • Perhaps the greatest service he rendered to his party was his consistent advocacy of the freedom of the press.

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  • (6) In recent years an attempt has been made to name Barbour as the author of the Buik of Alexander (a translation of the Roman d'Alexandre and associated pieces, including the Vcrux du Paon), as known in the unique edition, c. 1580, printed at the Edinburgh press of Alexander Arbuthnot.

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  • in 1622, and added to by Urban VIII., who founded the celebrated College of the Propaganda for the education of missionaries, and his polyglot press for printing the liturgical books of the East.

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  • The assaults of the South in defence of slavery upon free speech, free press, the right of petition and trial by jury, he pronounced "exorbitant claims. ..

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  • SOMA (Sanskrit for "pressed juice," from the root su, to press), in Hindu mythology the god who is a personification of the soma plant (Asclepias acida), from which an intoxicating milky juice is squeezed.

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  • He made himself exceedingly unpopular u1 1810 by bringing about the exclusion of strangers, including reporters for the press, from the House of Commons under the standing order, which led to the imprisonment of Sir Francis Burdett in the Tower and to riots in London.

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  • The edition of Petrarch's Italian Poems, published by Aldus in 1501, and the Terzerime, which issued from the same press in 1502, were edited by Bembo, who was on intimate terms with the great typographer.

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    0
  • It was also the site of one of the earliest printing-presses, and copies of the stannary laws and of a translation of Boethius issued from the Tavistock press in the reign of Henry VIII.

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    0
  • His letters were printed first in a selection, Epistolae ad Gallos (12mo, Leiden, 1648), abounding, though an Elzevir, in errors of the press.

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  • The purpose was reasonable, but it was impossible to draw an ideal line and the result was a general alienation of the press.

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  • It is a wrong though common practice to press the surface of the soil in the pot in order to feel if it is moist enough, as this soon consolidates it, and prevents it from getting the full benefit of aeration.

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  • The crushed mass is then placed in hempen cloths and pressed in a screw or hydraulic press.

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  • In place of the old system of privileges and exemptions were set equality before the law, universal liability to taxation, abolition of serfdom, security of person and property, liberty of conscience and of the press.

    0
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  • Freedom of worship, freedom of the press, and political equality were principles of the constitution, guaranteed to all.

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    0
  • It must be clearly borne in mind that though the Basidiomycetes show no traces of differ entiated sexual organs yet, like the micro and lepto forms of the Uredineae, they still show (in the association of nuclei and later fusion of From Annals of Botany, by permission of the Clarendon Press.

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  • Castings which, like hydraulic press cylinders and steam radiators, must be dense and hence must have but little graphite lest their contents leak through their walls, should not have more than 1.75% of silicon and may have even as little as 1% if impenetrability is so important that softness and consequent ease of machining must be sacrificed to it.

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  • In forging, whether under a hammer or under a press, the action is evidently a squeeze, however skilfully guided.

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  • The piece travels through the rolls very rapidly, so that the reduction takes place over its whole length in a very few seconds, whereas in forging, whether under hammer or press, after one part of the piece has been compressed the piece must next be raised, moved forward, and placed so that the hammer or press may compress the next part of its length.

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  • The first cost of a hammer of moderate size is much less than that of a hydraulic press of like capacity, as is readily understood when we stop to reflect what powerful pressure, if gradually applied, would be needed to drive the nail which a light blow from our hand hammer forces easily into the woodwork.

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  • Nevertheless the press uses much less power than the hammer, because much of the force of the latter is dissipated in setting up useless - indeed harmful, and at times destructive - vibrations in the foundations and the surrounding earth and buildings.

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  • Moreover, the effect of the sharp blow of the hammer is relatively superficial, and does not penetrate to the interior of a large piece as the slowly applied pressure of the hydraulic press does.

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  • Because of these facts the great hammers have given place to enormous forging presses, the 125-ton Bethlehem hammer, for instance, to a 14,000-ton hydraulic press, moved by water under a pressure of FIG.

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  • MANUTIUS, the Latin name of an Italian family (Mannucci, Manuzio), famous in the history of printing as organizers of the Aldine press.

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  • Teobaldo Mannucci, better known as Aldo Manuzio, the founder of the Aldine press, was born in 1450 at Sermoneta in the Papal States.

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    0
  • Alberto Pio supplied Aldo with funds for starting his printing press, and gave him lands at Carpi.

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    0
  • These have no date; but they are the earliest tracts issued from his press, and are called by him "Precursors of the Greek Library."

    0
    0
  • Nor was the Aldine press idle in regard to Latin and Italian classics.

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  • Andrea had already bought the press established by Nicholas Jenson at Venice.

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    0
  • After this event his grandfather and two uncles, the three Asolani, carried on the Aldine press, while Paolo prosecuted his early studies at Venice.

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  • invited him to Rome, offering him a yearly stipend of 500 ducats, and undertaking to establish and maintain his press there.

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    0
  • Aldo remained at Venice, studying literature and superintending the Aldine press.

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  • The Aldine press continued through this period to issue books, but none of signal merit; and in 1585 Aldo determined to quit his native city for Bologna, where he occupied the chair of eloquence for a few months.

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    0
  • In 1597 he died, leaving children, but none who cared or had capacity to carry on the Aldine press.

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  • " Never literary attempt was more unfortunate; it fell dead-born from the press, without reaching such distinction as even to excite a murmur among the zealots."

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    0
  • The Belgian constitution stipulates for " freedom of conscience, of education, of the press and also of the right of meeting," but the sovereign must be a member of the Church of Rome.

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    0
  • The principle of liberty of worship and of the press, which it laid down, was so offensive to the Catholics that the bishops condemned it publicly, and in the Doctrinal Judgment actually forbade their flocks to take the oath.

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  • It was also one of the earliest books to issue from the press.

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  • By this time he had a very large business as advocate, and was engaged on behalf of journalists in many press prosecutions.

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    0
  • He stood forward with a noble resolution to maintain the freedom of the press, and severely censured the rigorous measures of the police department.

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    0
  • He advocated trial by jury in press prosecutions, the extension of municipal franchises and other liberal measures.

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  • It must always have been perfectly well known that population will probably (though not necessarily) increase with every augmentation of the supply of subsistence, and may, in some instances, inconveniently press upon, or even for a certain time exceed, the number properly corresponding to that supply.

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    0
  • Liberal-minded as he was, he held that "the will of the nation should be a law to the king," and he boldly upheld the freedom of the press as the surest of safety-valves.

    0
    0
  • Hobbes now entrusted it, early in 1646, to his admirer, the Frenchman Samuel de Sorbiere, by whom it was seen through the Elzevir press at Amsterdam in 1647 - having previously inserted a number of notes in reply to objections, and also a striking preface, in the course of which he explained its relation to the other parts of the system not yet forthcoming, and the (political) occasion of its having been composed and being now published before them.

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  • 229-278), issued from the press, claiming to be an answer to a discourse on the same subject by Bishop Bramhall of Londonderry (afterwards archbishop of Armagh, d.

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  • But as a matter of fact no more entirely factitious book ever issued from the press.

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    0
  • The fifteen hundred guineas which the booksellers had agreed to pay him had been advanced and spent before the last sheets issued from the press.

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    0
  • In order to defray the charges of her funeral, and to pay some debts which she had left, he wrote a little book in a single week, and sent off the sheets to the press without reading them over.

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    0
  • The others have been re-edited with scrupulous care for the Oxford University Press by the pious diligence of that most enthusiastic of all Johnsonians, Dr Birkbeck Hill.

    0
    0
  • The legislative power of the empire also takes precedence of that of the separate states in the regulation of matters affecting freedom of migration (Freizugigkeit), domicile, settlement and the rights of German subjects generally, as well as in all that relates to banking, patents, protection of intellectual property, navigation of rivers and canals, civil and criminal legislation, judicial procedure, sanitary police, and control of the press and of associations.

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  • This office is divided into four departments, dealing with (i.) the business of the Bundesrat, the Rcichstag, the elections, citizenship, passports, the press, and military and naval matters, so far as the last concern the civil authorities; (ii.) purely social matters, such as old age pensions, accident insurance, migration, settlement, poor law administration, &c.; (iii.) sanitary matters, patents, canals, steamship lines, weights and measures; and (iv.) commercial and economic relationssuch as agriculture, industry, commercial treaties and statistics.

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  • Though still, in fact at least, if not by law, excluded from many public offices, especially from commands in the army, they nevertheless are very powerful in Germany the press being for the most part in their hands, and they furnisl in many cities fully one-half of the lawyers and the members of the corporation.

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  • These containedelaborateprovisions for supervising the universities and muzzling the press, laying down that no constitution inconsistent with the monarchical principle should be granted, and setting up a central commission at Mainz to inquire into the machinations of the great revolutionary secret society which existed only in the imagination of the authorities.

    0
    0
  • At the same time the ministry persecuted the press, and allowed hardly a whisper of discontent to pass unpunished.

    0
    0
  • As he had used his large personal property to organize a regiment in order to regain his possessions, the Prussian government had sequestrated that part of his income, amounting to some ~5o,ooo, over which they had control, and used it as secret service money chiefly for controlling the press; to this fund the name Welfen-Fond was commonly given.

    0
    0
  • To meet the increase in the French army, and the open menaces in which the Russian press indulged, a further increase in the German army seemed desirable.

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  • Moreover, the bitter and unscrupulous attacks of the Bismarckian press to which Caprivi was exposed made him unpopular in the country, for the people could not feel at ease so long as they were governed by a minister of whom Bismarck disapproved.

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    0
  • His son, Henry John Patmore (1860-1883), left a number of poems posthumously printed at Mr Daniell's Oxford Press, which show an unmistakable lyrical quality.

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    0
  • Its principal manufactures are gunpowder, carpets, brick, cotton press machinery, and coffin hardware.

    0
    0
  • On October 22, 1669, he was sent for by the delegates of the press, "that whereas he had taken a great deal of paines in writing the Hist.

    0
    0
  • in 1501) gave special directions to the archbishops of Cologne, Mainz, Trier and Magdeburg regarding the growing abuses of the printing press; in 1515 the Lateran council formulated the decree De Impressione Librorum, which required that no work should be printed without previous examination by the proper ecclesiastica' authority, the penalty of unlicensed printing being excommunication of the culprit, and confiscation and destruction of the books.

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  • He also wrote on Spanish America, China, General Miranda, the East India Company, and the Liberty of the Press.

    0
    0
  • He contributed largely to every number - his principal topics being Education, Freedom of the Press, and Prison Discipline (under which he expounded Bentham's "Panopticon").

    0
    0
  • After his marriage he went to Vienna to press the restitution of his wife's rights, and spent some time in Warsaw.

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    0
  • Rudolph Under him the Jesuits were encouraged to press on H.

    0
    0
  • 2 The peril from the independent growth of Liberalism within was guarded against by a rigid supervision of the press and the re-establishment of clerical control over education.

    0
    0
  • Each of these had taken advantage of the March troubles to press its claims, and everywhere the government had shown the same yielding spirit.

    0
    0
  • Vienna again became the centre g of a despotic government the objects of which were to Germanize the Magyars and Sla y s, to check all agitation for a constitution, and to suppress all attempts to secure a free press.

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  • influenced by the revolutionary movement in Russia, resolved to press for franchise reform in Austria also.

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    0
  • His apprenticeship ended in 1826, when he began the publication of a new paper (actually the old one under a new name), the Free Press, in his native place.

    0
    0
  • Other newspapers were afterwards established upon the same principles; anti-slavery societies, founded upon the doctrine of immediate emancipation, sprang up on every hand; the agitation was carried into political parties, into the press, and into legislative and ecclesiastical assemblies; until in 1861 the Southern states, taking alarm from the election of a president known to be at heart opposed to slavery though pledged to enforce all the constitutional safeguards of the system, seceded from the Union and set up a separate government.

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  • Garrison's visit to England enraged the pro-slavery people and press of the United States at the outset, and when he returned home in September with the "protest" against the Colonization Society, and announced that he had engaged the services of George Thompson as a lecturer against American slavery, there were fresh outbursts of rage on every hand.

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  • While his edition was passing through the press, it was observed by the present writer that all the while the work had been in our hands in Greek, though in a slightly abbreviated form, as it had been imbedded as a speech in a religious novel written about the 6th century, and entitled "The Life of Barlaam and Josaphat."

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  • of the Rev. C. Plummer's edition of Two of the Saxon Chronicles Parallel (Clarendon Press, 1892, 1899); to which the student may be referred for detailed arguments.

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    0
  • In 1865 the Clarendon Press published Two Saxon Chronicles (A and E) Parallel, with supplementary extracts from the others, by the Rev. John Earle.

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    0
  • At Bulak are the arsenal, foundry and railway works, a paper manufactory and the government printing press, founded by Mehemet Ali.

    0
    0
  • They also disliked and opposed his measures for introducing education among the natives and his encouraging the freedom of the press.

    0
    0
  • Side by side with these literary organs there exists a vernacular press largely devoted to nationalist propaganda.

    0
    0
  • For some time Abbas Hilmi clung to his idea of liberating himself from all control, and secretly encouraged a nationalist and antiBritish agitation in the native press; but he gradually came to perceive the folly, as well as the danger to himself, of such a course, and accordingly refrained from giving any overt occasion for complaint or protest.

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  • The pan-Islamic press, allowed full licence by the Cairo authorities, spread abroad rumours that the Egyptian government intended to construct fortifications in the Sinai peninsula with the design of menacing the railway, under construction by Turkey, from Damascus to Mecca.

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  • Hartmann, The Arabic Press of Egypt (London, 1899).

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    0
  • Graham was placed in command of this force, with orders to break down the power of Osman Digna and to press the construction of the railway towards Berber.

    0
    0
  • Although checked, the dervishes were not discouraged, and continued to press upon the frontier in frequent raids, and thus in many bloody skirmishes the fighting qualities of the Egyptian troops were developed.

    0
    0
  • The theory of the physiocrats now found powerful advocates in Denmark; and after 1755, when the press censorship was abolished so far as regarded political economy and agriculture, a thorough discussion of the whole agrarian question became possible.

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  • Moreover, until two years after Bernstorff's death in 1797, the Danish press enjoyed a larger freedom of speech than the press of any other absolute monarchy in Europe, so much so that at last Denmark became suspected of favouring Jacobin views.

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  • (1839-1848), the agitation for a free constitution, both in Denmark and the duchies, continued to grow in strength, ins spite of press prosecutions and other g ?

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  • In 1490, the first printing press was set up at Copenhagen, by Gottfried of Gemen, who had brought it from Westphalia; and five years later the first Danish book was printed.

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  • Stevenson, Clarendon Press, 1904); and the Saxon Chronicles (text and notes by Earle and Plummer, 2 vols., Clar.

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  • Press, 1902).

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  • Press, 1901).

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  • Press, 1899); translation by the same (1900).

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  • Press, 1835)..

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  • Ward) and in Collins's Peerage, and the Correspondence of Lord Clarendon with James, earl of Abingdon,1683-1685(Clarendon Press, 1896).

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  • The World War brought about various forms of restriction of publicity in the shape of a censorship, which provides a new chapter in the history of the Press Laws.

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  • - The following note to newspaper editors, dated July 27 1914, was the first official intimation to the British press of the approach of war: "At a meeting of the Admiralty War Office and Press Committee, held this afternoon, it was resolved that as, in view of the present situation, the authorities may have to take exceptional measures, the Press should be asked to refrain from publishing any information relative to movements of British warships, troops, and aircraft, or to war material, fortifications, and naval and military defences, without first communicating with the Admiralty and War Office respectively in accordance with the arrangement which was notified to you by me in January of last year.

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  • The " Admiralty War Office and Press Committee " had been formed in 1911, mainly through the efforts of Mr. (afterwards Sir) Reginald Brade, to establish a permanent liaison in peace and war between the Admiralty and the War Office on the one hand and the Press on the other.

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  • 7 the Press Bureau (the outward and visible sign of the censorship) was established by Lord Kitchener, acting in conjunction with Mr. Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty.

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  • The objects of the Press Bureau were: (r) The censoring of incoming and outgoing press cablegrams and certain inland press messages, chiefly those passing through the General Post Office.

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  • His job was to censor matter voluntarily submitted by the Press.

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  • These regulations placed heavy shackles upon the Press, but in the main they were accepted with patriotic equanimity.

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  • It will be seen that the Press Bureau had no power to insist upon the submission of matter for censorship. The responsibility rested with the editor, who could publish what he thought fit, subject to complying with the Defence of the Realm Regulations.

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  • Cable and Postal Censorship. - In addition to the Press Bureau, censorships of incoming and outgoing cables, letters and parcels, were established by the War Office at the commencement of the war with the three-fold object of preventing information of military value from reaching the enemy, of acquiring similar information for British purposes and of checking the dissemination of information likely to be useful to the enemy or prejudicial to the Allies.

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  • The cable censorship extended throughout the Empire, and the number of persons employed in the United Kingdom, exclusive of those in the Press Bureau, was about 200.

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  • The department was divided into three branches - (r) the section which censored the correspondence of prisoners of war in the United Kingdom and British prisoners in enemy countries; (2) the private correspondence section which dealt with letters from members of the British Expeditionary Force, letters and parcels to and from certain foreign countries, press messages sent abroad by other means than cable, and newspapers.

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  • In the early part of the war a great outcry was made by the British (and also the American) newspapers concerning the working of the Press cable censorship in London.

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  • In numerous instances, Press cables received in England were entirely suppressed without notice to the sender or addressee, and in others messages were so mutilated as to be indecipherable.

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  • These complaints led to a declaration by the Foreign Office on Dec. 20 1915, that in future incoming press cablegrams would not be censored from a political point of view; the responsibility of publishing would be with the editors who knew that a prosecution against them, under the Defence of the Realm Act, might result from the publication of anything endangering the good relations between Great Britain and the Allies or the Neutrals.

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  • This change, however, only applied to censorship by the Foreign Office, and messages were still liable to censorship from the point of view of other departments (Admiralty, War Office, Home Office or Treasury, for instance) consulted by the Press Bureau - a system which continued until 1919.

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  • These were primarily (and compulsorily) censored by military censors on the field, but they all came through the Press Bureau, which occasionally exercised a super-censorship. The methods adopted caused constant grumbling and discontent.

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  • The news supplied was meagre and inappropriate, and it did not take long for mischievous results to accrue, and the official mind was at first disposed to blame the Press for what was wrong in the " publicity " of the moment.

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  • On March 26 the Newspaper Proprietors' Association, through its chairman Sir George (afterwards Lord) Riddell, sent the following letter to the Press Bureau, and copies to the Prime Minister, Mr. Winston Churchill, Lord Kitchener and other members of the Cabinet: "My Council have had under consideration your Memorandum of 12th March, 1915, Serial No.

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