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posterity

posterity

posterity Sentence Examples

  • Let our remotest posterity recall your achievements this day with pride.

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  • Elisha was apparently the champion, and posterity told of his exploits when Samaria was visited with the sword.

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  • What gave them a seeming importance in the eyes of posterity was the fact that the true history of the Egyptians, Mesopotamians, Arabians and Hittites had been well-nigh forgotten.

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  • 13), and such a priest naturally handed down his place to his posterity (Judges xviii.

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  • Sixtus died execrated by his own subjects; but posterity has recognized in him one of the greatest popes.

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  • "Posterity will do him justice," he concluded, and at once turned to Pierre.

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  • The writings and career of Bolingbroke make a far weaker impression upon posterity than they made on contemporaries.

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  • But a decision to which he soon came deprived posterity of the results which might have sprung from the policy of his earlier years.

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  • Among the benevolent acts attributed to renowned Buddhist priests posterity specially remembers their efforts to encourage the building of roads and bridges.

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  • In the eyes of posterity he became more and more completely the model of an Israelitish king and the natural consequence was that he was idealized.

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  • One is that Adam is said to have had from the first a wicked heart, owing to which he fell, and his posterity likewise, into sin and guilt.

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  • There is some reason to hope that the day of these misconceptions is passed; although there is also some reason to fear that on other grounds the present era may be known to posterity as an era of instrumentation comparable, in its gorgeous chaos of experiment and its lack of consistent ideas of harmony and form, only to the monodic period at the beginning of the 17th century, in which no one had ears for anything but experiments in harmonic colour.

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  • The essence of his views is contained in the following passage, which he follows up with the conclusion "that one and the same kind of living filaments is and has been the cause of all organic life": "Would it be too bold to imagine that, in the great length of time since the earth began to exist, perhaps millions of ages before the commencement of the history of mankind, - would it be too bold to imagine that all warm-blooded animals have arisen from one living filament, which the great First Cause endued with animality, with the power of acquiring new parts, attended with new propensities, directed by irritations, sensations, volitions and associations, and thus possessing the faculty of continuing to improve by its own inherent activity, and of delivering down these improvements by generation to its posterity, world without end!"

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  • His early life gave little indication of his subsequent activity, and up to the moment of his accession in 1855 no one ever imagined that he would be known to posterity as a great reformer.

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  • Under the most splendid house in the city is still to be found the cellar where they store their roots as of old, and long after the superstructure has disappeared posterity remark its dent in the earth.

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  • Montaigne's widow survived him, and his daughter left posterity which became merged in the noble houses of Segur and Lur-Saluces.

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  • Might not the basket, stable-broom, mat-making, corn-parching, linen-spinning, and pottery business have thrived here, making the wilderness to blossom like the rose, and a numerous posterity have inherited the land of their fathers?

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  • The judgment of posterity has not repeated the flattering verdict of his contemporaries; but he remains the model of a great king in all that concerns the externals of kingship.

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  • The names of Pasteur and Lister will descend to posterity as those of two of the greatest figures in the annals of medical science, and indeed of science in general, during the 19th century.

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  • In accumulating property for ourselves or our posterity, in founding a family or a state, or acquiring fame even, we are mortal; but in dealing with truth we are immortal, and need fear no change nor accident.

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  • The book appears to have been known in the ages immediately succeeding his own; and, though there is no contemporary manuscript in existence, there are some half-dozen which appear to date from the end of the 13th or the course of the 14th century, while one at least appears to be a copy made from his own work in that spirit of unintelligent faithfulness which is much more valuable to posterity than more pragmatical editing.

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  • Recriminations ensued until his death in 1557, and although he sustained his claim for priority, posterity has not conceded to him the honour of his discovery, for his solution is now known as Cardan's Rule.

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  • He won his cause; but in the eyes of all posterity he justified the reproaches of his contemporaries, who describe him as a cruel, venal, grasping seeker after power, eager to support a despotism for the sake of honours, offices and emoluments secured for himself by a bargain with the oppressors of his country.

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  • are eight horns in the orchestra their material should be indistinguishable from pianoforte writing, and that, in short, the part of every instrument should look exactly like the part of every other - such questions are for posterity to decide.

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  • As for the influence he exercised on posterity, it is enough to say that Luca Pacioli, about 1500, in his celebrated Summa, leans so exclusively to Leonardo's works (at that time known in manuscript only) that he frankly acknowledges his dependence on them, and states that wherever no other author is quoted all belongs to Leonardus Pisanus.

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  • Not only did his contemporaries, carried away by their passions, talk in this way, but posterity and history have acclaimed Napoleon as grand, while Kutuzov is described by foreigners as a crafty, dissolute, weak old courtier, and by Russians as something indefinite--a sort of puppet useful only because he had a Russian name.

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  • Poetry, philology, philosophy all flourished under his encouragement, and his name was handed down to posterity as the first of the many Spanish Jews who combined diplomatic skill with artistic culture.

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  • " His published writings have had with posterity a very indifferent success; his literary reputation rests on a volume of letters never designed to appear in print.

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  • After creation Adam was allowed to till the ground on condition that he sold himself and his posterity to the owner of the earth.

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  • It will be conveyed over to posterity."The army faction gradually gathered strength in the parliament.

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  • His conversational powers rivalled those of Dr Johnson; and, if more of his sayings have not been chronicled for the benefit of posterity, the defect is due to the absence of a Boswell.

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  • Perhaps Gerbert's chief claim to the remembrance of posterity is to be found in the care and expense with which he gathered together MSS.

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  • And certainly Manning does betray in these autobiographical fragments an unheroic sensitiveness to the verdict of posterity on his career.

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  • If that literature was to be a power in the world, it must be handed down to posterity in a form capable of being understood.

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  • Of the composition of history and the description of their own manners and customs by the Egyptians for posterity, few traces have reached our day.

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  • He gave to posterity not one code but two digests or collections of extracts, which are new only to this extent that they are arranged in a new order, having been previously altogether unconnected with one another, and that here and there their words have been modified in order to bring one extract into harmony with some other.

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  • Hillel lived in the memory of posterity chiefly as the great teacher who enjoined and practised the virtues of charity, humility and true piety.

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  • From the time when he was bidden to leave his country to enter the unknown land, Yahweh was ever present to encourage him to trust in the future when his posterity should possess the land, and so, in its bitterest hours, Israel could turn for consolation to the promises of the past which enshrined in Abraham its hopes for the future.

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  • 4 The Samaritans, for their part, claimed the traditions of their land and called themselves the posterity of Joseph, Ephraim and Manasseh.

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  • Considering that his legal reforms are those by which his name is mainly known to posterity, it is curious that we should have hardly any information as to his legal knowledge, or the share which he took in those reforms. In person he was somewhat above the middle height, well-shaped, with plenty of fresh colour in his cheeks, and an extraordinary power of doing without food and sleep. He spent most of the night in reading or writing, and would sometimes go for a day with no food but a few green herbs.

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  • It is possible, though not certain, that to this date also belongs the famous portrait of himself at Munich bearing a false signature and date, 150o; in this it has been lately shown that the artist modified his own lineaments according to a preconceived scheme of facial proportion, so that it must be taken as an ideal rather than a literal presentment of himself to posterity as he appeared in the flower of his early middle age.

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  • The precise truth in these matters is hardly recoverable, even if it concerns posterity: and though Froude was often inaccurate, he was given full authority by Carlyle, he had all the unpublished material before him, and he was dead and unable to reply to criticism when the later attacks were made.

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  • If we except writers like Voltaire who could see in Augustus only the man who had destroyed the old republic and extinguished political liberty, the verdict of posterity on Augustus has varied just in proportion as his critics have fixed their attention, mainly, on the means by which he rose to power, or the use which he made of the power when acquired.

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  • Iunius Iuvenalis or Juvenal (c. 47-130), sum up for posterity the moral experience of the Roman world from the accession of Tiberius to the death of Domitian.

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  • If, then, the art of writing was unknown in Greece before, let us say, the 6th century B.C., it would be useless to expect that any events of Grecian history prior to about the 7th century B.C. could have been transmitted to posterity with any degree of historical accuracy.

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  • He died about fifty years before Abu `Ubaida and al-Asma`i, to whose labours posterity is largely indebted for the arrangement, elucidation and criticism of ancient Arabian verse; and his anthology was put together between fifty and sixty years before the compilation by Abu Tammam of the Ilamasa (q.v.).

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  • - Great as is Pascal's reputation as a philosopher and man of letters, it may be fairly questioned whether his claim to be remembered by posterity as a mathematician and physicist is not even greater.

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  • BARTOLOME DE LAS CASAS (1474-1566), for some time bishop of Chiapa in Mexico, and known to posterity as "The Apostle of the Indies," was a native of Seville.

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  • 24, 1600) declared that Sigismund and his posterity had forfeited the Swedish throne, and, passing over duke John, the second son of John III., a youth of ten, recognized duke Charles as their sovereign under the title of Charles IX.

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  • His posterity kept possession till 1369, when Timur or Tamerlane bore down everything before him, and established his capital at Samarkand, which with Bokhara regained for a time its former splendour.

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  • I have respected posterity; and should there be a posterity which cares for letters, I dare to hope that it will respect me."

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  • Although Pell had nothing to do with the solution, posterity has termed the equation Pell's Equation, or Problem, when more rightly it should be the Hindu Problem, in recognition of the mathematical attainments of the Brahmans.

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  • Other interpretations are "posterity of God" or "his name (shemo; perhaps Yahweh's) is God."

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  • In 1520 a potter named Gorodayu Goshonzui (known to posterity as Shonzui) made his way to Fuchow and thence to King-te-chen, where, after five years study, he acquired the art of manufacturing porcelain, as distinguished from pottery, together with the art of applying decoration in blue under the glaze.

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  • Another tradition places the expulsion of Hagar after the birth of Isaac. It was thirteen years after the birth of Ishmael, according to the latest narratives, that God appeared unto Abram with a renewed promise that his posterity should inhabit the land.

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  • 9); in the rabbinic literature "the fathers" are the more eminent of the earlier rabbis whose sayings were handed down for the guidance of posterity.

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  • A "General Society of Mayflower Descendants" was organized in 1894 by lineal descendants of passengers of the "Mayflower" to "preserve their memory, their records, their history, and all facts relating to them, their ancestors and their posterity."

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  • It was not so well received as his De concordia, but is more appreciated by posterity.

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  • His political works, in which the expression is often splendidly eloquent, spirited and dignified, are for the most part exceedingly rhetorical in style, while his philosophical essays were undertaken with the chief object of displaying his eloquence, and no characteristic renders writings less readable for posterity.

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  • His ambition was generally more manifest than his discretion; but fortune favoured his ambition, even as to himself, somewhat beyond expectation, and still more in his posterity.

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  • He is the industrious compiler who gathered up the remnants of the learning of his predecessors and transmitted them to posterity.

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  • Evelyn's friendship with Mary Blagge, afterwards lvIrs Godolphin, is recorded in the diary, when he says he designed "to consecrate her worthy life to posterity."

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  • In view of such Chinese sacrifices the names of the dead are inscribed on wooden plaques called spirit-tablets, into which the spirits are during the ceremony supposed to enter, having quitted the very heaven and presence of God in order to commune with posterity.

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  • Like a true prince of the Renaissance he favoured men of letters whom he trusted to preserve his reputation to posterity.

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  • He well deserved the surname of Le Bon, by which he is known to posterity.

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  • Although he often gave offence by his haughty and aggressive disposition, few German princes have earned so thoroughly the goodwill of posterity.

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  • in the XVIIIth, eventually received the honors of deification; and Hardadf under Cheops of the IVth Dynasty was little behind these two in the estimation of posterity.

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  • Like other masterpieces, they suggest much more than they clearly express, and endless meanings have been, rightly or wrongly, read into them by posterity.

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  • As the benefactor and protector of Roger Bacon he has a special title to the gratitude of posterity.

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  • But his chief claim upon the attentions of posterity is as a scholar.

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  • " I am in good hope," said Bacon himself, "that when Sir Edward Coke's reports and my rules and decisions shall come to posterity, there will be (whatsoever is now thought) question who was the greater lawyer."

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  • Elizabeth never forgave him; but Cecil corresponded with the Scottish lords, and their answer in July 1559, in Knox's handwriting, assures England not only of their own constancy, but of "a charge and commandment to our posterity, that the amity and league between you and us, contracted and begun in Christ Jesus, may by them be kept inviolated for ever."

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  • The massacre of St Bartholomew rather united English and Scottish Protestantism; and Knox in St Giles' pulpit, challenging the French ambassador to report his words, denounced God's vengeance on the crowned murderer and his posterity.

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  • Sigismund and his posterity were declared to have forfeited the Swedish crown which was to pass to the heirs male of Charles.

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  • Though Courbet's realistic work is not devoid of importance, it is as a landscape and sea painter that he will be most honoured by posterity.

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  • Posterity, indeed, has been able to recognize more fully the independent genius of those who carried out his purposes.

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  • Through the first sin Adam and his posterity lost Immortality, And His Will Received A Bias Towards Evil.

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  • The reasons leading to the great undertaking, in which Eusebius had no predecessors, were in part historical, in part apologetic. He believed that he was living at the beginning of a new age, and he felt that it was a fitting time, when the old order of things was passing away, to put on record for the benefit of posterity the great events which had occurred during the generations that were past.

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  • Accordingly, we find him journeying again in 1351 to Vaucluse, again refusing the office of papal secretary, again planning visionary reforms for the Roman people, and beginning that 'curious fragment of an autobiography which is known as the Epistle to Posterity.

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  • These are divided into Familiar Correspondence, Correspondence in Old Age, Divers Letters and Letters without a Title; to which may be added the curious autobiographical fragment entitled the Epistle to Posterity.

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  • The verdict of posterity will probably be kinder than the first, and less unmeasured than the second.

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  • There, in the Tze line, towards the end of the 8th century B.C., we find a Kung Kia, whose posterity, according to the rules for the dropping of surnames, became the Kung clan.

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  • His philosophical treatises abound with incoherent formulae to which, according to their inventor, every demonstration in every science may be reduced, and posterity has ratified Bacon's disdainful verdict on Lull's pretensions as a thinker; still the fact that he broke away from the scholastic system has recommended him to the historians of philosophy, and the subtle ingenuity of his dialectic has compelled the admiration of men so far apart in opinion as Giordano Bruno and Leibniz.

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  • If you have a video camera, record the show for posterity.

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  • and his posterity.

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  • Of him Edward Eggleston says: "A strange mixture of rashness, pious zeal, genial manners, hot temper, and harsh bigotry, his extravagances supply the condiment of humour to a very serious history - it is perhaps the principal debt posterity owes him."

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  • He took note of sites associated with the Roman invasion of Germany, and, amid the scenes of the victories of Drusus, he had a dream in which the victor enjoined him to transmit his exploits to posterity (Plin.

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  • He won the admiration of Albert Gallatin and others by his powerful support of the movement in 1811 to recharter the Bank of the United States; he earned the condemnation of posterity by his authorship in 1820 of the four-years-term law, which limited the term of service of thousands of public officials to four years, and did much to develop the " spoils system."

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  • of our gallant forefathers, and commit base treason against our posterity, should we permit Cuba to be Africanized and become a second Santo Domingo, with all its attendant horrors to the white race, and suffer the flames to extend to our own neighboring shores, seriously to endanger or actually destroy the fair fabric of our Union "; and recommended that " the United States ought, if practicable, to purchase Cuba as soon as possible."

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  • With the exception of the pultrelands all the estates he inherited descended to his posterity.

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  • (5) Son of Jehu, of the posterity of Judah (1 Chron.

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  • Having through centuries undergone cruel injury, from technical imperfections at the outset, from disastrous atmospheric conditions, from vandalism and neglect, and most of all from unskilled repair, its remains have at last (1904-1908) been treated with a mastery of scientific resource and a tenderness of conscientious skill that have revived for ourselves and for posterity a great part of its power.

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  • The total result, if adequate steps can be taken to counteract the effects of atmospheric change in future, will remain a splendid gain for posterity and a happy refutation of D'Annunzio's despairing poem, the Death of a Masterpiece.

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  • The stress which Swift thus laid upon his character as an assertor of liberty has hardly been ratified by posterity, which has apparently neglected the patriot for the genius and the wit.

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  • These serious shortcomings may explain the diminution of his vogue in Spain; they will certainly tell against him in the estimate of posterity.

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  • Pierre, the eldest son, a cavalry officer who died before his father, left posterity in whom the name has continued; Marie, the eldest daughter, was twice married, and by her second husband, M.

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  • The choice was one which posterity can heartily approve.

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  • As soon as the demand for a vigorous prosecution of the war relaxed, the Whigs could but rely on their domestic policy, in which they were strongest in the eyes of posterity but weakest in the eyes of contemporaries.

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  • They who should have been to me as posterity are in the place of ancestors."

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  • But the value of his work was much under-estimated by posterity.

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  • SHEM (Hebrew for "name, renown, posterity"), in the Bible, the eldest of the three sons of Noah, whose superiority over Canaan is reflected in the tradition that Noah pronounced a curse upon the latter (Gen.

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  • His erudition was large but ill-digested; his knowledge of the ancient authors, if extensive, was superficial; his style was vulgar; he had no brilliancy of imagination, no pungency of epigram, no grandeur of rhetoric. Therefore he has left nothing to posterity which the world would not very willingly let die.

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  • In dedicating to him his Commentary on the First Epistle to the Thessalonians, as "eximiae pietatis et doctrinae viro," he declares that so had he been aided by his instruction that whatever subsequent progress he had made he only regarded as received from him, and "this," he adds, "I wish to testify to posterity that if any utility accrue to any from my writings they may acknowledge it as having in part flowed from thee."

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  • It may be doubted also if the history of literature presents us with another instance of a book written at so early an age, which has exercised such a prodigious influence upon the opinions and practices both of contemporaries and of posterity.

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  • One of them, Simon Brec, proceeded to Greece, where his posterity multiplied to such an extent that the Greeks grew afraid and reduced them to slavery.

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  • Niall's posterity held the position of ardri uninterruptedly until 1002.

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  • Four of his sons, Loigaire, Conall Crimthand, Fiacc and Maine, settled in Meath and adjoining territories, and their posterity were called the southern Hy Neill.

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  • The descendants of Eogan were the O'Neills and their numerous kindred septs; the posterity of Conall Gulban were the O'Donnells and their kindred septs.

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  • "One of the most notable victims of posterity's lack of judgment," says Bertrand Russell, "is the Eleatic Zeno.

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  • The grand design of Sully, the organization of a Christian Republic of the European nations for the preservation of peace, was but the invention of an irresponsible minister, soured by defeat and wishing to impress posterity.

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  • His posterity included several famous names, those of his grandchildren.

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  • His paper, however, the Point du Jour, according to Aulard, owes its reputation not so much to its own qualities as to the fact that the painter David, in his famous picture of the "Oath in the Tennis Court," has represented Barere kneeling in the corner and writing a report of the proceedings as though for posterity.

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  • The occupation of Uganda certainly, and of the Nigerian territory and Rhodesia probably, will prove to have been rather for the benefit of posterity than of the companies which effected it.

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  • The condemnation of Oldenbarneveldt was carried out with Maurice's consent and approval, and he cannot be acquitted of a prominent share in what posterity has pronounced to be a judicial murder.

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  • For, more than all else, the temple of St Francis has served to transmit to posterity the history of their loves.

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  • A warrior might perform valiant deeds, but his fame would soon vanish if he had no bard to record them for posterity.

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  • You then bung the whole lot on the computer for posterity.

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  • The authors noticed also cellular differentiation violations in posterity of white rats irradiated by EMF with PFD of 500 microW/cm2.

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  • condescension of posterity?

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  • They exist today only because a cat-lover who recognized pure genius was thoughtful enough to save them for posterity.

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  • Fifty percent of the unique prehistoric landscape surrounding the Thornborough Henges has already been denied to posterity for short-term economic gain.

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  • mediaevaligrant Nepalese colliers were friendly and helpful and their hospitality has ensured that this almost medieval industry has been recorded for posterity.

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  • An international outcry saved the rock art for posterity.

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  • Gouraud invited distinguished personages from all walks to record their voices for posterity at Little Menlo.

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  • We may forgive posterity for the paucity of information left to us, but we ourselves shall not be judged so lightly by posterity.

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  • Malta's bright story of human fortitude and courage will be read by posterity with wonder and with gratitude through all the ages.

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  • leaving no posterity, ' Twas not their infirmity, It was married chastity.

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  • let not posterity be surprised that this register is not complete.

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  • But before we reach posterity we must survive the present.

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  • Burns, then, clearly did his bit to preserve Scotland's heritage, not to mention language, for future posterity.

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  • Regions Caesar never knew thy posterity shall sway, Where his eagles never flew, None invincible as they.

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  • posterity records only one example of a politician escaping with some credibility intact.

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  • preserved for posterity, are a few speeches.

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  • record for posterity and to receive the god's blessing.

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  • valiant deeds, but his fame would soon vanish if he had no bard to record them for posterity.

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  • Alexander the Great is one of the instances of the vanity of appealing from contemporary disputes to "the verdict of posterity"; his character and his policy are estimated to-day as variously as ever.

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  • But this atom, only grazed by calumny, has already been restored to him by posterity, for he died poor, having been the first to suffer by the disaster to his illusions.

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  • "If you beat the king ninety-nine times," Manchester urged at Newbury, "yet he is king still and so will his posterity be after him; but if the king beat us once we shall all be hanged and.

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  • our posterity be made slaves."

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  • A statue by Donatello and a picture by Antonio del Pollajuolo remained to commemorate a citizen who chiefly for his services to humanistic literature deserved the notice of posterity.

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  • Although a minor figure in the conspiracy, Tira-dentes was made the scapegoat of the thirtytwo men arrested and sent to Rio de Janeiro for trial, and posterity has made him the proto-martyr of republicanism in Brazil.

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  • Whatever may be the ultimate order of reputation among his various books, or whatever posterity may ultimately see fit to ordain as regards the popularity of any of them, it is difficult to believe that the time will ever come in which Stevenson will not be remembered as the most beloved of the writers of that age which he did so much to cheer and stimulate by his example.

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  • He deserves well of posterity for his services to learning and art; the restoration of the Arch of Constantine; the enrichment of the Capitoline museum with antique marbles and inscriptions, and of the Vatican library with oriental manuscripts (see Assemani); and the embellishment of the city with many buildings.

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  • Their technical ability was incomparablethough in grace of decorative conception they yielded the palm to the Japaneseand the representative specimens they bequeathed to posterity remained, until quite recently, far beyond the imitative capacity of European or Asiatic experts.

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  • Most unfortunately for posterity, the Greeks wrote mainly on perishable materials, and hence the chief records even of their later civilization have vanished.

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  • (a) As a mine of materials for reconstructing the history of Church institutions, they are invaluable, and that largely in virtue of their spontaneous and "esoteric" character, with no view to the public generally or to posterity.

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  • The homely terseness of his style, his abounding humour - rough, cheery and playful, but irresistible in its simplicity, and occasionally displaying sudden and dangerous barbs of satire - his avoidance of dogmatic subtleties, his noble advocacy of practical righteousness, his bold and open denunciation of the oppression practised by the powerful, his scathing diatribes against ecclesiastical hypocrisy, the transparent honesty of his fervent zeal, tempered by sagacious moderation - these are the qualities which not only rendered his influence so paramount in his lifetime, but have transmitted his memory to posterity as perhaps that of the one among his contemporaries most worthy of our interest and admiration.

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  • In 1603 the United Provinces, desiring to transmit to posterity some account of their struggle with Spain, determined to appoint a historiographer.

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  • - Between 1742 and 1749, that is to say, at the very climax of the personal activity of Holberg, several poets were born, who were destined to enrich the language with its first group of lyrical blossoms. Of these the two eldest, Wessel and Ewald, were men of extraordinary genius, and destined to fascinate the attention of posterity, not only by the brilliance of their productions, but by the suffering and brevity of their lives.

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  • The Szeklers are of disputed origin, but closely akin to the Magyars (see Szeklers) The Saxons are the posterity of the German immigrants brought by King Geza II.

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  • In plain terms he stated his abhorrence of the proposal; he was at a loss to conceive what part of his conduct could have encouraged their address; they could not have found "a person to whom their schemes were more disagreeable"; and he charged them, "if you have any regard for yourself or posterity, or respect for me, to banish these thoughts from your mind, and never communicate, as from yourself or any one else, a sentiment of the like nature."

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  • His keen intuition of truth, his vigour and yet sobriety of argument, his fertility of illustration and acuteness of sarcasm, made him irresistible to his antagonists; and the evanescent triumphs of scornful controversy have given place to the sedate applause of a long-lived posterity.

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  • The advent of the Persians, bringing with them a conception of religion of a far higher order than Babylonian-Assyrian polytheism (see Zoroaster), must also have acted as a disintegrating factor in leading to the decline of the old faith in the Euphrates Valley, and we thus have the interesting though not entirely exceptional phenomenon of a great civilization bequeathing as a legacy to posterity a superstition instead of a real achievement.

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  • And the exile, separated from the beloved France so dear to his heart, died a lingering death on that rock and bequeathed his great deeds to posterity.

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  • The copper ' peg ' acted as a record for posterity and to receive the god 's blessing.

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  • Parks were once a vey good way of ensuring that your posterity if you were wealthy enough to own a fair bit of land.

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  • These dynamic fragrances are more than just perfumes - they're your own adventures and experiences, bottled for posterity.

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  • There is also the added stress of knowing that the vows you speak on your wedding day will be heard by all in attendance and will probably also be recorded for posterity.

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  • This incident of hugs and forgiveness between the sworn archenemies could all be just a bunch of hearsay as there were no cameras to record the momentous event for posterity.

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  • The earliest images of dance steps are from the renaissance, when dancing masters who traveled from village to village would try to record their new dances for posterity.

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  • Family Tree Maker, Legacy Family Tree and other software programs offer individuals the tools they need to fill in the gaps in their trees and keep the information safe for posterity.

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  • You will want to wait until close to the end of your pregnancy for maternity photography to be most effective; after all, the whole point is to capture your belly for posterity.

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  • Creating life is a fleeting moment that lasts for just nine months, so capturing it for posterity is important to many women.

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  • If you are headed to a bikini contest that you know will be videotaped, there's a very good chance that your image will be captured for posterity and available online.

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  • You'll find practical advice on how to search for, purchase, and keep your WWE figures for the sake of posterity, and can start discussions and ask question of other WWE fans in the forums.

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  • Hippies, hula dancers and the Statue of Liberty (also not much of a stretch) were all captured for posterity.

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  • This is a great way to introduce your significant other to friends and relatives who may not have met them yet, and it is a nice way to capture your happiness for posterity.

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  • Whether you're an aspiring filmmaker or you have a major family event you want to capture for posterity, you've probably given a thought to making your own homemade movies.

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  • Halley certainly deserves the gratitude of posterity for undertaking the publication of the work at a very considerable pecuniary risk to himself.

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