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penitence

penitence

penitence Sentence Examples

  • She cut off her hair and sent it to Musset as a token of penitence, but Musset, though he still flirted with her, never quite forgave her infidelity and refused to admit her to his deathbed.

  • He proclaimed a crusade against Louis and the French, and, after the peace of Lambeth, he forced Louis to make a public and humiliating profession of penitence (1217).

  • The Old Testament depicts the history of the people as a series of acts of apostasy alternating with subsequent penitence and return to Yahweh, and the question whether this gives effect to actual conditions depends upon the precise character of the elements of Yahweh worship brought by the Israelites into Palestine.

  • 47 sqq.), Penitence of Adam and Eve (op. cit.

  • those on Patience and Penitence, read as though they had been spoken, and it is hard to believe that this brilliant rhetorician did not consecrate his powers of address to his new faith.

  • Seeking out Nonnus, she overcame his canonical scruples by her tears of genuine penitence, was baptized, and, disguising herself in the garb of a male penitent, retired to a grotto on the Mount of Olives, where she died after three years of strict penance.

  • A process which is intended to produce penitence and ultimate restoration cannot at the same time contemplate handing the offender over to eternal punishment.

  • He points out the equivocal character of the word poenitentia, which meant both " penance " and " penitence "; he declared that " true contrition seeks punishment, while the ampleness of pardons relaxes it and causes men to hate it."

  • 3 Some passages refer exclusively to the endurance of punishment as a condition of pardon; 4 others to the penitence and amendment of the sinner.'

  • Tenison's reputation as an enemy of Romanism led the duke of Monmouth to send for him before his execution in 1685, when Bishops Ken and Turner refused to administer the Eucharist; but, although Tenison spoke to him in "a softer and less peremptory manner" than the two bishops, he was, like them, not satisfied with the sufficiency of Monmouth's penitence.

  • ASH WEDNESDAY, in the Western Church, the first day of Lent, so called from the ceremonial use of ashes, as a symbol of penitence, in the service prescribed for the day.

  • (1154) he retired from the world and spent the rest of his life in works of charity and penitence.

  • Fergus, lord of Galloway, a celebrated church-builder of the 12th century, had his principal seat on Palace Isle in a lake called after him Loch Fergus, near St Mary's Isle, where he erected the priory de Trayle, in token of his penitence for rebellion against David I.

  • The conclusion was naturally drawn that a process of penitence which began with sorrow of the more unworthy kind needed a larger amount of Satisfactions or penance than what began with Contrition.

  • His doctrine at that date appears to have been very vague; he seemingly rejected the invocation of saints and also second marriages, and preached penitence.

  • chap. xx.) the whole of his teaching, outside the preaching of penitence, was summed up in these maxims: - " Clerks who have estates, bishops who hold fiefs, monks who possess property, cannot be saved."

  • At last Abenner himself yields to the faith, and after some years of penitence dies.

  • 8.3 In times of calamity litanies were held, in which the people walked in robes of penitence, fasting, barefooted, and, in later times, frequently dressed in black (litaniee nigrae).

  • Mention may be made of a few more moral treatises such as the Ufa poceiintei, " Gate of Penitence " (Kronstadt, 1812); Oglinda omului din eiuntru, " The Mirror of the Inner Man "; or Pilde filosofesti, " Philosophical Saws and Maxims " (Tirgovishtea, 1715).

  • In the Roman Catholic church Advent is still kept as a season of penitence.

  • The abandonment of plenary penitence (i.e.

  • the full rigour of exomologesis), the extension of the system in which there was nothing public about the penitence except the solemn reconciliation on Maundy Thursday, the allowing of repeated recourse to this reconciliation, the delegation to priests of the power to reconcile penitents in private; such were the successive stages in the development.

  • Thus we reach what has been called la penitence tarifee.

  • Robertson, Sermons, third series - Absolution (London, 1857); Mead, "Exomologesis" and "Penitence" in Dictionary of Christian Antiquities (London, 18 75); E.

  • It might, however, be thought that whatever be the compatibility of theories of punishment or of the activity of the state as a moralizing agency with determinism, to reconcile the R denial of freedom with a belief in the reality of remorse or penitence will be plainly impossible.

  • The existence of feelings of remorse and penitence testify to the presence in the individual of motives to good conduct which, if acted upon and allowed full scope and development, may produce a complete change of character.

  • Moreover, in a certain sense the very feelings of remorse and penitence which are the chief weapons in the libertarians' armoury testify to the truth of the determinists' contention.

  • And the existence of penitence and remorse is not merely a sign of the emergence in consciousness of elements in character nobler than and opposed to those tendencies which once held sway.

  • Moreover, remorse and penitence are witnesses in the wrongdoer to the truth of the interpretation.

  • The unreflective moral consciousness never finds it difficult to distinguish between a man's power of willing and all the forces of circumstance, heredity and the like, which combine to form the temptations to which he may yield or bid defiance; and such facts as " remorse " and " penitence " are a continual testimony to man's sense of freedom.

  • This formal and regulated " penitence " was extended from apostasy to other grave - or, as they were subsequently called, " deadly " - sins; while for minor offences all Christians were called upon to express contrition by fasting and abstinence from ordinarily permitted pleasures, as well as verbally in public and private devotions.

  • The penitence of Almohdes took the field against Alphonso in force, Aragon.

  • They begged, and preached penitence.

  • The story of his penitence referred to in xxxiii.

  • This is the color of penitence and fasting as well as the color of royalty to welcome the Advent of the King.

  • If he is convinced of your penitence, he will absolve you and finish by imposing a penance.

  • Here too we express penitence both for our neglect and for having sometimes regarded evangelism and social concern as mutually exclusive.

  • In 1212 he sent out the brethren, two and two, to reform the world by preaching penitence.

  • If you doubt the penitence as a practical fact, there are your knives and forks.

  • genuine penitence and faith are seen in terms of justice and caring love.

  • Rather God forgives only the penitent and one of the chief evidences of true penitence is a forgiving spirit.

  • It was a wonderful display of public penitence, the like of which we have not seen for a good while.

  • She cut off her hair and sent it to Musset as a token of penitence, but Musset, though he still flirted with her, never quite forgave her infidelity and refused to admit her to his deathbed.

  • He proclaimed a crusade against Louis and the French, and, after the peace of Lambeth, he forced Louis to make a public and humiliating profession of penitence (1217).

  • The Old Testament depicts the history of the people as a series of acts of apostasy alternating with subsequent penitence and return to Yahweh, and the question whether this gives effect to actual conditions depends upon the precise character of the elements of Yahweh worship brought by the Israelites into Palestine.

  • 47 sqq.), Penitence of Adam and Eve (op. cit.

  • those on Patience and Penitence, read as though they had been spoken, and it is hard to believe that this brilliant rhetorician did not consecrate his powers of address to his new faith.

  • Seeking out Nonnus, she overcame his canonical scruples by her tears of genuine penitence, was baptized, and, disguising herself in the garb of a male penitent, retired to a grotto on the Mount of Olives, where she died after three years of strict penance.

  • His letters (especially Ep. 45) are full of outcries against his enemies and of indignant protestations that he had done nothing unbecoming a Christian, that he had taken no money, nor gifts great nor small, that he had no delight in silken attire, sparkling gems or gold ornaments, that no matron moved him unless by penitence and fasting, &c. His route is given in the third book In Rufinum; he went by Rhegium and Cyprus, where he was entertained by Bishop Epiphanius, to Antioch.

  • A process which is intended to produce penitence and ultimate restoration cannot at the same time contemplate handing the offender over to eternal punishment.

  • He points out the equivocal character of the word poenitentia, which meant both " penance " and " penitence "; he declared that " true contrition seeks punishment, while the ampleness of pardons relaxes it and causes men to hate it."

  • 3 Some passages refer exclusively to the endurance of punishment as a condition of pardon; 4 others to the penitence and amendment of the sinner.'

  • The Psalter is that part of the Old Testament in which the devotional aspect of the religious character finds its completest expression; and in lyrics of exquisite tenderness and beauty the most varied emotions are poured forth by the psalmists to their God - despondency and distress, penitence and resignation, hope and confidence, jubilation and thankfulness, adoration and praise.

  • Tenison's reputation as an enemy of Romanism led the duke of Monmouth to send for him before his execution in 1685, when Bishops Ken and Turner refused to administer the Eucharist; but, although Tenison spoke to him in "a softer and less peremptory manner" than the two bishops, he was, like them, not satisfied with the sufficiency of Monmouth's penitence.

  • ASH WEDNESDAY, in the Western Church, the first day of Lent, so called from the ceremonial use of ashes, as a symbol of penitence, in the service prescribed for the day.

  • They are, however, traditionally vestments symbolical of joy (the bishop in placing the dalmatic on the newly ordained deacon says: - "May the Lord clothe thee in the tunic of joy and the garment of rejoicing"), and they are therefore not worn during seasons of fasting and penitence or functions connected with these, the folded chasuble (paenula plicata) being substituted (see Chasuble).

  • (1154) he retired from the world and spent the rest of his life in works of charity and penitence.

  • Court intrigue favouring him, he succeeded, by the betrayal of his comrades and by two submissive letters, in reconciling himself with the help of Halifax both to the king and to James, though he had the humiliation of seeing his confessions and declarations of penitence published at length in the Gazette.

  • Fergus, lord of Galloway, a celebrated church-builder of the 12th century, had his principal seat on Palace Isle in a lake called after him Loch Fergus, near St Mary's Isle, where he erected the priory de Trayle, in token of his penitence for rebellion against David I.

  • The conclusion was naturally drawn that a process of penitence which began with sorrow of the more unworthy kind needed a larger amount of Satisfactions or penance than what began with Contrition.

  • His doctrine at that date appears to have been very vague; he seemingly rejected the invocation of saints and also second marriages, and preached penitence.

  • chap. xx.) the whole of his teaching, outside the preaching of penitence, was summed up in these maxims: - " Clerks who have estates, bishops who hold fiefs, monks who possess property, cannot be saved."

  • At last Abenner himself yields to the faith, and after some years of penitence dies.

  • 8.3 In times of calamity litanies were held, in which the people walked in robes of penitence, fasting, barefooted, and, in later times, frequently dressed in black (litaniee nigrae).

  • Mention may be made of a few more moral treatises such as the Ufa poceiintei, " Gate of Penitence " (Kronstadt, 1812); Oglinda omului din eiuntru, " The Mirror of the Inner Man "; or Pilde filosofesti, " Philosophical Saws and Maxims " (Tirgovishtea, 1715).

  • In the Roman Catholic church Advent is still kept as a season of penitence.

  • The abandonment of plenary penitence (i.e.

  • the full rigour of exomologesis), the extension of the system in which there was nothing public about the penitence except the solemn reconciliation on Maundy Thursday, the allowing of repeated recourse to this reconciliation, the delegation to priests of the power to reconcile penitents in private; such were the successive stages in the development.

  • Thus we reach what has been called la penitence tarifee.

  • Robertson, Sermons, third series - Absolution (London, 1857); Mead, "Exomologesis" and "Penitence" in Dictionary of Christian Antiquities (London, 18 75); E.

  • It might, however, be thought that whatever be the compatibility of theories of punishment or of the activity of the state as a moralizing agency with determinism, to reconcile the R denial of freedom with a belief in the reality of remorse or penitence will be plainly impossible.

  • The existence of feelings of remorse and penitence testify to the presence in the individual of motives to good conduct which, if acted upon and allowed full scope and development, may produce a complete change of character.

  • Moreover, in a certain sense the very feelings of remorse and penitence which are the chief weapons in the libertarians' armoury testify to the truth of the determinists' contention.

  • And the existence of penitence and remorse is not merely a sign of the emergence in consciousness of elements in character nobler than and opposed to those tendencies which once held sway.

  • Moreover, remorse and penitence are witnesses in the wrongdoer to the truth of the interpretation.

  • The unreflective moral consciousness never finds it difficult to distinguish between a man's power of willing and all the forces of circumstance, heredity and the like, which combine to form the temptations to which he may yield or bid defiance; and such facts as " remorse " and " penitence " are a continual testimony to man's sense of freedom.

  • This formal and regulated " penitence " was extended from apostasy to other grave - or, as they were subsequently called, " deadly " - sins; while for minor offences all Christians were called upon to express contrition by fasting and abstinence from ordinarily permitted pleasures, as well as verbally in public and private devotions.

  • The penitence of Almohdes took the field against Alphonso in force, Aragon.

  • They begged, and preached penitence.

  • The story of his penitence referred to in xxxiii.

  • Pelageya stopped doubtfully, but in Pierre's face there was such a look of sincere penitence, and Prince Andrew glanced so meekly now at her and now at Pierre, that she was gradually reassured.

  • Labyrinths were popular in the Middle Ages and designed to be walked as penitence for one's sins.

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