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oysters

oysters Sentence Examples

  • Oysters are more valuable than any other single product of the fisheries, and in at least twenty-five countries are an important factor in the food-supply.

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  • Oysters are dredged here and are shipped hence in large quantities.

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  • The chief industry is the cultivation of oysters in four large beds in the Mare Piccolo; besides oysters, Taranto carries on a large trade in cozze, a species of large black mussel, which is packed in barrels with a special sauce.

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  • It is the largest peanut market in the world, is in a great truck-gardening region, and makes large shipments of cotton (822,930 bales in 1905), oysters, coal, fertilizers, lumber, grain, fruits, wine, vegetables, fish and live stock.

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  • The values of the principal catches in 1902 were: red snapper, $103,398; oysters, $100,359; squeteague, $49,577, and channel bass, $39,525.1 Minerals.-The total value of the mineral products of Texas in 1890 was $1,986,679; in 1902, $6,981,532; in 1907, $19,806,458, and in 1908, $15,212,929-the valuations for the two years last named being those of the United States Geological Survey.

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  • Hampton is an agricultural shipping point, ships fish, oysters and canned crabs, and manufactures fish oil and brick.

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  • end of Long Island; the value of oysters alone rising from $2,050,058 to $3,780,352.

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  • Oysters, clams, and shrimp abound along the coast, and there are more than 500 species of mollusks in the state.

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  • The products of greatest value in 5905 were: custom-made men's clothing; fruits and vegetables and oysters, canned and preserved; iron and steel; foundry and machine-shop products, including stoves and furnaces; flour and grist mill products; tinware, coppersmithing and sheet iron working; fertilizers; slaughtering and meat-packing; cars and repairs by steam railways; shirts; cotton goods; malt liquors; and cigars and cigarettes.

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  • There are numerous tile-works and potteries of fine ware; and a considerable trade is carried on in anchovies and oysters caught in the Scheldt.

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  • Only in very recent years have oysters, though plentiful, become of competitive importance in the national market; they are greatly favoured by state protective legislation.

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  • Oysters, both mud and rock, are good and plentiful.

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  • Oysters are shipped from Greenwich.

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  • Oysters are reared chiefly at Marennes, which is the chief French market for them, and at Arcachon, Vannes, Olron, Auray, Cancale and Courseulles.

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  • Oysters abound on the eastern coast, and on the shelving banks of a vast extent of the northern coast the pearl oyster is the source of a considerable industry.

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  • Buffalo-fish, paddle-fish, cat-fish, drum, crappie, black bass, rock bass, German carp, sturgeon, pike, perch, eels, suckers and shrimp inhabit the waters of the Mississippi and its tributaries, and oysters, shrimp, trout, Spanish mackerel, channel bass, black bass, sheepshead, mullet, croakers, pompano, pin-fish, blue-fish, flounders, crabs and terrapin are obtained from the Mississippi Sound and the rivers flowing into it.

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  • Large numbers of shad, blue fish, weak fish (squeteague), alewives, Spanish mackerel, perch, bass, croakers (Micropogon undulatus), mullet, menhaden, oysters and clams are caught in the sounds, in the lower courses of the rivers flowing into them, or in the neighbouring waters of the sea.

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  • The fisheries are chiefly of shad, oysters, mullet, alewives, clams, black bass, menhaden, croakers and bluefish.

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  • Shrimps, frogs (of great commercial importance), terrapin, clams and oysters are common.

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  • Prawns, crayfish and oysters are also obtainable, and turtle (Chelonia mydas) are frequently captured.

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  • The natives engaged in the fishery used some 400 sailboats of 3 to 15 tons capacity, and the beds were raked in search of pearl oysters.

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  • Norwalk has some manufactures, including woollen goods and typewriting machines; and there is some coasting trade, oysters especially being shipped from Norwalk.

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  • These organisms live in cockles, oysters and other lamellibranchs and they so affect the gonads of these molluscs as to castrate and sterilize their host.

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  • The production of pearls by oysters and mussels is common knowledge, but it is only recently that the origin of pearls has been traced and admitted to be due to inflammation set up by a parasite.

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  • In 1905 the number of persons employed in the general fisheries industry was 2212; and the value of the catch was $ 1, 54 6, 6 5 8, the largest items being: lobsters, squeteague (weakfish), $86,478; scup, $138,030; and oysters (for market), $874,232.

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  • North of the Atlas it belongs to the European type, in the south it contains a fauna of oysters and sea-urchins belonging to the facies " africano-syrian " of Zittel.

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  • The coast of Lower California is a favourite resort for the fur-bearing seal, r and pearl oysters find a congenial habitat in the south waters of the Gulf.

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  • It is a business centre for the prosperous farming region by which it is surrounded, and is a shipping point for oysters and fish; among its manufactures are canned fruits and vegetables, flour, hominy, phosphates, underwear and lumber.

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  • In such Lamellibranchs as the oysters, scallops and many others which have the edges of the mantleskirt quite free, there are numerous tentacles upon those edges.

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  • l * An independent anatomical investigation of the Mollusca had been carried on by the remarkable Neapolitan naturalist Poli (1791), whose researches 2 were not published until after his death (1817), and were followed by the beautiful works of another Neapolitan zoologist, the illustrious Delle Chiaje.3 The embranchement or sub-kingdom Mollusca, as defined by Cuvier, included the following classes of shellfish: (1) the cuttles or poulps, under the name Cephalopoda; (2) the snails, whelks and slugs, both terrestrial and marine, under the name Gastropoda; (3) the sea-butterflies or winged-snails, under the name Pteropoda; (4) the clams, mussels and oysters, under the name Acephala; (5) the lamp-shells, under the name Brachiopoda; (6) the seasquirts or ascidians, under the name Nuda; and (7) the barnacles and sea-acorns, under the name Cirrhopoda.

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  • Both Camden and Fuller mention the trade in barrelled oysters and candied eringo-root.

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  • The coast is locally noted for fisheries (especially of lobsters and oysters) and some ship-building is carried on.

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  • Fisheries are still of importance, although the bed of Pandore oysters (an esteemed variety) has lost something of its former fertility.

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  • around its peninsula, and bordered by an automobile drive; along the beach are some attractive residences, hotels and boarding houses, and several sanatoriums. The city's principal industries are the canning of oysters, shrimp, fish, figs and vegetables, and the manufacture of fertilizers and flour.

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  • Among the manufactures are cotton goods, canned oysters, lumber and fertilizer.

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  • Olympia oysters are widely known in the Pacific coast region; they are obtained chiefly from Oyster Bay, Skookum Bay, North Bay and South Bay, all near Olympia.

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  • The fish mostly caught are cod, haddock and herrings, while Heligoland yields lobsters, and the islands of Fhr, Amrum and Sylt oysters of good quality.

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  • The fishery products, including oysters, tarpon, sturgeon,caviare and sponges, are also important.

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  • Oysters are found in some places, but have disappeared from many localities, where their abundance in ancient times is proved by their shell moulds on the coast.

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  • The annual value of the shell-fish (lobsters, crabs, oysters, mussels, clams, periwinkles, cockles, shrimps) is about £73,000.

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  • sardines and oysters; hemp is woven, and the neighbourhood is famed for its fruit and wine.

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  • Oysters are found in large numbers in the estuaries and fixed to the submerged parts of the mangroves.

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  • Freshwater oysters, which attain a large size, are also found in the rivers, particularly in the Niger.

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  • Native oysters are small and of peculiar flavour; eastern varieties also are fattened, but not bred in California waters.

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  • Chesapeake Bay covers much land that might otherwise be agriculturally valuable, but repays this loss, in part at least, by its excellent fisheries, including those for oysters.

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  • Oysters are by far the most valuable of the fisheries products, but, of the 400,000 acres of waters within the state suitable for oyster culture, in 1909 only about one-third was used for that purpose.

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  • Fredericksburg at the head of navigation on the Rappahannock and West Point on the York have traffic of commercial importance in lumber and timber, oysters and farm produce, cotton and tobacco especially being shipped in coastwise vessels from West Point.

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  • Lobsters and crabs are caught in Cardigan Bay, and oysters are found at various points of the Pembrokeshire coast.

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  • Oysters of excellent flavour are found in the sheltered waters of Chiloe.

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  • Ultimately they sink to the bottom and fix themselves to shells, stones or other objects, and rapidly take on the appearance of minute oysters, forming white disks 2 o in.

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  • The appearance of these minute oysters constitutes what the fishermen call a "fall of spat."

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  • Professor Mobius is of opinion that oysters over twenty years of age are rare, and that most of the adult Schleswig oysters are seven to ten years old.

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  • Hence it is that so-called artificial fertilization is possible; that is to say, fertilization will take place when ripe eggs and milt are artificially pressed from the oysters and allowed to fall into a vessel of sea-water.

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  • All that would be necessary would be to take a number of mature oysters containing white spat and lay them down in tanks till the larvae escape.

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  • This would be merely carrying oyster culture a step farther back, and instead of collecting the newly fixed oysters, to obtain the free larvae in numbers and so insure a fall of spat independently of the uncertainty of natural conditions.

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  • Natural beds of oysters occur on stony and shelly bottoms at depths varying from 3 to 20 fathoms. In nature the beds are liable to variations, and, although Huxley was somewhat sceptical on this point, it seems that they are easily brought into an unproductive condition by over-dredging.

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  • Oysters do not flourish in water containing less than 3% salt; and hence they are absent from the Baltic. The chief enemies of oysters are the dog-whelk, Purpura lapillus, and the whelk-tingle, Murex erinaceus, which bore through the shells.

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  • The approximate value of the world's oyster crop approaches f4,000,000 annually, representing over 30,000,000 bushels, or nearly Io billion oysters.

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  • The states which lead in the quantity of oysters taken are Maryland, Virginia, New York, New Jersey and Connecticut; the annual value of the output in each of these is over $ I, 000,000.

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  • The quantity of oysters taken in 1898 was 26,853,760 bushels, with a value of $12,667,405.

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  • The output of cultivated oysters in 1899 was about 9,800,000 bushels, worth $8,700,000.

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  • The natural oyster beds of Great Britain and Ireland have been among the most valuable of the fishery resources, and British oysters have been famous from time immemorial.

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  • In the fishery on public grounds in 1896 only 6370 fishermen were engaged, employing 1627 vessels and boats, valued at 1,473,449 francs, and apparatus worth 211,495 francs, while only 13,127,217 kilograms of oysters were taken, or about 320,000 bushels, valued at 414,830 francs.

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  • In the parks, claires and reservoirs the private culture of oysters has attained great perfection.

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  • Fully 40,000 men, women and children are employed, and the output in 1896 was 1,536,417,968 oysters, worth 1 7,537,77 8 francs.

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  • The oyster being sedentary, except for a few days in the earliest stages of its existence, is easily exterminated in any given locality; since, although it may not be possible for the fishermen to rake up from the bottom every individual, wholesale methods of capture soon result in covering up or otherwise destroying the oyster banks or reefs, as the communities of oysters are technically termed.

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  • The main difference between the oyster industry of America and that of Europe lies in the fact that in Europe the native beds have long since been practically destroyed, perhaps not more than 6 or 7% of the oysters of Europe passing from the native beds directly into the hands of the consumer.

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  • At present the oyster is one of the cheapest articles of diet in the United States; and, though it can hardly be expected that the price of American oysters will always remain so low, still, taking into consideration the great wealth of the natural beds along the entire Atlantic coast, it seems certain that a moderate amount of protection would keep the price of seed oysters far below European rates, and that the immense stretches of submerged land especially suited for oyster planting may be utilized and made to produce an abundant harvest at much less cost than that which accompanies the complicated system of culture in vogue in France and Holland.

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  • Upon this, in fact, depends the whole future of the industry, since it is not probable that any system of artificial breeding can be devised which will render it possible to keep up a supply without at least occasional recourse to seed oysters produced under natural conditions.

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  • It is the opinion of almost all who have studied the subject that any natural bed may in time be destroyed by overfishing (perhaps not by removing all the oysters, but by breaking up the colonies, and delivering over the territory which they once occupied to other kinds of animals), by burying the breeding oysters, by covering up the projections suitable for the reception of spat, and by breaking down, through the action of heavy dredges, the ridges which are especially fitted to be seats of the colonies.'

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  • It has also been demonstrated that under proper restriction great quantities of mature oysters, and seed oysters as well, may be taken from any region of natural oyster-beds without injurious effects.

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  • He further shows that the productive capacity of a bed can only be maintained in one of two ways: (I) b y diminishing the causes which destroy the young oysters, in which case the number of breeding oysters may safely be decreased; this, however, is practicable only under such favourable conditions as occur at Arcachon, where the beds may be kept under the constant control of the oyster-culturist; (2) by regulating the fishing on the natural beds in such a manner as to make them produce permanently the highest possible average quantity of oysters.

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  • Since the annual increase of half-grown oysters is estimated by him to be four hundred and twenty-one to every thousand full-grown oysters, he claims that not more than 42% of these latter ought to be taken from a bed during a year.

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  • Huxley has illustrated the futility of "close-time" in his remark that the prohibition of taking oysters from an oyster-bed during four months of the year is not the slightest security against its being stripped clean during the other eight months.

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  • Huxley's conclusions as regards the future of the oyster industry in Great Britain are doubtless just as applicable to other countries - that the only hope for the oyster consumer lies in the encouragement of oyster-culture, and in the development of some means of breeding oysters under such conditions that the spat shall be safely deposited.

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  • Such property right should undoubtedly be extended to natural beds, or else an area of natural spawning territory, should be kept under constant control and surveillance by government, for the purpose of maintaining an adequate supply of seed oysters.

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  • Oysters cannot thrive where the ground is composed of moving sand or where mud is deposited; consequently, since the size and number of these places are very limited, only a very small percentage of the young oysters can find a resting-place, and the remainder perish.

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  • Unoccupied territory may, however, be prepared for the reception of new beds, by spreading sand, gravel and shells over muddy bottoms, or, indeed, beds may be kept up in locations for permanent natural beds, by putting down mature oysters and cultch just before the time of breeding, thus giving the young a chance to fix themselves before the currents and enemies have had time to accomplish much in the way of destruction.

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  • Breeding oysters are piled upon the rookeries, and their young become attached to the stakes and twigs provided for their reception, where they are allowed to remain until ready for use, when they are plucked off and sent to the market.

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  • Birch trees are thrown into the water near a natural bed of oysters, and the trunks and twigs become covered with spat; the trees are then dragged out upon the shore by oxen, and the young fry are broken off and laid down in the shallows to increase in size.

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  • At the beginning of the 19th century there were only natural oyster beds in the basin, and these produced 75 million oysters per annum.

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  • Cultch is placed upon them every year, and gathering of oysters upon them is allowed only at intervals of two or more years, when the authority thinks they are sufficiently stocked to permit of it.

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  • It is necessary to detach the young oysters from the tiles when they are nearly a year old (detroquage): this could not be done without destroying the oysters if they were attached directly to the surface of the tile.

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  • The coating of lime or mortar is soft and brittle, and consequently the young oysters can easily be detached with a stout knife.

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  • In the following season, about April, the young oysters, then from z to 1 in.

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  • The young oysters grow rapidly in these cases, and have to be thinned out as they grow larger.

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  • These two regions of production, Arcachon and M orbihan supply young oysters for "relaying," i.e.

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  • Among rearing districts Marennes and La Tremblade are specially celebrated on account of the extensive system of claires or oyster ponds, in which the green oysters so much prized in Paris are produced.

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  • The irrigation of the claires is entirely under control, and the claires undergo a special preparation for the production of the green oysters, whose colour seems to be derived from a species of Diatom which abounds in the claires.

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  • The tiles with the young oysters on them are placed in enclosures during the winter, and detroquage is carried out in the following summer.

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  • In many places oysters are simply imported from France and Holland and laid down to grow, or are obtained by dredging from open grounds.

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  • In the estuaries of Essex there are many private or semi-private oyster fisheries, where the method of culture is to dredge up the oysters in autumn and place them in pits, where they are sorted out, and the suitable ones are selected for the market.

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  • Just before the close season the young oysters and all the rest that remain are scattered over the beds again, with quantities of cultch, and in many cases the fishery is maintained by the local fall of spat, without importation.

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  • Turtle are common on the southern coast-line, sand and mangrove oysters are plentiful.

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  • The fishermen and fisherwomen form a quite distinct class of the people; both sexes are noted for their bodily strength, and the men for their bold and skilful seamanship. Tunny and sardines are cured and exported in large quantities, oysters are also exported, and many other sea fish, such as hake, sea-bream, whiting, conger and various flat-fish are consumed in the country.

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  • The oysters from the beds on the west coast of Schleswig are widely known under the misnomer of "Holstein natives."

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  • The main exports are grain, cattle, horses, fish and oysters, in return for which come timber, coal, salt, wine and colonial produce.

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  • The waters of the coast and bays abound in shad, menhaden, bluefish, weak-fish (squeteague), clams and oysters.

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  • Until 1901 New Jersey's fisheries were more important than those of any other state in the Middle or South Atlantic groups; but after that date, owing to a decrease in the catch of bluefish, shad, clams and oysters, the annual catch of New York and Virginia became more valuable.

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  • The shell fisheries (oysters particularly) are centred in Delaware Bay and at Maurice River Cove, in Cumberland county, but are important also in Cape May, Atlantic, Ocean and Monmouth 1 The following statistics of the products for 1900 and for 1905 are for factory products, those for 1900 differing, therefore, from the statistics which appear in the reports of the census of 1900.

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  • Among shell-fish, crabs and oysters are taken principally off the east coast; the oyster beds in the shallow water off the north Kent and Essex coasts, as at Whitstable and Colchester, being famous.

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  • Some catfish, shad, smelt, halibut, herring, perch, sturgeon, flounders, oysters, clams, crabs and crawfish are also obtained from Oregon waters.

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  • The term " cove oysters," now applied to canned oysters everywhere, was originally applied to the oysters found in the coves on the W.

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  • At the time of the last great subsidence, in glacial times, an arm of the sea extended across Sweden, submerging a great part of the littoral up to the Gulf of Bothnia, and including the Plies period the this of themnorthe and Baltic were s fg ficiently salt for oysters to flourish.

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  • There are valuable vegetable dye-stuffs, medicinal plants (especially sarsaparilla, copaiba and ipecacuanha), cabinet and building timber (mahogany, &c.), india-rubber, tropical fruits (especially bananas), and various palms; fish are economically important - the name Panama is said to have meant in an Indian dialect " rich in fish " - and on the Pacific coast, oysters and pearl " oysters " (Meleagrina californica) - the headquarters of the pearl fishery is the city of San Miguel on the largest of the Pearl Islands, and Coiba Island.

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  • The change, in spite of the misnomer - for, whatever may be the case elsewhere, in England the bird does not feed upon oysters - met with general approval, and the new name has, at least in books, almost wholly replaced what seems to have been the older one.'

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  • Oysters, crabs, shrimp and terrapins are also abundant here, and in the inland streams are some pike, perch, trout and catfish.

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  • Excellent oysters are found along the coast, and cotton and cattle are the chief exports.

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  • In 1905, according to the U.S. Bureau of Fisheries, the fisheries' products of the state were valued at $3,173,948, market oysters being valued at $1,206,217 and seed oysters at $1,603,615.

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  • The fisheries include trepang, turtle and pearl oysters.

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  • Fossil sea shells can be found in the rocks, including bivalves related to modern oysters.

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  • Hours i played message out every day along lakeside drive oysters clams and.

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  • Supplies were kept up only by the introduction in recent decades of commercially cultivated gigas oysters.

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  • dredged for oysters, mainly in the Paglesham area.

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  • Salt fish, oysters, mussels or the specially fattened dormice cooked in a variety of ways.

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  • Other fossils include numerous gastropods and bivalves, particularly small colonies of oysters.

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  • The remaining top cultured species include kelp, oysters, shrimp and salmon.

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  • Week 5 Poaching brill in red wine sauce, opening oysters, pan-frying Sea bass and the classic lobster thermidor.

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  • Dinner began with Shimoni oysters, served raw with lemon, followed by a vast crab, recently wrestled from a nearby mangrove swamp.

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  • molluscfish farming in our coastal waters is concentrated on mollusk production, the main species being mussels, oysters and scallops.

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  • A man would need to eat oysters for several days to feel a noticeable effect!

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  • It may be possible to find imported chocolate, tinned prawns or smoked oysters - even vegemite!

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  • oysters served were poisoned and caused the death of the Dean of Winchester and others.

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  • These foods include oysters, meats, seafood, poultry and eggs.

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  • Ate delicious oysters at the bar in the fish market.

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  • Frozen raw oysters will keep in a standard UK freezer for up to three months.

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  • I'd prefer it with some fresh oysters myself!

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  • Also occurring in flat oysters, where the eggs are incubated on the gills.

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  • Jenkins said that he trained on ' champagne and a dozen oysters ' .

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  • Notable starters were the Irish rock oysters and the scallops with truffle oil or Saffron sauce.

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  • I now realize that pressure is being brought to bear for me to eat prairie oysters and blog my experience.

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  • seafood dishes, oysters or salads.

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  • They've got a rotating menu, ranging from juicy oysters to a hearty white bean stew.

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  • This wine is an excellent partner to fish dishes, including sushi, oysters and chicken and salad dishes.

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  • Week 5 Poaching brill in red wine sauce, opening oysters, pan-frying Sea bass and the classic lobster Thermidor.

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  • But unless you eat dozens of oysters and a few servings of beef every day, chances are you aren't getting enough zinc.

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  • The chief varieties of the product in 1904, with their value, were as follows: oysters, $1,691,953; clams, $430,766; shad, $238,517; squeteague (weak-fish), $253,200; bluefish, $120,085; menhaden, $109,090; sea bass, $97,903; cod, $53,789.

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  • Food Choice: Drink on its own or with light seafood dishes, oysters or salads.

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  • They 've got a rotating menu, ranging from juicy oysters to a hearty white bean stew.

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  • But unless you eat dozens of oysters and a few servings of beef every day, chances are you are n't getting enough zinc.

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  • It's been said that the famed Italian charmer Casanova ate sixty oysters a day!

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  • Mollusks: Scallops, mussels, oysters and clams.

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  • Mollusks such as oysters, clams and mussels should have closed lids.

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  • Oysters, clams, mussels, tilapia, catfish and trout are common varieties of farmed products.

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  • FreshSeafood.com will deliver Pacific Northwest octopus, oysters and mussels to you overnight.

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  • In answer to this problem, Kokichi Mikimoto set out to create pearls by seeding oysters, something no one had ever succeeded at before.

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  • A proprietary two-step bleaching and heating process produce chocolate pearls from black Tahitian pearls taken from Black-Lipped oysters.

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  • Although natural brown colored pearls are occasionally found in cultured oysters, they are extremely rare.

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  • Oysters from the South Seas region, especially Tahiti, produce a variety of beautiful dark pearls; chocolate is only one of these colors.

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  • Tahitian pearls are harvested from the oysters found in the waters surrounding the French Polynesia located in the Polynesian islands.

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  • Foods rich in calcium include almonds, swiss cheese, collards, sardines and salmon with bones, spinach, ice cream, kale, beet greens, cheddar cheese, molasses, oysters, milk, and broccoli.

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  • There are a handful of restaurants and it's always a treat to be at the Slanted Door for cocktails and innovative Vietnamese food or stop by Hog Island Oysters and slurp down some fresh Sweetwater mollusks from Tomales Bay.

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  • Fish: Next in line for vitamin D sources are fish of all types: herring, catfish, salmon, trout, tuna and even shellfish such as oysters.

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  • Oysters - Next to certain types of liver, this animal product contains the most vitamin C.

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  • These oysters frequently reject the initial irritant needed to form the pearl, making them even harder to cultivate and subsequently much rarer.

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  • These oysters produce naturally dark pearls that range in color from silver, charcoal, dark green, deep purple and blue to a true black.

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  • Limit your consumption of mussels, oysters and organ meats to four ounces per day because they are higher in carbs that other meats.

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  • Fresh, frozen or canned fish including lobster, crab, scallops, clams and oysters are acceptable.

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  • Take advantage of a raw bar featuring oysters, caviar and mussels.

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  • The cold menu include lobster ceviche, oysters with three sauces and salmon tartar with caviar.

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  • The restaurant has a raw bar, with oysters and clams from the area.

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  • It also serves mussels, clams, shrimp, crab cakes, oysters, lobster, steaks, burgers, and more.

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  • A cascading raw shellfish bar, baked oysters, whole fish, steak and clam chowder are among the fresh and sustainable fare served.

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  • Indulge on local oysters, prime steaks and fresh seafood in a rustic but refined lakeside setting.

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  • White table cloths, good beer and some nice shucked oysters will make for a perfect day.

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  • Other favorites include curry chicken and nha trang oysters.

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  • The restaurant advertises fresh local steamed oysters by the bucket.

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  • If you are looking for some fresh seafood, there are several menu items, including pan-fried oysters, prawns, crab cakes, grilled swordfish and parmesan crusted halibut.

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  • Appetizers include seafood such as prawns, oysters and escargot.

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  • They also have a raw bar with mussels, clams and oysters.

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  • Start off with a small plate like the lamb burger made with lamb from a local farm or the fried oysters with house made tartar sauce.

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  • Diners can either choose from a "raw bar" selection, which has uncooked dishes like shrimp cocktail, clams and oysters, or hot food menu with has a variety of seafood dishes.

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  • Appetizers include oysters baked or raw, jumbo jump crab meat cocktail, and fried calamari.

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  • Have your oysters raw, boiled, chargrilled or fried, along with shrimp, crab claws, catfish and crawfish.

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  • The restaurant also offers a raw bar featuring oysters and shrimp.

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  • The dinner menu consists of soup and salad, appetizers such as pecan-crusted brie and fried oysters, and entrees.

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  • The menu changes seasonally but may include appetizers like salmon ceviche, iced oysters, or crispy lamb apricot and almond spring rolls.

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  • It consists principally of one long street (the Roman Watling Street) and the northern suburb of Milton, a separate urban district (pop. 7086), celebrated for its oysters, the fishery of which used to employ a large number of the inhabitants.

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  • - In primitive times deer, ducks, turkeys, fish and oysters were especially numerous, and wolves, squirrels and crows were a source of annoyance to the early settlers.

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  • In the value of fertilizers manufactured, and in that of oysters canned and preserved, Maryland was first among the states in 1900 and second in 1905; in 1900 and in 1905 it was fourth among the states in the value of men's clothing.

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  • The waters of the Chesapeake Bay are especially rich in oysters and crabs, and there, also, shad, alewives, " striped " (commonly called " rock ") bass, menhaden, white perch and weak-fish (" sea-trout ") occur in large numbers.

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  • Oysters constitute more than 80% of the total value, the product in 1901 amounting to 5,685,561 bushels, and being valued at $3,031,518.

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  • They include oysters, crabs of great size, and a small mussel, found in enormous numbers.

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