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owed

owed Sentence Examples

  • Before she went, she owed him the truth.

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  • She owed him that, if nothing else.

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  • I figured I owed myself a present after getting busted.

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  • While I dreaded frightening my wife further, I knew I owed her the information on the motor home.

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  • All that, he would have owed to my friendship.

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  • She owed it to him to be honest.

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  • She looked up, wondering who she now owed an apology for her embarrassing scene.

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  • He owed Fred a "gotcha" after the hard time he'd given the old man about his electronic sales adventures.

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  • Class loyalties run deep, and he called me up about twenty years ago and said he was calling in a favor my dad owed him.

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  • She owed him something for what she had taken away from him.

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  • (in 1215) it owed its first important civic rights.

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  • As their king, Damian owed them nothing.

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  • Exactly. I then called in the favor she owed me from the bet I actually lost.

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  • She owed him nothing.

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  • Mehemet Ali, who was the viceroy of Egypt, owed his position, to a certain extent, to the recommendations made in his behalf to the French government by Mathieu de Lesseps, who was consul-general in Egypt when Mehemet Ali was a simple colonel.

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  • Some of his finest tragedies were written for her, but her repertoire was not confined to them, and many an indifferent play - like Thomas Corneille's Ariane and Comte d'Essex - owed its success to "her natural manner of acting, and her pathetic rendering of the hapless heroine."

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  • To early training he also owed the skilful horsemanship for which he was conspicuous.

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  • He knew he owed Cynthia Byrne the truth in spite of what it would do to their fledgling relationship.

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  • I owed a follow up call to both Ethel Reagan at the Boston newspaper and Agnes Delanco, at After.

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  • It wasn't an invitation but I figured I owed my presence for what I'd learned so far and I couldn't wait to renew our conversation.

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  • If for no other reason, she owed it to Jake to try.

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  • If she owed him something, Darkyn wouldn't be waiting for her to deliver.

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  • Then again, if she owed any sort of debt to Darkyn, Gabriel wasn't about to be caught off guard.

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  • As much as he hated to admit it, Darkyn wasn't one to wait to claim debts owed him.

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  • If she wanted to see his father or Texas, he owed her that much.

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  • He owed them nothing after his mission, which cleared a path for him to do what he must to regain his throne.

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  • He hadn't spoken to Edith Shipton since her husband's accident and felt, as the host of Bird Song, he owed the woman some sort of condolence.

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  • Perhaps, he thought, we are all owed contemplation of our actions, as a parting gift to those who succeed us so they might somehow learn from our deeds and mistakes.

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  • I took Martha in 'cause I owed Patsy a favor for some stuff.

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  • He owed the scoundrel nothing.

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  • He owed her that, and so much more.

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  • debitum, a thing owed), a definite sum due by one person to another.

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  • It was rebuilt by Pompey, and restored by Aulus Gabinius: but it was to Herod that it owed much of its later glory.

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  • In 1534 Alessandro Farnese, who owed his elevation to his sister Giulia, one of Alexander VI.s mistresses, took the tiara with the title of Paul III.

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  • 14-16), owed its employment to the fact that the root often divides into branches resembling the arms and legs of a man, and this resemblance gave rise to the belief that it conferred strength and virility.

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  • The institution owed its origin to federal land grants; it is maintained by the state, the United States, and by small fees paid by the students; tuition is free in all colleges except the college of law.

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  • This appointment he owed chiefly to his work, Ober den Ursprung der menschlichen Seelen (1854), in which he maintained that the human soul was not implanted by a special creative act in each case, but was the result of a secondary creative act on the part of the parents: that soul as well as body, therefore, was subject to the laws of heredity.

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  • Public opinion was now keenly excited; he received an ovation from the Munich students, and the king, to whom he owed his appointment, supported him warmly.

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  • That meant for every pound someone made, he owed more than a pound in taxes.

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  • She owed it to herself to find out for sure, didn't she?

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  • Quinn owed some residual time on his sabbatical project but his class commitments were nearly at an end.

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  • He obviously knew he owed us an explanation but I sensed he would wait us out until someone asked.

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  • I felt I owed it to Howie to at least hear her out.

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  • The current balance owed was over four hundred dollars.

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  • He'd cave to Andre's advice and double-check with Darkyn about whether or not his mate owed the Dark One anything – formally or informally.

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  • The town owed its origin and growth to its position on the shores of the Bristol Channel, and its good harbour developed an oversea trade with Bristol, South Wales and the Irish ports.

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  • Partly owing to this, and partly to ancient feuds whose origin we cannot trace, the Athenian people was split up into three great factions known as the Plain (Pedieis) led by Lycurgus and Miltiades, both of noble families; the Shore (Parali) led by the Alcmaeonidae, represented at this time by Megacles, who was strong in his wealth and by his recent marriage with Agariste, daughter of Cleisthenes of Sicyon; the Hill or Upland (Diacreis, Diacrii) led by Peisistratus, who no doubt owed his influence among these hillmen partly to the possession of large estates at Marathon.

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  • As illustrating the general impoverishment of the Russian peasantry, it may be stated that the arrears of taxation owed by them have increased enormously since 1882, when they a, ounted to £2,854,000, until in 1900 the total amount was put k £15,222,000.

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  • He owed his influence partly to the fact that he was the governor of Paul, who was greatly attached to him; partly to the peculiar circumstances in which Catherine had mounted the throne; and partly to his knowledge of foreign affairs.

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  • The young emperor was during the first years of his reign completely in the hands of Prince Felix Schwarzenberg, to whom, with Windischgratz and Radetzky, he owed it that Austria had emerged from the revolution apparently stronger than it had been before.

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  • His ecclesiastical preferment he owed to the influence of an uncle, Cardinal Oliviero Caraffa.

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  • Its sympathies were always Guelphic, and it was closely allied with Florence, which it assisted in the battle of Monteaperto (1260), and its constitution owed much to her model.

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  • Whatever the predominant party might think of foreign marriages, the tradition of the half-Moabite origin of David serves, in the beautiful idyll of Ruth (q.v.), to suggest the debt which Judah and Jerusalem owed to one at least of its neighbours.

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  • And if the work of criticism has brought a fuller appreciation of the value of these facts, the debt which is owed to the Jews is enhanced when one proceeds to realize the immense difficulties against which those who transmitted the Old Testament had to contend in the period of Greek domination.

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  • Judas and the Asmoneans were usurpers, who owed their title to Lysias.

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  • Hyrcanus could not entertain the proposal that he should resign the sacred office to which he owed much of his authority.

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  • American universities have owed much to Jewish generosity, a foremost benefactor of these (as of many other American institutions) being Jacob Schiff.

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  • Any general statement as to the debt owed by early European civilizations to western Asia would at present be premature, for though important discoveries have been made in Crete and Babylonia the best authorities are chary of positive conclusions as to the relations of Cretan civilization to Egypt and Babylonia.

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  • They owed their position to Anaxagoras Chaumette, procureur of the Commune, and to the fact that Simon had prevented one of the attempts of the baron de Batz.

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  • David owed his success to his troop of freebooters (i Sam.

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  • He owed his success to the confidence placed in him by Queen Victoria, to his wide knowledge of European politics, to his intimate friendship with Guizot, and not least to his own conciliatory disposition.

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  • His New Year's presents were reckoned by Giustiniani at 15,000 ducats, and the emperor paid - or owed - him 18,000 livres a year.

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  • Condorcet's statement that Turgot corresponded with Smith is disproved by a letter of Smith to the duc de la Rochefoucauld, published in the Economic Journal (March 1896), p. 165, in which he says, "But tho' I had the happiness of his acquaintance: Turgot owed his appointment to the ministry to Maurepas, the" Mentor "of Louis XVI., to whom he was warmly recommended by the abbe Very, a mutual friend.

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  • It owed its fertility to the Nile, which, inundating the land near its banks, was distributed by means of canals over more distant portions of its valley.

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  • Sir Richard Weston's Discourse on the Husbandry of Brabant and Flanders was published by Hartlib in 1645, and its title indicates the source to which England owed much of its subsequent agricultural advancement.

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  • He may, in fact, be regarded as the final exponent of that empirical school of philosophy which owed its impulse to John Locke, and is generally spoken of as being typically English.

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  • Reference to the articles on Logic, Metaphysics, &c., will show that subsequent criticism, however much it has owed by way of stimulus to Mill's strenuous rationalism, has been able to point to much that is inconsistent, inadequate and even superficial in his writings.

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  • The story that he owed this promotion solely to the influence of Barras and Josephine is, however, an exaggeration.

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  • There have now been recognized in the collections at Cairo, Florence, London, Paris and Bologna several Egyptian imitations of the Aegean style which can be set off against the many debts which the centres of Aegean culture owed to Egypt.

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  • To this wave were owed in all probability the Nilotic scenes depicted on the Mycenae daggers, on frescoes of Hagia Triada and Cnossus, on pottery of Zakro, on the shell-relief of Phaestus, &c.; and also many forms and fabrics, e.g.

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  • That the palatal structure must be taken into consideration by taxonomers as affording hints of some utility there can no longer be a doubt; but perhaps the characters drawn thence owed more of their worth to the extraordinary perspicuity with which they were presented by Huxley than to their own intrinsic value, and if the same power had been employed to elucidate in the same way other parts of the skeleton - say the bones of the sternal apparatus or even of the pelvic girdle - either set might have been made to appear quite as instructive and perhaps more so.

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  • Far from being ambitious or scheming, he was lazy and selfindulgent, fond of eating and drinking, and owed his elevation to the throne to Caecina and Valens, commanders of two legions on the Rhine.

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  • The growth of Baldwin's kingdom, as it was suggested above, owed more to the interests of Italian traders than it did to crusading zeal.

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  • It owed its origin to his feverish zeal for the recovery of Jerusalem, rather than to any pressing need in the Holy Land.

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  • The development of the art of war, and the growth of a systematic taxation, are two debts which medieval Europe also owed to the Crusades.

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  • The first commissioner was Sir Marshall Clarke, to whose tact and ability the country owed much.

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  • His great wealth may have been in part hereditary, but he owed his position and influence to his close connexion with the emperor Augustus.

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  • The Athenaeum owed its foundation to Hadrian.

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  • in the campaign of 1744-48 and attained high military rank, which he owed more to his courtiership than to his generalship. Soon after the beginning of the Seven Years' War, through the influence of Mme de Pompadour, he was put in command of a corps of 24,000 men, and in November 1757 he sustained the crushing defeat of Rossbach.

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  • After a short interval Cambaceres was, by the constitution of December 1799, appointed second consul of France - a position which he owed largely to his vast legal knowledge and to the conviction which Sieyes entertained of his value as a manipulator of public assemblies.

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  • It was to their control over the machinery of law that the Eupatridae owed their predominance.

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  • In 493 the imminent prospect of a Persian invasion brought into power men like Themistocles and Miltiades (qq.v.), to whose firmness and insight the Athenians largely owed their triumph in the great campaign of 490 against Persia.

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  • Originally it owed its whole importance to the copper mines of the Parys (probably, Parry's) mountain, as, before ore was discovered in March 1768, it was a small hamlet of fishermen.

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  • Lavoisier adequately recognized and acknowledged how much he owed to the researches of others; to himself is due the co-ordination of these researches, and the welding of his results into a doctrine to which the phlogistic theory ultimately succumbed.

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  • It is coming to be recognized that the growth of religious toleration owed much to the early Quakers who, with the exception of a few Baptists at the first, stood almost alone among Dissenters in holding their public meetings openly and regularly.

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  • A.).] During the anarchy which accompanied Ottoman rule in Egypt from first to last, Alexandria sank to a small town of about 4000 inhabitants; and it owed its modern renascence solely to Mehemet Ali, who wanted a deep port and naval station for his viceregal domain.

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  • His tastes were of the simplest; and while scholars like Filelfo were intent on extracting money from their patrons by flattery and threats, he remained so poor that he owed the publication of all his many works to private munificence.

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  • Wenlock (Weneloche) is said to be of pre-Roman origin, but owed its early importance to the nunnery founded c. 680 by St Milburg, daughter of Merewald, king of Mercia.

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  • The opportunity for this concentration he owed to the time gained for him by his rearguard at Joukendorf, for this had stood just long enough to induce the French columns to swing in to surround him, and the next day was thus lost to the emperor as his corps had to extend again to their manoeuvring intervals.

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  • Droitwich (Wic, Salturic, Wich) probably owed its origin to the springs, which are mentioned in several charters before the Conquest.

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  • A popular and successful democratic leader, he cannot, however, be ranked among the great statesmen of the republic. As a general he was headstrong and selfsufficient and seems to have owed his victories chiefly to personal boldness favoured by good fortune.

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  • This it owed largely to its position.

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  • Dempster owed his great position in the history of scholarship to his extraordinary memory, and to the versatility which made him equally at home in philology, criticism, law, biography and history.

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  • The poem owed its subsequent widespread reputation to its appeal to this sentiment rather than to its literary quality.

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  • His friends therefore felt, at the close of that long campaign, that the nation owed him some substantial token of gratitude and admiration for those sacrifices.

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  • Much as he owed to them, however, Sigismund was no mere nobles' king.

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  • was by this time so extreme, that he owed his very meals to the charity of his servants.

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  • It owed its ascendancy in to restore nearly a hundred churches to the sects and to acknowledge the sway of Rakoczy over the north Hungarian counties.

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  • Yet both Bethlen and Rakoczy owed far more to favourable circumstances than to their own cunning.

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  • These benefits the nation owed for the most part to Gabor Baross, Hungary's greatest finance minister, who entered the cabinet in 1886 and greatly strengthened it.

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  • His father was a small farmer, and he owed his education to the interest excited by his lively parts in some persons of position.

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  • To this linguistic excellence the writer owed the place accorded to him 1 "Plan de l'Ouvrage," Ouvres, tom.

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  • It owed its origin to an attempt made in 452 B.C. by Sybarite exiles and their descendants to repeople their old home.

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  • But he owed all to Concini, and his taste of power ended with the murder of his patron on the 24th of August 161 7.

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  • Separatism was non-existent, for the cogent reason that there was no point toward which a new irredenta could gravitate: the Habsburg cause had no adherents, save a few discredited traitors who congregated in Graz and Vienna: and communism, which was quite alien to an agrarian and peasant-owned State, owed its passing success to the aftermath of war and the blunders of the middle class rather than to its own attractions.

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  • The founder of the Jacobite Church in Asia owed his surname (Burdeana) to his rough horse-cloth.

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  • The town (Fauresfeld, Faveresham) owed its early importance to its situation as a port on the Swale, to the fertile country surrounding it, and to the neighbourhood of Watling Street.

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  • He is said to have owed the favour of the great as much to his personal gifts and graces as to his literary eminence; and in one of his prologues he declares it to be his ambition, while not offending the many, to please the "boni."

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  • The Syracusans were neither united nor adequately prepared for effectual defence, and it is perfectly clear that they owed their final deliverance to extraordinary good fortune.

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  • To him Syracuse owed her deliverance from the younger Dionysius and from Hicetas, who held the rest of Syracuse, and to him both Syracuse and the Sicilian Greeks owed a decisive triumph over Carthage and the safe possession of Sicily west of the river Halycus, the largest portion of the island.

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  • The medical school owed its foundation largely to Jewish teachers, themselves educated in the Moorish schools of Spain, and imbued with the intellectual independence of the Averroists.

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  • Friedrich Hoffmann (1660-1742), like Boerhaave, owed his influence, and perhaps partly his intellectual characteristics, to his academical position.

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  • The walled city of London was a distinct political unit, although it owed a certain allegiance to that one of the kingdoms around it which was the most powerful for the time being.

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  • In 1566 the first stone was laid of the " Burse," which owed its origin to Sir Thomas Gresham.

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  • Fareham owed its importance in medieval times to its facilities for commerce.

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  • This last, which perhaps owed its name to Khammurabi, was conducted from the Euphrates towards Upi or Opis, which has been shown by H.

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  • He was controverted by Ctesias, who, however, has mistaken mythology for history, and Greek romance owed to him its Ninus and Semiramis, its Ninyas and Sardanapalus.

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  • this scholar, however, is owed the next great step ahead.

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  • The reforming efforts of the grand vizier Bairakdar, to whom he had owed his life and his accession, broke on the opposition of the janissaries; and Mahmud had to wait for more favourable times.

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  • Nicholas was selected to deliver the oration at the reception of Cardinal Pole's visitors by the university in 1557, and soon after Elizabeth's accession he went to Rome where he was befriended by Pole's confidant, Cardinal Morone; he also owed much to the generosity of Sir Francis Englefield.

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  • He only owed his life on this occasion to a sudden illness.

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  • In the course of a long period characterized by a weak central government, it was not difficult to enlarge the rights which the lord thus obtained, to exclude even the king's personal authority from the immunity, and to translate the duties and payments which the tenant had once owed to the state into obligations which he owed to his lord, even finally into incidents of his tenure.

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  • When the government of the state had entered into feudalism, and the king was as much senior as king; when the vassal relationship was recognized as a proper and legal foundation of public duties; when the two separate sides of early feudalism were united as the almost universal rule, so that a man received a fief because he owed a vassal's duties, or looked at in the other and finally prevailing way, that he owed a vassal's duties because he had received a fief; and finally, when the old idea of the temporary character of the precarium tenure was lost sight of, and the right of the vassal's heir to receive his father's holding was recognized as the general rule - then the feudal system may be called full grown.

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  • The early German governments whose chief functions, military, judicial, financial, legislative, were carried on by the freemen of the nation because they were members of the body politic, and were performed as duties owed to the community for its defence and sustenance, no longer existed.

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  • But the members of the feudal court met, not to fulfil a duty owed to the community, but a private obligation which they had assumed in return for the fiefs they held, and in the history of institutions it is differences of this sort which are the determining principles.

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  • It no doubt owed its subsequent development to the destruction of Samaria and the rise in the district surrounding of the Samaritan nation founded on the colonists settled by Sargon and Assurbani-pal.

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  • To Kant's lectures and conversations he further owed something of his large interest in cosmological and anthropological problems. Among the writers whom he most carefully read were Plato, Hume, Shaftesbury, Leibnitz, Diderot and Rousseau.

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  • He owed his Christian names to a vow which his father, actuated by the death of several children in infancy, had made to dedicate any that survived to the Dominican saint, Peter Martyr, who lived in the 13th century.

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  • And though he did not believe in the Incarnation, yet he held deity to be in a sense manifest in humanity; its saints and heroes became, in spite of innumerable frailties, after a sort divine; man underwent an apotheosis, and all life was touched with the dignity and the grace which it owed to its source.

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  • The NO, however, owed its development mainly to Buddhist infltience.

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  • They were born at the close The Theatre of the 16th century and they owed their origin to the ~growing influence of the commercial class, who asserted a right to be amused but were excluded frons enjoyment of the aristocratic No and the Kyogen.

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  • This last owed its inception to a priestess who, having abandoned her holy vocation at the call of love, espoused dancing as a means of livelihood and trained a number of girls for the purpose.

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  • It was not to his paintings, however, that he owed his greatest influence, but to the powerful impulse he gave to the illustration of books and broadsides by wood-engravings.

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  • At a school of art officially established in Tokyo in 1873 under the direction of Italian teachersa school which owed its signal failure partly to the incompetence and intemperate behaviour of some of its foreign professors, and partly to a strong renaissance of pure Japanese classicismone of the few accomplishments successfully taught was that of modelling in plaster and chiselling in marble after Occidental methods.

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  • The raku faience owed much of its popularity to the patronage of the tea clubs.

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  • The ceramic art in Satsuma owed much to the aid of a number of Korean experts who settled there after the return of the Japanese forces from Korea.

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  • In its early days the ceramic industry of this province owed something to the assistance of Korean experts who settled there after the expedition of 1592.

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  • Even the yi-hsing-yao, too, owed much of its popularity to special utility.

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  • The decorative industry in Tokyo owed much also to the kOshO-kaisha, an institution started by Wakai and Matsuo in 1873, with official assistance.

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  • That he learnt anything, and that he grew up an amiable and magnanimous man, were solely due to his natural worth, for no one ever owed less to education or to family example.

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  • He had, however, before this, taken up arms in Monmouth's expedition, and is supposed to have owed his lucky escape from the clutches of the king's troops and the law, to his being a Londoner, and therefore a stranger in the west country.

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  • He remained in prison until August 1704, and then owed his release to the intercession of Robert Harley, who represented his case to the queen, and obtained for him not only liberty but pecuniary relief and employment, which, of one kind or another, lasted until the termination of Anne's reign.

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  • The influences of Greek literature to which Latin literature owed its birth had not as yet spread beyond Rome and Latium.

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  • Lostwithiel owed its ancient liberties - probably its existence - to the neighbouring castle of Restormel.

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  • Having lost his father at an early age, he owed much to his mother and to his guardian, Verginius Rufus, who had twice filled the office of consul and had twice refused the purple (ii.

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  • He owed still more to his uncle.

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  • It does not appear in history before 396 B.C., and seems to have owed its importance mainly to its naturally strong position.

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  • He had early become connected with the brilliant band of authors and politicians who then led the Whig party, a connexion to which he owed his appointment to the well-paid and easy post of commissioner of stamps; but in practical politics, for which he was by nature unsuited, he took no active share.

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  • This honour he owed to the purity of style and remarkable eloquence of his speeches, which, with a few pamphlets, form the bulk of his published work.

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  • After the accession of the Whigs to office in 1832 he held various important offices in the ministry, and most of the measures of reform for Scotland, such as burgh reform, the improvements in the law of entail, and the reform of the sheriff courts, owed much to his sagacity and energy.

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  • The policy of opposing uncivilized tribes by the construction of the limes, a raised embankment of earth or other material, intersected here and there by fortifications, was not his invention, but it owed in great measure its development to him.

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  • He owed something to Lucretius, something to the Stoic nature-pantheism, something to Anaxagoras, to Heraclitus, to the Pythagoreans, and to the Neoplatonists, who were partially known to him; above all, he was a profound student of Nicolas of Cusa, who was indeed a speculative Copernicus.

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  • The beautiful Hebrew style created a new school of Hebrew poetry, and the Hebrew renaissance which resulted from the career of Moses Mendelssohn owed much to Luzzatto.

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  • To the criticisms of the latter, in particular, Fichte owed much, but his own activity went far beyond what they supplied to him.

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  • In point of form the satire of Lucilius owed nothing to the Greeks.

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  • His style in its simplicity, facility and clearness owed something to De Foe, something to Cotton Mather, something to Plutarch, more to Bunyan and to his early attempts to reproduce the manner of the third volume of the Spectator; and not the least to his own careful study of word usage.

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  • As governor he took part in the formal ceremony of admitting the waters of Lake Erie into the canal in October 1825, and thus witnessed the completion of a work which owed more to him than to any other man.

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  • The nobles were awed by her warlike preparations or won over by adroit diplomacy, and their league was broken up. St Louis owed his realm to his mother, but he himself always remained somewhat under the spell of her imperious personality.

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  • Later the state comptroller announced a shortage of $120,000 in the military accounts, but Tompkins claimed that the state owed him $130,000.

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  • Later investigations disclosed that the state actually owed him more than $90,000.

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  • Baptism and the agape took their rise in Palestine, and in their origin certainly owed little or nothing to outside influences.

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  • In medieval times Southampton owed its importance to the fact that it was the chief port of Winchester.

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  • His influence was indeed by no means so decisive and so pervasive as has commonly been supposed, and his attacks on the evils in the Church were no bolder or more comprehensive than those of Marsiglio and Wycliffe, or of several among his contemporaries who owed nothing to his example.

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  • It is much less certain that the disciplinary reforms which the council, following the example of its predecessors, re-enacted, owed anything to Protestantism, unless indeed the council would have shown itself less intolerant in respect to such innovations as the use of the vernacular in the services had this not smacked of evangelicalism.

    0
    0
  • The change thus established de facto owed its first diplomatic consecration to the developments of international politics in the Old World.

    0
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  • The borough, which apparently owed its existence to the castle, shared its fortunes.

    0
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  • Before its conquest by the Egyptians in 1820 its ruler owed allegiance to the kings of Sennar.

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  • The first owed its origin to Jonathan Edwards (the elder) and was carried on by Samuel Hopkins (17 2 I-1803), Joseph Bellamy (1719-1790), Nathaniel Emmons (1745-1840), Jonathan Edwards (the younger) and Timothy Dwight (1752-1817).

    0
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  • Chertsey owed its importance primarily to the abbey, but partly to its geographical position.

    0
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  • In 1870 peace had not yet been quite won; industry was depressed; and the scattered and scanty colonists already owed seven millions sterling.

    0
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  • It was not, however, to the imperial favour that he owed these high positions.

    0
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  • He had a singular faculty for reading the minds and the motives of men, and to this insight he perhaps owed the power of adaptability (called by his opponents shiftiness) which characterized his whole career.

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  • His symphony Le Midi (written in 1761) already shows a remarkable freedom and independence in the handling of orchestral forces, and further stages of advance were reached in the oratorio of Tobias, in the Paris and Salomon symphonies, and above all in the Creation, which turns to good account some of the debt which he owed to his younger contemporary.

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  • He hoped for assistance from the friendly Nabataeans; but, as they owed everything to their position as middlemen for the South-Arabian trade, which a direct communication between Rome and the Sabaeans would have ruined, their viceroy Syllaeus, who did not dare openly to refuse help, sought to frustrate the emperor's scheme by craft.

    0
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  • Frederick was a member of the family of Wettin, which since his day has played a prominent part in the history of Europe, and he owed his new dignity to the money and other assistance which he had given to the emperor during the Hussite war.

    0
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  • He owed his relatively excellent education to the care of his mother, a woman of profound political sagacity, who was his chief counsellor in diplomatic affairs during the greater part of his long reign.

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  • He got an answer couched in somewhat ironical terms to the effect that Protestantism owed its existence in a measure to the house of Saxony, from which the prince descended, seeing that this house and that of the landgrave of Hesse had stood quite alone against Europe in upholding Luther and his cause.

    0
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  • Lexington succeeded Sibley as the eastern terminus of the Santa Fe trade, and was in turn displaced by Independence; it long owed its prosperity to the freighting trade up the Missouri, and at the opening of the Civil War it was the most important river town between St Louis and St Joseph and commanded the approach by water to Fort Leavenworth.

    0
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  • To these powerful connexions as much as to his piety and ability, he owed the immense influence he possessed.

    0
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  • It is impossible to separate this fusion of law and equity, this union of all the higher courts into one supreme tribunal, from the construction of a single home for this great institution; and the opening of the Royal Courts in the Strand in the year 1882, when Queen Victoria personally presided in her one supreme court, and handed over the care of the building to Lord Selborne, as her chancellor and as the head of this great body, was impressive as an outward and visible sign of the silent revolution, which owed more to Lord Selborne than to any other individual.

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  • was equalled, when he took the side of Clement VII., by the ardour and resourcefulness which he displayed in defending the cause of the pope of Avignon; it was mainly to him that the latter owed his recognition by Castile, Aragon and Navarre.

    0
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  • At the enfeoffments of 1072 and 1002 no great undivided fiefs were created, and the mixed Norman, French and Italian vassals owed their benefices to the count.

    0
    0
  • Eugenius certainly owed his success merely to the political necessities of the emperor of the East, and his union was forthwith destroyed owing to its repudiation by oriental Christendom; yet at the same time his decretals of union were not devoid of importance, for in them the pope reaffirmed the scholastic doctrine regarding the sacraments as a dogma of the Church, and he spoke as the supreme head of all Christendom.

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  • His character peeps forth most clearly perhaps in the saying which has become his epithet, Atterdag (" There will be a to-morrow"), which is an indication of that invincible doggedness to which he owed most of his successes.

    0
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  • The sons of Zadok, the priests-of the royal chapel, were the king's servants as absolutely as any other great officers of state; they owed their place to the fiat of King Solomon, and the royal will was supreme in all matters of cultus (2 Kings xii., xvi.

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  • It is to him that Poland owed the important acquisition of the greater part of Red Russia, or Galicia, which enabled her to secure her fair share of the northern and eastern trade.

    0
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  • In purely political matters also both initiative and fulfilment came entirely from the Crown, and to the last of the Jagiellos Poland owed the important acquisition of Livonia and the welding together of her loosely connected component parts into a single state by the Union of.

    0
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  • he owed his cardinal's hat; but the steady favour which he enjoyed under successive popes was due to his own cleverness and capacity for affairs.

    0
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  • Spain undoubtedly owed to Isabella's clear intellect, resolute energy and unselfish patriotism much of that greatness which for the first time it acquired under "the Catholic sovereigns."

    0
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  • (B) THE Study Of The Classics In Secondary Education After the Revival of Learning the study of the classics owed much to the influence and example of Vittorino da Feltre, Budaeus, Erasmus and Melanchthon, who were among the leading representatives of that revival in Italy, France, England and Germany.

    0
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  • Romsey (Romesyg, Romeseie) probably owed its origin, as it.

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  • 553), so Sebastian Castellio owed (in part) to the same indiscretion his expulsion from Geneva in 1544.

    0
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  • Dean Stanley owed something to Ewald and spoke warmly of him, but the Preface to the History of the Jewish Church in which he does so bears eloquent testimony to the general attitude towards Old Testament criticism in 1862, of which we have further proof in the almost unanimous disapprobation and far-spread horror with which Colenso's Pentateuch, pt.

    0
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  • He owed his political influence chiefly to his rank, his mild disposition, and his personal integrity, for his talents were in no sense brilliant, and he was deficient in practical energy as well as in intellectual grasp.

    0
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  • as the duke had set out to meet Mary, Cecil became the most active intriguer against him, and to these efforts, of which he laid a full account before Queen Mary, he mainly owed his immunity.

    0
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  • He owed his extraordinary influence to the fact that he was the only one of Charles's advisers who believed, or pretended to believe, that Sweden was still far from exhaustion, or at any rate had a sufficient reserve of power to give support to an energetic diplomacy - Charles's own opinion, in fact.

    0
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  • But he owed his high advancement to:exceptional ability as an administrator and a soldier.

    0
    0
  • But Hubert owed his success to the skill with which he manoeuvred for the weather-gage, and his victory was not less brilliant than momentous.

    0
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  • In the seventh book of his Confessions he has recorded how much he owed to the perusal of Neoplatonic works.

    0
    0
  • Undoubtedly he owed the triumphs of his reign very largely to the statesmanship of Absalon and the valour of Valdemar.

    0
    0
  • He may have owed his election to Cecil's influence, for to Cecil he subsequently attributed his rise to power; but his brotherin-law Sir Walter Mildmay was well known at court and in 1566 became chancellor of the exchequer.

    0
    0
  • The town owed its origin to trade, and became of some size in the 13th century.

    0
    0
  • The town probably owed its origin to the suitability of its position for defence, and it was the site of a Danish fort, later replaced by a Saxon settlement.

    0
    0
  • The town, which for long was a mere village, owed its origin to the founding of a large Benedictine monastery, with its church, the seat of the metropolitan archbishop of Sicily.'

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  • Pliny accordingly forbade them in Bithynia, and the renegade Christians to whom he owed his information gave them up. These suppers included an Eucharist: for it was because the faithful ate in the latter of the flesh and blood of the Son of God that the charge of devouring children was made against them.

    0
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  • That this line owed its inception and construction chiefly to the joint enterprise of two private individuals, Messrs Mackenzie and Mann, was a striking proof of the industrial capacities of the country.

    0
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  • He especially owed his celebrity and fortune to his idea of crossing Niagara Falls on a tight-rope, i ioo f t.

    0
    0
  • The town of Coburg, first mentioned in a record of 1207, owed its existence and its name to the castle, and in the 15th and 16th centuries was of considerable importance as a halting-place on the great trade route from Nuremberg via Bamberg to the North.

    0
    0
  • Italian though he was by birth, education and nature, France owed him a great debt for his skilful management during the early years of Louis XIV., and the king owed him yet more, for he had not only transmitted to him a nation at peace, but had educated for him his great servants Le Tellier, Lionne and Colbert.

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  • Literary men owed him also much; not only did he throw his famous library open to them, but he pensioned all their leaders, including Descartes, Vincent Voiture (1598-1648), Jean Louis Guez de Balzac (1597-1654) and Pierre Corneille.

    0
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  • He owed the position to Vergennes, who for three years and a half continued to support him; but the king was not well disposed towards him, and, according to the testimony of the Austrian ambassador, his reputation with the public was extremely poor.

    0
    0
  • Like the English scholar and statesman, Thomas Wilson, he owed his escape to the riot which broke out on the death of Paul IV.

    0
    0
  • But he maintained the state of his kingdom with the resources which he owed to the Church; and he is the last in the fine list of the early kings of Jerusalem.

    0
    0
  • To this circumstance they both owed their selection for early settlement.

    0
    0
  • Ripon (In Rhypum, Ad Ripam) owed its origin to the monastery founded in the 7th century.

    0
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  • It probably owed its origin to M.

    0
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  • Buchner (q.v.) himself said that he owed to Moleschott the first impulse to composing his important Buchner.

    0
    0
  • He owed his education to an uncle, Nicolas de Besze, counsellor of the Paris parlement, who placed him (1529) under Melchior Wolmar at Orleans, and later at Bourges.

    0
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  • It was to these adventurers, according to tradition, that the kingdom of Kent owed its origin.

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    0
  • According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle the kingdom of Sussex was founded by a certain Ella or /Elie, who landed in 477, while Wessex owed its origin to Cerdic, who arrived some eighteen years later.

    0
    0
  • To his firmness, and at the same time to the conciliatory readiness with which he accepted and elaborated the principles of a modus vivendi, the two powers owed the avoidance of what threatened to be a dangerous quarrel.

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  • The town is first mentioned as a borough in the Pipe Roll of 1189, which states that William de Bendenges owed 9: tos.

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  • for the ancient farm of Bridport, and that the men of the town owed tallage to the amount of 53s.

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  • It may even be maintained that his elevation was due solely to his personal claims. This was a victory for Rome, and it was repeated in the case of the first Hohenstaufen, Conrad III., who owed his elevation (1138) mainly to the princes of the Church and the legate of Innocent II., by whom he was crowned.

    0
    0
  • This, undoubtedly, was the part of his task that Innocent preferred, and it was to this, as well as to his much overrated moral and theological treatises, that he owed his enormous contemporary prestige.

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  • His immense authority narrowly escaped destruction but a stone's-throw from the Lateran palace; but Italy the victory finally rested with him, since the Roman people could no* dispense with the Roman Church, to which it owed its existence.

    0
    0
  • Not until 1210, when Otto of Brunswick turned against the pope to whom he owed his crown, was Innocent compelled to open hostilities; and the struggle ended in a victory for the Curia.

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  • This pope, so distinguished in many respects, owed his election Gregory mainly to the circumstance that he was considered XII., 1406- a zealous champion of the restoration of unity within 1415.

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  • owed his empire and France her deepest humiliation.

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  • The great improvement in trade during 1905 and 1906 checked this tendency, and probably the manufacturing extensions owed something to the capital set free by the reductions of stocks.

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    0
  • The compromise tariff of 1833, made necessary by the hostile attitude of South Carolina, owed its inception largely to him, but he voted against the "force bill," an act for enforcing the collection of duties, being the only senator whose vote was so recorded.

    0
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  • The two churches of Iberia and Albania at first depended on the Armenian for ordination of their primates or catholici, and in large part owed their first constitution to Armenian missionaries sent by Gregory the Illuminator.

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  • This appointment, which he owed to Limborch, he held from 1684, and in 1712 on the death of his friend he was called to occupy the chair of church history also.

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  • It owed much to the English deists, to the Pietistic movement, and to the French esprits forts who had already made a vigorous attack on the supernatural origin of the Scriptures.

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  • Under Ethbaal further expansion is recorded; Botrys north of Byblus and Aoza in North Africa are said to have been founded by him; the more famous Carthage owed its origin to the civil discords which followed the death of Metten I.

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  • It owed its name to an old belief that the Danube (Ister, in Greek) discharged some of its water by an arm entering the Adriatic in that region.

    0
    0
  • They were known to St Benedict, who refers his monks to "the Rule of our holy Father Basil," - indeed St Benedict owed more of the ground-ideas of his Rule to St Basil than to any other monastic legislator.

    0
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  • Works, p. 166) has defended Grotius, affirming that his work "is perhaps the most complete that the world has yet owed, at so early a stage in the progress of any science, to the genius and learning of one man."

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  • In 1718 he found himself under the necessity of once more entering Spain with an army; and this time he had to fight against Philip V., the king who owed chiefly to Berwick's courage and skill the safety of his throne.

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  • And if the designation of knights was first applied to the military tenants of the earls, bishops and barons - who although they held their lands of mesne lords owed their services to the king - the extension of that designation to the whole body of military tenants need not have been a very violent or prolonged process.

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  • Mainly through John Gough (1757-1825), a blind philosopher to whose aid he owed much of his scientific knowledge, he was appointed teacher of mathematics and natural philosophy at the New College in Moseley Street (in 1889 transferred to Manchester College, Oxford), and that position he retained until the removal of the college to York in 1799, when he became a "public and private teacher of mathematics and chemistry."

    0
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  • To the natural strength of the place and its commanding situation Praeneste owed in large measure its historical importance.

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  • On the great day of the feast there was a procession of the priests, the sacrificial assistants of every kind, the representatives of every part of the empire with their victims, of the cavalry, in short of the population of Attica and 1 So named from a note (1902) directed by Dr Don Louis Maria Drago, the Argentine minister of foreign affairs, to the Argentine diplomatic representative at Washington at the time of the difficulties of Venezuela incident to the collection of debts owed to foreigners by that country.

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  • Edi on the north-east coast, with another harbour, is capital of a sultanate which formerly owed allegiance to the sultan of Achin, but has formed a political division of the government of Achin since 1889, when an armed expedition restored order.

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  • But Charles owed a grudge against Holland, and he was determined to gratify it.

    0
    0
  • Langport (Llongbooth, Langeberga, Langeport) owed its origin to its defensible position on a hill, and its growth to its facilities for trade on the chief river of Somerset.

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    0
  • The earliest recognition of any civic organization they may have possessed they owed to Archbishop Hartwig II.

    0
    0
  • The election was ultimately determined by the diplomacy and the gold of Philip's agents, and the new pope, Clement V., was the weak-willed creature of the French king, to whom he owed the tiara.

    0
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  • This agreement was ratified by the Belgian and French sovereigns on the 10th and 24th of November, by the British on the 6th of December, but the Austrian and Prussian and Russian governments, whose sympathies were with the " legitimate " King William rather than with a prince who owed his crown to a revolution, did not give their ratification till some five months later.

    0
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  • The Belgian revolution owed its success to the union of the Catholic and Liberal parties; and the king had been very careful to maintain the alliance between them.

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  • This review, which owed much of its success to Waller's energy, defended the intense preoccupation of the new writers with questions of style, and became the depository of the Parnassian tradition in Belgium.

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  • and Queen Marie Antoinette; his governess was the famous Madame de Geniis, to whose influence he doubtless owed many of the qualities which later distinguished him: his wide, if superficial knowledge, his orderliness, and perhaps his parsimony.

    0
    0
  • Apart from this, Hobbes owed little to his university training, which was based on the scholastic logic then prevalent.

    0
    0
  • He was certainly born farther east at Samosata, and may have owed his promotion in the Church to Zenobia, queen of Palmyra.

    0
    0
  • He was admitted a citizen, and became rector of the university, which owed to him much of its recovered strength, particularly in the theological faculty.

    0
    0
  • Stephen owed his crown to Henry (1135), but they quarrelled when Stephen refused to give Henry the primacy; and the bishop took up the cause of Roger of Salisbury (1139).

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  • In the Preface the author truly declared that he owed nothing to the great, and described the difficulties with which he had been left to struggle so forcibly and pathetically that the ablest and most malevolent of all the enemies of his fame, Horne Tooke, never could read that passage without tears.

    0
    0
  • Among the members of this celebrated body was one to whom it has owed the greater part of its celebrity, yet who was regarded with little respect by his brethren, and had not without difficulty obtained a seat among them.

    0
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  • Later friendly relations between the United States and Great Britain, where, among the upper classes, there was a strong sentiment in favour of the Confederacy, were seriously threatened by the fitting out of Confederate privateers in British ports, and the Administration owed much to the skilful diplomacy of the American minister in London, Charles Francis Adams. A still broader foreign question grew out of Mexican affairs, when events culminating in the setting up of Maximilian of Austria as emperor under protection of French troops demanded the constant watchfulness of the United States.

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  • his rule, however, made Louis popular with his German subjects, to whose support mainly he owed his restoration to power on two occasions.

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  • They had now induced Conrad to quarrel with both Swabia and Bavaria, and also with Henry, duke of Saxony, son of the duke to whom he chiefly owed his crown.

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    0
  • Like his predecessors he reserved to himself the right to resist it in the realm of politics; in the rea!m of faith he considered that he owed to it his entire allegiance.

    0
    0
  • In order to strengthen their position for the new elections, the Liberal ministry, who owed their position chiefly to the support of the king, by royal ordinance ordered a redistribution of seats.

    0
    0
  • Finally the romance to which it owed much of its popular appeal, became, through the medium of Rufinus's Latin, the parent of the late medieval legend of Faust, and so the ancestor of a famous type in modern literature.

    0
    0
  • Like Schleiermacher he combined with the keenest logical faculty an intensely religious spirit, while his philosophical tendencies were in sympathy rather with Hegel than with Schleiermacher, and theosophic mysticism was more congenial to him than the abstractions of Spinoza, to whom Schleiermacher owed so much.

    0
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  • He received neither office nor reward from the university which owed so much to his labours.

    0
    0
  • The ecclesiastical organization of Austria was imperfect, so long as there was no archbishopric within its borders, and its clergy owed allegiance to foreign prelates.

    0
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  • been succeeded by his son Francis His popular and designation of " our good Kaiser Franz " this monarch Metter- owed to a certain simplicity of address and bonhomie °ich' which pleased the Viennese, certainly not to his serious qualities as a ruler.

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  • He had not even consulted Hohenwart, to whose assistance he owed his long tenure of power.

    0
    0
  • From Vitruvius himself we learn that he was appointed, in the reign of Augustus, together with three others, a superintendent of balistae and other military engines, a post which, he says, he owed to the friendly influence of the emperor's sister, probably Octavia (De Architectura, i.

    0
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  • By birth he was only one of many Sikh barons and owed his rapid rise entirely to force of character and will.

    0
    0
  • Antigonus fixed his capital at the old Phrygian town of Celaenae, and the famous cities of Nicaea and Alexandria Troas owed to him their first foundation, each as an Antigonia; they were refounded and renamed by Lysimachus (301-281 B.C.).

    0
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  • Worshipped in Memphis, he perhaps owed his importance more to the political prominence of that town than to anything else.

    0
    0
  • The prince, however, seems to have acknowledged to some extent the divinity of Ammon and the debt owed by Phoenicia to Egyptian culture, and nitied the many misfortunes of (Jnamfin.

    0
    0
  • This wily chief professed his willingness to obey the commands of the Porte, but stated that his troops, to whom he owed a vast sum of money, opposed his departure.

    0
    0
  • The administrative system of the church owed much to Sixtus.

    0
    0
  • Yet more even than to felicitous circumstances, Denmark owed her short-lived greatness to the great statesmen and administrators whom Frederick II.

    0
    0
  • Schleswig was recognized as a Danish fief, in contradistinction to Holstein, which owed vassalage to the Empire.

    0
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  • All kinds of manufacture, too, particularly that of silk, owed much to his encouragement.

    0
    0
  • Vitale at Ravenna, though built in Justinian's reign, and containing mosaic pictures of him and Theodora, does not appear to have owed anything to his mind or purse.

    0
    0
  • 10-26 originally stood in a different connexion, and was misplaced at some stage in the redaction of the Hexateuch, does not help us, since it would still have to be admitted that the editor to whom we owed the present form of the chapter identified this little code of religious observances with the Ten Words.

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  • Europe, in fact, owed much at this time to Alexander's exalted temper.

    0
    0
  • Marazion was once a flourishing town, and owed its prosperity to the throng of pilgrims who came to visit St Michael's Mount.

    0
    0
  • He was obliged, however, to make great concessions to the aristocracy, to whom he owed his victory.

    0
    0
  • Added to this there was still in the background the veteran statesman to whom Liberalism owed an unequalled obligation.

    0
    0
  • The liberality which a generation later was recognized by Clement of Rome as a traditional virtue of the Corinthian Church owed its inception to Titus.

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    0
  • parliament owed not a little of its future growth, and to the aid rendered by parliament Henry owed his success.

    0
    0
  • The English owed the victory to their archers, whose shafts rolled up a courageous charge by the Scots.

    0
    0
  • He owed little to the historians of feudalism who knew what feudalism was, but not how it came about.

    0
    0
  • They may have owed their origin to the Roman galleys: they did without doubt owe their sails to them.

    0
    0
  • John is said to have owed his education in philosophy, mathematics and theology to an Italian monk named Cosmas, whom Sergius had redeemed from a band of captive slaves.

    0
    0
  • In completing Wilhelm Meister, Goethe found a sympathetic and encouraging critic in Schiller, to whom he owed in great measure his renewed interest in poetry.

    0
    0
  • Sigebert, king of the East Angles, founded a monastery here about 633, which in 903 became the burial place of King Edmund, who was slain by the Danes about 870, and owed most of its early celebrity to the reputed miracles performed at the shrine of the martyr king.

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  • That it owed its institution to Lycurgus (Herod.

    0
    0
  • The existing privileges, which the Jews owed to their ambassador to Rome, were thrust aside.

    0
    0
  • In 153 B.C. there appeared another of the series of pretenders to the Syrian throne, to whose rivalry Jonathan, and Simon after him, owed the position they acquired for themselves and their nation.

    0
    0
  • To his legal scholarship and collecting zeal Virginia owed the preservation of a large part of her early statutes.

    0
    0
  • The last owed success to Payindah's son, Fatteh Khan (known as the "Afghan Warwick "), a man of masterly ability in war and politics, the eldest of twenty-one brothers, a family of notable intelligence and force of character, and many of these he placed over the provinces.

    0
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  • If, as has been claimed, Louis owed to them any of his tendency to prefer the society of the poor, or rather of the bourgeois, to that of the nobility, their example was his best lesson in the craft of kingship. In June 1436, when scarcely thirteen, he was married to Margaret (c. 1425-1445), daughter of James I.

    0
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  • Brahman astronomy owed much to the Greeks, and what the Buddhists were to the architecture of northern India, that the Greeks were to its sculpture.

    0
    0
  • The Umballa durbar, at which Shere Ali was recognized as amir of Afghanistan, though in one sense the completion of what Lord Lawrence had begun, owed much of its success to the personal influence of Lord Mayo himself.

    0
    0
  • After the fall of the Theban power, to which it had owed its foundation, it became an ally of Philip II.

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  • By his alliance with the Liberals under Nicotera in 1891, and by his understanding with the Radicals under Cavallotti in 1894-98; by abandoning his Conservative colleague, General Ricotti, to whom he owed the premiership in 1896; and by his vacillating action after his fall from power, he divided and demoralized a constitutional party which, with greater sincerity and less reliance upon political cleverness, he might have welded into a solid parliamentary organization.

    0
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  • While he owed to Reid all his theory of morality, he repaid the debt by giving to Reid's views the advantage of his admirable style and academic eloquence.

    0
    0
  • As he owed his position to the aid of the Kalbites, he chose his officers from among them.

    0
    0
  • They believed that the caliph was their lord, to whom they owed their daily bread, and came to pay him divine honours.

    0
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  • When on the point of death, Mahommed gave the famous sword of the Prophet called Dhu`l-Figar to a merchant to whom he owed 400 dinars.

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  • Sahl, to whose service he owed his success, he not only chose him as prime minister of the empire, but also named his brother, Hasan b.

    0
    0
  • The two generals to whom he owed still more were not treated as they deserved.

    0
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  • But the arrogance of Itakh, to whom he owed his Caliphate, became insufferable.

    0
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  • 932) Munis, discovering a court intrigue against him, set out for Mosul, expecting that the Hamdanids, who owed to him their power, would join him.

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  • Hamilton's Philosophy, and there is no doubt that the empirical school owed a great deal to his sound, accurate thinking, untrammelled by any reverence for authority, technique and convention.

    0
    0
  • Here he fell under the influence of Mark Pattison, to whom his impressionable nature perhaps owed a certain over-fastidiousness that characterized his whole career.

    0
    0
  • 47) B.C. he assumed the "toga virilis" and was elected into the pontifical college, an exceptional honour which he no doubt owed to his great-uncle, now dictator and master of Rome.

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  • On his way at Puteoli, the passengers and crew of a ship just come from Alexandria cheered the old man by their spontaneous homage, declaring, as they poured libations, that to him they owed life, safe passage on the seas, freedom and fortune.

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    0
  • Ferdinand, son of Sancho I., king of Portugal, owed his county to Philip, who, hoping to find him a docile protege, had married him to Jeanne, heiress of Flanders, daughter of Count Baldwin IX., who became emperor of the East, using the weak Philip of Namur, her guardian, to accomplish that end.

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  • Crassus was a man of only moderate abilities, and owed his importance to his great wealth.

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  • Hayes, McKinley owed much in his earlier years in Congress.

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  • The Ophites actually identified the serpent with Sophia (" Wisdom "); the old sage Garga, one of the fathers of Indian astronomy, owed his learning to the serpent-god Sesha Naga; and the Phoenician 14pwv 'Ocbiwv wrote the seven tablets of fate which were guarded by Harmonia.

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  • Antonio Perez, who was legitimated by an imperial diploma issued at Valladolid in 1542, was, however, believed by many to be in reality the son of Philip's minister, Ruy Gomez de Silva, prince of Eboli, to whom, on the completion of a liberal education at home and abroad, he appears at least to have owed his first introduction to a diplomatic career.'

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  • Danzig originally owed its commercial importance to the fact that it was the shipping port for the corn grown in Poland and the adjacent regions of Russia and Prussia; but for some few years past this trade has been slipping away from her.

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    0
  • The king is the commander in war, and the office probably owed its existence to military necessities.

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    0
  • Not only was faith made independent of reason, but it was considered all the purer, the less it owed to any kind of mental process.

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    0
  • He modelled an empire, Roman in name but essentially Teutonic, since it owed such substance as its fabric possessed to Frankish armies and the sinews of the German people.

    0
    0
  • We should, however, here remember that the study of Roman law, which was one important precursory symptom of the Renaissance, owed much to medieval respect for the empire as a divine institution.

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    0
  • It is obvious that Italian literature owed little at the outset to the Revival of Learning.

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    0
  • These qualities she owed to her material prosperity, to her freedom from feudalism, to her secularized church, her commercial nobility, her political independence in a federation of small states.

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    0
  • Cimabue started with work which owed nothing directly to anti quity.

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    0
  • Chaucer's poetry, which owed so much to Italian examples, gave an early foretaste of the former.

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    0
  • The Renaissance closed the middle ages and opened the modern era, - not merely because the mental and moral ideas which then sprang into activity and owed their force in large measure to the revival of classical learning were opposed to medieval modes of thinking and feeling, but also because the political and international relations specific to it as an age were at variance with fundamental theories of the past.

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  • It owed its origin in the latter half of the 17th century to the discovery of salt-springs, and now produces coal, salt, alabaster and quicksilver, and manufactures steel rails.

    0
    0
  • It can scarcely be denied that the Roman Catholic clergy have always owed much of their influence to their celibacy, and that in many cases this influence has been most justly earned by the celibate's devotion to an unworldly ideal.

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    0
  • The royal navy owed all to him, for the king thought only of military exploits.

    0
    0
  • It was probably to this relation that the burgesses owed the privilege of parliamentary representation, conferred by Edward VI.

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    0
  • Those who still kept their property nominally were in the position of Irish cottiers: they owed more than they could pay, and stone pillars erected on their land showed the amount of the debts and the names of the lenders.

    0
    0
  • For a considerable period one of the most flourishing towns in the county, Belper owed its prosperity to the establishment of cotton works in 1776 by Messrs Strutt, the title of Baron Belper (cr.

    0
    0
  • In 1377 the reformer appeared before Archbishop Sudbury and Courtenay, when an altercation between the duke and the bishop led to the dispersal of the court, and during the ensuing riot Lancaster probably owed his safety to the good offices of his foe.

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    0
  • It now became evident to La Chetardie that only a revolution would overthrow Osterman, and this he proposed to promote by elevating to the throne the tsesarevna Elizabeth, who hated the vice-chancellor because, though he owed everything to her father, he had systematically neglected her.

    0
    0
  • The increased dignity which the royal power owed to Earl Birger was still further extended by King Magnus Ladulas (1275-1290).

    0
    0
  • It was to this national devotion quite as much as to his own qualities that Gustavus owed his success as an empire-builder.

    0
    0
  • Another principal member of the school was Karl Frederik Dahlgren (q.v.; 1791-1844), a humorist who owed much to the example of Bellman.

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    0
  • but the Galatian churches owed their origin to a mission of Paul undertaken some time before he crossed from Asia to Europe.

    0
    0
  • In every part of the empire they gradually superseded the Seljuk princes, and the minor dynasties above mentioned all owed their existence to the ambition of the Turkish regents or atabegs.

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  • But Hajji Ibrahim had been intriguing against his sovereign, to whose family he owed everything, not only with his officers and soldiers but also with Aga Mahommed, the chief of the Kajars, and arch-enemy of the Zends.

    0
    0
  • Glastonbury owed its medieval importance to its connexion with the abbey.

    0
    0
  • Like other Russian composers he owed much to the influence of Liszt at Weimar.

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  • In historic times it was situate on the lower slopes of the hills, Coressus and Prion, which rise out of a fertile plain near the mouth of the river Cayster, while the temple and precinct of Artemis or Diana, to the fame of which the town owed much of its celebrity, were in the plain itself, E.N.E.

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  • Twice in the period 700 -500 B.C. the city owed its preservation to the interference of the goddess; once when the swarms of the Cimmerians overran Asia Minor in the 7th century and burnt the Artemision itself; and once when Croesus besieged the town in the century succeeding, and only retired after it had solemnly dedicated itself to Artemis, the sign of such dedication being the stretching of a rope from city to sanctuary.

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  • Gustavus was educated under the care of two governors who were amongst the most eminent Swedish statesmen of the day, Carl Gustaf Tessin and Carl Scheffer; but he owed most perhaps to the poet and historian Olof von Dalin.

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  • It is difficult to extract any historical fact out of this maze of myths; the various groups cannot be fully co-ordinated, and a further perplexing feature is the neglect of Thebes in the Homeric poems. At most it seems safe to infer that it was one of the first Greek communities to be drawn together within a fortified city, that it owed its importance in prehistoric as in later days to its military strength, and that its original "Cadmean" population was distinct from other inhabitants of Boeotia such as the Minyae of Orchomenus.

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    0
  • It was to Dorat that Scaliger owed the home which he found for the next thirty years of his life.

    0
    0
  • Sertorius owed much of his success to his statesmanlike ability.

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    0
  • They found a leader in Sancho's brother Alphonso, count of Boulogne, who owed his title to a marriage with Matilda, countess of Boulogne.

    0
    0
  • The monarchy owed its triumph to its championship of national interests, to the support of the municipalities and military orders, and to the prestige gained by the royal armies in the Moorish and Castilian wars.

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  • The existing debt owed by D.

    0
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  • After some unspecified secular employment, Wykeham became "under-notary (vice tabellio) to a certain squire, constable of Winchester Castle," probably Robert of Popham, sheriff of Hampshire, appointed constable on the 25th of April 1340, not as commonly asserted Sir John Scures, the lord of Wykeham, who was not a squire but a knight, and had held the office from 1321, though, from Scures being named as second of his benefactors, Wykeham perhaps owed this appointment to his influence.

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  • The chief evidence cited in support of the theory that .Wykeham owed his advancement to his skill as an architect is the remark in a tract Why Poor Priests have no benefices that "Lords will not present a clerk able of cunning of God's law and good life and holy ensample ...

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  • Hamburg commerce, too, owed much to the enterprise of Portuguese Maranos.

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  • It has even been said that the only permanent acquisition that England owed directly to him was her Canadian dominion; and, strictly speaking, this is true, it being admitted that the campaign by which the Indian empire was virtually won was not planned by him, though brought to a successful issue during his ministry.

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  • It was to them that the Tibetans owed the great collection of what are still regarded as their sacred books - the Kandjur.

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  • owed certain duties to the lord; he promised fidelity and service; and the lord was bound to perform reciprocal duties, not very clearly defined, to the vassal - Dominus vassallo conjux et amicus dicitur.

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    0
  • He was a ready patron of letters, and the great library, which was Alexandria's glory, owed to him its inception.

    0
    0
  • The city of Bijapur owed its greatness to Yusuf Adil Shah, the founder of the independent state of Bijapur.

    0
    0
  • To a large extent he may have owed his reputation to the victories over the Mahommedans, with which he began the period of the great reconquest.

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    0
  • 'CONSTANTINE' Monomachus, emperor 1042-1054, owed his elevation to an old admirer, Zoe, the widow of Romanus III.

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    0
  • From this time she was the ardent champion of her husband's and son's rights; to her energy the cause of Lancaster owed its endurance, but her implacable spirit contributed to its failure.

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    0
  • After romantic adventures, in which she owed her safety to the loyalty of a boy of fourteen, her only companion, she escaped with her little son to Harlech.

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    0
  • Once she owed her escape from capture to the generosity of a Yorkist squire, who carried her off on his own horse; finally she and her son were brought to Bamburgh through the compassionate help of a robber, whom they had encountered in the forest.

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  • According to others, he owed his recovery to Aesculapius.

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  • On the right bank they are of pliocene gravel, on the left of tufa; and on the latter, on a cliff above the river (the ancient Puilia saxa) stood Ficana (marked by the farmhouse of Dragoncello), which is said to have owed its origin to Ancus Martius.

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  • But it may safely be said that his tale is best where most unvarnished, and probably no writer of the same rank has owed less to the mere sparkle of highly polished literary style.

    0
    0
  • No man owed less to external advantages.

    0
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  • In 1841 he was chosen Bampton lecturer, and shortly afterwards made chaplain to Prince Albert, an appointment he owed to the impression produced by a speech at an anti-slavery meeting some months previously.

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  • and the duke of Burgundy, to which France owed her salvation.

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  • He served in the war next year, and was wounded at Agincourt, where he owed his life.

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  • History The Congo Free State owed its existence to the ambition and force of character of a single individual.

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  • To his high connexions and his adroitness, as well as to the gross mistakes of his rival, Clement owed the immediate support of Queen Joanna of Naples and of several of the Italian barons; and the king of France, Charles V., who seems to have been sounded beforehand on the choice of the Roman pontiff, soon became his warmest protector.

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    0
  • Pittsburg owed its origin to the strategic value of its site in the struggle between the English and the French for the possession of the North American continent.

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    0
  • Edward owed his throne to his kinsmen the Nevilles, and he was content for the time to be guided by them.

    0
    0
  • The most important compositions of this period of Mackenzie's life were the Quartette in E flat for piano and strings, Op. 11, and an overture, Cervantes, which owed its first performance to the encouragement and help of von Billow.

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    0
  • Her son owed his escape from the miseries of her household to another member of the company, Moody, who wrote to Mr Stratford Canning, a merchant in London and younger brother of the elder George Canning.

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    0
  • Barca is said to have owed its origin to Greek refugees flying from the tyranny of Arcesilaus II.

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    0
  • It owed its early prosperity to its easy access to the sea, and to the fact that natural conditions in Cyrenaica and the Sahara behind it, tend to divert trade to the west of the district - a fact which is exemplified by the final survival of Berenice (mod.

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    0
  • Landskrona, originally called Landora or Landor, owed its first importance to King Erik XIII., who introduced a body of Carmelite monks from Germany in 1410, and bestowed on the place the privileges of a town.

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    0
  • Constantine Mavrocordato was the author of really liberal reforms. He introduced an urbarium or land law, limiting to 24 the days of angaria, or forced labour, owed yearly by the peasants to their feudal lord.

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    0
  • The voivodes owed their nomination entirely to the Porte, and the great officers of the realm were appointed at their discretion.

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  • He owed his complete liberation to one of the worst acts of one of the worst governments that England has ever seen.

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  • Therein appeared Polyeucte, the memorable comedy of Le Menteur, which though adapted from the Spanish stood in relation to French comedy very much as Le Cid, which owed less to Spain, stood to French tragedy; its less popular and far less good Suite, - and perhaps La Mort de Pompee.

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    0
  • the princes of Conde, Conti and Lamballe owed their exalted precedence, not to their principalities, but to their royal descent.

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    0
  • He was brought up, till he went to a tutor's, by his kinswoman, Kristin Vigfussdottir, to whom, he records, he "owed not only that he became a man of letters, but almost everything."

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    0
  • The change from slave to free labour proved to be advantageous to the farmers in the western provinces; an efficient educational system, which owed its initiation to Sir John Herschel, the astronomer (who lived in Cape Colony from 1834 to 1838), was adopted; Road Boards were established and did much good work; to the staple industries - the growing of wheat, the rearing of cattle and the making of wine - was added sheepraising; and by 1846 wool became the most valuable export from the country.

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    0
  • In 1854 Sir George Grey became governor of the Cape, and the colony owed much to his wise administration.

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  • the kin of Ghalib and the house of Ibn`Aun - to assert the right of designating or removing the sherif, to whom in turn he owed the possibility of maintaining, with the aid of considerable pensions, the semblance of his much-prized lordship over the holy cities.

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  • This victory he owed mainly to the valour of the Sacred Band, a picked body of 300 infantry.

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    0
  • It was to the efforts of Cousin that France owed her advance, in Relation to primary education, between 1830 and 1848.

    0
    0
  • impulse came from Rome, and Augustine is rightly regarded as the evangelist of the English; yet only a comparatively small part of the nation owed its Christianity directly to the mission sent out by Pope Gregory.

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  • Essex, which had received its first bishop from Augustines hands but had relapsed into heathenism after a few years, also owed its ultimate conversion to a Northumbrian preacher, Cedd, whom Oswio lent to King Sigeberht after the latter had visited his court and been baptized, hard by the Roman wall, in 653.

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  • servants, new men who owed all to him and served him faithfully.

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  • It is to Henry, aided by his great justiciar, Roger, bishop of Salisbury, that England owed the institution of the machinery of government by which it was to be ruled during the Constftu- earlier middle ages.

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    0
  • As a contemporary chronicler wrote, the realm was out of all good governanceas it has been many days before the king was simple, and led by covetous councillors, and owed more than he was worth.

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  • But he owed his long continuance in office especially to his sagacity.

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    0
  • Enjoying her full confidence, consulted by her on every occasion, he had always used his influence for the public good; and perhaps those who look back now with so much satisfaction at the queens conduct during a reign of unexampled length, imperfectly appreciate the debt which in this respect is owed to her first prime minister.

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  • no experience of: high office; and it had no chance of commanding a majority of the House of Commons in the existing parliament: It owed its position to the divisions of its opponents.

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  • But it owed its lasting character to the benevolence of its opponents rather than to the enthusiasm of its supporters.

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    0
  • They recognized that they owed more to the moral support of England than to the armed assistance of France.

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    0
  • It was everywhere felt that the new kingdom owed much to the moral support which had been steadily and consistently given to it by Great Britain.

    0
    0
  • With all his hatred for the book-man in politics, Burke owed much of his own distinction to that generous richness and breadth of judgment which had been ripened in him by literature and his practice in it.

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    0
  • Cambridge is "one of the few American towns that may be said to have owed their very name and existence to the pursuit of letters" (T.

    0
    0
  • Some allowance, too, must be made for the probability that Hamza's system owed something to doctrines Christian and other, with which the metropolitan position of Cairo brought Fatimite society into contact.

    0
    0
  • Hugh was a devoted son of the church, to which, it is not too much to say, he owed his throne.

    0
    0
  • It was to the ramparts of Constantine that the city owed its.

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    0
  • But he was well aware of how much he owed to his opponents' errors,.

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    0
  • Carved ivory objects abound, and there are many evidences of the skill attained by native artists, who perhaps owed something to their contact with the Portuguese.

    0
    0
  • To his vigour and intrepidity the Dutch in no small measure owed the preservation and establishment of their .empire in the East.

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    0
  • Maimonides owed a good deal to him.

    0
    0
  • Winckler may be right in restoring a mutilated passage in the annals of this king so as to make it mean that Babylon owed its name to Sargon, who made it the capital of his empire.

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    0
  • The town originally owed its prosperity to the large iron and coal fields underlying the basin in which it is situated.

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  • Something also he owed to Scotus and other medieval schoolmen.

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    0
  • To him the city owed her trade in cloths and velvets, from which so much wealth accrued to her 1 Fidelis Expositio Errorum Serveti, sub init.

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    0
  • It owed its importance in Saxon times to its position at the passage of the Thames.

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    0
  • This citadel was, even as late as the beginning of the 19th century, the strongest fortified place in Persia, and owed its strength to the Afghans who took Barn in 1719 and were not finally expelled until 1801.

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    0
  • The tribesmen owed fealty only to their chiefs, who in turn owed a kind of conditional allegiance to the over-king, depending a good deal upon the ability of the latter to enforce it.

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    0
  • The famine, emigration and the new poor law nearly got rid of starvation, but the people never became frankly loyal, feeling that they owed more to their own importunity and to their own misfortunes than to the wisdom of their rulers.

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    0
  • Two companies brought suit for moneys owed for liquor sold to the state dispensary; the commission resisted the suit on the ground that as a court and as a representative of the state it could not be sued; the circuit court and the circuit court of appeals overruled this plea and put the funds into the hands of a receiver; but in April 1909 this famous cause was closed by the decision of the Federal Supreme Court, upholding the commission and restoring to it the fund.

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  • He owed his election to the support of the German bishops, especially that of Aribo, archbishop of Mainz, who crowned him in his cathedral on the 8th of September 1024; and the king's biographer, Wipo, remarks that Charlemagne himself could not have been welcomed more gladly by the people.

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  • This work is now mostly in charge of a government department, and mission medical work is much restricted; but for thirty-five years the Malagasy owed all such help to the benevolence of European Christians.

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    0
  • The kingdoms of France and Germany, still too large, owed their existence to a series of dispossessions imposed on sovereigns too feeble to hold their own, and consisted of a great number of small states united by a very slight bond.

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    0
  • Louis only escaped being crushed because he remembered, as did his successors for long after him, that his house owed its power to the Church.

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    0
  • The disaster at Poitiers almost led to the establishment in France of institutions analogous to those which England owed to Bouvines.

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    0
  • He also drew most of the members of his special commissions from the grand council, a supreme administrative tribunal which owed all its influence to him.

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    0
  • What is known as " Arabian " philosophy owed to Arabia little more than its name and its language.

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    0
  • Alphonso, who during his exile owed some good services to the Mahommedan king of Toledo, spared that city while his friend lived.

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    0
  • The Trastamara, nobles and the cities to whom he owed his crown 1368-4379.

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    0
  • Reigate (Cherchefelle, Regat, Reygate) owed its first settlement to its situation at a cross-road on the Pilgrim's Way, at the foot of the North Downs; and its early importance to the castle which was the stronghold of the De Warennes in the 12th, 13th and 14th centuries.

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  • He owed the signal successes of his reign partly to his skilful choice of advisers and administrators, to his chancellors Jean and Guillaume de Dormans and Pierre d'Orgemont, to Hugues Aubriot, provost of Paris, Bureau de la Riviere and others; partly to a singular coolness and subtlety in the exercise of a not over-scrupulous diplomacy, which made him a dangerous enemy.

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    0
  • Thus he could afford to ignore the criticism of the House, and the king was obliged to acquiesce in the policy of a minister to whom he owed so much.

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    0
  • He found, however, a deliberate intention on the part of Austria to humble Prussia, and to degrade her from the position of an equal power, and also great jealousy of Prussia among the smaller German princes, many of whom owed their thrones to the Prussian soldiers, who, as in Saxony and Baden, had crushed the insurgents.

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    0
  • Tonbridge owed its early importance to the castle built by Richard, earl of Clare, in the reign of Henry I.

    0
    0
  • Whether the latter had bought his electors by money and promises, or owed his success to his dominant position in Bologna, and to the support of Florence and of Louis II.

    0
    0
  • He owed his influence partly to his natural genius and partly to the transparent integrity and nobility of his character.

    0
    0
  • It is to the "Russia Company," which received its first charter in 1554, that Great Britain owed its first intercourse with an empire then almost unknown.

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    0
  • Though still the market of the nomads, the surer and cheaper sea route has almost destroyed the transit trade to which it once owed its wealth, and has even diminished the importance of the annual pilgrim caravan to Mecca.

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    0
  • This privilege he owed to the influence of L.

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    0
  • Rabbu1a perhaps owed his elevation to the see of Edessa (411-435), in the year which produced the oldest dated Syriac MS., to his asceticism, and it was to his time that the sojourn there of the " Man of God " (Alexis) was assigned; but he won from the Nestorians the title of the Tyrant of Edessa.

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    0
  • She owed a large debt to the Giddons.

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    0
  • She owed it to the dead to attend one Guardian's wake.

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    0
  • He had wanted to convey to Cynthia his concerns over Billy Langstrom's death, but he felt he owed his election bid at least a modicum of concentration if he didn't want to make a fool of himself.

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    0
  • He'd cave to Andre's advice and double-check with Darkyn about whether or not his mate owed the Dark One anything – formally or informally.

    0
    0
  • He had to determine if the one he owed Darkyn was present or not and then warn Rhyn that the half-demon's Immortal father would soon no longer be dead-dead.

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    0
  • If anything, she owed him at least the benefit of the doubt.

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    0
  • Memon wanted Tiyan on its knees, and the warlord of Tiyan owed him one oath, the gift of his choice.

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    0
  • She felt gratitude was owed to her supporters.

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    0
  • The report showed the monies owed.

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    0
  • Should payment not be forthcoming then NUS would move to recover monies owed.

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    0
  • Some of these owed a very shaky allegiance to the new republic.

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    0
  • allodial land, family lands which owed no services.

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    0
  • arrears owed by the non-resident parent.

    0
    0
  • CSA deferred the arrears owed by the non-resident parent.

    0
    0
  • It was said in his obituary that he owed his advancement to unwearied assiduity, good talents, and respectability of character.

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    0
  • churchmanrn for their lands all tenants-in-chief, including churchmen, owed the King military service.

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    0
  • This part of the empire what medieval development owed to Islamic conquest?

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    0
  • They might include stocks of goods (not just raw materials but also work in progress) sums owed by debtors and cash balances.

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    0
  • That is the LSC would pay the costs incurred under the representation order less the amount paid or owed by the defendant.

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    0
  • deferred the arrears owed by the non-resident parent.

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    0
  • denariusus's parable, Simon might actually be the one who owed five hundred denarii instead of fifty.

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    0
  • In comparison invoice discounters help companies raise capital against the debts owed.

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    0
  • The prosody was significant and owed much to Scottish philosophical discourse.

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    0
  • I left her my Armenian, to whom she gladly paid the hundred ducats I owed him.

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    0
  • duty owed by an expert witness.

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    0
  • Another wealthy farmer, Chandra Bhan, owed $ 3,000.

    0
    0
  • Nova Oblata, 1204: the M of Wix owed an untrained goshawk (PR, 6 John, p. 32 ).

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    0
  • liquidation committee would be needed to enable the liquidator to agree a compromise regarding the amount owed by a contributory.

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    0
  • Yugoslavia, too, has owed its relative longevity more to Western liberal well-wishers that to the true consensus of its disparate peoples.

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    0
  • Do not forget to note down any debts owed to you or any money you owe to others.

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    0
  • Other major elements are stocks of goods for sale and monies due to the charity less monies owed by the charity.

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    0
  • owed one palfrey.

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    0
  • owed by the defendant.

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    0
  • owed so much to so many.

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    0
  • Some people owed much more than the average: 26% of those with some debt owed much more than the average: 26% of those with some debt owed more than £ 5,000.

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    0
  • owed partly to the amazing special effects.

    0
    0
  • However, some people are still owever, some people are still owed quite a lot of money by the Club.

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    0
  • owed in the meantime.

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    0
  • The key question was how much they owed to everyone, from the bank manager to the drinking pal at the local pub.

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    0
  • In 1200, Nova Oblata: H. archbp of Canterbury owed four palfreys for the fair (PR, 3 John, pp.

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    0
  • Weill seems to think he's owed undivided loyalties in return for his own perfidy.

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    0
  • Many people to whom the Colonel owed a grudge were, on the slightest pretext, incarcerated in the dungeon.

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    0
  • Creditors who were owed more than £ 50 could petition for bankruptcy proceedings.

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    0
  • Gerard son of Peter Bath owed the rent c.

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    0
  • royaltyer server keeps a track of the royalties owed to performers for each sale of their recording.

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    0
  • Owed to a Job I guess I'm hooked, I need you to keep sane.

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    0
  • sect of the Pharisees owed their origin.

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    0
  • None of the city-states enjoyed self-rule, but owed their allegiance to Egypt.

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  • Every day shopkeepers turn up asking for the money they are owed.

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  • stabilizeoffice some changes in he owed the bank stabilizing influences of.

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  • unjust steward, when he owed a hundred, bade him set down fifty.

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  • unmerciful servant of the Lord's story who owed his master a vastly great amount.

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  • The tribunal began by setting out the duty owed by an expert witness.

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