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missouri

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missouri

missouri Sentence Examples

  • She ain't in Missouri anymore.

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  • Hector in Missouri is gonna help me straighten it out.

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  • I crossed the mighty Missouri River, leaving agrarian Nebraska in my rear view window.

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  • A steel bridge across the Missouri (built in 1872; rebuilt in 1906) connects the city with Elwood, Kansas (pop. 1905, 711), and is used by two railways.

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  • The water is drawn from the Missouri, 3 m.

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  • He studied at Phillips Andover Academy, Andover, Massachusetts, and entered Yale, but left in his junior year (1857) to accept a position as a teacher of shorthand in the St Louis, Missouri, public schools.

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  • From the surplus of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition was constructed in 1914 the Jefferson Memorial costing 8485,000 and devoted to the collections of the Missouri Historical Society.

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  • Louis, $2,000,000; the Missouri athletic club, $500,000; the Railway Exchange, $3,000,000, 18 storeys, covering an entire city block; the University club, $600,- 000; the Young Women's Christian Association, $500,000; the Boatmen's bank, $750,000; the Arcade, $1,250,000; the Post-Despatch building, $500,000; the Bevo Manufacturing Company, $r,000,000.

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  • He was incredulous as a Missouri cynic but interested.

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  • Tell me you're not this psychic guy that's got everyone chasing after ghosts 'cause I have to tell you I'm from Missouri and you've got to show me.

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  • In the third place, the rejection of the Wilmot Proviso and the acceptance (as regards New Mexico and Utah) of "Squatter Sovereignty" meant the adoption of a new principle in dealing with slavery in the territories, which, although it did not apply to the same territory, was antagonistic to the Missouri Compromise of 1820.

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  • He was out on parole from an arrest in Missouri.

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  • They have them in Oklahoma and Missouri.

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  • Its strength was increased by the addition: in 1863 of the small Independent Presbyterian Church of South Carolina; in 1865 of the United Synod (New School), which at that time had 120 ministers, 190 churches, and 12,000 communicants; in 1867 of the presbytery of Patapsco; in 1869 of the synod of Kentucky; and in 1874 of the synod of Missouri.

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  • of St Louis, Missouri.

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  • (In 1892 he received a Congressional medal of honour for "conspicuous gallantry at the battle of Wilson's Creek.") In1861-1863he performed various military duties in Missouri.

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  • Nevada, Missouri >>

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  • Marshall, Missouri >>

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  • After 1880 his law office was in Bowling Green, Missouri.

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  • On the 7th of June 1856 it was plundered by about 170 pro-slavery men from Missouri.

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  • Louisiana, Missouri >>

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  • Three days later more than 2000 of the Indians were surrounded and captured, Little Crow with a few of his companions alone escaping beyond the Missouri.

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  • The original constitution of Missouri prescribed that the capital should be on the Missouri river within 40 m.

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  • The city is served by the International & Great Northern, and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railways.

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  • His attitude towards slavery at the moment was shown by his vote, in January 1820, for a resolution opposing the admission of Missouri as a slave state.

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  • MEXICO, a city and the county-seat of Audrain county, Missouri, U.S.A., N.E.

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  • Hardin (1820-1892), governor of the state in 1872-1874, and of the Missouri Military Academy (1889).

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  • The city is situated in the blue grass region of Missouri, and is a shippingpoint for horses and mules.

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  • The chief events of his administration, which has been called the " era of good feeling," were the Seminole War (1817-18); the acquisition of the Floridas from Spain (1819-21); the "Missouri Compromise " (1820), by which the first conflict over slavery under the constitution was peacefully adjusted; the veto of the Cumberland Road Bill (1822) 1 on constitutional grounds; and - most 1 The Cumberland (or National) Road from Cumberland, Maryland, to Wheeling, West Virginia, was projected in 1806, by an appropriation of 1819 was extended to the Ohio River, by an act of 1825 (signed by Monroe on the last day of his term of office) was continued to Zanesville, and by an act of 1829 was extended westward from Zanesville.

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  • HANNIBAL, a city of Marion county, Missouri, U.S.A., on the Mississippi river, about 120 m.

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  • It is served by the Wabash, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, and the St Louis & Hannibal railways, and by boat lines to Saint Louis, Saint Paul and intermediate points.

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  • Hannibal has a good public library (1889; the first in Missouri); other prominent buildings are the Federal building, the court house, a city hospital and the high school.

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  • The city is served by the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe, and the Missouri, Kansas, & Texas railways, and by an interurban electric railway.

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  • Hastings is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago & North-western, the Missouri Pacific and the St Joseph & Grand Island railways.

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  • Of less importance is the silicate, Zn 2 SiO 4 H 2 0, named electric calamine or hemimorphite; this occurs in quantity in Altenburg near Aix-laChapelle, Sardinia, Spain and the United States (New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Missouri, Wisconsin).

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  • of zinc. This region now furnishes the bulk of the ore required by the smelters of Illinois, Missouri and Kansas.

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  • Upon the repeal of the Missouri Compromise by the Kansas-Nebraska Bill in 1854, he joined the great popular movement in Ohio against the policy represented by this bill, and was elected to Congress in the autumn of that year as an "Anti-Nebraska" man.

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  • Its ethnological value as indicating the existence of man on the Missouri in the glacial period is very doubtful, it being impossible accurately to determine the age of the deposits.

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  • For the next six years he lived in St Louis, Missouri, earning a scanty subsistence by farming and dealings in real estate.

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  • On the 7th of November he fought his first battle as a commander, that of Belmont (Missouri), which, if it failed to achieve any material result, certainly showed him to be a capable and skilful leader.

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  • In the absence of higher authority Porter sanctioned on his own responsibility the request of Missouri Unionists for permission to raise troops, a step which had an important influence upon the struggle for the possession of the state.

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  • He served from 1852 to 1856 in the Missouri legislature as a Free Soil Democrat, in 1856 joined the Republican party, and in1857-1859and1861-1862was a member of Congress, where he proved an able debater.

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  • Immediately after South Carolina's secession, Blair, believing that the southern leaders were planning to carry Missouri into the movement, began active efforts to prevent it and personally organized and equipped a secret body of l000 men to be ready for the emergency.

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  • This action gave the Federal cause a decisive initial advantage in Missouri.

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  • In1871-1873he was a United States senator from Missouri.

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  • Virginia has contributed largely to the population of West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Missouri.

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  • KIRKSVILLE, a city and the county-seat of Adair county, Missouri, U.S.A., about 129 m.

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  • It is the seat of the First District Missouri State Normal School (1870); of the American School of Osteopathy (opened 1892); and of the related A.

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  • A little later he was placed in command of the department of the Missouri, and the year following assumed command of the fifth military division, comprising Louisiana and Texas.

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  • of Pineville, McDonald county, Missouri, named after its discoverer, E.

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  • In the financial troubles between 1850 and 1860 it is said that more than half the railways north of the Ohio river and between the Hudson and the Missouri rivers were at some time his clients.

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  • CLINTON, a city and the county-seat of Henry county, Missouri, U.S.A., on the Grand river, 87 m.

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  • It is served by the St Louis & San Francisco, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, and the Kansas City, Clinton & Springfield railways.

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  • This group of fields is followed in importance by the " Eastern Interior " group in Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky, and the " Western Interior " group in Iowa, Missouri and Kansas.

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  • by Missouri, and W.

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  • by the Missouri and Big Sioux rivers, which separate it from Nebraska and South Dakota.

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  • from the mouth of the Big Sioux river, extends a line of mound-like bluffs usually free from rocks, but rising abruptly from the flood plain of the Missouri to a height varying from TOO to 300 ft, A broad water-parting extending from Spirit lake, on the northern border, nearly S.

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  • is drained by tributaries of the Missouri, mostly short streams taking their rise from numerous rivulets, flowing quite rapidly over muddy beds through much of their courses, and in the bluff belt along the Missouri having steep but grassy banks 200 ft.

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  • The alluvial soil, composed of what has been washed from other soils, together with decayed vegetable matter, covers about 6% of the surface of the state and is found in the river bottoms, of greatest extent in that of the Missouri; it varies much in fertility.

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  • The loess soil, chiefly a mixture of porous clay and carbonate of lime, forms the bluffs that border the bottom lands of the Missouri.

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  • Iowa, as a part of the whole Mississippi Valley, was taken into the formal possession of France in 1682; in 1762 as a part of the western half of that valley it was ceded to Spain; in 1800 it was retroceded to France; in 1803 was ceded to the United States; from 1804 to 1805, as a part of the District of Louisiana, it was under the government of Indiana Territory; from 1805 to 1812 it was a part of Louisiana Territory; from 1812 to 1821 a part of Missouri Territory; from 1821 to 1834 a part of the unorganized territory of the United States; from 1834 to 1836 a part of Michigan Territory; from 1836 to 1838 a part of Wisconsin Territory.

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  • Clinton, Missouri >>

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  • MARK TWAIN, the nom de plume of [[Samuel Langhorne Clemens]] (1835-1910), American author, who was born on the 30th of November 1835, at Florida, Missouri.

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  • His father was a country merchant from Tennessee, who moved soon after his son's birth to Hannibal, Missouri, a little town on the Mississippi.

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  • Just before the purchase of Louisiana, President Jefferson had recommended to Congress (18th January 1803) the sending of an expedition to explore the headwaters of the Missouri, cross the Rockies and follow the streams to the Pacific. In accordance with the recommendation Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, both officers of the United States Army, with a considerable party left St Louis on the 14th of May 1804, ascended the Missouri to the headwaters, crossed the Rockies and, following the Columbia river, reached the ocean in November 1805.

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  • Its subscribers were found throughout all quarters of the northern half of the Union from Maine to Oregon, large packages going to remote districts beyond the Mississippi or Missouri, whose only connexion with the outside world was through a weekly or semi-weekly mail.

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  • The only states Greeley carried were Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, Tennessee and Texas.

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  • The main range of the Rocky Mountains separates that part which is drained west into the'Columbia river and the Pacific Ocean from that which is drained east into the Missouri and Mississippi rivers and the Gulf of Mexico, and from a very small part which is drained north-east into Hudson Bay; the water-parting which in Montana separates the drainage into Hudson Bay from the drainage into the Gulf of Mexico crosses only the north-west region of Teton county.

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  • The principal rivers east of the Rockies are the Missouri and three of its tributaries; the Yellowstone in the south-east, the Musselshell in the middle, and the Milk in the north.

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  • The Missouri is formed by a union of the Jefferson, the Madison and the Gallatin.

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  • The Missouri is navigable for small boats to Fort Benton in Chouteau county, but farther upstream near Great Falls, Cascade county, to which it is navigable at high water, it falls 512 ft.

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  • Granite county; a portion of the skull of a Mesohippus latidens, found near the confluence of the three forks which form the Missouri river; and a portion of the skull of a Hyrachyus priscus, found near Lima, Beaverhead county.

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  • The first exploration within the borders of Montana was made in 1743 by Sieur de la Verendrye, who in that year led an expedition up the Missouri river to the Great Falls and near where Helena now stands; the first exploration in that part of the state which lies west of the main range of the Rocky Mountains was made by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark in 1805.

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  • That part which lies east of the mountains was included in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803 and became successively a part of Missouri Territory in 1812, of Nebraska Territory in 1854, of Dakota Territory in 1861 and of Idaho Territory in 1863; that which lies west of the mountains became successively a part of Oregon Territory in 1848, of Washington Territory in 1853 and of Idaho Territory in 1863.

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  • The report of Lewis and Clark attracted many traders and trappers, and within a few years the Missouri Fur Company, the Rocky Mountain Fur Company, the Hudson Bay Company and the American Fur Company had established fortified trading posts on the Missouri, the Yellowstone, the Marias, the Milk and other rivers; the most prominent among these was Fort Benton, which was established in 1846 at the head of navigation on the Missouri, and was made the headquarters of the American Fur Company.

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  • In 1884, partly because his political life seemed at least for the immediate present to be at an end, partly on account of the freedom and activity of out-of-door life, he bought two cattle ranches near Medora on the Little Missouri river in North Dakota, where he lived for two years, becoming intimately associated with the life and spirit of the western portion of the United States.

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  • Lake Traverse and the Big Stone Lake separate the state in part from Minnesota; the Big Sioux River forms most of the boundary between South Dakota and Iowa; and the Missouri river separates the state in part from Nebraska.

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  • West of the James River Valley lies an elevated table-land, known as the Coteau du Missouri, which marks the waterparting between the James and the Missouri rivers, and has a general elevation of about 1800 ft.

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  • West of the Missouri river the sheet of glacial drift is absent, and the lands everywhere show evidence of extensive stream erosion.

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  • With the exception of the extreme north-east, the state lies within the drainage system of the Missouri river.

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  • To the west of this stream and almost parallel with it is the James or Dakota river, which rises in North Dakota and follows a general course southward until it joins the Missouri river near Yankton.

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  • From the west the Missouri receives the Grand, Moreau or Owl, Cheyenne and White rivers.

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  • The portion of South Dakota east of the Missouri river is dotted with numerous lakes, ranging from small ponds to bodies of water from Io to 15 m.

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  • The plains, except in the south-east corner, are underlaid by sheets of water-bearing sandstone, which carry a volume of water under such pressure that in the valleys of the James river and the Missouri river and its western tributaries a strong surface flow may be obtained from artesian wells.

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  • In 1905 over a thousand wells had been sunk east of the Missouri, and the flow was estimated at 7,000,000 gallons per day.

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  • The state is coldest in the north-east and warmest in the region south of the Cheyenne and west of the Missouri river.

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  • The glacial drift east of the Missouri river, unlike that of the New England states, is remarkably free from boulders and gravel, except in a few morainic belts.

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  • West of the Missouri river the drift gives place to a fine soil of sand aid clay, with deposits of alluvium in the vicinity of streams. Though lacking in vegetable mould, these soils are generally capable of producing good crops where the water-supply is sufficient.

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  • The principal waterway is the Missouri River, whose channel has an average depth at low water of about 2 ft.

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  • The " Yellowstone," a steamboat sent out by the American Fur Company, ascended the Missouri to Fort Pierre in 1831 and to the mouth of the Yellowstone river in 1832.

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  • In the meantime several small colonies had been established east of the Missouri River, but growth was much hampered by the Civil War and by Indians.

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  • A movement was at once begun to break up the great Sioux reservation, partly because it cut off this region from the older settlements east of the Missouri and partly because it contained a large amount of land which was very valuable for farming and grazing purposes.

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  • This included, roughly speaking, all of the land between the Missouri River and the Black Hills and between the White River and the Big Cheyenne and a strip extending north from the Black Hills to the North Dakota line between the 102nd and 103rd meridians.

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  • The territory included within the present limits of the state was a part of the district of Louisiana from 1803 to 1805, of the territory of Louisiana from 1805 to 1812, and of the territory of Missouri from 1812 to 1820.

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  • After the formation of the state of Missouri in 1820 it remained unorganized, the section east of the Missouri River until 1834, and the section west until 1854.

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  • dam at Canyon Ferry, on the Missouri river, 18 m.

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  • LEXINGTON, a city and the county-seat of Lafayette county, Missouri, U.S.A., situated on the S.

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  • bank of the Missouri river, about 40 m.

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  • N.W.), and the Missouri Pacific railway systems. The city lies for the most part on high broken ground at the summit of the river bluffs, but in part upon their face.

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  • Lexington succeeded Sibley as the eastern terminus of the Santa Fe trade, and was in turn displaced by Independence; it long owed its prosperity to the freighting trade up the Missouri, and at the opening of the Civil War it was the most important river town between St Louis and St Joseph and commanded the approach by water to Fort Leavenworth.

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  • Again, during General Price's Missouri expedition in 1864, a Federal force entered Lexington on the 16th of October, and three days later there was some fighting about 4 m.

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  • bank of the Missouri River, at the mouth of the Kansas, altitude about Soo ft.

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  • It is separated from its greater neighbour, Kansas City, Missouri, only by the state line, and is the largest city in the state.

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  • It is served by the Union Pacific, the Missouri Pacific, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, and the Chicago Great Western railways, and by electric lines connecting with Leavenworth and with Kansas City, Missouri.

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  • 9, '611861-1863-1863-18651865-1869-1869 (3 months)1869-1873-1873-18771877-1879-1879-18831883-1885-1885-18891889-1893-1893-18951895-1897-1897-18991899-1903-1903-19051905-1909-1909 extraordinary railway facilities of Kansas City, Missouri.

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  • During the Kansas struggle Wyandotte was a pro-slavery town, while Quindaro (1856), a few miles up the Missouri, was a free-state settlement and Wyandotte's commercial rival until after the Civil War.

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  • Kansas City, Missouri >>

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  • The escarpment of the Coteau du Missouri is the dividing line, that portion to the N.

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  • of this ridge lies the third and highest plain within the state, the so-called Coteau du Missouri.

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  • East of the Missouri river this region is covered with glacial drift, and is noticeably different from the more level lands of the lower plains.

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  • As the Missouri river marks approximately the lower edge of the ice-sheet, the region W.

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  • The highest point in the state, about 3500 ft., is in the southern part of Bowman county, east of the Little Missouri river.

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  • and the Missouri river and its tributaries.

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  • The James river, flowing southward into South Dakota, is the Missouri's only important eastern tributary within the state.

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  • the Missouri receives the waters of the Little Missouri, Cannon Ball, Heart and Knife rivers.

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  • of the valleys of the Mouse and Missouri rivers is dotted with small lakes.

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  • Cottonwoods flourish along the Little Missouri river, and in sheltered ravines grow stunted junipers and cedars, which seldom rise above the crest of some protecting bluff.

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  • The drift becomes thinner toward the W., and finally disappears in the semi-arid regions of the Missouri river valley.

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  • Irrigation is confined to the western half of the state, and more especially to the north-west, being employed chiefly in the drainage basin of the Missouri river.

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  • The Buford-Trenton, Williston and Nesson projects are situated in Williams county, on the left bank of the Missouri river.

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  • The Washburn project was to irrigate 5000 acres in McLean county with water pumped from the Missouri river.

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  • of the Missouri river, in the Mouse river valley along the line of the Minneapolis, St Paul & Sault Ste Marie railway, and at a few places in the same region along the line of the Great Northern railway.

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  • in the state; and the " Missouri River Line," penetrating the southern and central portions of the state from Hankinson to Garrison, with a length of 282 m.

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  • as Belmont, and the Missouri river is navigable throughout its course within the state, although it requires a skilful pilot.

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  • David Thompson (1770-1857), an employee at different times of the Hudson's Bay and North-West Fur companies, explored the region of the Missouri river in 1797-1798, and thus anticipated the work of Lewis and Clark, who entered the present limits of the state in 1804 and wintered among the Mandans,constructingFortMandan in what is nowMcLean county.

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  • From 1803 to 1805 it was included in the District of Louisiana, and from 1805 to 1812 it was a part of the Louisiana Territory, the name of which was changed to Missouri Territory in 1812.

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  • of the Missouri river was included in the newly organized Territory of Michigan, and became successively a part of Wisconsin Territory in 1836, of Iowa Territory in 1838, and of Minnesota Territory in 1849.

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  • In 1854 the Territory of Nebraska was organized from a portion of the Missouri Territory, and the part of the Dakotas W.

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  • of the Missouri, then locally called " Mandan Territory," was included in its limits.

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  • After Minnesota entered the Union, in 1858, the country between the Red and the Missouri rivers had no Territorial government for three years, but the inhabitants formed a provisional government.

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  • In the following year General Alfred Sully (1821-1879), commanding United States troops, marched up the Missouri river as far as Bismarck, and thence to the valley of the James river.

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  • of the Missouri river, and forts and garrisons were placed along this stream.

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  • Mullet, and built of Maine and Missouri granite) is a fine structure in classic style, 360 ft.

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  • The clays used are exclusively American, much being obtained in Missouri.

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  • All the remaining states and territories stood by the Union, except Missouri, Kentucky and Maryland, in which public opinion was divided.

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  • Missouri, at the other flank of the line, contained an even stronger Confederate element, and it was not without a severe struggle that the energy of Mr (afterwards General) F.

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  • In Kentucky the Unionist victory was secured almost without a blow, and, even at the end of 1861, the Confederate outposts west of the Alleghenies lay no farther north than the line Columbus - Bowling Green - Cumberland Gap, though southern Missouri was still a contested ground.

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  • reoccupy Missouri.

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  • The left flank, even after the evacuation of Columbus, was exposed, and the Missouri divisions under Pope quickly seized New Madrid.

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  • Meanwhile, in the Missouri theatre, the Federal general Curtis, outnumbered and outmanoeuvred by the forces of Price and Van Dorn, fought, and by his magnificent tenacity won, the battle of Pea Ridge (March 7-8), which put an end to the war in this quarter.

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  • Minor operations moreover, especially in Arkansas and southern Missouri, were continually undertaken by both sides during 1862-1863, of which the battle of Prairie Grove, Arkansas (December 7, 1862), was the most notable incident.

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  • SIOUX CITY, a city and the county-seat of Woodbury county, Iowa, U.S.A., at the confluence of the Big Sioux with the Missouri river, about 156 m.

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  • The bluffs approach the Missouri more closely at this point than elsewhere in the state, so that little more than manufacturing establishments and business blocks are built on the bottom lands, and the residences are spread over the slope and summit of the bluffs.

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  • by the Mississippi river, which separates it from Missouri.

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  • In the Upper Mississippi lead region of Missouri, Illinois, Iowa and Wisconsin the ore fills large cavities or chambers in limestone.

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  • Galena is met with at all places where lead is mined; of localities which have yielded finely crystallized specimens the following may be selected for mention: Derbyshire, Alston in Cumberland, Laxey in the Isle of Man (where crystals measuring almost a foot across have been found), Neudorf in the Harz, Rossie in New York and Joplin in Missouri.

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  • Saint Joseph, Missouri >>

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  • bank of the Missouri river, in the S.

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  • Bismarck is the headquarters for navigation of the upper Missouri river, is situated in a good agricultural region, and has a large wholesale trade, shipping grain, hides, furs, wool and coal.

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  • Tacoma is served by the Northern Pacific, the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound, and the Tacoma Eastern railways; the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railway operates through trains to and from Missouri river points and Tacoma, over the Northern Pacific tracks, which are also used by the Great Northern and Oregon & Washington railways.

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  • He started on the r 5th of July; and went north along the Missouri and the Osage into the present state of Kansas and probably to the Republican river in the south of the present Nebraska, where on the 29th of September he held a grand council of the Pawnees.

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  • MISSOURI COMPROMISE, an agreement (1820) between the pro-slavery and anti-slavery factions in the United States, involving primarily the regulation of slavery in the public territories.

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  • A bill to enable the people of Missouri to form a state government preliminary to admission into the Union came before the House of Representatives in Committee of the Whole, on the 13th of February 1819.

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  • An amendment offered by James Tallmadge (1778-1853) of New York, which provided that the further introduction of slaves into Missouri should be forbidden, and that all children of slave parents born in the state after its admission should be free at the age of twenty-five, was adopted by the committee and incorporated in the Bill as finally passed (Feb.

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  • The Senate decided to connect the two measures, and passed a bill for the admission of Maine with an amendment enabling the people of Missouri to form a state constitution.

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  • Thomas (1777-1850) of Illinois, excluding slavery from the "Louisiana Purchase" north of 36° 30' (the southern boundary of Missouri), except within the limits of the proposed state of Missouri.

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  • on the slavery issue, but also on the parliamentary question of the inclusion of Maine and Missouri within the same bill.

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  • The committee recommended the enactment of two laws, one for the admission of Maine, the other an enabling act for Missouri without any restrictions on slavery but including the Thomas amendment.

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  • This is sometimes known as the second Missouri Compromise.

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  • Woodburn, "The Historical Significance of the Missouri Compromise" in the Annual Report of the American Historical Association for 1893 (Washington, D.C.); Dixon, History of the Missouri Compromise (Cincinnati, 1899); Schouler's and McMaster's Histories of the United States.

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  • Missouri River >>

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  • Dallas is served by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe, the Houston & Texas Central, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, the" St Louis South-western, the Texas & New Orleans, the Trinity & Brazos Valley, and the Texas & Pacific railways, and by interurban electric railways to Fort Worth and Sherman.

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  • Thus the prairies may be described as lying in a general way between the Ohio and Missouri rivers on the south and the Great Lakes on the north.

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  • The southernmost drift sheets, as in southern Iowa and northern Missouri, have lost their initially plain surface and are now maturely dissected into gracefully rolling forms; here the valleys of even the small streams are well opened and graded, and marshes and lakes are wanting: hence these sheets are of early Pleistocene origin.

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  • When the ice sheets fronted on land sloping southward to the Ohio, Mississippi and Missouri rivers, the drift-laden streams flowed freely away from the ice border; and as the streams, escaping from their subglacial channels, spread in broader channels, they ordinarily could not carry forward all their load; hence they acted not as destructive but as constructive agents, and aggraded their courses.

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  • In the same way the western side of the em- Mississippi ~ayment, trending south and south-west, passes along the Emba.vmeni.lower south-eastern side of the dissected Ozark plateau of southern Missouri and northern Arkansas, which in many ways resembles the Appalachian plateau, and along the eastern end of the Massern ranges of the Ouachita mountain system in central Arkansas, which in geological history and topographical form present many analogies with the ridges and valleys of the Appalachians; and as the coastal plain turns westward to Texas it borders the Arbuckle hills in Oklahoma, a small analogue of the crystalline Appalachian belt.

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  • Missouri 530,000 14

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  • The small proportion of total water volume supplied from the great Missouri basin is due to the light precipitation in that region.

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  • The peneplain is no longer in the cycle of erosion that witnessed its production; it appears to have suffered a regional elevation, for the riversthe upper Missouri and its branchesno longer flow on the surface of the plain, but in well graded, maturely opened valleys, several hundred feet below the general level.

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  • A significant exception to the rule of mature valleys occurs, however, in the case of the Missouri, the largest river, which is broken by several falls on hard sandstones about 50 m.

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  • As far north as the gorge of the Missouri river in Montana, the Front range, facing the Great Plains, is a rather simple uplift, usually formed by upturning the flanking strata, less often by a fracture.

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  • Farther north in Montana, beyond the gorge of the Missouri river, the structure of the Front Range is altogether different; it is here the carved residual of a great mass of moderately bent Palaeozoic strata, overthrust eastward upon the Mesozoic strata of the plains; instead of exposing the oldest rocks along the axis and the youngest rocks low down on the flanks, the younger rocks of the northern range follow its axis, and the oldest rocks outcrop along its eastern flanks, where they override the much younger strata of the plains; the harder strata, instead of lapping on the mountain flanks in great slab-like masses, as in the Bighorns, form out-facing scarps, which retreat into the mountain interior where they are cut down by outfiowing streams.

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  • It is in association with this field of extinct volcanic activity that a remarkable group of geysers and hot springs has been developed, from which the Yellowstone river, a branch of the Missouri, flows northeastward, and the Snake river, a branch of the Columbia, flows south-westward.

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  • Its eastern part is drained north-eastward through a gorge that separates the Laramie and Rattlesnake (Front) ranges by the North Platte river to the Missouri-Mississippi; its western part, where the basin floor is much dissected, often assuming a bad-land expression, is drained southward by the Green river, through a deep canyon in the Uinta Ran~e to the Colorado river and then to the Pacific. The Bighorn basin has a moderately dissected floor, drained north-eastward by Bighorn river through a deep canyon in the range of the same name to the Missouri.

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  • Several smaller basins occur in Montana, all somewhat dissected and drained through narrow gorges and canyons by members of the Missouri system.

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  • It is well exposed in New York, Wisconsin, Missouri and elsewhere, about the outcrops of older rocks.

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  • The lead of south-eastern Missouri conies from about the same horizon.

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  • Devonian System.The Devonian system appears in some parts of New England, throughout most of the Appalachian region, over much of the eastern interior from New York to the Missouri River, in Oklahoma, and perhaps in Texas.

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  • The zinc and lead of the Joplin district of Missouri are in the limestone of this system, and the corresponding limestone in some parts of Colorado, as at Leadville, is one of the horizons of rich ore.

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  • West of the Mississippi the Coal Measures are subdivided into two series, the Des Moines below and the Missouri above.

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  • Missouri formation 1500 It.

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  • Reports of state geological surveys have been published by most of the states east of the Missouri river, and some of those farther west (California, Washington, Kansas, Nebraska and Wyoming) and south (Arkansas, Texas and Louisiana).

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  • The Caiolinian area extends from southern Michigan to northern Georgia and from the Atlantic coast to Western Kansas, comprising Delaware, all of Maryland except the mountainous Western portion, all of Ohio except the north-east corner, nearly the whole of Indiana, Illinois, Iowa and Missouri, eastern Nebraska and Kansas, south-eastern South Dakota, western central Oklahoma, northern Arkansas, middle and eastern Kentucky, middle Tennessee and the Tennessee valley in eastern Tennessee, middle Virginia and North Carolina, western \Vest Virginia, north-eastern Alabama.

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  • The Austroriparian zone comprises nearly all the Gulf States as far West as the mouth of the Rio Grande, the greater part of Georgia, eastern South Carolina, North Carolina and Virginia, and extends up the lowlands of the Mississippi Valley acru_~s western Tennessee and Kentucky into southern Illinois andlndiana and across eastern and southern Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma into south-eastern Missouri and Kansas.

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  • A rapid development of the lead mines of the West, both in Missouri and on the Upper Mississippi in the region where Iowa, Wisconsin and Illinois adjoin one another, took place during the first quarter of the I9th century, and as early as 1826 or 1827 the amount of this metal obtained had risen to nearly 10,000 tons a year.

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  • The lead production of the Missouri mines had for some years been nearly stationary, or had declined slightly from its former importance; while that of the upper Mississippi region, which in the years just previous to 1850 had risen to from 20,000 to 25,000 tons a year, was declining, having in 1850 sunk to less than 18,000 tons.

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  • Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, West Virginia, California, Colorado, Montana, Michigan, New York and Missouri were the ten states of greatest absolute production in 1907.

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  • Colorado, 296,272; Illinois, 240,000; \Vest Virginia, 231,000; Utah, 196,408; Pennsylvania, 112,574; Kentucky, 104,028; OhiO, 86,028; Alabama, 68,903; Indiana, 44,169; Missouri, 40,ooo; New Mexico, 30,805, Tennessee, 25,665; Virginia.

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  • Indiana in 1889, along with Illinois, Kansas, Texas and Missouri, Oklahoma in 1891, Wyoming in 1894, and, lastly, Louisiana in 1902.

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  • The iron-producing area of the country may be divided, with regard to natural geographic, historic and trade considerations, into four districts: (1) the Lake Superior district, embracing the states of Minnesota, Michigan and Wisconsin; (2) the southern district, embracing the triangle tipped by Texas, Maryland and Georgia; (3) the northern district, embracing the triangle tipped by Ohio, New Jersey and Massachusetts, plus the states of Iowa and Missouri; (4) the western district, which includes the states of the Rocky Mountain region and Pacific coast.

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  • d the Lower Mines of south-eastern Missouri.

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  • The greatest lead district is in south-western Missouri nod south-eastern Kansas, known as the Joplin-Galena district after the names of the two cities that are its centre.

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  • Of the soft lead smelted in 1907 no less than 94.8% came from Missouri.

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  • Of the product of 1907 above stated no less than 63.4% came from Missouri alone; Colorado, Wisconsin, Kansas and New Jersey yielding together 30.8% more.

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  • wide on the Osage river near its confluence with the Missouri, where a hollow, wooden, cylindrical sector, stiffened inside by iron framing and revolving on an axis laid along the crest of the solid part of the weir, fits into a drum at the back „ vim 4 ..

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  • It is on the main line of the Union Pacific railway, on a branch of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy system, and on the main western line of the Chicago & North-Western railway, several branches of which (including the formerly independent Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley and the Sioux City & Pacific) converge here.

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  • He was military governor of Havana and Pinar del Rio in 1899, subsequently commanded the department of the Missouri, and retired as a brigadier-general U.S. Army in 1901.

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  • The parallel of 49° approximately separates the Saskatchewan waters from the streams going south to the Missouri, though a few sn1all tributaries of the latter river begin on Canadian territory.

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  • The very flat and rich prairie near Winnipeg is the former bed of the glacial Lake Agassiz; but most of the prairie to the west is of a gently rolling character and there are two rather abrupt breaks in the plain, the most westerly one receiving the name of the Missouri Coteau.

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  • The principal localities are at Missouri Bar, Ruby Bar and other places near Helena, where they were first worked, and also at Yogo Gulch, near Utica.

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  • Hwang Ho = Yellow river, Missouri = Big Muddy, the Red river, &c. It has been estimated that the Mississippi annually carries 4064 million tons of sediment to the sea; the Hwang Ho 796 million tons; the Po 67 million tons.

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  • It is served by the Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio, the International & Great Northern, the San Antonio & Aransas Pass, and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railways.

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  • A public park extending from the James to the heart of the city, a deep, spacious and well-protected harbour, a large shipbuilding yard with three immense dry docks, and two large grain elevators of 2,000,000 bushels capacity, are among the most prominent features; at the shipbuilding yard various United States battleships, including the "Kearsarge," "Kentucky," "Illinois," "Missouri," "Louisiana," "Minnesota," "Virginia" and "West Virginia," were constructed, as well as cruisers, gun-boats, merchant vessels, ferry-boats and submarines.

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  • CARTHAGE, a city and the county-seat of Jasper county, Missouri, U.S.A., on the Spring river, about 950 ft.

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  • It is served by the St Louis & San Francisco, the Missouri Pacific, and the St Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern railways, and is connected with Webb City and Joplin, Mo., and Galena, Kan., by the electric line of the Southwest Missouri railway.

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  • In 1856 he was engaged under the United States government, and commenced a series of investigations of the Western Territories, one result of which was his Geological Report of the Exploration of the Yellowstone and Missouri Rivers in 1859-1860 (1869).

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  • 4) "Palaeontology of the Upper Missouri, Pt.

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  • After the independence of Mexico Santa Fe became the centre of a growing commerce with the United States, conducted at first by pack animals, and later by wagon trains over the old Santa Fe Trail leading south-west from Independence, Kansas City, and, in earlier years, other places in Missouri, to Santa Fe.

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  • Austin is served by the Houston & Texas Central, the International & Great Northern, and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railways.

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  • It is served by the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, and the Texas & Pacific railways.

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  • A Republican in politics, and a firm believer in the doctrines of strict construction and state sovereignty which Thomas Jefferson had been principally instrumental in formulating, he opposed consistently the demand for internal improvements and increased tariff duties, and declined to follow Henry Clay in the proposed recognition of the independence of the Spanish colonies in South America and in the Missouri Compromise legislation.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Rock Island & Gulf, the Fort Worth & Denver City, the Fort Worth & Rio Grande, and the St Louis, San Francisco & Texas of the "Frisco" system, the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe, the Houston & Texas Central, the International & Great Northern, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas, the St Louis SouthWestern, the Texas & Pacific, and the Trinity & Brazos Valley (Colorado & Southern) railways.

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  • Aurora, Missouri >>

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  • of Saint Louis, Missouri.

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  • It served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, and the Missouri Pacific railway systems. A railway and wagon bridge spans the Missouri.

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  • In 1858 it became the headquarters of a great freighting-firm that distributed supplies for the United States government among the army posts between the Missouri river and the Rocky Mountains; in seven months in 1859 this one firm employed 602 men, used 517 wagons, 5682 oxen, and 75 mules, and shipped 2,782,258 lb.

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  • of the Divide is drained by the Yellowstone and Madison rivers into the Missouri, the Mississippi and the Gulf of Mexico.

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  • The state of Virginia is the chief producer, followed successively by Georgia, North Carolina, Colorado, Massachusetts, California, Missouri, New York, &c. From Indiana and Ohio a quantity of pyrites is obtained as a by-product in coalmining.

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  • United States, in Missouri, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio and elsewhere, there is an unconformable junction between the Lower and Upper Carboniferous, representing an interval of time during which the lower member was strongly eroded; it has even been proposed to regard the Mississippian (Lower Carboniferous) as a distinct geological period, mainly on account of this break in the succession.

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  • These are the Hudson's Bay Co., Russian Fur Co., Alaska Commercial Co., North American Commercial Co., Russian Sealskin Co., Harmony Fur Co., Royal Greenland Fur Co., American Fur Co., Missouri Co.

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  • When he was a year old his parents removed to Howard (Family)|Howard county, Missouri, then a frontier settlement, and the boy was early trained in the hardships and requirements of pioneer life.

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  • It has an active river trade with St Louis, Memphis and New Orleans, and five railway outlets - the Missouri Pacific and its branch, the Pine Bluff & Western, and the St Louis South-Western and its two branches, the Pine Bluff Arkansas River and the Aitheimer.

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  • New English Synods were: that of Pittsburg (1870); that of the Potomac (1873); and that of the Interior (1887), organized at Kansas City, Missouri.

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  • Dakota, Missouri, New Jersey, Connecticut, Kansas, W.

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  • Blende occurs in metalliferous veins, often in association with galena, also with chalcopyrite, barytes, fluorspar, &c. In oredeposits containing both lead and zinc, such as those filling cavities in the limestones of the north of England and of Missouri, the galena is usually found in the upper part of the deposit, the blende not being reached until the deeper parts are worked.

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  • Garrison in 1831, had stirred the conscience of the North, and had had its influence even upon many who strongly deprecated its extreme radicalism; the Compromise of 1850 had failed to silence sectional controversy, and the Fugitive Slave Law, which was one of the compromise measures, had throughout the North been bitterly assailed and to a considerable extent had been nullified by state legislation; and finally in 1854 the slavery agitation was fomented by the passage of the KansasNebraska Act, which repealed the Missouri Compromise and gave legislative sanction to the principle of "popular sovereignty" - the principle that the inhabitants of each Territory as well as of each state were to be left free to decide for themselves whether or not slavery was to be permitted therein.

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  • On the 30th of August General Fremont by military order declared martial law and confiscation against active enemies, with freedom to their slaves, in the State of Missouri.

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  • From the very beginning of his service in Congress he was prominent as an opponent of the extension of slavery; he was a conspicuous supporter of the Wilmot Proviso, spoke against the Compromise Measures of 1850,1850, and in 1856, chiefly because of the passage in 1854 of the Kansas-Nebraska Bill, which repealed the Missouri Compromise, and his party's endorsement of that repeal at the Cincinnati Convention two years later, he withdrew from the Democrats and joined the newly organized Republican party.

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  • TRENTON, a city and the county-seat of Grundy county, Missouri, U.S.A., on the E.

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  • 1869), a native of Missouri, and the organizer of the Ruskin Hall Workingmen's College, Oxford, England.

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  • KANSAS CITY, a city and port of entry of Jackson county, Missouri, U.S.A., the second in size and importance in the state, situated at the confluence of the Missouri and Kansas rivers, adjoining Kansas City, Kansas, and 235 m.

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  • South and west of this highland, along the Kansas river, is a low, level tract occupied chiefly by railway yards, stock yards, wholesale houses and manufacturing establishments; north and east of the highland is a flat section, the Missouri River bottoms, occupied largely by manufactories, railway yards, grain elevators and homes of employes.

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  • Two great railway bridges across the Missouri, many smaller bridges across the Kansas, and a great interstate toll viaduct extending from bluff to bluff across the valley of the latter river, lie within the metropolitan area of the two cities.

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  • The streets of the Missouri city are generally wide and excellently paved.

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  • The city is supplied with water drawn from the Missouri river above the mouth of the Kansas or Kaw (which is used as a sewer by Kansas City, Kan.); the main pumping station and settling basins being at Quindaro, several miles up the river in Kansas; whence the water is carried beneath the Kansas, through a tunnel, to a high-pressure distributing station in the west bottoms. The waterworks (direct pressure system) were acquired by the city in 1895.

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  • Westport, a little inland town - platted 1833, a city 1857, merged in Kansas City in 1899 - now a fashionable residence district of Kansas City - was a rival of Independence in the Santa Fe trade which she gained almost in toto in 1844 when the great Missouri flood (the greatest the river has known) destroyed the river landing utilized by Independence.

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  • After the war the railways came, taking away the traffic to Santa Fe, and other cities farther up the Missouri river took over the trade to its upper valley.

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  • In 1866 Kansas City was entered by the first railway from St Louis; 1867 saw the beginning of the packing industry; in 1869 a railway bridge across the Missouri assured it predominance over Leavenworth and St Joseph; and since that time - save for a depression shortly after 1890, following a real-estate boom - the material progress of the city has been remarkable; the population increased from 4418 in 1860 to 32,260 in 1870, 55,785 in 1880, and 13 2, 716 in 1890.

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  • Sections of the Missouri flood plain made by the United States geological survey show a great variety of material of varying coarseness, the stream bed being scoured at one place, and filled at another by currents and floods of varying swiftness, so that sometimes the deposits are of coarse gravel, sometimes of fine sand, or of fine silt, and it is probable that any section of such an alluvial plain would show deposits of a similar character.

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  • of the Missouri river opposite Omaha, Nebraska, with which it is connected by a road bridge and two railway bridges.

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  • In 1838 the Federal government made this the headquarters of the Pottawattamie Indians, removed from Missouri.

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  • In 1869-1875 he was United States senator from Missouri, and made a great reputation (especially in 1873-1874) by his speeches on financial subjects.

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  • During this period he broke with the administration: he started the Liberal Republican movement in Missouri in 1870 which elected B.

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  • The city is served by the Louisiana Railway & Navigation Company, the St Louis, Watkins & Gulf, the Texas & Pacific, the Louisiana & Arkansas, the Southern Pacific, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, and the Missouri Pacific railways.

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  • He then settled in Carrollton, Missouri, and in 1875 was a member of the State House of Representatives; in 1879 he was United States senator from Missouri for six weeks to fill an unexpired term.

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  • by the Mississippi river, which separates it from Missouri and Iowa.

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  • Chief of these were Kaskaskia, established near the mouth of the Kaskaskia river, about 1720; Cahokia, a little below the mouth of the Missouri river, founded at about the same time; and Fort Chartres, on the Mississippi between Cahokia and Kaskaskia, founded in 1720 to be a link in a chain of fortifications intended to extend from the St Lawrence to the Gulf of Mexico.

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  • A notable incident in the history of the state was the immigration of the Mormons from Missouri, about 1840.

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  • The majority of the early settlers came from the southern and border states, principally from Missouri and Kentucky; but subsequently there was a large immigration of New England and Eastern people, and these elements were stronger in the population of Jacksonville than in any other city of southern Illinois.

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  • FULTON, a city and the county-seat of Callaway county, Missouri, U.S.A., 25 m.

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  • At Fulton are the Westminster College (Presbyterian, founded in 1853), the Synodical College for Young Women (Pres., founded in 1871), the William Woods College for Girls (Christian Church, 1890), and the Missouri 'school for the deaf (1851).

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  • Here, too, is a state hospital for the insane (1847), the first institution of the kind in Missouri.

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  • His anti-slavery opinions grew in strength with years (though he was somewhat inconsistent in his attitude on the Missouri question in 1820 - 1821).

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  • NEW MADRID, a city and the county-seat of New Madrid county, Missouri, U.S.A., on the right bank of the Mississippi river, about 35 m.

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  • CHILLICOTHE, a city and the county-seat of Livingston county, Missouri, U.S.A., situated in the N.

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  • In July 1838 he was appointed second lieutenant of Topographical Engineers in the United States army, and for the next three years he was assistant to the French explorer, Jean Nicholas Nicollet (1786-1843), employed by the war department to survey and map a large part of the country lying between the upper waters of the Mississippi and Missouri rivers.

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  • Benton of Missouri, and it was in no small measure through Benton's influence with the government that Fremont was enabled to accomplish within the next few years the exploration of much of the territory between the Mississippi Valley and the Pacific Ocean.

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  • When the claim of the United States to the Oregon territory was being strengthened by occupation, Fremont was sent, at his urgent request, to explore the frontier beyond the Missouri river, and especially the Rocky Mountains in the vicinity of the South Pass, through which the American immigrants travelled.

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  • Within four months (1842) he surveyed the Pass and ascended to the summit of the highest of the Wind River Mountains, since known as Fremont's Peak, and the interest aroused by his descriptions was such that in the next year he was sent on a second expedition to complete the survey across the continent along the line of travel from Missouri to the mouth of the Columbia river.

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  • by Missouri, E.

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  • The Boston Mountains are substantially a continuation of the Ozark dome of Missouri.

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  • The greatest of these internal improvements is the St Francis levee, from New Madrid, Missouri, to the mouth of the St Francis, 212 m.

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  • From 1804 to 1812 what is now Arkansas was part of the district (and then the territory) of Louisiana, and from 1812 to 1819 of the territory of Missouri.

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  • Harrell's The Brooks and Baxter War: A History of the Reconstruction Period in Arkansas (St Louis, Missouri, 1893), which is frankly in favour of Baxter; also a paper by B.

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  • When the American Civil War broke out in 1861, Sigel was active in raising and training Federal volunteer corps, and took a prominent part in the struggle for the possession of Missouri.

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  • In 1862 he took a conspicuous part in the desperately fought battle of Pea Ridge, which definitely secured Missouri for the Federals.

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  • It is the shipping point of the Bedford Indiana (oolitic) limestone, which is found in the vicinity and is one of the most valuable and best known building stones in the United States - of this stone were built the capitols of Indiana, Georgia, Mississippi and Kentucky; the state historical library at Madison, Wisconsin; the art building at St Louis, Missouri; and many other important public buildings.

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  • Well-crystallized specimens are met with at many localities; for example, formerly at Wheal Towan (hence the name towanite, which has been applied to the species) in the St Agnes district of Cornwall, at Freiberg in Saxony, and Joplin, Missouri.

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  • It is served by the Missouri, Kansas & Texas and the Houston & Texas Central railways, and by the Dallas & Sherman inter-urban (electric) line, the central power plant of which is immediately north of the city.

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  • contains the Little Missouri Buttes and the Mato Tepee (or Devil's Tower), prominent erosion remnants of volcanic intrusions.

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  • Much of the state is drained by branches of the Missouri river, the most important being the Yellowstone, Bighorn and Powder rivers flowing N., and the Cheyenne and North Platte flowing E.

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  • 19,507 were natives of Wyoming, 6112 were born in Iowa, 5009 in Nebraska, 4923 in Illinois, 4412 in Missouri and 3750 in Utah.

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  • penetrated almost to the Missouri river during the first half of the 17th century and even formed settlements within the present limits of Wyoming, but these stories are more than doubtful.

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  • It was laid out as a town in 1864 and was named in honour of Oakes Ames, at the time one of the proprietors of the Cedar Rapids & Missouri River railway (now part of the Chicago & North-Western); five years later it was incorporated.

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  • He was then placed in charge of the Department of the Missouri, which he commanded for sixteen years, and in 1869, on Grant's election to the presidency and Sherman's consequent promotion to the full rank of general, he was made lieutenant-general.

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  • He had great energy and administrative ability, was for a time president of the Chicago & Rock Island and of the Mississippi & Missouri railways, first president of the Union Pacific in 1863-1868, and for a short time in 1872 president of the Erie.

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  • Three of these flow east and south-east to the Missouri, Mississippi and the Gulf; but the waters of the Colorado system flow to the south-west into the Gulf of California.

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  • The great Santa Fe (1873), Burlington (1882), Missouri Pacific (1887) and Rock Island (1888) systems reached Pueblo, Denver and Colorado Springs successively from the east.

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  • Long explored the valleys of the South Platte and Arkansas, pronouncing them uninhabited and uncultivable (as he also did the valley of the Missouri, whence the idea of the "Great American Desert").

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  • Pittsburg is situated near the lead and zinc region of south-east Kansas and south-west Missouri, is in the midst of a large and rich bituminous coalfield, and lies near natural gas and oil fields.

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  • In 1820 he congratulated the new South American republics on having abolished slavery, but the same year the threats of the Southern states to destroy the Union led him to advocate the "Missouri Compromise," which, while keeping slavery out of all the rest of the territory acquired by the "Louisiana Purchase" north of Missouri's southern boundary line, permitted it in that state.

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  • From Missouri caravans of pack animals, and later wagon trains, set out in May of each year on the Boo m.

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  • RICH .HILL, a city of Bates county, Missouri, U.S.A., situated near the Osage (Marais des Cygnes) river, in the west central part of the state, about 75 m.

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  • It is served by the Missouri Pacific and the St.

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  • It is served by the Kansas City Fort Scott & Memphis (St Louis & San Francisco system) and the Missouri Kansas & Texas railways.

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  • The city has large machine shops of the Missouri Kansas & Texas railway and various manufactures.

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  • It was named in honour of Levi Parsons (1822-1887), the first president of the Missouri Kansas and Texas railway.

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  • SEDALIA, a city and the county-seat of Pettis county, Missouri, U.S.A., a little W.

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  • Sedalia is served by the Missouri Pacific and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railway systems, and is a transportation centre with good facilities.

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  • There are a city hospital and the Maywood, a private hospital; and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railway maintains here a hospital for all parts of its system.

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  • The Missouri Pacific, three of whose operating divisions end at Sedalia and thus make the city its central division point, in 1904 established large shops (12 9 acres) in a suburb E.

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  • These shops and those of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railway, of which Sedalia is the central division point on the N.

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  • Sedalia was established as a station on the Missouri Pacific railroad in 1857.

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  • Chrysocolla contains in the pure state 30% of the metal; it is an abundant ore in Chile, Wisconsin and Missouri.

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  • Lexington, Missouri >>

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  • In the following year he collected geological and mineralogical specimens in Missouri and Arkansas, and in 1819 he published his View of the Lead Mines of Missouri.

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  • He was a member of the conference committee on the bill for the admission of Maine and Missouri, which in its final form embodied what is known as the Missouri Compromise.

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  • PLATTSMOUTH, a city and the county-seat of Cass county, Nebraska, U.S.A., situated in the valley and on the bluffs of the Missouri river near the mouth of the Platte.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, and the Missouri Pacific railway systems. There are railway car-shops, and a considerable trade is done in grain and cattle.

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  • Jones; he was rescued and taken to Lawrence; the city disclaimed complicity, but Jones persuaded Governor Wilson Shannon that there was rebellion, and Shannon authorized a posse; Missouri responded, and a pro-slavery force marched on Lawrence.

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  • On the 21st of August 1863 William C. Quantrell and some 400 mounted Missouri bushrangers surprised the sleeping town and murdered 150 citizens.

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  • of the Missouri river, situated centrally on the coast of the state in 37° 47' 22'55" N.

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  • In 1860 he was nominated for the presidency by the pro-slavery seceders from the Democratic national convention, and received a total of 72 electoral votes, including those of every Southern state except Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee and Missouri.

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  • that empty into Great Salt Lake, Utah) rises in Yellowstone National Park a few miles from the heads of the Madison fork of the Missouri, which flows to the Gulf of Mexico, and the Green fork of the Colorado, which flows to the Gulf of California.

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  • In 1810 Fort Henry, on the Snake river, was established by the Missouri Fur Company, and in the following year a party under the auspices of the Pacific Fur Company descended the Snake river to the Columbia.

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  • Osage, Liberty, Sibley, Lexington, Independence and Westport had successively been abandoned as terminals, as the transferpoint from boat to prairie caravan was moved steadily up the Missouri.

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  • In 1803 Harrison also became a special commissioner to treat with the Indians " on the subject of boundary or lands," and as such negotiated various treaties - at Fort Wayne (1803 and 1809), Vincennes (1804(1804 and 1809) and Grouseland (1805) - by which the southern part of the present state of Indiana and portions of the present states of Illinois, Wisconsin and Missouri were opened to settlement.

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  • In accordance with this view in 1819 he voted against Tallmadge's amendment (restricting the extension of slavery) to the enabling act for the admission of Missouri.

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  • Harrison was a member of the Ohio senate in 1819-1821, and was an unsuccessful candidate for the National House of Representatives in 1822, when his Missouri vote helped to cause his defeat; he was a presidential elector in 1824, supporting Henry Clay, and from 1825 to 1828 was a member of the United States Senate.

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  • He opposed the Bank Act of 1816, the "internal improvements" policy of Calhoun (in the early part of his career) and Clay, and the Missouri Compromise, his speech against the last being especially able.

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  • The fort, from which the city took its name, was built in 1827, in the Indian country, by Colonel Henry Leavenworth (1783-1834) of the 3rd Infantry, for the protection of traders plying between the Missouri river and Sante Fe.

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  • During the Civil War Leavenworth enjoyed great prosperity, at the expense of more inland towns, partly owing to the proximity of the fort, which gave it immunity from border raids from Missouri and was an important depot of supplies and a place for mustering troops into and out of the service.

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  • Leavenworth was, in Territorial days and until after 1880, the largest and most thriving commercial city of the state, and rivalled Kansas City, Missouri, which, however, finally got the better of it in the struggle for railway facilities.

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  • Owing to the peculiar situation at the time in Congress, arising from the contest over the admission of Missouri, the question of the admission of Maine became an important one in national politics.

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  • By an Act of the 3rd of March 1820, however, Maine was finally admitted into the Union as a separate state, her admission being a part of the Missouri compromise.

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  • NEVADA, a city and the county-seat of Vernon county, Missouri, U.S.A., in the south-western part of the state, about go m.

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  • It is served by the Missouri Pacific and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railway systems. The principal public buildings are the county court house, the federal building and the high school.

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  • Nevada is the seat of Cottey College for girls (Methodist-Episcopal, South, 1884) and of a state hospital for the insane, and there is a state camp ground for the National Guard of Missouri.

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  • He was second in command at the battle of Belmont (Missouri) in November 1861, and commanded the right wing at Fort Donelson.

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  • The city is built picturesquely on the sides of a gulch, down which runs the Missouri & North Arkansas railway.

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  • MISSOURI, a north-central state of the United States of America, and one of the greatest and richest, and economically one of the most nearly independent, in the Union, lying almost midway between the two oceans, the Gulf of Mexico and Canada.

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  • by the Missouri.

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  • along the Missouri, and about 00 m.

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  • Missouri has three distinct physiographic divisions: a north-western upland plain, or prairie region; a lowland, in the extreme south-east; and, between these, the Missouri portion of the Ozark uplift.

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  • The boundary between the prairie and Ozark regions follows the Missouri river from its mouth to Glasgow, running thence south-westward, with irregular limits, but with a direct trend, to Jasper county at the south-east corner of Kansas; and the boundary between the Ozark and embayment regions runs due south-west from Cape Girardeau.

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  • The prairie region embraces, accordingly, somewhat more than "northern" Missouri - i.e.

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  • the portion of the state north of the Missouri river - and somewhat more than a third of the state.

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  • The elevations of the crest in Missouri (the highest portion of the uplift is in Arkansas) vary from 1100 to 1600 ft.

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  • The drainage of the state is wholly into the Mississippi, directly or indirectly, and almost wholly into either that river or the Missouri within the borders of the state.

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  • Caves, chiefly of limestone formation, occur in great numbers in and near the Ozark Mountain region in the south-western part of Missouri.

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  • Northern Missouri is covered with a mantle of glacial deposits, generally thick, although in the stream valleys of the north-east the bed-rocks are widely exposed.

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  • The southern limit of these glacial deposits is practically the bluffs bordering the Missouri river, except for a narrow strip along the Mississippi below St Louis.

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  • It is exposed in very deep cuts along the bluffs of the Missouri.

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  • Southern Missouri is covered, generally speaking, with residuary rocks.

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  • Along the margin of this great deposit, on the Mississippi river below St Louis and along the northern shore of the Missouri near its mouth, is an outcrop of Silurian.

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  • The western edge of these follows an irregular line from Schuyler county, on the northern border, to Barton county, on the western border, of the state, but with a great eastward projection north of the Missouri river, to Montgomery county.

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  • Excepting the embayment region, Missouri lies wholly within the Carolinian area of the Upper Austral life-zone; the There has been some controversy as to whether this condition is due to the elevation and corrosion of original flood-plain meanders after their development in a past base-level condition - which theory is probably correct - or to the natural, simultaneous lateral and vertical cut of an originally slightly sinuous stream, under such special conditions of stream declivity and horizontal bedstrata (conditions supposed by some to be peculiarly fulfilled in this region) as would be favourable to the requisite balance of bank cutting and channel incision.

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  • An almost entire absence of underbrush is characteristic of Missouri forests.

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  • Missouri has a continental climate, with wide range of moisture and temperature.

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  • The Missouri river is often closed by ice, and the Mississippi at St Louis, partly because it is obstructed by bridges, sometimes freezes over so that for weeks together horses and wagons can cross on the ice.

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  • Missouri lies very frequently in the dangerous quadrant of the great cyclonic storms passing over the Mississippi valley - indeed, northern Missouri, lies in the area of maximum frequency of tornadoes.

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  • Speaking generally, the Ozark region is characterized by reddish clays, mixed with gravels and stones, and cultivable in inverse proportion to the amount of these elements; northern Missouri by a generally black clay loam over a clay subsoil, with practically no admixture of stones; the southern prairies, above referred to, share the characteristics of those north of the Missouri.

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  • Grapes are mainly grown in the Ozark region, and wine is produced in Gasconade and other central and north-central counties in amounts sufficient to place Missouri, California aside, in the front rank of wine states in the Union.

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  • Indian corn and abundant grasses give to Missouri, as to the other central prairie states, a sound basis for her livestock interests.

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  • As a mule market Missouri has no rival.

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  • Cobalt and nickel are associated with lead in the St Francois field; but though the American ouput is almost exclusively derived from Missouri the production is small in comparison with the amount derived from abroad.

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  • Missouri is also the largest producer in the Union of tripoli and of barytes.

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  • Superficial evidences of natural gas and petroleum are abundant in western and north-western Missouri, but these have not been found in commercially profitable quantities.

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  • The total value of natural gas from wells in Missouri in 1908 was $22,592.

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  • Both crude oil and natural gas are drawn from Kansas for the supply of Kansas City and other parts of western Missouri.

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  • Lead occurs in three areas in southern Missouri.

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  • The so-called "Joplin district" of south-western Missouri and south-eastern Kansas-three-fourths of it being in Missouri-produces ninetenths of all the zinc mined in the United States.

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  • Mining in southwestern Missouri began about 1851, but zinc was of no importance in the output until 1872.

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  • In 1905 and 1907 the rank of Missouri was sixth in the Union in the value of clay products-namely, $6,203,411 in 1905 and $6,898,871 in 1907.

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  • This Missouri tripoli is a finely decomposed light rock, about 98% silica, and is used for filter stones and as an abrasive.

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  • Though an agricultural state, Missouri had in 1900 three cities with populations of above 100,000, whose wealth is based on manufactures and trade.

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  • Missouri is the leading manufacturing state west of the Mississippi.

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  • Although Missouri is not a great tobacco state, St Louis is one of the greatest centres of the country in the output of tobacco products.

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  • The boot and shoe industry is new west of the Mississippi, but Missouri holds in it a high and rising rank.

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  • The finer clays, also, are mainly shipped from the state in natural form, but in the manufacture of sewer-pipe and fire-brick, Missouri is a very prominent state.

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  • In1906-1907there was a notable agitation for improvement, following trial voyages that proved the navigability of the Missouri up to Kansas City.

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  • In 1907 the amount of freight carried from the mouth of the Missouri to Sioux City, Iowa, was 843,863 tons, and river rates were about 60% of railway rates.

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  • The improvement of the Missouriwhich is far more difficult to navigate than the Mississippi-was begun by Congress in 1832, and (in addition to large joint appropriations for the Missouri, Mississippi, Arkansas and Ohio rivers from 1832 to 1882) cost $11,130,560 between 1876 and 1900.

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  • The mileage of these within the state rose from 3960 in 1880 to 6142 in 1890, and to 8023.94 in 1908; the Missouri Pacific being far the greatest system of the state.

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  • Population.-The total population of Missouri in 1900 was 3,106,665 and in 1910, 3,293,335.

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  • The German immigration began about 1845, and long ago passed its maximum, so that in 1900 more than half of all the foreign-born (not only the Germans, but also the later-coming nationalities) had lived within Missouri for more than twenty years, and more than three-fourths of all had been residents of the state for ten 1 Omitting here printing and publishing, and foundry and machineshop products, which (like carpentering, bakery products, &c., in cities) have little distinctive in them to set Missouri off from other states.

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  • As Missouri was originally a French colony the Roman Catholic is its oldest church; and it is still the strongest with 382,642 communicants in 1906 out of a total of 1,199,239 for all denominations.

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  • The legislature (or, as it is called in Missouri, General Assembly) had been permitted to hold adjourned sessions under the constitution of 1865.

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  • A widower is entitled to a share in his wife's personal estate equal to the share of a child, and if there are 4 In 1907, in Missouri, as in various other states, passenger rates were reduced by law to 2 cents per mile; but this law was declared unconstitutional in 1909.

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  • Education.-The expenditure upon public schools is much greater in Missouri than in any other of the old slave states.

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  • Among institutions of higher learning the university of Missouri at Columbia is the chief one maintained by the state.

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  • - The early French explorers of the Mississippi valley left the first trace of European connexion in the history of Missouri.

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  • Ste Genevieve was settled in 1735; Fort Orleans, two-thirds of the way across the state up the Missouri river, had been temporarily established in 1720; the famous Mine La Motte, in Madison county, was opened about the same time; and before the settlement of St Louis, the Missouri river was known to trappers and hunters for hundreds of miles above its mouth.

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  • In 1818, after passing meanwhile through four stages of limited selfgovernment, 3 that portion of the Purchase now included in the state of Missouri made application for admission to the Union as a state.

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  • A large region was sunken, enormous fissures were opened in the earth, the surface soil was displaced 3 In 1804, the District of Louisiana, in the administrative system of the Territory of Indiana; in 1805, an independent government, renamed the Territory of Louisiana; in 1812, the Territory of Missouri; in 1816, another grade of territorial government.

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  • The addition of the triangle west of that line-the so-called Platte Purchase-violated the Missouri Compromise.

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  • The application for statehood precipitated one of the most famous and significant episodes of national history - the Missouri Compromise.

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  • In August 1821, after three years of bitter controversy, Missouri was formally admitted to statehood.

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  • First St Louis, and then other towns on the Missouri river in succession westward, as they were settled and became available as depots, served as the outfit points for the Indian trade up the Missouri and the trade with Mexico through Santa Fe.

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  • Independence, Missouri (after about 1831) and Kansas City (after 1844) were the great centres of this trade, which by 1860 was of national importance.'

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  • No steamer traversed the Mississippi above the Ohio until 1817, nor was a voyage made between New Orleans and St Louis, nor the lower Missouri entered, until 1819.

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  • In1906-1907an active campaign was begun at Kansas City for improving the channel of the Missouri and stimulating river freighting below that point.

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  • Among events leading up to the Civil War, first the annexation of Texas and then the war with Mexico left special impress on Missouri history.

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  • Since 1828, when national political parties were first thoroughly organized in the state, the Democrats had been supreme, and carried Missouri on the pro-slavery side of every issue of free and slave territory.

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  • The struggle over Kansas (q.v.) aroused tremendous passion in Missouri.

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  • The election showed that popular sentiment was overwhelmingly hostile to secession; and the convention, by a vote of 80 to 1, resolved (March 4, 1861) that Missouri had "no adequate cause" therefor.

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  • Governor Jackson refused point-blank to contribute the quota of troops from Missouri called for by President Lincoln.

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  • After this the Confederates held much of southern Missouri until the next spring, when they were driven into Arkansas, never afterward regaining foothold in the state.

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  • In the autumn of 1864 Sterling Price led a brilliant but rather bootless Confederate raid across the state, along the Missouri River, and was only forced to retreat southward by defeat at Westport (Kansas City).

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  • There was more or less internecine conflict throughout the war, and local disaffection under Union rule; and Confederate recruiting was carried on even north of the Missouri.

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  • In October 1861 a rump of the deposed Assembly passed an act of secession, which the Confederate States saw fit to regard as legitimate, and under which they admitted Missouri to their union by declaration of the 28th of November.

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  • The Union death-roll of Massachusetts (troops furnished, 159,165) was 13,942, that of Missouri 13,887.

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  • 1885-1887-1887-18891889-1893-1893-18971897-1901-1901-19051905-1909 1909 The Governors of Missouri since 1804 have been as follow: - Territorial Period.

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  • Gratz Brown of Missouri as Liberal Republican candidates for the presidency and vice-presidency respectively.

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  • The first definite organization of the Liberal Republican party may therefore be said to have been made in Missouri in 1870.

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  • x., Jefferson City, 1896); publications of the State Bureau of Geology and Mines, including bulletins and reports of the Missouri Geological Survey (1853 seq.; new series, 15 vols., 1891-1904); publications of United States Geological Survey, particularly Bulletins 132, 213, 267, the 22nd Annual Report, part ii.

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  • On administration: the annual Official Manual of the State of Missouri (really private, Jefferson City); also F.

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  • Judson, Law and Practice of Taxation in Missouri (Columbia, 1900); M.

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  • Snow, Higher Education in Missouri (U.S. Bureau of Education, Washington, 1898).

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  • On History: Lucian Carr, Missouri (" American Commonwealths" Series, Boston, 1892); L.

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  • Houck, Spanish Regime in Missouri (3 vols., Chicago, 1910); T.

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  • Snead, The Fight for Missouri (New York, 1886); Wiley Britton, The Civil War on the Border (2 vols., New York, 1891-1899; 3rd ed.

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  • Chittenden, History of Early Steamboat Navigation on the Missouri River (2 vols., New York, 1903); W.

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  • Durrie, An Illustrated History of Missouri (St Louis, 1876); Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri..

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  • Missouri Compromise >>

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  • Of those born within the United States only 164,431, or less than one-half, were natives of Oregon, and of those born in other states of the Union 128,654, or about seventenths, were natives of one or another of the following states: Missouri, Illinois, Iowa, Ohio, California, New York, Indiana, Kansas, Washington, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania.

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  • The new government encountered the opposition of the missionaries and of the non-American population, but it was soon strengthened by the "Great Immigration" in 1843, when nearly nine hundred men, women and children, after assembling at Independence, Missouri, crossed the plains in a body and settled in the Columbia Valley.

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  • Fort Clark was erected on the site in 1850 to protect settlers against the Indians; in 1851 the name was changed by order of the secretary of war to Fort Dodge in honour of Colonel Henry Dodge (1782-1867), who was a lieutenant-colonel of Missouri Volunteers in the War of 181 2, served with distinction as a colonel of Michigan Mounted Volunteers in the Black Hawk War, resigned from the military service in March 1833, was governor of Wisconsin Territory from 1836 to 1841 and from 1846 to 1848, and was a delegate from Wisconsin Territory to Congress from 1841 to 1845, and a United States senator from Wisconsin in 1848-1857.

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  • The use of the term " Mason and Dixon Line " to designate the boundary between the free and the slave states (and in general between the North and the South) dates from the debates in Congress over the Missouri Compromise in 1819-1820.

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  • As so used it may be defined as not only the Mason and Dixon Line proper, but also the line formed by the Ohio River from its intersection with the Pennsylvania boundary to its mouth, thence the eastern, northern and western boundaries of Missouri, and thence westward the parallel 36° 30' - the line established by the Missouri Compromise to separate free and slave territory in the " Louisiana Purchase," except as regards Missouri.

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  • It is to be noted, however, that the Missouri Compromise did not affect the territory later acquired from Mexico.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, the Union Pacific, the Missouri Pacific and the Chicago & North-Western railways.

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  • COLUMBIA, a city and the county-seat of Boone county, Missouri, U.S.A., situated in the central part of the state, about 145 m.

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  • Columbia is served by the Wabash and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railways.

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  • Columbia is the seat of the University of Missouri, a coeducational state institution, established in 1839 and opened in 1841; it received no direct financial support from the state until 1867, and its founding was due to the selfsacrifice of the people of the county.

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  • At Columbia, also, are the Parker Memorial hospital, the Teachers College high school, the University Military Academy, the Columbia Business College, Christian College (Disciples) for women, established in 1851, its charter being the first granted by Missouri for the collegiate education of Protestant women; the Bible College of the Disciples of Christ in Missouri; and Stephens College (under Baptist control) for women, established in 1856.

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  • by Missouri, on the S.

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  • The bluffs on the Missouri are in places 200 ft.

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  • Numerous small affluents of the Missouri enrich and diversify the north-east quarter.

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  • During the following decade the lines of the Missouri Pacific, the Missouri, Kansas & Texas and the Santa Fe were well under construction.

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  • on the Missouri, which is navigable for steamboats of good size.

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  • Despite the Missouri Compromise, which had prohibited slavery in the Louisiana Purchase N.

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  • (except in Missouri), slaves were living at the missions and elsewhere, among Indians and whites, in 1854.

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  • Thus the South had to establish slavery by other than actual slaveholders, unless Missouri should act for her to establish it.

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  • But Missouri did not move her slaves; while her vicinity encouraged border partisans to seek such establishment even without residence - by intimidation, election frauds and outrage.

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  • In the summer of 1854 Missouri " squatters " began to post claims to border lands and warn away intending anti-slavery settlers.

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  • The resultant legislature (at Pawnee, later at Shawnee Mission) adopted the laws of Missouri almost en bloc, made it a felony to utter a word against slavery, made extreme pro-slavery views a qualification for office, declared death the penalty for aiding a slave to escape, and in general repudiated liberty for its opponents., The radical free-state men thereupon began the importation of rifles.

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  • During the (almost bloodless) " Wakarusa War " Lawrence was threatened by an armed force from Missouri, but was saved by the intervention of Governor Shannon.

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  • In May 1856 another Missouri force entered Lawrence without resistance, destroyed its printing offices, wrecked buildings and pillaged generally.

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  • Immediately after the sack of Lawrence, John Brown and a small band murdered and mutilated five pro-slavery men, on Pottawatomie Creek; a horrible deed, showing a new spirit on the freestate side, and of ghastly consequence - for it contributed powerfully to widen further the licence of highway robbery, pillage and arson, the ruin of homes, the driving off of settlers, marauding expeditions, attacks on towns, outrages in short of every kind, that made the following months a welter of lawlessness and crime, until Governor Geary - by putting himself above all partisanship, repudiating Missouri, and using Federal troops put an end to them late in 1856.

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  • (In the isolated south-eastern counties they continued through 1856-1858, mainly to the advantage of the " jay-hawkers " of free-state Kansas and to the terror of Missouri.) The struggle now passed into another phase, in which questions of state predominate.

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  • Military operations within her own borders were largely confined to a guerrilla warfare, carrying on the bitter neighbourhood strife between Kansas and Missouri.

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  • The Confederate officers began by repressing predatory plundering from Missouri; but after James H.

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  • Lane, with an undisciplined brigade, had crossed the border, sacking, burning and killing in his progress, Missouri " bushrangers " retaliated in kind.

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  • But William C. Quantrell, after sacking various small Kansas towns along the Missouri river (1862-63), in August 1863 took Lawrence (q.v.) and put it mercilessly to fire and sword - the most ghastly episode in border history.

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  • In the autumn of 1864 the Confederate general, Sterling Price, aiming to enter Kansas from Missouri but defeated by General Pleasanton's cavalry, retreated southward, zigzagging on both sides of the Missouri-Kansas line.

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  • It is served by the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley (Illinois Central), the St Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern (Missouri Pacific), the Arkansas Midland, and the Missouri & North Arkansas railways.