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melancholy

melancholy

melancholy Sentence Examples

  • He was cold, haughty, melancholy and dull.

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  • He had many melancholy reflections of his old school days.

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  • The melancholy silence that followed was broken by the sounds of the children's voices and laughter from the next room.

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  • In the film two of the characters don't achieve their aims. That makes the film rather melancholy, although it's basically a romantic story.

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  • Melancholy descended over her with the rain.

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  • There was a melancholy mood by the river.

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  • "Comfortable. Just like an old slipper," he replied, with just a hint of melancholy in his voice.

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  • Oddly, the sound seemed more melancholy than menacing.

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  • Boris sketched two trees in the album and wrote: "Rustic trees, your dark branches shed gloom and melancholy upon me."

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  • My face grew grave, and Agatha became melancholy.

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  • His over-emotional nature passed rapidly from one phase of feeling to another; but the more melancholy moods predominated.

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  • His nature was timid, lethargic and melancholy, and his court was not marked by the scandals which had been seen under Henry IV.

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  • Coleridge seemed to him to be ineffectual as a philosopher, and personally to be a melancholy instance of genius running to waste.

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  • A deep melancholy took possession of him, and gave a dark tinge to all his views of human nature and of human destiny.

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  • The Phrygian mythology, so far as we know it, has a melancholy and mystic tone, and their religion partakes of the same character.

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  • He is very melancholy with Mademoiselle Karagina, said Pierre.

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  • Elisabeth could hear the music playing; it sounded dark and melancholy.

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  • Why was he suddenly so melancholy - so bitter?

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  • The most melancholy spectacle of all to my mind was, that the bridegroom was decidedly tipsy.

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  • It was a melancholy end to what might have been a singularly brilliant career.

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  • The drunkenness produced by kava is of a melancholy, silent and drowsy character.

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  • His end was not unimpressive, but it was melancholy.

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  • Worn out with his evasions, she at last (1723) took the desperate step of writing to Stella or, according to another account, to Swift himself, demanding to know the nature of the connexion with him, and this terminated the melancholy history as with a clap of thunder.

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  • "If only you could touch horses," Grande said with a sigh of exaggerated melancholy.

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  • or boldness of character; where the landscape has beauty it is of a subdued melancholy character.

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  • His work divides itself into two classes - the one profoundly melancholy, the other witty or boisterous.

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  • Other plants such as Northern Marsh orchid, greater burnet, ox-eye daisy and melancholy thistle occur in some.

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  • Ferdinand was by temperament melancholy, shy and distrustful of his own abilities.

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  • Shooting and music were his only pleasures, and he was the generous patron of the famous singer Farinelli, whose voice soothed his melancholy.

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  • The king, reckless as he was, had more than his share of the Stuart melancholy.

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  • The melancholy incident illustrates several points of interest: (1) the correctness of the bacterial theory of causation, and the identity of the bacillus pestis as the cause; (2) the infectious character of the pneumonic type of disease; (3) its high fatality; (4) the difficulty of diagnosis.

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  • is a melancholy story, what took place under Charles II.

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  • A melancholy catalogue of forced settlements marks the annals of the church from 1749 to 1780, and wherever an unpopular presentee was settled the people quietly left the Establishment and erected a meeting-house.

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  • Butler was an earnest and deep-thinking Christian, melancholy by temperament, and grieved by what seemed to him the hopelessly irreligious condition of his age.

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  • He pictures the world in the beginning: "total darkness, formless as yet, without tending of stars, the melancholy abyss, the earth unprepared, the heaven undevelopt.

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  • The melancholy tale of Swift's attachment will be more conveniently narrated in another place, and is only alluded to here for the sake of chronology.

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  • Living during the most melancholy period of Byzantine history, Psellus exhibited the worst faults of his age.

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  • The severe training through which he had passed had given him such an experimental knowledge of all the modes of religious melancholy as he could never have gathered from books; and his vigorous genius, animated by a fervent spirit of devotion, enabled him not only to exercise a great influence over the vulgar, but even to extort the half-contemptuous admiration of scholars.

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  • He became melancholy, severe and taciturn.

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  • Melancholy of temperament will partially explain this, but there were other reasons.

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  • He is now very well, and though I fear he is under some small degree of melancholy, yet I think there is no reason to suspect it bath at all touched his understanding, and I hope never will; and so I am sure all ought to wish, that love learning or the honour of our nation, which it is a sign how much it is looked after, when such a person as Mr Newton lyes so neglected by those in power."

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  • Abandoning at last all hope she sank into melancholy, ill health, and, according to some accounts, insanity, and died a victim to state policy on or about the 25th of September 1615.

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  • He fell into melancholy, imbecility, and at last madness, with lucid intervals, and died at Milan on the 15th (13th) of February 1787.

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  • It is clear, therefore, that any moral science which is to be of value must wait until the " laws of life " and " conditions of existence " have been satisfactorily determined, presumably by biology and the allied sciences; and there are few more melancholy instances of failure in philosophy than the paucity of the actual results attained by Spencer in his lifetime in his application of the socalled laws of evolution to human conduct - a failure recognized by Spencer himself.

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  • He had, indeed, a melancholy advantage.

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  • The king, melancholy spectacle as he was, seemed indeed to suit that tragic hour when Orleans, the last bulwark of the south, was besieged by the earl of Salisbury, now roused from inactivity (1428).

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  • Her father, possibly influenced by Cowper's melancholy tendencies, perhaps possessed by prejudices against the marriage of cousins, interposed, and the lovers were separated - as it turned out for ever.

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  • He considered a cheerful temper to be more Christian than a melancholy one, and carried this spirit into his whole life.

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  • Feuillet, however, having still further declined, he summoned his son to leave Paris and bury himself as his constant attendant in the melancholy château at Saint-LO.

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  • These books are often bitter and melancholy, yet not destitute of optimism.

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  • He is not happy, and that melancholy which is visible in the countenance made me sad at times; the sternness of the eyes goes very much off when you know him, and changes according to his being put out or not....

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  • Don't use melancholy for an excuse for crass behavior.

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  • Determination slowly replaced melancholy and we returned to work.

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  • She took his hand but didn't look at him, the odd melancholy stirring his instincts once more.

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  • She sensed Evelyn's sudden melancholy and tried to focus.

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  • If she picked, it would be something melancholy, and in his opinion, that was the last thing she needed now.

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  • "Rhyn could do it.  He's my … I guess was my mate," Katie said, melancholy descending over her with the rain.

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  • Katie smiled, amused despite the rain, thunder and bugs.  The woman was as unique as she'd claimed to be, at once easily entertained and melancholy.  Katie couldn't quite keep up with Deidre's odd mixture of emotions, but she pitied the woman, who seemed more lost in her own world than anything.

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  • While Dean caught brief hints of melancholy, she seemed for the most part successful in putting darker thoughts aside, content to enjoy the peace of the day.

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  • This is a body of work, which, beneath their overtly visual romance, is almost visceral in its melancholy.

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  • pop behemoths Coldplay have scored great success with melancholy hits like " Yellow " and " Shiver.

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  • Glockenspiel, strings, reeds, world percussion and programming combine to create classy, intelligent, frail and melancholy pieces.

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  • From the pepper cruet you may shake a cloud of something tasteless and melancholy, like volcanic dust.

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  • Here, acoustic guitar and bass, brushes and sparse piano create a melancholy evocation of memories of lost times and old friends.

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  • fondness for melancholy music you can't dance to.

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  • Also, there are some genuine flashes of pop genius here, albeit somewhat melancholy ones.

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  • The Queen became godmother to Sarah's daughter Victoria Davies describing her as " a lively intelligent child, with big melancholy eyes " .

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  • janglejangling guitar sound breathes life into this subtle, slightly melancholy piece.

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  • Uttering a few sounds with an air of melancholy, he took the pail from her head and bore it to the cottage himself.

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  • Hamlet shows a full range of emotions, beginning with confusion and depression, to melancholy and eventually murderous rage.

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  • reprise at the end captures melancholy in an instant.

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  • We wanted something retro, and quite melancholy... There's a real Englishness about that song, too.

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  • The remnants of architecture achieve a melancholy reverie as ivy creeps up a lonely column.

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  • A beautifully designed work, it's a tender film suffused with melancholy.

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  • Winter is a melancholy time and Saturn governs the melancholic temperament.

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  • It is followed by a slow, melancholy Blues where solo woodwinds are the dominating voice throughout.

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  • His over-emotional nature passed rapidly from one phase of feelirg to another; but the more melancholy moods predominated.

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  • Softness of outline, warmth of colouring, a fine and almost voluptuous feeling for beauty of every kind, and a pleading and melancholy tenderness-such were the elements of the spell which he threw round the sympathies of his reader, and which his compatriots expressed by the vague but expressive word blanditia.

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  • It is a melancholy history, telling of the invasion of the Northmen, and of the dynastic struggles between the petty feudal sovereigns who carved out counties and lordships Growth of the for themselves during the dark centuries which feudal followed the fall of the Carolingian empire.

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  • Meanwhile, like Bunyan and many other puritans, Cromwell had been passing through a trying period of mental and religious change and struggle, beginning with deep melancholy and religious doubt and depression, and ending with "seeing light" and with enthusiastic and convinced faith, which remained henceforth the chief characteristic and impulse in his career.

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  • The issue was not unfavourable to Theodoret's cause, but melancholy enough for Theodoret himself: the council of Chalcedon condemned monophysitism, but he unhappily yielded to pressure so far as also to take part in pronouncing " anathema upon Nestorius, and upon all who call not the Holy Virgin Mother of God, and who divide the one Son into two."

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  • Like a cousin and namesake (to whom, with other members of the society of Gray's Inn, he dedicated his play of The Lover's Melancholy), the future dramatist entered the profession of the law, being admitted of the Middle Temple in 1602; but he seems never to have been called to the bar.

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  • Of the plays by Ford preserved to us the dates span little more than a decade - the earliest, The Lover's Melancholy, having been acted in 1628 and printed in 1629, the latest, The Lady's Trial, acted in 1638 and printed in 1639.

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  • When writing The Lover's Melancholy, it would seem that Ford had not yet become fully aware of the bent of his own dramatic genius, although he was already master of his powers of poetic expression.

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  • A wholly baseless anecdote, condensed into a stinging epigram by Endymion Porter, asserted that The Lover's Melancholy was stolen by Ford from Shakespeare's papers.

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  • The plot of The Lover's Melancholy, which is ineffective because it leaves no room for suspense in the mind of X.

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  • In the Anatomy of Melancholy Burton assures us that they were never more numerous than in A.D.

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  • Nevertheless Will and not Reason is the primary aspect of the Unconscious, whose melancholy career is determined by the primacy of the Will and the subservience of the Reason.

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  • But in reading all the accounts of Mme de Stael's life which come from herself or her intimate friends, it must be carefully remembered that she was the most distinguished and characteristic product of the period of sensibilite - the singular fashion of ultra-sentiment which required that both men and women, but especially women, should be always palpitating with excitement, steeped in melancholy, or dissolved in tears.

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  • and the battle of Mohacs is the most melancholy and discreditable period of Hungarian history.

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  • The melancholy state of the country consequent upon the persecutions of Rudolph I., Ferdinand II.

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  • Joseph Bajza was a lyricist of a somewhat melancholy cast, but his Borenek (Wine Song), Sohajtds (Sigh), Ebreszto (Awakening) and Apotheosis are much admired.

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  • Among lyricists were: Coloman Toth, who is also the author of several epic and dramatic pieces; John Vajda, whose Kisebb Koltemenyek (Minor Poems), published by the Kisfaludy society in 1872, are partly written in the mode of Heine, and are of a pleasing but melancholy character; Joseph Levay, known also as the translator of Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus, Taming of the Shrew and Henry I V.; and Paul Gyulai, who, not only as a faultless lyric and epic poet, but as an impartial critical writer, is highly esteemed, and whose Romhdnyi is justly prized as one of the best Magyar poems that has appeared in modern times.

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  • There he lived in discreet, if melancholy retirement, writing "A Defence of the Main Principles of the Catholic Faith," and had apparently little hope of a further political career when the escape of Marie de' Medici from Blois, on the 2 2nd of February 1619, again opened paths for his ambition.

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  • But the insistence with which Lucretius returns to the subject, and the horror with which he recalls the effects of such abnormal phenomena, suggest that he himself may have been liable to such hallucinations, which are said to be consistent with perfect sanity, though they may be the precursors either of madness or of a state of despair and melancholy.

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  • Many ideas and expressions of the Sicilian have been reproduced by the Roman poet; and the same tone of impassioned solemnity and melancholy seems to have pervaded both works.

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  • He did not recover his health for more than a year, and as soon as convalescence set in he was seized by so profound a melancholy at the disaster which had thus overtaken him, that he threw himself into the Seine.

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  • But he was, in fact, of a great simplicity in temperament, affectionate, shy, still exquisitely sensitive in extreme old age to the influences of beauty, melancholy and sweetness.

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  • Gladstone, addressing the electors of Newark, said that he was bound by the opinions of no man and no party, but felt it a duty to watch and resist that growing desire for change which threatened to produce " along with partial good a melancholy preponderance of mischief."

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  • On the other hand, he exhibits a decided tendency to the world-ennui and melancholy which was one of the earlier symptoms of the movement, and he has experimented in French verse in a manner which would have led to his excommunication by the typical performers of the 18th century.

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  • As the poet of love he gives utterance to the pensive melancholy rather than to the pleasures associated with it.

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  • It is curious, for instance, to compare the scanty references to the material marvels of Constantinople which Villehardouin saw in their glory, which perished by sack and fire under his very eyes, and which live chiefly in the melancholy pages of his Greek contemporary Nicetas, with the elaborate descriptions of the scarcely greater wonders of fabulous courts at Constantinople itself, at Babylon, and elsewhere, to be found in his other contemporaries, the later chanson de geste writers and the earlier embroiderers of the Arthurian romances and romans d'aventures.

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  • Wise and generally melancholy reflections on human nature and political society are not infrequent in his writings, and they arise naturally and incidentally out of the subject he is discussing.

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  • RAFAEL DEL RIEGO NUNEZ (1784-1823), Spanish army officer, who has the melancholy distinction of having begun the long series of political military mutinies - pronunciamientos - in Spain, was born at Santa Maria de Tuna in Asturias on the 2nd of April 1784.

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  • Meanwhile charred and rotting stumps give a melancholy and untidy air to valleys and denuded hillsides, for hard-wood stumps - and most New Zealand trees are hard-woodtake more than a generation to decay utterly.

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  • Like Cervantes at times, Mark Twain reveals a depth of melancholy beneath his playful humour, and like Moliere always, he has a deep scorn and a burning detestation of all sorts of sham and pretence, a scorching hatred of humbug and hypocrisy.

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  • His state of universal doubt he describes as a " malady " or as " philosophical melancholy and delirium."

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  • The sorrows of his country and his own physical sufferings have communicated a melancholy tone to the writings of Krasinski, which read like a dirge, or as if the poet stood always by an open grave - and the grave is that of Poland.

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  • But what he failed to give, Ewald supplied, and if more of De Wette's than of Ewald's work still stands to-day, that is but an illustration of the melancholy fact that in history negative criticism is surer than positive construction.

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  • The death by small-pox of his favourite child was followed by that of his wife, who, long a prey to melancholy, was on the 3rd of July carried off by typhus.

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  • His commanding stature, the symmetry of his form, the dark and melancholy beauty of his countenance, rather rendered piquant than impaired by an obliquity of vision, produced an imposing impression even before his deep and powerful voice had given utterance to its melodious thunders; and harsh and superficial half-truths enunciated with surpassing ease and grace of gesture, and not only with an air of absolute conviction but with the authority of a prophetic messenger, in tones whose magical fascination was inspired by an earnestness beyond all imitation of art, acquired a plausibility and importance which, at least while the orator spoke, made his audience entirely forgetful of their preconceived objections against them.

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  • It was supposed in olden times to be the seat of ill-humour and melancholy, whence such phrases as "to have the spleen," to be out of temper, sulky, morose, "splenetic."

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  • On the day of John Wesley's death the preachers in London sent a brief note to those stationed in the country: "Dear Brother, The melancholy period we have so long dreaded is now arrived.

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  • The 18th century, alike in its literature and its theology, was a favourite study, as is illustrated by his contribution (Tendencies of Religious Thought in England, 1688-1750) to the once famous Essays and Reviews (1860), and by his edition of Pope's Essay on Man (1869), &c. His Sermons and Collected Essays, edited by Henry Nettleship, were published posthumously (1889), as well as the Memoirs (1885), an autobiography deeply tinged with melancholy and bitterness.

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  • The varied sources of his work and its worthlessness as a transcript of actual Celtic poems do not alter the fact that he produced a work of art which by its deep appreciation of natural beauty and the melancholy tenderness of its treatment of the ancient legend did more than any single work to bring about the romantic movement in European, and especially in German, literature.

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  • Probably the true statement of Hume's attitude regarding the problem is the somewhat melancholy utterance with which the Dialogues close.

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  • 130), either in a fit of melancholy or in order to prolong his patron's life by his voluntary sacrifice.

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  • The best work of the Belgian romanticists is in the rich and picturesque prose of the 16th century romance of Charles de Coster (see DE Coster), and in the melancholy and semi-philosophical writings of the moralist Octave Pirmez.

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  • Lamon, The Life of Abraham Lincoln from his Birth to his Inauguration as President (Boston, 1872), supplemented by Recollections of Abraham Lincoln 1847-1865 (Chicago, 1895), compiled by Dorothy Lamon, valuable for some personal recollections, but tactless, uncritical, and marred by the effort of the writer, who as marshal of the District of Columbia, knew Lincoln intimately, to prove that Lincoln's melancholy was due to his lack of religious belief of the orthodox sort; William H.

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  • Frederick, riding forward, saw a caricature of himself: "King in very melancholy guise," says Preuss (as translated by Carlyle), "seated on a stool, a coffee-mill between his knees, diligently grinding with the one hand, and with the other picking up any bean that might have fallen.

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  • Another element in his character discovered itself when in 180r he mounted the throne over the body of his murdered father: a mystic melancholy liable at any moment to issue in extravagant action.

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  • In his later years, however, he fell into a mood of settled melancholy; and, though still accessible to all who chose to approach him with complaints or petitions, he withdrew from all but the most essential social functions, and lived a life of strenuous work and of Spartan simplicity.

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  • Their mythology so far as we know it, has a melancholy and mystic tone, and their religion partakes of the same character.

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  • one cannot help having a thousand fears and melancholy thoughts, but whatever changes may happen you shall ever find me firm to my religion and faithfully yours."

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  • The kingdom was in the desperate state described in the last melancholy pages of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, when life and property were nowhere safe from the objectless ferocity of feudal tyrants when every shire was full of castles and every castle filled with devils and evil men, and the people murmured that Christ and his saints slept.

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  • Feuillet, however, having still further declined, he summoned his son to leave Paris and bury himself as his constant attendant in the melancholy château at Saint-LO.

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  • The caliph wished you to amuse him with pleasant thoughts, and you have filled his mind with melancholy.

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  • To please Moscow girls nowadays one has to be melancholy.

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  • The reprise at the end captures melancholy in an instant.

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  • We wanted something retro, and quite melancholy... There 's a real Englishness about that song, too.

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  • A beautifully designed work, it 's a tender film suffused with melancholy.

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  • Unusually there are tall herb ledges at low altitude with species such as wood vetch Vicia sylvatica and melancholy thistle Cirsium heterophyllum.

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  • This is a body of work, which, beneath their overtly visual romance, is almost visceral in it 's melancholy.

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  • The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya - Haruhi Suzumiya is a Japanese high school student interested in the unusual, but she might be the most unusual one of all.

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  • A fan favorite thanks to Internet buzz, The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya is available on DVD.

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  • 'Can't Get It Out of My Head': Jeff Lynne channels George Harrison on this melancholy mid-tempo ballad.

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  • The feeling of melancholy and loss associated with tango was epitomized in 1917 by Carlos Gardel in Mi Noche Triste In 1921, tango first hit the silver screen danced by Hollywood star Rudolph Valentino.

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  • Thus, Taurus pairs exceptionally well with the equally wistful and somewhat melancholy sign of Cancer.

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  • The elements of air and fire pose too great a threat to Capricorn's stability, and so the grounded nature of earth and the melancholy and soothing nature of water help nurture Capricorn and pacify his anxieties.

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  • This depth, when combined with a propensity for melancholy though processes, can create a very depressing partner.

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  • Those who returned involuntarily often exhibit signs of depression, sadness and melancholy.

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  • Feelings of sadness or melancholy may come out of nowhere and consume her.

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  • Stefan's theme is more hopeful yet retaining the brooding melancholy that marks the character's trials with his existence.

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  • For every drawn out, melancholy symphony, they also had a catchy, almost cute song to go with it.

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  • The man in the song is letting go and is apparently allowing himself to fall in love without reservation - it's a love song with an edgy melody and melancholy touch.

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  • This beautiful song is tinged with sweetness and melancholy and contrasts the inevitable danger a child will face in this world and the safety of a mother's arms.

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  • Lambert selected Mad World, a melancholy ballad originally written by the British pop-duo Tears for Fears in 1982 and was the first single from the band's debut album The Hurting.

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  • (the beautiful version of the story of the nightingale's death) is translated from Strada; while the scheme of the tedious interlude exhibiting the various forms of madness is avowedly taken, together with sundry comments, from Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy.

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  • In the midst of these distinctions, a profound melancholy.

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  • The remaining story of Lamartine's life is somewhat melancholy.

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  • At the present day, with the exception of the Chahar-sick, where there is always a certain amount of traffic, and where the great diversity of race and costume imparts much liveliness to the scene, Herat presents a very melancholy and desolate appearance.

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  • Kanaris is described as of small stature, simple in appearance, somewhat shy and melancholy.

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  • After his two years in the French galleys, if not before, Knox suffered permanently from gravel and dyspepsia, and he confesses that his nature "was for the most part oppressed with melancholy."

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  • Wearied by his melancholy isolation, he was driven to seek a return to the Jewish communion.

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  • The ensuing period was a melancholy one.

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  • Bengt Lidner (1759-1793), a melancholy and professedly elegiacal writer, had analogies with Novalis.

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  • But my pride was soon humbled, and a sober melancholy was spread over my mind by the idea that I had taken an everlasting leave of an old and agreeable companion, and that whatsoever might be the future date of my History, the life of the historian must be short and precarious."

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  • The predominance of the Anglo-Burgundians in France having made it impossible for him to stay there, he went to Avignon to end his days in melancholy calculations arising from the calamities of which he had been the witness, and the astrological reckonings, in which he found pleasure, of the chances for and against the world coming to an end in the near future.

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  • His melancholy end was commemorated in a special treatise (KaXXu OEVns ij 7rEpi 7rEvOovs) by his friend Theophrastus, whose acquaintance he made during a visit to Athens.

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  • A melancholy interest surrounds the name of Victoria Benedictsson (Ernst Ahlgren, 1850-1889), who committed suicide in Copenhagen after achieving marked success with her sketches of humble life in Fran Shine, and with the more ambitious works Money and Marianne.

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