Jersey sentence examples

jersey
  • He wanted to stay in New Jersey this fall.

  • When we got to Jersey City at six o'clock Friday evening we were obliged to cross the Harlem River in a ferry-boat.

  • He represented New Jersey in the first and second Continental Congresses (1774,1775-1776), but left Philadelphia in June 1776, probably to avoid voting on the question of adopting the Declaration of Independence, which he regarded as inexpedient.

  • Laornis from the Cretaceous marls of New Jersey was as large as a swan.

  • In 1772 he removed to Elizabeth, New Jersey, where after 1773 he lived on his estate known as "Liberty Hall."

  • A court of arbitration appointed by the Continental Congress met at Trenton, New Jersey, in 1782, and on December 30th gave a unanimous decision in favour of Pennsylvania.

  • Gibbons, who had begun to run a steamboat from New Jersey, appealed to the Supreme Court.

  • Then in Jersey I made up a cardboard sign saying I was doing it for the homeless.

  • He was attending Bucknell University on a baseball scholarship and working in a New Jersey camp for the summer.

  • There are two sorts - the common, and the Jersey or Russian, the latter being much larger and less pungent.

  • Fred O'Connor and David Dean kept close tabs on the New Jersey nuptials via telephone.

  • Guiteau, whose mind had no doubt been somewhat influenced by the abuse lavished upon the president by his party opponents; and on the 19th of September 1881, he died at Elberon, New Jersey, whither he had been removed on the 6th.

  • Amber and certain similar substances are found to a limited extent at several localities in the United States, as in the greensand of New Jersey, but they have little or no economic value.

  • It will be noticed that such characteristically milking breeds as the Ayrshire, Jersey and Guernsey have no place here.

  • That's on the Delaware river—on the Jersey border.

  • That's in New Jersey, isn't it?

  • Under John Witherspoon the college of New Jersey was the favoured school of the reunited church.

  • Large ore-bodies of granular and compact magnetite occur as beds and lenticular masses in Archean gneiss and crystalline schists, in various parts of Norway, Sweden, Finland and the Urals; as also in the states of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Michigan, as well as in Canada.

  • Jen, the valedictorian of her class, was to attend Ryder College in New Jersey and major in English Literature.

  • Cynthia would attend the New Jersey wedding—thank God for Visa—while Fred and Dean would hold down Bird Song.

  • He was re-zipping his front bag when he glanced down at a biker a switchback below him pulling off a jersey and donning a bright yellow jacket.

  • In Jersey and in Guernsey there are courts of first instance with appeal to the bishop of Winchester.

  • More or less closely connected with the Northern Church are the theological seminaries at Princeton, Auburn, Pittsburg (formerly Allegheny - the Western Seminary), Cincinnati (Lane), New York (Union) and Chicago (McCormick), already named, and San Francisco Seminary (1871) since 1892 at San Anselmo, Cal., a theological seminary (1891) at Omaha, Nebraska, a German theological seminary (1869) at Bloomfield, New Jersey, the German Presbyterian Theological School of the North-west (1852) at Dubuque, Iowa, and the Presbyterian Theological Seminary of Kentucky, which is under the control and supervision of the northern and southern churches.

  • The time is two hours later in New Jersey.

  • Bucknell was in Pennsylvania, and Ryder College, where Jen attended, in New Jersey.

  • Strictly a temporary pad—home's in Jersey.

  • One couple was now living in New Jersey.

  • BENJAMIN LUNDY (1789-1839), American philanthropist, prominent in the anti-slavery conflict, was born of Quaker parentage, at Hardwick, Warren county, New Jersey, on the 4th of January 1789.

  • English Puritans emigrated under the auspices of the Virginia Company to the Bermudas in 1612; and in 1617 a Presbyterian Church, governed by ministers and four elders, was established there by Lewis Hughes, who used the liturgy of the isles of Guernsey and Jersey.

  • About 1695 Thomas Bridge, with Presbyterians from Fairfield county, Connecticut, settled at Cohansey, in West Jersey.

  • France and Great Britain jointly acquired the cables between Calais and Dover, Boulogne and Folkestone, Dieppe and Beachy Head, Havre and Beachy Head, Piron, near Coutances, and Vieux Châteaux (St Heliers, Jersey).

  • New Jersey >>

  • In1849-1851he was a representative in Congress from New Jersey.

  • Of organizations of cattle-breeders the English Jersey Cattle Society, established in 1878, may be taken as a type.

  • This volume records the births in the herds of members of the society, and gives the pedigrees of cows and bulls, besides furnishing lists of prizewinners at the principal shows and butter-test awards, and reports of sales by auction of Jersey cattle.

  • He refused calls to churches in Dublin and Rotterdam, and in 1766 declined an invitation brought him by Richard Stockton to go to America as president of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University); but he accepted a second invitation and left Paisley in May 1768.

  • Holland, France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Sicily, Greece, Hungary, Silesia, Moravia, Westphalia, Brunswick, Hanover, Schleswig-Holstein, (German) Silesia, Poland, Kutais, Uralsk, Turkestan, Armenia, Syria, Arabia, Persia, Tunis, Egypt, West Africa, British Columbia, Alberta, Assiniboia, Athabasca, Manitoba, New Jersey, South Dakota, Washington, Montana, Oklahoma, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, California, New Mexico, Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, Mexico, Hayti, Trinidad, Colombia, Argentina [?], New Zealand.

  • The region was repeatedly raided by camp followers of each army; earthworks and a fort, commanding the Hudson ferry and the ferry to Paramus, New Jersey, were built; the British army made Dobbs Ferry a rendezvous, after the battle of White Plains, in November 1776, and the continental division under General Benjamin Lincoln was here at the end of January 1777.

  • At the Democratic Convention for the nomination of a presidential candidate held at Baltimore in 1912, he led on 27 ballots, and had a clear majority on eight, but he was finally defeated by Woodrow Wilson of New Jersey.

  • JERSEY CITY, a city and the county-seat of Hudson county, New Jersey, U.S.A., on a peninsula between the Hudson and Hackensack rivers at the N.

  • It is the eastern terminus of the Pennsylvania, the Lehigh Valley, the West Shore, the Central of New Jersey, the Baltimore & Ohio, the Northern of New Jersey (operated by the Erie), the Erie, the New York, Susquehanna & Western, and the New Jersey & New York (controlled by the Erie) railways, the first three using the Pennsylvania station; and of the little-used Morris canal.

  • Jersey City is served by several inter-urban electric railways and by the tunnels of the Hudson & Manhattan railroad company to Dey St.

  • Grain is shipped to and from Jersey City in large quantities, and in general the city is an important shipping port; being included, however, in the port of New York, no separate statistics are available.

  • Jersey City when first incorporated was a small sandy peninsula (an island at high tide) known as Paulus Hook, directly opposite the lower end of Manhattan Island.

  • In 1804 Paulus Hook, containing 117 acres and having about 15 inhabitants, passed into the possession of three enterprising New York lawyers, who laid it out as a town and formed an association for its government, which was incorporated as the "associates of the Jersey company."

  • In 1820 the town was incorporated as the City of Jersey, but it remained a part of the township of Bergen until 1838, when it was reincorporated as a distinct municipality.

  • The foreign and colonial clubs which are affiliated to the Kennel Club are: the Guernsey Dog Club, the Italian Kennel Club, the Jersey Dog Club, La Societe Centrale (Paris), Moscow Gun Club of the Emperor Alexander II., New South Wales Kennel Club, Nimrod Club (Amsterdam), Northern Indian Kennel Association, Royal St Hubert's Society (Brussels) and the South African Kennel Club (Cape Town).

  • The student of English constitutional history will observe the success with which Friends have, by the mere force of passive resistance, obtained, from the legislature and the courts, indulgence for all their scruples and a legal recognition of their customs. In American history they occupy an important place because of the very prominent part which they played in the colonization of New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

  • In1671-1673he had visited the American plantations from Carolina to Rhode Island and had preached alike to Indians and to settlers; in 1674 a portion of New Jersey was sold by Lord Berkeley to John Fenwicke in trust for Edward Byllynge.

  • In1677-1678five vessels with eight hundred emigrants, chiefly Quakers, arrived in the colony (then separated from the rest of New Jersey, under the name of West New Jersey), and the town of Burlington was established.

  • In 1677 the fundamental laws of West New Jersey were published, and recognized in a most absolute form the principles of democratic equality and perfect freedom of conscience.

  • It must not be forgotten that either before or soon after the formation of the Union the Northern States - beginning with Vermont in 1777, and ending with New Jersey in 1804 - either abolished slavery or adopted measures to effect its gradual abolition within their boundaries.

  • SAMUEL FINLEY BREESE MORSE (1791-1872), American artist and inventor, was born at Charlestown, Massachusetts, on the 27th of April 1791, son of Jedidiah Morse (1761-1826), Congregational minister there and a writer on geography, and a grandson of Samuel Finley, president of the college of New Jersey.

  • of copper wire had been set up, with such satisfactory results as to awaken the practical interest of the Messrs Vail, iron and brass workers in New Jersey, who thenceforth became associated with Morse in his undertaking.

  • John Thoreau, his father, who married the daughter of a New England clergyman, was the son of a John Thoreau of the isle of Jersey, who, in Boston, married a Scottish lady of the name of Burns.

  • This last-named John was the son of Philippe Thoreau and his wife Marie le Gallais, persons of pure French blood, settled at St Helier, in Jersey.

  • In April 1888 he was at the coast of New Jersey for some weeks, and in June started for San Francisco, where he had ordered a schooner, the "Casco," to be ready to receive him.

  • In the autumn of this year he received a visit 'at Vailima from the countess of Jersey, in company with whom and some others he wrote the burlesque extravagance in prose and verse, called An Object of Pity, privately printed in 1893 at Sydney.

  • Dover, New Jersey >>

  • The Great Western railway company maintains a regular service of passenger steamers to Guernsey and Jersey.

  • After the coup d'etat of 1851 he settled with his family in Jersey, where he pursued agricultural experiments and wrote his socialist poem La Greve de Samarez.

  • BRISTOL, a borough of Bucks county, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., on the Delaware river, opposite Burlington, New Jersey, 20 m.

  • Grave as most of his writings are, they include a short description of a crossing from Jersey to Granville, in which he satirizes English character and customs, and reveals an unexpected sense of humour.

  • In 1844 he was chosen as a presidential elector on the Polk and Dallas ticket; in February 1845 he married Miss Varina Howell (1826-1906) of Mississippi (a granddaughter of Governor Richard Howell of New Jersey), and in the same year became a Democratic representative in Congress.

  • In 1812 he became first professor in the newly established Presbyterian Theological Seminary at Princeton, New Jersey, where he remained until his death at Princeton on the 22nd of October 1851, filling successively the chairs of didactic and polemic theology (1812-1840), and pastoral and polemic theology (1840-1851).

  • It is served by the Erie, the Lehigh Valley, the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, the Central of New Jersey, the Delaware & Hudson, and the Lackawanna & Wyoming Valley railways; there is an electric railway from Pittston to Scranton, and a belt-line electric railway connects Pittston with Avoca, Nanticoke, Plymouth and Wilkes-Barre.

  • He graduated at Hamilton College, Clinton, N.Y., in 1820, and at the Princeton Theological Seminary in 1823, was ordained as a Presbyterian minister by the presbytery of Elizabethtown, New Jersey, in 1825, and was the pastor successively of the Presbyterian Church in Morristown, New Jersey (1825-1830) and of the First Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia(1830-1867).

  • Selling his Baltimore works, he built, in 1836, in partnership with his brother Thomas, a rolling mill in New York; in 1845 he removed it to Trenton, New Jersey, where iron structural beams were first made in 1854 and the Bessemer process first tried in America in 1856; and at Philippsburg, New Jersey, he built the largest blast furnace in the country at that time.

  • He built other foundries at Ringwood, New Jersey, and at Durham, Pennsylvania; bought iron mines in northern New Jersey, and carried the ore thence by railways to his mills.

  • Tamaqua is served by the Central railroad of New Jersey, by the Philadelphia and Reading railway and by an electric line connecting with Mauch Chunk, Pottsville, and other places.

  • He was removed to Carnarvon Castle, and thence to Mont Orgueil Castle in Jersey, where he occupied himself in writing against popery.

  • Of less importance is the silicate, Zn 2 SiO 4 H 2 0, named electric calamine or hemimorphite; this occurs in quantity in Altenburg near Aix-laChapelle, Sardinia, Spain and the United States (New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Missouri, Wisconsin).

  • Freehold, New Jersey >>

  • It is served by the Central of New Jersey, the Lehigh Valley, the Perkiomen (of the Reading system) and the Philadelphia & Reading railways.

  • At the beginning of the War of Independence he raised a regiment and as colonel did good service in the Battle of Bunker Hill, in the Canadian expedition, and in Washington's New Jersey campaign in the winter of 1776-77.

  • from Princeton, New Jersey, in 1841, was chosen by the Assembly of the Free Church to succeed Chalmers in the chair of divinity in the New College, Edinburgh.

  • He was a tutor for four years in the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), and from 1859 until his death was professor of Greek language and literature in New York University.

  • Dayton's site was purchased in 1795 from John Cleves Symmes by a party of Revolutionary soldiers, and it was laid out as a town in 1796 by Israel Ludlow (one of the owners), by whom it was named in honour of Jonathan Dayton (1760-1824), a soldier in the War of Independence, a member of Congress from New Jersey in 1791- ' 799, and a United States senator in 1799-1805.

  • He died on the 21st of May 1901, at Morristown, New Jersey.

  • He graduated at Bowdoin College in 1834, and subsequently held pastorates at Newark, New Jersey (1851-1857), and Georgetown, Massachusetts; and from 1870 to 1877 lived in Florida, where he was state superintendent of public instruction in 1871-1873.

  • FREDERICK THEODORE FRELINGHUYSEN (1817-1885), American lawyer and statesman, of Dutch descent, was born at Millstone, New Jersey, on the 4th of August 1817.

  • His grandfather, Frederick Frelinghuysen (1753-1804), was an eminent lawyer, one of the framers of the first New Jersey constitution, a soldier in the War of Independence, and a member (1778-1779 and 1782-1783) of the Continental Congress from New Jersey, and in 1793-1796 of the United States senate; and his uncle, Theodore (1787-1862), was attorney-general of New Jersey from 1817 to 1829, was a United States senator from New Jersey in 1829-1835, was the Whig candidate for vice-president on the Clay ticket in 1844, and was chancellor of the university of New York in 1839-1850 and president of Rutgers College in 1850-1862.

  • He became attorney for the Central Railroad of New Jersey, the Morris Canal and Banking Company, and other corporations, and from 1861 to 1867 was attorney-general of New Jersey.

  • In 1861 he was a delegate to the peace congress at Washington, and in 1866 was appointed by the governor of New Jersey, as a Republican, to fill a vacancy in the United States senate.

  • Princeton, New Jersey >>

  • by the Delaware river and Delaware Bay, which separate it from New Jersey, and by the Atlantic Ocean; S.

  • In 1899 Delaware spent more per acre for fertilizers than any of the other states except New Jersey, Rhode Island and Maryland.

  • He arrived early in 164 3 and subsequently established settlements on the island of Tinicum, near the present Chester, Pennsylvania, at the mouth of Salem Creek, New Jersey, and near the mouth of the Schuylkill river.

  • He graduated as valedictorian in 1808 at the college of New Jersey (Princeton); studied theology under the Rev. Walter Addison of Maryland, and in Princeton; was ordained deacon in 1811 and priest in 1814; and preached both in the Stone Chapel, Millwood, and in Christ Church, Alexandria, for some time.

  • Doane of New Jersey.

  • BORDENTOWN, a city of Burlington county, New Jersey, U.S.A., on the E.

  • The legislature of New Jersey passed a special law, enabling him, as an alien, to own real property, and it is said to have been in reference to this that the state received its nickname "Spain."

  • He was agent now, not only of Pennsylvania, but also of New Jersey, of Georgia and of Massachusetts.

  • 2 William Franklin served on the Canadian frontier with Pennsylvania troops, becoming captain in 1750; was in the post-office in 1 7541 75 6; went to England with his father in 1758; was admitted to legal practice in 1758; in 1763, recommended by Lord Fairfax, became governor of New Jersey; he left the Whig for the Tory party; and in the War of Independence was a faithful loyalist, much to the pain and regret of his father, who, however, was reconciled to him in part in 1784.

  • He was an excellent compositor and pressman; his workmanship, clear impressions, black ink and comparative freedom from errata did much to get him the public printing in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, and the printing of the paper money a and other public matters in Delaware.

  • In 1848 he came to London, but passed on in 1849 to America, where he ministered as rabbi in Cleveland,Cincinnati, Milwaukee, Detroit and Newark, New Jersey.

  • STEPHEN GROVER CLEVELAND (1837-1908), president of the United States from 1885 to 1889, and again from 1893 t6 1897, was born, the fifth in a family of nine children, in the village of Caldwell, Essex (disambiguation)|Essex county, New Jersey, on the 18th of March 1837.

  • Cleveland's second term expired on the 4th of March 1897, and he then retired into private life, universally respected and constantly consulted, in the university town of Princeton, New Jersey, where he died on the 24th of June 1908.

  • He was appointed United States minister to France in 1792, and was the only representative of a foreign country who remained at his post throughout the Reign of Terror; but his ill-concealed attitude of hostility to the Revolu manor and also a large estate from his uncle in Monmouth county, East Jersey.

  • He was an influential advocate of the surrender of the proprietary government of the Jerseys to the Crown (1702), became a member of the New Jersey Council in 1703, was suspended 'by Governor Cornbury in 1704, was elected a member of the Assembly in 1707 and led that body in opposition to Cornbury, was reappointed to the Council under Governor Lovelace in 1708, was again suspended in 1709 by Lieut.-Governor Ingoldsby, was made President of the Council in 1710 under Governor Hunter, and in 1711, during Hunter's administration (1710-1719), of which he was a staunch supporter, was made a justice of the supreme court of New Jersey.

  • He was chief justice of New York from about 1720 until 1733, was sent to England by the popular party late in 1734 to present their grievances to the king, and was governor of New Jersey from 1738 until his death on the 21st of May 1746.

  • 1860) was pastor of the Freehold (New Jersey) Presbyterian Church in 1886-1896, and from 1897 to 1903 was professor of systematic theology in Lane Theological Seminary.

  • Here you find articles in the encyclopedia on topics related to New Jersey and Maryland.

  • JOHN WOOLMAN (1720-1772), American Quaker preacher, was born in Northampton, Burlington county, New Jersey, in August 17 20.

  • Vermont, Massachusetts and Connecticut bound New York on the E.; the Atlantic Ocean, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, on the S.; and Pennsylvania, Lake Erie and the Niagara river on the W.

  • across New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia.

  • into the Highlands of New Jersey and thence to the Blue Ridge.

  • South of the Highlands, in New Jersey, but extending to the very banks of the Hudson,.

  • extension of the coastal plains which attain a much more perfect development in New Jersey and the states farther S.

  • With its source in Canada, it overrode even the highest mountains and spread beyond the boundary of New York into Pennsylvania and New Jersey; but farther E.

  • The western bank of the lower Hudson is in New Jersey.

  • Naturally, therefore, a dense population, engaged mainly in manufacturing and commerce, has gathered around the shores of this harbour, the greatest number on Manhattan 'Island and the contiguous mainland in New York City, but large numbers also on western Long Island, in Brooklyn, on the smaller islands, and on the New Jersey side.

  • It is supplied by the tidaland wind-formed currents, which are drifting sand from the Long Island and New Jersey coasts, extending the barrier beaches, such as Sandy Hook, out across the entrance to New York Bay.

  • On the summits of the Adirondacks are a few alpine species, such as reindeer moss and other lichens; on the shores of Long Island, Staten Island and Westchester county are a number of maritime species; and on Long Island are several species especially characteristic of the pine barrens of New Jersey.

  • The separation from it of what is now New Jersey (q.v.) was begun by the duke's conveyance, in the preceding June, of that portion of his province to Berkeley and Carteret, and among numerous changes from Dutch to English names was that from Fort Orange to Fort Albany.

  • as well as for the erection of a stronger barrier against the French, and in 1688 New York and New Jersey were consolidated with the New England colonies into the Dominion of New England and placed under the viceregal authority of Sir Edmund Andros as governor-general.

  • Therefore, in response to their repeated complaints of the weakness of the English arising from disunion, Governor Fletcher, in 1694, called another intercolonial conference consisting of delegates from New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut and New Jersey, and urged the necessity of more united feelings.

  • When they had assumed a neutral attitude, he persuaded a number of them to join troops from New York, New Jersey and Connecticut in the unsuccessful expeditions of 1709 and 1711 against the French at Montreal.

  • This brought on the battle of White Plains late in October, in which Howe gained no advantage; and from here both armies withdrew into New Jersey, the British capturing Fort Washington on the way, the Americans leaving behind garrisons to guard the Highlands of the Hudson.

  • Lord Jersey's committee in 1904 suggested that the president should be put on the same footing as a secretary of state, and be given the title of "minister of commerce and industry."

  • The northern section includes the Shickshock Mountains and Notre Dame Range in Quebec, scattered elevations in Maine, the White Mountains and the Green Mountains; the central comprises, besides various minor groups, the Valley Ridges between the Front of the Allegheny Plateau and the Great Appalachian Valley, the New York-New Jersey Highlands and a large portion of the Blue Ridge; and the southern consists of the prolongation of the Blue Ridge, the Unaka Range, and the Valley Ridges adjoining the Cumberland Plateau, with some lesser ranges.

  • 15 r888, and educated in Jersey and at Dinard as well as at the High School, Oxford, proceeding on to Jesus College, Oxford, and graduating 1st class in modern history 1910.

  • NEWARK, the largest city of New Jersey, U.S.A., a port of entry, and the county-seat of Essex county, on the Passaic river and Newark Bay, about 8 m.

  • Newark is served by the Pennsylvania, the Lehigh Valley, the Erie, the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western and the Central of New Jersey railways, and by steamboats engaged in coastwise and river commerce.

  • By electric lines it is connected with most of the cities and towns within a radius of 20 m., including Jersey City, Paterson and the residential suburbs, among which are the Oranges, Montclair, Bloomfield, Glen Ridge, Belleville and Nutley.

  • The Public Library (opened in 1889) contained about 160,000 volumes in 1910, and the library of the New Jersey Historical Society about 26,000 books, about 27,000 pamphlets and many manuscripts; the Prudential Insurance Company has a law library of about 20,000 volumes; and the Essex County Lawyers' Club has one of 5000 volumes or more.

  • The College of New Jersey, now Princeton University, was situated here from 1747 to 1756, for all but the first few months under the presidency of the Rev. Aaron Burr, who published in 1752 the well-known Newark Grammar, long used in Princeton and originally prepared for Burr's very successful boys' school in Newark.

  • Thowless, Historical Sketch of the City of Newark, New Jersey (Newark, 1902); F.

  • Atkinson, The History of Newark, New Jersey (Newark, 1878).

  • HOBOKEN, a city of Hudson county, New Jersey, U.S.A., on the Hudson river, adjoining Jersey City on the S.

  • The city is served by the West Shore, and the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western railways, being the eastern terminus of the latter, and is connected by electric railway with the neighbouring cities of north-eastern New Jersey.

  • and lies near the foot of the New Jersey Palisades, which rise both on the W.

  • by the Narrows which connect Upper and Lower New York Bay; from New Jersey on the N.

  • by the narrow channel of Kill van Kull which connects New York Bay with Newark Bay; and from New Jersey on the W.

  • distant, and with Perth Amboy, New Jersey.

  • In 1664 the duke of York became proprietor of the newly erected province of New York and by his grant in the same year to Berkeley and Carteret of all that portion which lay west of the Hudson river, Staten Island became properly a part of New Jersey, but in 1668 the duke decided that all islands within New York Bay which could be circumnavigated in twenty-four hours should be adjudged to New York.

  • From it the British made frequent predatory raids into New Jersey and the Americans made several retaliatory raids into the island.

  • AARON BURR (1756-1836), American political leader, was born at Newark, New Jersey, on the 6th of February 1756.

  • His father, the Rev. Aaron Burr (1715-1757), was the second president (1748-1757) of the College of New Jersey, now Princeton University; his mother was the daughter of Jonathan Edwards, the well-known Calvinist theologian.

  • The son graduated from the College of New Jersey in 1772, and two years later began the study of law in the celebrated law school conducted by his brother-in-law, Tappan Reeve, at Litchfield, Connecticut.

  • After the expiration of his term as vicepresident (March 4, 1805), broken in fortune and virtually an exile from New York, where, as in New Jersey, he had been indicted for murder after the duel with Hamilton, Burr visited the South-west and became involved in the so-called conspiracy which has so puzzled the students of that period.

  • Galloway declined a second election to Congress in 1775, joined the British army at New Brunswick, New Jersey (December 1776), advised the British to attack Philadelphia by the Delaware, and during the British occupation of Philadelphia (1777-1778) was superintendent of the port, of prohibited articles, and of police of the city.

  • In 1897 the value of the fishery product of Maryland was exceeded only by that of Massachusetts, but by 1901, although it had increased somewhat during the four years, it was exceeded by the product of New Jersey, of Virginia and of New York.

  • The Burley Tobacco Society attempted to pool the entire crop and thus force the buyers of the American Tobacco Company of New Jersey (which usually bought more than three-fourths of the crop of Burley) to pay a much higher price for it.

  • Scranton is served by the Erie, the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, the Central of New Jersey, the New York, Ontario & Western, the Delaware & Hudson, and the Lackawanna & Wyoming Valley railways.

  • Boulanger himself, having been tried and condemned in absentia for treason, in October 1889 went to live in Jersey, but nobody now paid much attention to his doings.

  • Mason died in December of this year, and New Hampshire, unlike the other colonies from which the United States originated, New Jersey and Delaware excepted, never received a royal charter.

  • The British then pushed down through New Jersey with designs on Philadelphia.

  • Marching on to Morristown, Washington encamped there on the flank of the British advance in New Jersey, thus ending the first campaign fought on the new issue of American Independence, which had been declared on the 4th of July 1776.

  • Meanwhile Mayhew had recognized the jurisdiction of Maine; 2 and though the officials of that province showed no disposition to press their claim, it seems that this technical suzerainty continued until 1664, when the Duke of York received from his brother, Charles II., the charter for governing New York, New Jersey, and other territory, including Martha's Vineyard.

  • still more, it is discontinuous, because of the inclusion of certain belts of weak non-crystalline rock; here the rolling uplands are worn down to lowland belts, the longest of which reaches from the southern corner of New York, across New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Maryland, into central Virginia.

  • The Appalachian trends (N.E.S.W.) that are so prominent in the stratified belt of the middle Appalachians, and are fairly well marked in the crystalline belt of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, are prevailingly absent in New England.

  • A section of the coastal plain, from North Carolina to southern New Jersey, resembles the plain farther south in general form and quality of soils, but besides being narrower, it is further characterized by several embayments or arms of the sea, caused by a slight depression of the land after mature valleys had been eroded in the plain.

  • The small triangular section of the coastal plain in New Jersey north of Delaware Bay deserves separate treatment because of the development there of a pectiliar topographic feature, which throws light on the occurrence of the islands off the New England coast, described in the next paragraph.

  • There is good reason for believing that at least along the southern border of New England a narrow coastal plain was for a time added to the continental border; and that, as in the New Jersey section the plain was here stripped from a significant breadth of inland overlap and worn down so as to form an inner lowland enclosed by a longitudinal upland or cuesta; and that when this stage was reached a submergence, of the kind which has produced the many embayments of the New England coast, drowned the outer part of thy plain and the inner lowland, leaving only the higher parts of the cuesta as islands.

  • (I) the North Atlantic division~down to New Jersey and Pennsylvania; (2) the South Atlantic divisionfrom Delaware to Florida (including West Virginia); (3) the North Central divisionincluding the states within a triangle tipped by Ohio, Kansas and North Dakota; (4) the South Central division -covering a triangle tipped by Kentucky, Alabama and Texas; and (5) the Western divisionincluding the Rocky Mountains and Pacific states.

  • In New York, New Jersey and Connecticut the city element also exceeded half of the population.

  • Early in the I 8th century the industry began to extend over New England and into New Jersey, the German bloomery forge being employed for reducing the ore directly to bar iron, and by the middle of that century it had taken a pretty firm hold in the Atlantic colonies.

  • The ore obtained there and in New Jersey seems to have been mostly shipped to England.

  • At many points in the Appalachian belt attempts had been made to work mines of copper and lead, but with no considerable success, About the middle of the century extensive works were erected at Newark, New Jersey, fo1~ the manufacture of the oxide of zinc for paint; about 1100 tons were produced in 1852.

  • The iron-producing area of the country may be divided, with regard to natural geographic, historic and trade considerations, into four districts: (1) the Lake Superior district, embracing the states of Minnesota, Michigan and Wisconsin; (2) the southern district, embracing the triangle tipped by Texas, Maryland and Georgia; (3) the northern district, embracing the triangle tipped by Ohio, New Jersey and Massachusetts, plus the states of Iowa and Missouri; (4) the western district, which includes the states of the Rocky Mountain region and Pacific coast.

  • Of the product of 1907 above stated no less than 63.4% came from Missouri alone; Colorado, Wisconsin, Kansas and New Jersey yielding together 30.8% more.

  • Whereas formerly legislatures met annually, regular sessions are now biennial except in New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Georgia and South Carolinaall original states.

  • In one group of statesPennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Indiana, Iowawhile the township has more or less power, and there are town officials, there is no town meeting.

  • They are a distinct breed of Jersey and Brittany type, and are stated to be descended from animals imported from France by the early settlers.

  • WILLIAM BAINBRIDGE (1774-1833), commodore in the United States navy, was born on the 7th of May 1774 in Princeton, New Jersey.

  • Somerville, New Jersey >>

  • He was pastor of the Presbyterian church of Roselle, New Jersey, 1869-1874, and professor of Hebrew and cognate languages in Union Theological Seminary 1874-1891, and of Biblical theology there from 1891 to 1904, when he became professor of theological encyclopaedia and symbolics.

  • on Lake Erie, on the east where the Delaware river with two large bends separates it from New York and New Jersey, and in the south-east where the arc of a circle which was described with a 12-m.

  • The north-east part is a south-westward arm of the New England uplands, is known as the Reading Prong, and extends from New Jersey through Easton to Reading.

  • Of the native population (5,316,865) 90.7% were born within the state and a little more than two-fifths of the remainder were natives of New York, Maryland, Ohio, New Jersey, Virginia, New England, Delaware and West Virginia.

  • The two Continental Congresses (1774, and 1 7751 781) met in Philadelphia, except for the months when Philadelphia was occupied by the British army and Congress met in Lancaster and York, Pennsylvania, and then in Princeton, New Jersey.

  • He graduated at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) in 1810.

  • He died at Perth Amboy, New Jersey, on the 25th of November 1857.

  • The fossil remains of three species have been described by Professor Marsh - one from the Miocene of Colorado, and two, one much taller and the other smaller than the existing species, from the post-Pliocene of New Jersey.

  • REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA, until 1867 called officially "The Reformed Protestant Dutch Church in North America," and still popularly called the Dutch Reformed Church, an American Calvinist church, originating with the settlers from Holland in New York, New Jersey and Delaware, the first permanent settlers of the Reformed faith in the New World.

  • The first church in New Jersey, at Bergen, in 1661, was quickly followed by others at Hackensack and Passaic. After English rule in 1664 displaced Dutch in New York, the relations of the Dutch churches there were much less close with the state Church of Holland; and in 1679 (on the request of the English governor of New York, to whom the people of New Castle appealed) a classis was constituted for the ordination of a pastor for the church in New Castle, Delaware.

  • In 1696 the first church charter in New York was granted to the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church (now the Collegiate Church) of New York City; at this time there were Dutch ministers at Albany and Kingston, on Long Island and in New Jersey; and for years the Dutch and English (Episcopalian) churches alone received charters in New York and New Jersey - the Dutch church being treated practically as an establishment - and the church of the fort and Trinity (Episcopalian; chartered 1697) were fraternally harmonious.

  • During the administration of Governor Edward Hyde, Lord Cornbury, many members joined the Episcopal Church and others removed to New Jersey.

  • More than onehalf of this total membership (63,350) was in New York state, the principal home of the first great Dutch immigration; more than one-quarter (32,290 was in New Jersey; and the other states were: Michigan (11,260), Illinois (4962), Iowa (4835), Wisconsin (2312), and Pennsylvania (1979).

  • There were 2990 in Iowa, 2392 in New Jersey, 2332 in Illinois, and smaller numbers in Wisconsin, Indiana, Minnesota, S.

  • The son graduated at Yale in 1748; studied theology with his father; studied medicine at Edinburgh in 1752-1753; was ordained deacon by the bishop of Lincoln and priest by the bishop of Carlisle in 1753; was missionary in New Brunswick, New Jersey, in 1754-1757, and was rector in Jamaica, New York, in 1757-1766; and of St.

  • The middle states, New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, are known to have many great deposits of rich magnetite, which supplied a very large proportion of the American ores till the discovery of the very cheaply mined ores of Lake Superior.

  • He studied law at Princeton, New Jersey, in the office of Richard Stockton, whose sister Hannah he married in 1762, and in November 1760 he was licensed as a counsellor and attorney-at-law, afterwards practising at Elizabethtown, New Jersey.

  • He was a deputy to the provincial congress of New Jersey from May to August 1775, and from May 1777 until July 1778 was the commissary-general of prisoners, with the rank of colonel, in the continental army.

  • He was one of the New Jersey members of the continental congress in 1778 and again from 1781 until 1783, and from November 1782 until October 1783 was president of that body, acting also for a short time, after the resignation of Robert R.

  • He was a trustee and a benefactor of the college of New Jersey (afterwards Princeton University).

  • Boudinot died at Burlington, New Jersey, on the 24th of October 1821.

  • ATLANTIC CITY, a city of Atlantic county, New Jersey, U.S.A., on the Atlantic Ocean, 58 m.

  • A part of his work was undertaken by Johann Conrad Wirtz, who was ordained by the New Brunswick (New Jersey) Presbytery in 1750, and in 1761-63 was pastor at York, Pennsylvania.

  • The New Jersey churches rapidly fell away, becoming Presbyterian, Dutch Reformed, or Lutheran.

  • Dakota, Missouri, New Jersey, Connecticut, Kansas, W.

  • SIR GEORGE CARTERET (c. 1610-1680), English politician, was born between 1609 and 1617 on the island of Jersey, where his family had long been prominent landholders.

  • In 1643 he succeeded by reversion from his uncle, Sir Philip Carteret, to the post of bailiff of Jersey, and in the same year was appointed by the king lieutenant-governor of the island.

  • After subduing the Parliamentary party in the island, he was commissioned (1644) a vice-admiral of Jersey and "the maritime parts adjacent," and by virtue of that office he carried on from there an active privateering campaign in the Royalist cause.

  • His rule in Jersey was severe, but profitable to the island; he developed its resources and made it a refuge for Royalists, among whom in 1646 and again in1649-1650was Prince Charles, who created Carteret a knight and baronet.

  • In 1650, in consideration of Carteret's services, Charles granted to him "a certain island and adjacent islets near Virginia, in America," which were to be called New Jersey; but no settlement upon this grant was made.

  • In 1651 Carteret, after a seven weeks' siege, was compelled to surrender Jersey to a Parliamentary force; he then joined the Royalist exiles in France, where for a time he held a command in the French navy.

  • In 1664 James, duke of York, granted that part of his American territory between the Hudson and Delaware rivers to Sir George Carteret and John, Lord Berkeley, and in Carteret's honour this tract received the name of New Jersey.

  • With them Carteret agreed (1676) upon a boundary line which divided the colony into East and West Jersey.

  • He died in January 1680, and two years later his heirs disposed of his New Jersey holdings to Penn and other quakers.

  • Mauch Chunk is served by the Central of New Jersey railway and, at East Mauch Chunk, across the river, connected by electric railway, by the Lehigh Valley railway.

  • The ladies who formed the first committee were: Lady Borthwick, the dowager-duchess of Marlborough (first lady president), Lady Wimborne, Lady Randolph Churchill, Lady Charles Beresford, the dowager-marchioness of Waterford, Julia marchioness of Tweeddale, Julia countess of Jersey, Mrs (subsequently Lady) Hardman, Lady Dorothy Nevill, the Honourable Lady Campbell (later Lady Blythswood), the Honourable Mrs Armitage, Mrs Bischoffsheim, Miss Meresia Nevill (the first secretary of the Ladies' Council).

  • ASBURY PARK, a city of Monmouth county, New Jersey, U.S.A., on the Atlantic Ocean, about 35 m.

  • It is served by the Central of New Jersey and the Pennsylvania railways, and by electric railway lines connecting it with other New Jersey coast resorts both north and south.

  • 2 So hopeless, meanwhile, was he growing of being able to return home that, later on in the year, he was on the point of leaving Paris to take up his abode in the south with a French friend, 3 when he was engaged " by the month " as mathematical instructor to the young prince of Wales, who had come over from Jersey about the month of July.

  • A pure white blende from Franklin in New Jersey is known as cleiophane; snow-white crystals are also found at Nordmark in Vermland, Sweden.

  • THOMAS DE WITT TALMAGE (1832-1902), American Presbyterian preacher, born at Bound Brook, New Jersey, on the 7th of January 1832.

  • SALEM, a city and the county-seat of Salem county, New Jersey, U.S.A., in the S.W.

  • It is served by the West Jersey && Seashore railroad, and has steamer connexion with Philadelphia.

  • After purchasing lands from the Indians, Fenwicke attempted to maintain an independent government, but in 1682 he submitted to the authority of the proprietors of West Jersey.

  • His father, Thomas (1778-1851), was born in Rockingham (then Augusta) county, Virginia; he was hospitable, shiftless, restless and unsuccessful, working now as a carpenter and now as a farmer, and could not read or write before his marriage, in Washington county, Kentucky, on the 12th of June 1806, to Nancy Hanks (1783-1818), who was a native of Virginia, who is said to have been the illegitimate daughter of one Lucy Hanks, and who seems to have been, in 1 Lincoln's birthday is a legal holiday in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, West Virginia and Wyoming.

  • The Duroc Jersey or Duroc, of a red or cherry-red colour - not sandy or dark - is the most popular pig in Nebraska and equal to any other in Iowa.

  • Salem, New Jersey >>

  • TRENTON, the capital of New Jersey, U.S.A., and the countyseat of Mercer county, on the eastern bank of the Delaware river, about 33 m.

  • In 1714 Stacy sold his plantation at "The Falls" to William Trent (c. 1655-1724), speaker of the New Jersey Assembly (1723) and chief justice of the colony (1723-1724), in whose honour the place came to be called Trenttown or Trenton.

  • In 1783 the New Jersey delegates in Congress proposed that Trenton be made the seat of the general government, but as this measure was opposed by the Southern delegates, it was agreed that Congress, pending a final decision, should sit alternately at Annapolis and Trenton.

  • Trenton, New Jersey >>

  • SOUTH ORANGE, a township and a village of Essex (disambiguation)|Essex county, New Jersey, U.S.A., in the N.E.

  • The burying-ground includes the tomb of Robert Treat (1622-1710), commander of the Connecticut troops in King Philip's War, leader of the company that founded Newark, New Jersey, governor of Connecticut (from 1683 to 1698) at the time its charter was demanded by Governor Andros in 1686-1687, and deputy-governor in1676-1683and 1698-1708; and also that of Jonathan Law (1674-1751), governor of Connecticut from 1742 to 1751.

  • In 1664 Milford, with the other members of the Jurisdiction, was absorbed by Connecticut; this caused considerable dissatisfaction and some of the inhabitants under the lead of Robert Treat removed to New Jersey and assisted in the founding of Newark.

  • WEEHAWKEN, a township of Hudson (disambiguation)|Hudson county, New Jersey, U.S.A., in the N.E.

  • BAYONNE, a city of Hudson county, New Jersey, U.S.A., occupying the peninsula (about 52 m.

  • wide) between New York harbour and Newark Bay, and immediately adjoining the south boundary of Jersey City, from which it is partly separated by the Morris Canal.

  • Bayonne is served by the Central of New Jersey and by the Lehigh Valley railways (the latter for freight only), and by electric railway lines to Newark and Jersey City.

  • The Virginia plan was opposed by the smaller states, Connecticut, New Jersey, Delaware and Maryland, which demanded equal representation in the legislature.

  • BLOOMFIELD, a town of Essex county, New Jersey, U.S.A., about 12 m.

  • In 1796 it was named Bloomfield in honour of General Joseph Bloomfield (1753-1823), who served (1775-1778) in the War of American Independence, reaching the rank of major, was governor of New Jersey in 1801-1802 and 1803-1812, brigadier general in the United States army during the War of 1812, and a Democratic representative in Congress from 1817 to 1821.

  • LUTHER MARTIN (1748-1826), American lawyer, was born in New Brunswick, New Jersey, on the 9th of February 1748.

  • He graduated at the college of New Jersey (now Princeton University) at the head of a class of thirty-five in 1766, and immediately afterwards removed to Maryland, teaching at Queenstown in that colony until 1770, and being admitted to the bar in 1771.

  • In 1817 he was invited to become pastor of the chapel of St Paul at Jersey, but he declined, being unwilling to subscribe to the Thirty-nine Articles of the Church of England.

  • NICHOLAS MURRAY BUTLER (1862-), American educator, was born at Elizabeth, New Jersey, on the 2nd of April 1862.

  • He was also a member of the New Jersey state board of education from 1887 to 1895, and was president of the Paterson (N.J.) board of education in 1892-1893.

  • Later the system was extended to connect with the Erie and Pennsylvania terminals in Jersey City, and in 1909 the tunnel under the Hudson river to downtown New York was finished.

  • WEST HOBOKEN, a town of Hudson (disambiguation)|Hudson county, New Jersey, U.S.A., in the N.E.

  • part of the state, adjoining Hoboken and Jersey City.

  • For transportation facilities the town depends upon the railways serving Hoboken and Jersey City.

  • WEST ORANGE, a town of Essex (disambiguation)|Essex county, New Jersey, U.S.A., in the N.E.

  • The tract lay within the province of "Louisiana," and the grant to Morgan was a part of Gardoqui's plan to annex to that province the western American settlements, Morgan being required to establish thereon a large number of emigrants, whom he secured from New Jersey, Canada and elsewhere.

  • With this assistance the Manila Railroad Company, organized under the laws of the state of New Jersey, agreed to construct about 600 m.

  • In 1769 the son entered the college of New Jersey (nor Princeton University), where, in the same year, he founded the well-known literary club, "The American Whig Society."

  • It is served by the Lehigh Valley, the Philadelphia & Reading, the Central of New Jersey and the Lehigh & New England railways.

  • by Gravesend Bay, the Narrows, Upper New York Bay and East river, which separate it from Staten Island, Jersey City and the borough of Manhattan.

  • Ferries ply at frequent intervals between numerous points on its west waterfront and points in Manhattan; there is also ferry connexion with Jersey City.

  • Next to Trenton, New Jersey, East Liverpool is the most important place in the United States for the manufacture of earthenware and pottery, 4859 out of its 5228 wage-earners, or 92.9%, being employed in this industry in 1 9 05, when $5,373,852 (83.5% of the value of all its factory products) was the value of the earthenware and pottery.

  • He then went to Camden, New Jersey, to live and continued to reside in that city till his death on the 27th of March 1892.

  • It thus resembles magnetite in external characters, but is readily distinguished from this by the fact that it is only slightly magnetic. It is found in considerable amount, associated with zinc minerals (zincite and willemite) in crystalline limestone, at Franklin Furnace, New Jersey, where it is mined as an ore of zinc (containing 5 to 20% of the metal); after the extraction of the zinc, the residue is used in the manufacture of spiegeleisen (the mineral containing 15 to 20% of manganese oxides).

  • Hobart of New Jersey.

  • The English settlements in Virginia, New England, New York, New Jersey, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Georgia had, between the first decade of the 17th and the seventh decade of the 18th century, developed into a new nation, the United States of America.

  • It is served by the Central of New Jersey, the Lehigh & New England, the Lehigh Valley and the Phila 1 The country of Moab is clearly visible from around Bethlehem.

  • Burlington, New Jersey >>

  • Bayonne, New Jersey >>

  • Even on the Coastal Plain the Jersey and oldfield pines of to-day replace more valuable species of the original growth.

  • MICHAEL AUGUSTINE CORRIGAN (1839-1902), third archbishop of the Roman Catholic archdiocese of New York, in the United States, was born in Newark, New Jersey, on the 13th of August 1839.

  • Returning to America, he was appointed professor of Dogmatic Theology and Sacred Scripture, and director of the ecclesiastical seminary of Seton Hall College at South Orange, New Jersey; soon afterwards he was made vice-president of the institution; and in 1868 became president, succeeding Rev. Bernard J.

  • In October 1868 Corrigan became vicar-general of Newark, a diocese then including all the state of New Jersey.

  • Madison, New Jersey >>

  • Washington's retreat through New Jersey; the manner in which he turned and struck his pursuers at Trenton and Princeton, and then established himself at Morristown, so as to make the way to Philadelphia impassable; the vigour with which he handled his army at the Brandywine and Germantown; the persistence with which he held the strategic position of Valley Forge through the dreadful winter of 1777-1778, in spite of the misery of his men, the clamours of the people and the impotence and meddling of the fugitive Congress - all went to show that the fibre of his public character had been hardened to its permanent quality.

  • The prompt and vigorous pursuit of Sir Henry Clinton across New Jersey towards New York, and the battle of Monmouth, in which the plan of battle was thwarted by Charles Lee, another foreign recruit of popular reputation, closed the military record of Washington, so far as active campaigning was concerned, until the end of the war.

  • Orange, New Jersey >>

  • Both these works were composed entirely from the original documents at the Public Record Office, London, and the archives of jersey and Guernsey.

  • He retired from the regular ministry in 1865, but preached in New Brunswick, New Jersey, until the spring of 1867, and in that year, at the wish of its founder, Daniel Drew, became president of the newly established Drew theological seminary at Madison, New Jersey, where he died on the 4th of March 1870.

  • In 1844 he was consecrated bishop of Axieren in partibus, and was made coadjutor to Bishop Hughes of New York with the right of succession; in 1847 he became bishop of the newly created see of Albany; and in 1864 he succeeded to the archdiocese of New York, then including New York, New Jersey, and New England.

  • The states which lead in the quantity of oysters taken are Maryland, Virginia, New York, New Jersey and Connecticut; the annual value of the output in each of these is over $ I, 000,000.

  • Thence he fled to Jersey, and finally refusing all the overtures from the parliament, and in opposition to the counsels of Hyde, who desired the prince to remain on English territory, he repaired to the queen at Paris, where he remained for two years.

  • On the 17th of September, after a visit to his mother at St Germain, Charles went to Jersey and issued a declaration proclaiming his rights; but, owing to the arrival of the fleet at Portsmouth, he was obliged, on the 13th of February 1650, to return again to Breda.

  • Already in 1662 the king had sent Sir Richard Bellings to Rome to arrange the terms of England's conversion, and now in 1668 he was in correspondence with Oliva, the general of the Jesuits in Rome, through James de la Cloche, the eldest of his natural sons, of whom he had become the father when scarcely sixteen during his residence at Jersey.

  • (5) No inhabitant of England (except persons contracting, or, after conviction for felony, electing to be transported) shall be sent prisoner to Scotland, Ireland, Jersey, &c., or any place beyond the seas.

  • The act of 1679 expressly applies to Wales, Berwick-on-Tweed, Jersey and Guernsey, and the act of 1816 also extends to the Isle of Man.

  • the churchmen of the Dutch Reformed Theological Seminary in New Brunswick, New Jersey) and its English and Scottish members, - as late as 1856 J.

  • tamnoides in the United States from New Jersey southwards; by S.

  • The harbour docks and adjacent railways (which exceed 20 m.) are owned and administered by a harbour trust of 26 members, of whom one is the owner of the Briton Ferry estate (Earl Jersey), 4 represent the lord of the seigniory of Gower (the duke of Beaufort), 12 are proprietary members and 9 are elected annually by the corporation of Swansea.

  • RAHWAY, a city of Union county, New Jersey, U.S.A., in the north-eastern part of the state, on the Rahway river and about 20 m.

  • distant is the New Jersey Reformatory (1903), to which prisoners between the ages of sixteen and thirty may be sentenced instead of to the State Prison.

  • ORANGE, a city of Essex county, New Jersey, U.S.A., in the N.E.

  • GEORGE WASHINGTON DOANE (1799-1859), American churchman, Protestant Episcopal bishop of New Jersey, was born in Trenton, New Jersey, on the 27th of May 1799.

  • He was assistant in 1828-1830 and rector in 1830-1832 of Christ church, Boston, and was bishop of New Jersey from October 1832 to his death at Burlington, New Jersey, on the 27th of April 1859.

  • The diocese of New Jersey was an unpromising field, but he took up his work there with characteristic vigour, especially in the foundation of St Mary's Hall (1837, for girls) and Burlington College (1846) as demonstrations of his theory of education under church control.

  • From 1855 to 1860 he was pastor of a new Unitarian society in Jersey City, where he gave up the Lord's Supper, thinking that it ministered to self-satisfaction; and it was as a radical Unitarian that he became pastor of another young church in New York City in 1860.

  • He studied at the college of New Jersey (now Princeton University) from 1774 to 1776, when the institution was closed on account of the outbreak of the War of Independence; served for a short time in a New Jersey militia company; studied law at Bute Court-house, North Carolina, in 1 7771 7 80, at the same time managing his tobacco plantation; was a member of a Warren county militia company in 1780-1782, and served in the North Carolina Senate in 1781-1785.

  • In 1832 he was elected to the chair of natural philosophy in the New Jersey college at Princeton.

  • He graduated at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton) in 1815, and in 1819 at the Princeton Theological seminary, where he became an instructor in 1820, and the first professor of Oriental and Biblical literature in 1822.

  • He graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1841, and at the Princeton Theological seminary in 1846, and was ordained in 1847.

  • NEW JERSEY, one of the Middle Atlantic states of the American Union, lying between 41° 21' 22.6" and 38° 55' 40" N.

  • by the Delaware Bay and river, which separate New Jersey from Delaware and Pennsylvania.

  • New Jersey has an extreme length, N.

  • Of equal importance is the Hudson, whose lower waters, forming the north-eastern boundary of New Jersey for a distance of 22 m., drain a very small part of the state, but have contributed materially to the state's commercial develop ment.

  • Of these the largest and the most frequented are Lake Hopatcong, an irregular body of water in Morris and Sussex counties, and Greenwood Lake, lying partly in New York and partly in New Jersey.

  • The fauna of New Jersey does not differ materially from that of the other Middle Atlantic states.

  • New Jersey is a meeting ground for many species which have their principal habitat farther N.

  • North Eastern NEW Jersey Scale, z:600,000 G 0 g h t -pta.

  • New Jersey's forests have suffered much from fire, but with the exception of " The Plains " the soil everywhere is well adapted to tree growth.

  • On account of the proximity to the sea, New Jersey has a more equable climate than have some of the states in the same latitude farther west.

  • As the heat is thus made less oppressive along the coast, the beaches of New Jersey have rapidly built up with towns and cities that have become popular summer resorts - among the best known of these are Long Branch, Asbury Park, Ocean Grove, Atlantic City (also a winter resort) and Cape May.

  • Since 1830 market gardening in New Jersey has become increasingly important, especially in the vicinity of large cities, and has proved more profitable than the growing of cereals.

  • In the total acreage devoted to the raising of vegetables in marketable quantities New Jersey in 1900 was surpassed by only two other states.

  • In 1899 New Jersey produced nearly a fourth of the cranberry crop of the United States, the chief centre of production being the bogs of Burlington and Ocean counties.

  • In New Jersey the mining of clays is more important than in any other state, the amount mined and sold in 1902 being a third of the entire output of the United States, and the amount in 1907 (44 0, 1 3 8 tons) being more than one-fifth of all clay mined and sold in the United States; and in 1907 in the value of clay products ($16,005,460; brick and tile, $9,019, 834, and pottery, $6,985,626) New Jersey was outranked only by Ohio and Pennsylvania.

  • In Warren and Sussex counties are abundant materials for the manufacture of Portland cement, an industry that has attained importance since 1892; in the value of its product in 1907 ($4,73 8, 5 16) New Jersey was surpassed only by Pennsylvania.

  • The manufacture of iron in New Jersey dates from 1674, when the metal was reduced from its ores near Shrewsbury, Monmouth county.

  • In the production of zinc New Jersey once took a prominent part; in 1907 the only producer was The New Jersey Zinc Company's mine at Franklin Furnace, Sussex county, with an output of 13,573 short tons, valued at $1,601,614.

  • After 1850 New Jersey made rapid progress in manufacturing, which soon became its leading industry.

  • large markets and of great natural resources, such as the clays of New Jersey and the coal and iron of Pennsylvania.

  • The chief manufacturing centres in ($ 1 05, as judged by the value of their products, were Newark 1 5 0, 0 55, 2 77), Jersey City ($75,740,934), Bayonne ($60,633,761), Paterson ($54,673,083), Perth Amboy ($34,800,402), Camden ($33,5 8 7, 2 73), and Trenton ($32,719,945).

  • In 1900 New Jersey furnished 37.3%, and in 1905, 32.2%, of the silk products of the United States, and was surpassed by no other state.

  • West Hoboken and Jersey City are also important producers.

  • A second textile industry in which New Jersey in 1900 and in 1905 took first rank was the manufacture of felt hats; the total value of the product in 1905 was 16,540,433, a gain of 32.3% since 1900, and constituting 26% of the value of the product of the entire United States.

  • In this industry New Jersey was surpassed only by Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Pennsylvania.

  • During this five-year period there was an increase of 31.2% (from $6,540,289 to $8,518,527) in the value of the cotton goods manufactured in New Jersey; of 12.6% (from $2,168,570 to $2,441,516) in that of linen goods; of 45.3% (from $1,748,148 to $2,539,178) in that of hosiery and knit goods, and of 14.8% (from $1,522,827 to $1,748,831) in that of carpets and rugs.

  • In dyeing and finishing textiles New Jersey was first among the states of the Union in 1900 (value, $10,488,963, being 23.3% of the total for the country) and in 1905 (value, $11,979,947, being 23.6% of the total for the country); Paterson is the centre of this industry in New Jersey.

  • In the manufacture of clay products, including brick, tiling, terra cotta and pottery, the state takes high rank: the total value of pottery, terra cotta and fire-clay products increased from $8,940,723 in 1900 to $11,717,103 in 1905; in 1905 the most valuable pottery product was sanitary ware, valued at $3,006,406; and in that year New Jersey furnished 18.2% of the total pottery product of the United States, and was surpassed in this industry only by Ohio.

  • Glass is also an important product of New Jersey; the output being valued at $5,093,822 in 1900 and at $6,450,195 in 1905.

  • In 1900 the output was valued at $38,365,131; in 1905, at $ 62, 795,7 1 3, an increase of 63.7%; and in 1905 21.6% of the product of the United States came from New Jersey.

  • The raw materials for this industry, however, are imported into New Jersey from other states.

  • Until 1901 New Jersey's fisheries were more important than those of any other state in the Middle or South Atlantic groups; but after that date, owing to a decrease in the catch of bluefish, shad, clams and oysters, the annual catch of New York and Virginia became more valuable.

  • 2 This is one of the oldest of the important industries in New Jersey: at Old Boonton, about 1770, was established a rolling and slitting mill, probably the first in the country.

  • In 2905, with a total railway mileage of 22 74.4 0, New Jersey possessed an average of 30.22 m.

  • The eastern terminals of the southern and western lines running from New York City are situated on the western shore of the Hudson river, in Weehawken, Hoboken or Jersey City; whence passengers and freight are carried by ferry to New York.

  • Jersey City and Hoboken are also connected with New York by tunnels under the Hudson river.

  • from Jersey City via Buffalo; the New York, Susquehanna & Western (subsidiary to the Erie), from Jersey City to Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania; the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, from Hoboken to Buffalo; the Lehigh Valley, from Jersey City to Buffalo; the Pennsylvania, from Jersey City to the S.

  • 1; the New York, Ontario & Western (controlled by the New York, New Haven & Hartford), from Weehawken to Oswego; the West Shore (leased by the New York Central), from Weehawken to Buffalo; and the Central railway of New Jersey (controlled by the Philadelphia & Reading), with numerous short lines from Jersey City to the S.

  • Among the latter class are the Atlantic City railway (controlled by the Philadelphia & Reading) from Philadelphia to various coast resorts in southern New Jersey; and the West Jersey & Seashore (controlled by the Pennsylvania), from Philadelphia to Atlantic City and Cape May.

  • The excellence of the waggon roads of the state is largely due to the plentiful supply of trap rock in New Jersey.

  • Of New Jersey's 487 m.

  • The only deep water terminals of the state are Jersey City and Hoboken.

  • long, beginning at Jersey City and passing through Newark, Bloomfield, Paterson, Little Falls, Boonton, Rockaway, Dover, Port Oram, Lake Hopatcong, Hackettstown and Washington to Phillipsburg on the Delaware; it is practically in two sections, one east and the other west of Lake Hopatcong (Sussex and Morris counties; about 928 ft.

  • (leased to the Central Railroad of New Jersey), which follows the Lehigh river to Coalport (Carbon county, Pennsylvania), penetrating the coal regions of Pennsylvania.

  • The chief cities in 1910 were Newark (pop. 347,469), Jersey City (267,779), Paterson (1 2 5,600), Trenton (96,815), Camden (94,538) and Hoboken (70,324).

  • New Jersey has a court of pardons composed of the governor, chancellor and the six " lay " j udges of the court of errors and appeals, and the concurrence of a majority of its members, of whom the governor shall be one, is necessary to grant a pardon, commute a sentence or remit a fine.

  • The judges of the several New Jersey courts are appointed by the governor with the consent of the Senate for a term of years, usually five to seven.

  • But the schools of colonial New Jersey, especially the private schools, were usually taught by incompetent masters, and many children were permitted to grow up without any schooling whatever.

  • Funds for the support of the public schools are derived from various sources: (1) the interest on the " surplus revenue " ($760,670), deposited with New Jersey by the Federal government in 1836; (2) the income from the state school fund, consisting largely of receipts from the sale and rental of riparian lands 1; (3) a state school tax; (4) a direct appropriation by the legislature to supplement the school tax, so that the two combined will form a sum equal to a tax of two and three-fourths mills on each dollar of taxable property; and (5) local taxes.

  • Among the denominational institutions are the Theological Seminary (Presbyterian) at Princeton; the Drew Theological Seminary (Methodist Episcopal) at Madison; Seton Hall College (Roman Catholic), at South Orange; St Peter's College (Roman Catholic) at Jersey City; St Benedict's College (Roman Catholic) at Newark; the German Theological School of Newark 1 The state's title to its riparian lands was established, after a long controversy, in 1870 in the case of Stevens v.

  • There is no institution for the blind, but the state pays the expenses of blind children who are sent from New Jersey to the New York State School for the Blind.

  • A State Board of Children's Guardians, with an office in Jersey City, cares for destitute children.

  • Toward corporations the policy of New Jersey has always been liberal; there is no limit fixed either to capitalization or to bonded indebtedness; the tax rate, as already indicated, is lower for large than for small corporations; and so many large combinations of capital have been incorporated under the laws of the state that it is sometimes called " ` the home of the trusts."

  • For the fiscal year 1907 the fees collected from corporations by the secretary of state amounted to $204,454, the receipts from the tax on corporations other than railways amounted to $2,584,363.60, and the receipts from the tax on railway corporations were $807,780.4 It is the revenue from these sources that has enabled New Jersey to dispense almost entirely with the general property tax for state purposes.

  • Bones and implements have been found in the Quaternary gravels at Trenton, which have been held by some authorities to prove the presence of Palaeolithic man; but the earliest inhabitants of New Jersey of whom there is any certain record were the Lenni-Lennape or Delaware Indians, a branch of the Algonquian family.

  • For the extinction of all Indian titles the legislature of New Jersey in 1832 appropriated $2000, and since that date almost every vestige of Indian occupation has disappeared.

  • The first authenticated visit of a European to what is now New Jersey was made under French authority by Giovanni da Verrazano, a Florentine navigator, who in the spring of 1524 sailed within Sandy Hook and dropped anchor in the waters of upper New York Bay.

  • A trading hut built at Paulus Hook in 1633 was the beginning of the present Jersey City.

  • Upon the subsequent history of New Jersey the attempts of Holland and Sweden at colonization had very little influence.

  • As early as 1634 a patent had been issued to Sir Edmund Plowden, appointing him governor over New Albion, a tract of land including the present states of New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland and Pennsylvania.

  • The few inhabitants of what is now New Jersey acquiesced in the new order.

  • To this tract the name of Nova Caesarea, or New Jersey, was given, as the same name had been given in a patent to Carteret issued in 1650, to " a certain island and adjacent islets" near Virginia, in America, which were never settled - in honour of Carteret, who governed the isle of Jersey in1643-1651and there entertained Prince Charles during his exile from England.

  • As late as 1784, Charles Varlo, an Englishman who had purchased one-third of the grant from the heirs of Sir Edmund Plowden, came to New Jersey and sought to substantiate his claim.

  • In the meantime Governor Nicolls of New York, ignorant of the grant to Berkeley and Carteret, had approved certain Indian sales of land to settlers within New Jersey, and had confirmed their titles to tracts in what later became Elizabethtown, Middletown and Shrewsbury.

  • Moreover, when he had learned that the duke had parted with New Jersey he convinced him that it was a great loss, and in the effort to save what was possible, Staten Island was taken from the proprietors on the plea that one arm of the Hudson flowed along its western border.

  • Another change was impending, however, and in August 1673, when a Dutch fleet appeared off Staten Island, New Jersey for a second time became a part of New Netherland.

  • The crown lawyers decided that the rights of the proprietors of New York and New Jersey had been extinguished by the conquest, and that by treaty the lands had been reconveyed, not to the proprietors, but to the king.

  • accordingly wrote a letter confirming the title and power of Carteret in the eastern half of New Jersey.

  • 1687), a Quaker merchant.3 On the 29th of June the duke of York received a new patent similar to that of 1664, and he at once (on the 28th and 29th of July) confirmed Carteret in all his rights in that portion of New Jersey N.

  • Sir George Carteret again sent over his kinsman Philip Carteret to be governor of the eastern part of New Jersey, and the two governors arrived in October 1674 in the same ship. A disagreement arose as to 3 It has been supposed that Fenwicke and Byllynge intended to establish in America a retreat for those who desired religious and political freedom.

  • This was the first permanent English settlement in this part of New Jersey.

  • The Quakers' title to West Jersey, however, still bore the cloud resulting from the Dutch conquest, and the duke of York had desired to recover all of his original grant to Berkeley and Carteret ever since Governor Nicolls had protested against it.

  • A very liberal frame of government for West Jersey, drafted presumably by William Penn, and entitled " the Concessions and Agreements of the Proprietors, Freeholders and Inhabitants of West Jersey in America," was adopted in March 1677.

  • Fenwicke, after his release by Andros, endeavoured to re-establish a government at Salem with himself as " Lord and Chief Proprietor " of West Jersey, but the duke's officers further contested his claims and in 1682 Penn effected a peaceful settlement with him.

  • In East Jersey, after the return of Governor Carteret, there was a period of quiet, until the death of Sir George Carteret in 1680 gave the zealous Andros another chance to further the supposed interests of his ducal master.

  • Claiming jurisdiction over New Jersey by the terms of his commission, he issued a proclamation in March 1680 ordering Philip Carteret and his " pretended " officers to cease exercising jurisdiction within the duke's dominions unless he could show warrant.

  • To this Carteret made a spirited reply, and on the 30th of April a detachment of soldiers dragged the governor of East Jersey from his bed and carried him prisoner to New York.

  • When the assembly of East Jersey met in June, Andros appeared before it as governor and recommended such measures as he deemed advisable, but the deputies refused to pass them.

  • In 1686 Perth Amboy, the newly created port of East Jersey, became its seat of government.

  • showed an unyielding determination to annul the privileges of the colonies, and to unite New York, New Jersey and the New England colonies under a single government.

  • In order, therefore, to save their rights in the soil, the proprietors of East and West Jersey offered to surrender their claims to jurisdiction, and to this arrangement the king consented.

  • The seizure of Andros by the people of Boston in April 1689, following the news of the revolt in England against James II., gave the Jersey proprietors an opportunity to resume their rights, but the proprietary governments regained their former footing very slowly.

  • 1703) as governor of both East and West Jersey.

  • These disorders, and especially complaints against the Jerseys as centres of illegal trade, were brought to the attention of King William and his lawyers contended that as only the king could convey powers of government those exercised by the Jersey proprietors, derived as they were from the duke of York, were without sufficient warrant.

  • The proprietors of East Jersey had already offered to surrender their jurisdiction, in return for certain concessions by the royal government, but no action had been taken.

  • The provinces of East and West Jersey were then united under a government similar to that of the other royal provinces.

  • Until 1738 the governor of New York was also governor of New Jersey; after that date each colony had its own governor.

  • East Jersey had a fugitive slave law as early as 1675.

  • Between East and West Jersey certain political and religious differences developed.

  • In East Jersey, as in New England, the township became a vigorous element of local government; in West Jersey the county became the unit.

  • Important events in the period of royal government were the preaching of George Whitefield in 1739 and the following years, and the chartering of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) in 1746, and of Queen's (now Rutgers) College in 1766.

  • In 1774 occurred the " Greenwich Tea Party."' The last colonial assembly of New Jersey met in November 1775.

  • On the loth of September 1777 it was amended by the New Jersey legislature, the words "state" and "states" being substituted for the words " colony" (or " province") and " colonies."

  • Tories were active in New Jersey throughout the struggle; among them were bands known as " Pine Robbers," who hid in the pines or along the dunes by day and made their raids at night.

  • When Washington, in the autumn of 1776, was no longer able to hold the lower Hudson he retreated across New Jersey to the Delaware near Trenton and seizing every boat for miles up the river he placed his dispirited troops on the opposite side and left the pursuing army no means of crossing.

  • When the British had gained possession of Philadelphia, in September 1777, their communication between that city and the ocean through the Lower Delaware was obstructed on the New Jersey side by Fort Mercer, commanded by Colonel Christopher Greene, at Red Bank; three battalions of Hessians under Colonel Karl Emil Kurt von Donop attacked the fort on the 22nd of October, but they were repulsed with heavy loss.

  • Before daylight on the 19th of August 1779 was approaching, Major Henry Lee with a force of about 400 men surprised the British garrison at Paulus Hook, where Jersey City now stands, and, although sustaining a loss of 20 men, killed 50 of the garrison and took about 160 prisoners.

  • After the war New Jersey found its commercial existence threatened by New York and Philadelphia, and it was a feeling of weakness from this cause rather than any lack of state pride that caused the state to join in the movements for a closer Federal Union.

  • In 1786 New Jersey sent delegates to the Annapolis Convention, which was the forerunner of the Federal Convention at Philadelphia in the following year.

  • In the latter body, on the 15th of June, one of the New Jersey delegates, William Paterson (1745-1806), presented what was called the " New Jersey plan " of union, representing the wishes of the smaller states, which objected to representation in a national Congress being based on wealth or on population.

  • This merely federal plan, reported from a Conference attended by the delegates from Connecticut, New York and Delaware, as well as those from New Jersey (and by Luther Martin of Maryland), consisted of nine resolutions; the first was that " the Articles of Confederation ought to be so revised, corrected and enlarged as to render the federal Constitution adequate to the exigencies of government and the preservation of the Union "; and the actual " plan " was for a single legislative body, in which each state should be represented by one member, and which should elect the supreme court and have power to remove the executive (a Council), to lay taxes and import duties, to control commerce, and even, if necessary, to make requisitions for funds from the states.

  • The New Jersey plan left its impress in the provision of the Constitution (approved in the Convention on the 7th of July) for equal representation in the national Senate.

  • Excluding these five members from New Jersey the House of Representatives contained 119 Democrats and 118.

  • Whigs, so that the choice of a Whig speaker could be secured only by the seating of the five Whigs from New Jersey rather than their Democratic rivals.

  • A similar clause in the constitution of Massachusetts had been interpreted by the courts as an abolition of slavery, and an effort was made to have the same ruling applied in New Jersey, where the institution of slavery still existed.

  • The courts, however, declared that the clause in the constitution of New Jersey was a " general proposition," not applying " to man in his private, industrial or domestic capacity."

  • There were consequently a few vestiges of the slavery system in New Jersey until the adoption of the Thirteenth Amendment to the Federal Constitution.

  • In 1852 the Free-soil candidate for the presidency received only 350 votes in New Jersey; and in 1856 the Democratic candidate received a plurality of 18,605 votes, even.

  • During the Civil War New Jersey furnished 89,305 men for the Union cause and incurred extraordinary expenditures to the amount of $2,894,385.

  • Industrially the early part of the 19th century was marked in New Jersey by the construction of bridges and turnpikes, the utilization of water power for manufactures, and the introduction of steam motive power upon the navigable waters.

  • Material progress in New Jersey after the war is indicated by the construction of the Morris (1824-1836) and the Delaware & Raritan (1826-1838) canals, and the completion of its first railway, the Camden & Amboy, in 1834.

  • The Delaware & Raritan Canal Company and the Camden & Amboy Railroad Company, both chartered in 1830 and both monopolies,' had been practically consolidated in 1831; in 1836 these joint companies gained control of the Philadelphia & Trenton railway; in 1867 these " United New Jersey Railroad & Canal Companies " consolidated with the New Jersey Railroad & Transportation Company (which was opened in 1836 and controlled the important railway link between New Brunswick and Jersey City), and profits were to be divided equally between the four companies; and in 1871 these entire properties were leased for 999 years to the Pennsylvania Railroad Company.

  • This combination threatened to monopolize traffic, and it was opposed by the Central Railroad of New Jersey, the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, and a branch of the North Pennsylvania (from Jenkintown to Yardley; sometimes called the " national " or " air-line "), and by the general public; and in 1873 the state passed a general railway law giving other railways than the United New Jersey holdings of the Penn, In 1864 a bill was introduced in the Federal House of Representatives making the Camden & Atlantic (now the Atlantic City) railway and the Raritan & Delaware Bay (now a part of the Central of New Jersey) a post route between New York and Philadelphia and authorizing these railways to carry passengers and freight between New York and Philadelphia.

  • Thereupon the governor and legislature of New Jersey protested that such a measure was an infringement of the reserved rights of the state, since the state had contracted with the Camden & Amboy not to construct nor to authorize others to construct within a specified time any other railway across the state to be used for carrying passengers or freight between New York and Philadelphia.

  • In 1876 the " national " line was extended to Bound Brook (as the Delaware & Bound Brook) and this road, the North Pennsylvania & Central Railroad of New Jersey, were operated under a tripartite agreement as a through line between New York and Philadelphia; but in 1879 these three lines were leased for 99 0 years to the Philadelphia & Reading railway.

  • The governors of New Jersey have been as follows: Governors: Under The Proprietors Philip Carteret.1665-1672John Berry.1672-1673Anthony Colve2.1673-1674Governors of East Jersey and their Deputies.

  • Andrew Hamilton Jeremiah Basse Andrew Hamilton Governors of West Jersey and their Deputies.

  • Andrew Hamilton Under The Royal Government~ Governors of New York and New Jersey.

  • Governors of New Jersey only.

  • ' Jurisdiction only over New Jersey.

  • 177 and 301 of the United States Geological Survey; the Annual Reports and especially the Final Report of the New Jersey Geological Survey; and the Annual Reports of the New Jersey State Museum, the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station, and the New Jersey State Board of Agriculture.

  • The most important sources are: Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey (Archives of the State of New Jersey, 1st series), edited by W.

  • Nelson (26 vols., Newark, 1880-1903); Documents Relating to the Revolutionary History of the State of New Jersey (Archives of the State of New Jersey, 2nd series; 2 vols., Trenton, 1901-1903); and Acts of the General Assembly of New Jersey from 1703-1761, reprinted by A.

  • Spicer (Somerville, New Jersey, 1881).

  • P. Tanner, The Province of New Jersey (New York, 1908), the most thorough study of the period from 1664 to 1738; Samuel Smith's History of the Colony of Nova Caesarea, or New Jersey (Burlington, 1765; 2nd ed., Trenton, 1877), still one of the best accounts of the colonial period, and particularly valuable on account of its copious extracts from the sources, many of which are no longer accessible; see, also, William A.

  • Among the monographic contributions are Austin Scott's Influence of the Proprietors in Founding the State of New Jersey (Baltimore, 1885) and H.

  • Cooley's Study of Slavery in New Jersey (Baltimore, 1896).

  • Mellick, Story of an Old Farm; or, Life in New Jersey in the 18th Century (Somerville, New Jersey, 1889), full of interesting details; F.

  • Lee and others, New Jersey as a Colony and as a State (4 vols., with an additional biographical volume, New York, 1902, rather unevenly proportioned, and inaccurate as to details; W.

  • Mills, Historic Houses of New Jersey (Philadelphia, 1902); William Nelson, The New Jersey Coast in Three Centuries (2 vols., New York, 1902); Isaac S.

  • Mulford, Civil and Political History of New Jersey (Philadelphia, 1851); W.

  • Stryker, Official Register of the Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Revolutionary War (Trenton, 1872); W.

  • Sackett, Modern Battles of Trenton (Trenton, 1895), a political history of New Jersey from 1868 to 1894, dealing especially with the railway controversies; John E.

  • Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany (2 vols., New York, 1903-1906), containing data relating to the settlement and settlers of New York and New Jersey; R.

  • Field, The Provincial Courts of New Jersey; L.

  • C. Elmer, The Constitution and Government of New Jersey (vols.

  • of New Jersey Historical Society Collections, Newark, 1849, 1872); and David Murray, History of Education in New Jersey (No.

  • Lord Jersey assumed office on the 15th of January 1891, and a few weeks afterwards the conference to consider the question of federating the Australian colonies was held at Sydney, and the great strike, which at one time had threatened to paralyse the trade of the colony, came to an end.

  • Sir William Duff, who followed Lord Jersey as governor, died at Sydney in 1895, and was succeeded by Lord Hampden.

  • BURLINGTON, a city of Burlington county, New Jersey, U.S.A., on the E.

  • Doane, one of the first schools for girls to be established in the country, Van Rensselaer Seminary and the New Jersey State Masonic home.

  • In 1682 the assembly of West Jersey gave toBurlington "Matinicunk Island," above the town, "for the maintaining of a school for the education of youth"; re venues from a part of the island are still used for the support of the public schools, and the trust fund is one of the oldest for educational purposes in the United States.

  • Burlington was incorporated as a town in 1693 (re-incorporated, 1733), and became the seat of government of West Jersey.

  • On the union of East and West Jersey in 1702, it became one of the two seats of government of the new royal province, the meetings of the legislature generally alternating between Burlington and Perth Amboy, under both the colonial and the state government, until 1790.

  • In 1777 the New Jersey Gazette, the first newspaper in New Jersey, was established here; it was published (here and later in Trenton) until 1786, and was an influential paper, especially during the War of Independence.

  • In 1900, and for a long period preceding, Pittsburg ranked first among American cities in the manufacture of glass, but in 1905 it was outranked in this industry by Muncie, Indiana, Millville, New Jersey, and Washington, Pennsylvania; but in the district outside of the city limits of Pittsburg much glass is manufactured, so that the Pittsburg glass district is the greatest in the country, and there are large glass factories at Washington (18 m.

  • DANIEL MORGAN (1736-1802), American soldier, was born in Hunterdon county, New Jersey, in the winter of 1736, of Welsh ancestry.

  • In the summer of 1777 he was engaged in minor skirmishes in New Jersey, and early in September joined General Horatio Gates, then engaged in the campaign against General Burgoyne.

  • Most of the cattle are of the zebu or hump-backed variety, but there � are also two breeds - one large, the other resembling the Jersey cattle - which are straight-backed.

  • In 1757, on the death of President Burr, who five years before had married Edwards's daughter Esther, he reluctantly accepted the presidency of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), where he was installed on the 16th of February 1758.

  • He entered the Lutheran ministry, had charge of churches at New Germantown and Bedminster, New Jersey, and after 1772 of a church in Woodstock, Virginia, and there in 1775 raised the 8th Virginia (German) regiment, of which he was made colonel; in February 1 77 7 he became a brigadier-general in the Continental Army; and in September 1783 was breveted major-general.

  • With Orange, N.J., as his next principal residence, he became governor of New Jersey (1878-1881).

  • He retired in 1910, and was elected Democratic governor of New Jersey.

  • Nyack is served by the Northern Railroad of New Jersey (a branch of the Erie), and is connected by ferry with Tarrytown, nearly opposite, on the eastern bank of the Hudson.

  • The first grant of land within the present limits of Nyack was made by Governor Philip Carteret, of New Jersey, to one Claus Jansen, in 1671, but the permanent settlement apparently dates from about 1700.

  • He had some connexion with the Channel Islands, and resided for some time in Jersey; and he held livings in Yorkshire and in Leicestershire before he became archdeacon of Winchester in 1387.

  • NEW BRUNSWICK, a city and the county-seat of Middlesex county, New Jersey, U.S.A., on the Raritan river, at the terminus of the Delaware & Raritan canal, about 23 m.

  • Deacons are also admitted to a deciding voice in every diocese but New Jersey, where they may speak but not vote.

  • On Franklin's recommendation he was made a doctor of divinity by the university of Edinburgh in 1765; he had received a master's degree at Harvard in 1754, and was made doctor of divinity in 1780 by Dartmouth and in 1784 by the college of New Jersey (now Princeton University) .

  • The legislatures of New Jersey and Massachusetts distributed it in the schools at the expense of the states.

  • of New York city by rail, and at the intersection of the boundary lines of the states of New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

  • to the S., John Witherspoon (1722-1794), president of the,College of New Jersey (Princeton), and Charles Nisbet (1736-1804), president of Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, were born.

  • Removing after 1768 to Bordentown, New Jersey, he became a member of the council of that colony in 1774.

  • JAMES FENIMORE COOPER (1789-1851), American novelist, was born at Burlington, New Jersey, on the 15th of September 1789.

  • Howe in command, determined to abandon Philadelphia, captured in the previous year, and move his troops direct to New York through New Jersey.

  • Washington, who had spent the winter at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, and had materially recruited his army, immediately marched to intercept the British, and overtook them near Monmouth Court House (now Freehold), New Jersey, on the 28th of June 1778.

  • ELIZABETH, a city and the county-seat of Union county, New Jersey, U.S.A., on Elizabeth river, Newark Bay, and Arthur Kill, 10 M.

  • of Jersey City.

  • It is served by the Pennsylvania, the Lehigh Valley and the Central of New Jersey railways.

  • In the home of the Rev. Jonathan Dickinson (1688-1747), its first president, the first sessions of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) were held in 1747, but immediately afterwards the college removed to Newark.

  • Hatfield,History of Elizabeth, New Jersey(New York, 1868).

  • ROBERT WACE (1100?-1175?), Anglo-Norman chronicler, was born in Jersey.

  • He was long conspicuous in the State Republican organization, was chairman of the New Jersey State Republican Committee from 1880 to 1890, became a member in 5884 of the Republican National Committee, and was the delegate-at-large from New Jersey to five successive Republican national nominating conventions.

  • He served in the New Jersey Assembly in 1873-1874, and in the New Jersey Senate in 1877-1882, and was speaker of the Assembly in 1874 and president of the Senate in 1881 and 1882.

  • Her son graduated at Harvard in 1854, worked in an iron mill in Trenton, New Jersey, for a few months in 1855, spent two years abroad, and in 1858-1860 was local treasurer of the Burlington & Missouri river railroad.

  • In1871-1873he was professor of historical theology at Drew Theological Seminary, Madison, New Jersey, of which he was president from 1873 till 1880, when he was made a bishop. He died at Bethesda, Maryland, on the 4th of May 1903.

  • RICHARD WATSON GILDER (1844-1909), American editor and poet, was born in Bordentown, New Jersey, on the 8th of February 1844, a brother of Willia.m Henry Gilder (1838-1900), the Arctic explorer.

  • After three years (1865-1868) on the Newark, New Jersey, Daily Advertiser, he founded, with Newton Crane, the Newark Morning Register.

  • SOUTH AMBOY, a city of Middlesex county, New Jersey, U.S.A., on Raritan Bay at the mouth of the Raritan river, about 27 M.

  • It is served by the Pennsylvania, the Central of New Jersey, and the Raritan River railways.

  • He was detained successively in the Tower, in Jersey, in Guernsey and in Dover Castle.

  • The duel was fought at Weehawken on the Jersey shore of the Hudson opposite the City of New York.

  • In 1917 he was appointed state engineer of New Jersey, but after America's entrance into the World War he was released to serve as manager of the Emergency Fleet Corporation.

  • PERTH AMBOY, a city and port of entry of Middlesex county, New Jersey, U.S.A., at the mouth of the Raritan river, on Raritan Bay and Staten Island Sound, about 15 m.

  • It is served by the Pennsylvania, Lehigh Valley, Central of New Jersey and Staten Island Rapid Transit railways, and by boats to New York City.

  • In the city still stands Franklin Palace (erected in 1764-1774), the home of William Franklin (1729-1813), a natural son of Benjamin Franklin and the last royal governor of New Jersey.

  • From 1686 until the end of the proprietary government in 1702 Perth Amboy was the capital of the province of East Jersey, and during the period of royal government the general assembly and supreme court of New Jersey met alternately here and at Burlington.

  • He entered a railway office and had a successful business career, becoming general manager of the Detroit United Railways and the Public Service Railways of New Jersey.

  • Cynthia would attend the New Jersey wedding—thank God for Visa—while Fred and Dean would hold down Bird Song.

  • A Chicago update—nothing new—followed a New Jersey wedding plans update.

  • That's on the Delaware river—on the Jersey border.

  • Strictly a temporary pad—home's in Jersey.

  • Dean had had no direct contact with Cynthia Byrne after their acrimonious separation at the Jersey shore restaurant's parking lot.

  • auto in insurance jersey new quote Crelia Insurance & Financial Services today the company use of these of which have customer this is.

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  • More Lobster lunch on Sark Experience Jersey's stunning unspoiled coastline in style.

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  • Children's Organic Summer Top £ 8.99 US$17.53 E13.93 Short sleeve organic jersey cotton top.

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  • depart from the airport have been canceled, with the exclusion of flights from Jersey.

  • Sometimes he'd bring a pillow and blanket even tho it was 100 degrees at the Glen Ridge, New Jersey local drive-in.

  • Instead he was actively seeking points in pursuit of the green jersey awarded to the best sprinter, which narrowly eluded him last year.

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