Imagination sentence examples

imagination
  • She was letting her imagination run wild again.

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  • She was letting her imagination run wild.

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  • She now tells stories in which the imagination plays an important part.

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  • It was beyond his imagination that she would grant him that which he wanted!

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  • My imagination got the better of me and I took it out on you.

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  • Imagination could only go so far, though, and she ended up crying herself to sleep.

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  • Was it her imagination, or was it the man who drove the black car?

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  • Imagination boggles at the vileness of this effect.

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  • We were cowboy and Indian kids, living in an imagination paradise of rocks and trees and dirt, with her leading the way.

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  • His imagination would be worse than what Rob actually said.

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  • Fueled by her own imagination, she took a swing at him with the broom.

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  • It was probably her overactive imagination again.

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  • This work struck de Lesseps's imagination, and gave him the idea of piercing the African isthmus.

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  • In imagination I have bought all the farms in succession, for all were to be bought, and I knew their price.

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  • She was letting her imagination work overtime again.

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  • The black lady's tone left no imagination to what she thought of the latest deadbeat mom in her office.

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  • All that we do know certainly is that she has a good memory and imagination and the faculty of association.

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  • And suddenly, at this thought of death, a whole series of most distant, most intimate, memories rose in his imagination: he remembered his last parting from his father and his wife; he remembered the days when he first loved her.

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  • I never could understand the fondness some people have for confusing their minds by dwelling on mystical books that merely awaken their doubts and excite their imagination, giving them a bent for exaggeration quite contrary to Christian simplicity.

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  • With mournful pleasure she now lingered over these images, repelling with horror only the last one, the picture of his death, which she felt she could not contemplate even in imagination at this still and mystic hour of night.

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  • Maybe it was the near-inaudible buzz or the rain on the roof, or my imagination, by I actually napped, for about twenty minutes.

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  • Now that was a good example of her imagination working over time.

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  • What she drew from the guitar would have had no meaning for other listeners, but in her imagination a whole series of reminiscences arose from those sounds.

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  • And because some little snot-nose has a vivid imagination, or thinks it's fun to tell whoppers, I'm supposed to go traipsing off in some god-forsaken mine on the taxpayer's expense on a treasure hunt?

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  • Heat flared within her body, and her imagination painted an image of the warrior before her without the clothing.

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  • For a moment she let her imagination dwell on the feel of that lean body against hers.

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  • The recital of their travels fired the youthful imagination of young Marco Polo, son of Nicolo, and he set out for the court of Kublai Khan, with his father and uncle, in 1265.

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  • The judo pants rode low enough on his hips to tease her imagination of what lay just a couple inches below the seam.

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  • The figure of Alexander naturally impressed itself upon the imagination of the world which his career had shaken.

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  • She vividly pictured herself as Prince Andrew's wife, and the scenes of happiness with him she had so often repeated in her imagination, and at the same time, aglow with excitement, recalled every detail of yesterday's interview with Anatole.

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  • As, however, these machines impressed the popular imagination, they naturally figure largely in the traditions about him.

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  • But no power of imagination can conceive an acknowledged right of private war in Rome, Venice or Bern.

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  • Wild imagination, listening to too many stories, or maybe because I have the ranch.

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  • For power and range of imagination, for freshness and vividness of conception, for truth and originality of presentation, few Roman poets can compare with him when he is at his best.

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  • The amount of it is, the imagination give it the least license, dives deeper and soars higher than Nature goes.

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  • Once again she had let her imagination carry her into misery.

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  • She read widely though unsystematically, studying philosophy in Aristotle, Leibnitz, Locke and Condillac, and feeding her imagination with Rene and Childe Harold.

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  • The imagination of a lonely girl reaching out for someone — something.

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  • How my childish imagination glowed with the splendour of their enterprise!

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  • I wished to meditate, but instead my imagination pictured an occurrence of four years ago, when Dolokhov, meeting me in Moscow after our duel, said he hoped I was enjoying perfect peace of mind in spite of my wife's absence.

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  • Napoleon rode on, dreaming of the Moscow that so appealed to his imagination, and "the bird restored to its native fields" galloped to our outposts, inventing on the way all that had not taken place but that he meant to relate to his comrades.

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  • Maybe she was letting her imagination get the better of her.

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  • The story of the adoption of Moses by the Egyptian princess appealed to later imagination (Josephus,.

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  • Not one of the innumerable speeches addressed to the Emperor that he had composed in his imagination could he now recall.

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  • Thus passed several years; he was still young, but his new mode of life produced its effects on a man of his imagination and saintly piety.

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  • Mais cette imagination est bien eloignee de la nature des choses.

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  • Occasionally amid these memories temptations of the devil would surge into her imagination: thoughts of how things would be after his death, and how her new, liberated life would be ordered.

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  • Thoughts that had not entered her mind for years--thoughts of a life free from the fear of her father, and even the possibility of love and of family happiness--floated continually in her imagination like temptations of the devil.

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  • As in children, imagination and the senses prevailed in those men of the past.

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  • The very fine torso of Athena in the Ecole des Beaux Arts at Paris, which has unfortunately lost its head, may perhaps best serve to help our imagination in reconstructing a Pheidian original.

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  • Valentine, which was published in the same year, indicated that it was but the first chapter in a life of endless adventures, and that the imagination which turned the crude facts into poetry, and the fancy which played about them like a rainbow, were inexhaustible.

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  • Every day in imagination I made a trip round the world, and I saw many wonders from the uttermost parts of the earth--marvels of invention, treasuries of industry and skill and all the activities of human life actually passed under my finger tips.

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  • It was a ridiculous thought and she was letting her imagination run wild.

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  • In his imagination he appointed days for assemblies at the palace of the Tsars, at which Russian notables and his own would mingle.

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  • Was Edith's vivid imagination working overtime or had Jerome Shipton managed to slip by Janet O'Brien and invade his wife's room?

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  • Now and then his attention wandered from the book and the Square and he formed in imagination a new plan of life.

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  • Maybe it was her imagination, but it felt like he squeezed her hand – ever so slightly.

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  • Kids have a strong imagination.

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  • He worked hard at his book on refraction, and dissected the heads of animals in order to explain imagination and memory, which he considered physical processes.'

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  • Examining next what immediately follows the knowledge of pure intellect, he will pass in review all the other means of knowledge, and will find that they are two (or three), the imagination and the senses (and the memory).

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  • In the quiet of a country town, far removed from actual contact with painful scenes, but on the edge of the whirlwind raised by the Fugitive Slave Bill, memory and imagination had full scope, and she wrote for serial publication in The National Era, an anti-slavery paper of Washington, D.C., the story of "Uncle Tom's Cabin; or, Life among the Lowly."

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  • " I can say with truth," he writes to the princess Elizabeth, 9 " that the principle which I have always observed in my studies, and which I believe has helped me most to gain what, knowledge I have, has been never to spend beyond a very few hours daily in thoughts which occupy the imagination, and a very few hours yearly in those which occupy the understanding, and to give all the rest of my time to the relaxation of the senses and the repose of the mind."

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  • While listening to these love stories his own love for Natasha unexpectedly rose to his mind, and going over the pictures of that love in his imagination he mentally compared them with Ramballe's tales.

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  • The organizing genius of Dupleix everywhere overshadowed the native imagination, and the star of Clive had scarcely yet risen above the horizon.

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  • To gratify his own imagination or strike the imagination of the world he took his army over the Danube and burnt a settlement of the Getae upon the other side.

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  • What we're doing together blows my imagination so I'll devote as much time and energy as I can possible muster to optimizing our results.

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  • It was a kind of fiction, a work of the imagination only, so far as he was concerned.

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  • It was the most comical shapeless thing, this improvised doll, with no nose, mouth, ears or eyes--nothing that even the imagination of a child could convert into a face.

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  • My imagination carried me so far that I even had the refusal of several farms--the refusal was all I wanted--but I never got my fingers burned by actual possession.

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  • imagination roam free, without restrictions?

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  • Using your imagination and creativity is the best way to get started.

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  • boggles the imagination.

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  • flits past on the edge of my imagination.

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  • Ostensibly a solemn revenge for the burning of Greek temples by Xerxes, it has been justified as a symbolical act calculated to impress usefully the imagination of the East, and condemned as a senseless and vainglorious work of destruction.

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  • It was a bitter mortification to Alexander, before whose imagination new vistas had just opened out eastwards, where there beckoned the unknown world of the Ganges and its splendid kings.

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  • Certain features - the high physical courage, the impulsive energy, the fervid imagination - stand out clear; beyond that disagreement begins.

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  • Her mind is so filled with the beautiful thoughts and ideals of the great poets that nothing seems commonplace to her; for her imagination colours all life with its own rich hues.

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  • It may be vain to ask why the imagination will not be reconciled to flesh and fat.

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  • And now he again seemed to be saying the same words to her, only in her imagination Natasha this time gave him a different answer.

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  • Self-emancipation even in the West Indian provinces of the fancy and imagination--what Wilberforce is there to bring that about?

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  • When one man has reduced a fact of the imagination to be a fact to his understanding, I foresee that all men at length establish their lives on that basis.

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  • To my imagination it retained throughout the day more or less of this auroral character, reminding me of a certain house on a mountain which I had visited a year before.

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  • Perceiving further, that in order to understand these relations I should sometimes have to consider them one by one, and sometimes only to bear them in mind or embrace them in the aggregate, I thought that, in order the better to consider them individually, I should view them as subsisting between straight lines, than which I could find no objects more simple, or capable of being more distinctly represented to my imagination and senses; and on the other hand that, in order to retain them in the memory or embrace an aggregate of many, I should express them by certain characters, the briefest possible."

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  • In her imagination he was that terrible moaning personified.

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  • These forms are more agreeable to the fancy and imagination than fresco paintings or other the most expensive furniture.

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  • Mademoiselle Bourienne was often touched to tears as in imagination she told this story to him, her seducer.

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  • In imagination I can hear Homer singing, as with unsteady, hesitating steps he gropes his way from camp to camp--singing of life, of love, of war, of the splendid achievements of a noble race.

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  • When one enters the portals of learning, one leaves the dearest pleasures--solitude, books and imagination--outside with the whispering pines.

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  • Pierre stood pressed against the wall of a charred house, listening to that noise which mingled in his imagination with the roll of the drums.

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  • He was a man of vivid, but disordered, imagination, without possessing any conception of statesmanship. In 1887 a statue of the tribune was erected at the foot of the Capitoline Hill in Rome.

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  • Her own words bounced off the wall and came back as a flash of memory and imagination.

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  • Besides these pictures of sacred subjects, he made some designs for Dalziel's Bible, which for force of imagination excel the paintings.

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  • Use all your imagination to overcome the difficulties, act by service, flattery or even brute force.

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  • captivated the imagination of millions of children.

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  • captured the imagination of the world's travelers.

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  • cartographer's fertile imagination.

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  • figment of the media imagination.

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  • It is most difficult to appreciate aright this man of fervid imagination, of powerful and persistent convictions, of unbated honesty and love of truth, of keen insight into the errors (as he thought them) of his time, of a merciless will to lay bare these errors and to reform the abuses to which they gave rise, who in an instant offends us by his boasting, his grossness, his want of selfrespect.

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  • The soul, located in the ventricles of the brain, is affected by the temperament of the individual; the dry temperament produces acute intelligence; the moist, memory; the hot, imagination.

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  • He had pictured each of those young ladies as almost all honest-hearted young men do, that is, as a possible wife, adapting her in his imagination to all the conditions of married life: a white dressing gown, his wife at the tea table, his wife's carriage, little ones, Mamma and Papa, their relations to her, and so on--and these pictures of the future had given him pleasure.

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  • Those dreadful moments he had lived through at the executions had as it were forever washed away from his imagination and memory the agitating thoughts and feelings that had formerly seemed so important.

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  • Alex always said she had a good imagination.

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  • Not that she could deny a vivid imagination.

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  • There was only one thing that she was sure of, and that was the fact that she had an overactive imagination.

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  • She shook her head to remove the cobwebs of imagination.

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  • Was there something else, or was it her imagination?

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  • Did you read this somewhere or do you just have a vivid imagination?

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  • Nice story, but I think you have an overactive imagination.

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  • She's more than a body, and the things you can do are only limited by your imagination.

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  • The svelte model wore towering boots and a one- piece cat suit that left nothing to the imagination.

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  • And there are 'teddy' guys, you know, guys who drool over those short little outfits that leave nothing to the imagination.

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  • The woman has a vivid imagination.

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  • He tasted only ambrosia, sweet beyond imagination.

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  • The woman certainly had a vocabulary, and an imagination.

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  • How anyone could not want a baby was beyond her imagination.

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  • She was dressed in leggings and a snug T-shirt, neither of which left much to the imagination.

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  • From a sick-bed, from which he never rose, he conducted this work with surprising energy, and there composed those poems, too few in number, but immortal in the English language, such as the "Song of the Shirt" (which appeared anonymously in the Christmas number of Punch, 1843), the "Bridge of Sighs" and the "Song of the Labourer," which seized the deep human interests of the time, and transported them from the ground of social philosophy into the loftier domain of the imagination.

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  • The bill, however, fell absolutely dead, not because it was not a good bill, but because the movement out of which it arose had not popular initiative, and therefore failed to reach the popular imagination.

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  • 1873, p. 31 I) which describes" responsibility " or (sic) " moral desert in the vulgar sense" as " horrid figments of the imagination."

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  • It had a national history which left its impress upon the popular imagination, and sundry fragments of tradition reveal the pride which the patriot felt in the past.

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  • 6 The situation was one which lent itself to the imagination.

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  • A correct sense of proportion and the faculty of seizing upon the dominant factors in an historical problem are the result partly of the possession of certain natural gifts in which many individuals and some nations are conspicuously wanting, partly of general knowledge of the working of the economic and political institutions of the period we are studying, partly of what takes the place of practical experience in relation to modern problems, namely, detailed acquaintance with different kinds of original sources and the historical imagination by which we can realize the life and the ideals of past generations.

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  • In the popular imagination he seemed to be the only possible guarantor of victory abroad and order at home.

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  • I am but the magistrate of the republic. I merely act upon the imagination of the nation.

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  • Mr. Churchill had shown enormous vigour, industry, imagination and patriotism; but insufficient judgment and discretion.

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  • Probably the prices of the more distant "futures" are determined in a higher degree by farreaching imagination than the prices of nearer futures.

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  • While a new spirit which compares and tolerates thus sprang from the Crusades, the large sphere of new knowledge and experience which they gave brought new material at once for scientific thought and poetic imagination.

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  • Wagner's choice of subjects had from the outset shown an imagination far above that of any earlier librettist; yet he had begun with stories which could attract ordinary minds, as he dismally realized when the libretto of Der fliegende Hollander so pleased the Parisian wire-pullers that it was promptly set to music by one of their friends.

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  • How its splendour impressed the imagination may be seen from the stories of the Arabian Nights.

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  • His chief defects as a historian are want of imagination and an undignified familiarity of style, which, however, at least preserves his history from the dulness by which lack of imagination is usually accompanied.

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  • His earliest publications, beginning with A Syllabus of Plane Algebraical Geometry (1860) and The Formulae of Plane Trigonometry (1861), were exclusively mathematical; but late in the year 1865 he published, under the pseudonym of "Lewis Carroll," Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, a work that was the outcome of his keen sympathy with the imagination of children and their sense of fun.

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  • There is a touch of Byron, Swinburne and even of Schopenhauer in many of his rubais, which clearly proves that the modern pessimist is by no means a novel creature in the realm of philo- sophic thought and poetical imagination.

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  • The freshness of the new field which was opened up to the imagination - so full of vivid lights and shadows, light-hearted fun, grinding hardship, stirring adventure, heroic action, warm friendships, bitter hatreds - was in exhilarating contrast to the world of the historical romancer and the fashionable novelist, to which the mind of the general reader was at that date given over.

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  • His powerful scientific imagination enabled him to realize that all the points of a wavefront originate partial waves, the aggregate effect of which is to reconstitute the primary disturbance at the subsequent stages of its advance, thus accomplishing its propagation; so that each primary undulation is the envelope of an indefinite number of secondary undulations.

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  • One of the fragments may again be broken, and again two bipolar magnets will be produced; and the operation may be repeated, at least in imagination, till we arrive at molecular magnitudes and can go no farther.

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  • Most of his memoirs are masterpieces - full of original methods, profound ideas and far-reaching imagination.

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  • The district in dispute was the site of the fabled Lake of Parima and the Golden City of Manoa, the search for which in the early days of European settlement attracted so many adventurous expeditions, and which fascinated the imagination of Raleigh and drew him to his doom.

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  • A lack of imagination and of the philosophic spirit prevented him from penetrating or drawing characters, but his analytical gift, joined to persevering toil and honesty of purpose enabled him to present a faithful account of ascertained facts and a satisfactory and lucid explanation of political and economic events.

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  • But, since those universals, so far as they are called genera and species, cannot be perceived by any one in their purity without the admixture of imagination, Plato maintained that they existed and could be beheld beyond the things of sense, to wit, in the divine mind.

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  • Foremost among epic poets, though not equally successful as a dramatist, was Mihaly Vorbsmarty (q.v.), who, belonging also to the close of the last period, combines great power of imagination with elegance of language.

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  • But by far the most prolific and talented novelist that Hungary can boast of is Maurus Jokai (q.v.), whose power of imagination and brilliancy of style, no less than his true representations of Hungarian life and character, have earned for him a European reputation.

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  • Of these one of the most notable is Cyril Horvath, whose treatises published in the organs of the academy display a rare freedom and comprehensiveness of imagination.

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  • He is generally credited with having fostered the splendid vision of a restored empire that now began to fill the imagination of the young emperor, who is said to have confirmed the papal claims to eight counties in the Ancona march.

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  • A third hypothesis is that advanced by Karl Rieder (Der Gottesfreund von Oberland, Innsbruck, 1905), who thinks that not even Merswin himself wrote any of the literature, but that his secretary and associate Nicholas of Lowen, head of the House of St John at Griinenworth, the retreat founded by Merswin for the circle, worked over all the writings which emanated from different members of the group but bore no author's names, and to glorify the founder of the house attached Merswin's name to some of them and out of his imagination created "the Friend of God from the Oberland," whom he named as the writer of the others.

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  • James was not a mere tyrant and bigot, as the popular imagination speedily assumed him to be.

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  • Probably he found in his calmness of temperament, even in his want of imagination, a sense of rest and of exemption from the disturbing influences of life; while in his physical philosophy he found both an answer to the questions which perplexed him and an inexhaustible stimulus to his intellectual curiosity.

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  • In retirement she could devote herself wholly to art and science, and the opportunity of astonishing the world by the unique spectacle of a great queen, in the prime of life, voluntarily resigning her crown, strongly appealed to her vivid imagination.

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  • Whatever other gifts Comte may have had - and he had many of the rarest kind, - poetic imagination was not among them, any more than poetic or emotional expression was among them.

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  • If so, no Utopia has ever yet been presented in a style so little calculated to stir the imagination, to warm the feelings, to soothe the insurgency of the reason.

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  • The rich pastoral scenery of this part of Lincolnshire influenced the imagination of the boy, and is plainly reflected in all his early poetry, although it has now been stated with authority that the localities of his subject-poems, which had been ingeniously identified with real brooks and granges, were wholly imaginary.

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  • FitzGerald very justly attributed the landscape character of Tennyson's genius to the impress left on his imagination by "old Lincolnshire, where there were not only such good seas, but also such fine hill and dale among the wolds."

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  • It colours all his writings, and is intimately connected with some of the most characteristic attributes of his mind, a quick sympathetic imagination, a fine feeling for local differences, and a scientific instinct for seizing the sequences of cause and effect.

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  • He was too much under the sway of feeling and concrete imagination to be capable of great things in abstract thought.

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  • Provost Robertson belonged to the Clan Donachie, and by this marriage the robust and business-like qualities of the Lowlander were blended with the poetic imagination, the sensibility and fire of the Gael.

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  • He was a man happy in his ancestry; he inherited the dignity, the reserve, the keen and vivid intellect, and the picturesque imagination of the French Huguenot, though they came to him chastened and purified by generations of Puritan discipline exercised under the gravest ecclesiastical disabilities, and of culture maintained in the face of exclusion from academic privileges.

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  • He had the imagination that invested with personal being and ethical qualities the most abstruse notions.

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  • the delusion that nature as represented in the classical pictures (bunjingwa) of China and Japan exists only in the artists imagination.

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  • The idea that a nonprofessional could tread the hallowed ground of the stage did not enter any imagination.

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  • Therefore he took his motives from nature rather than from history; or, if he borrowed from the latter, what he selected was a scene, not the pains or the passions of its actors, Moreover, he never exhausted his subject, but was always careful to leave a wide margin for the imagination of the spectator.

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  • Francois de Rochefort, abbot of St Mesmin, instructed Francis and his sister Marguerite in Latin and history; Louise herself taught them Italian and Spanish; and the library of the château at Amboise was well stocked with romances of the Round Table, which exalted the lad's imagination.

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  • This was not entirely a work of imagination, its hero, the fortuneteller, being a real person.

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  • In 1725 appeared A New Voyage round the World, apparently entirely due to the author's own fertile imagination and extensive reading.

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  • In spite of the frequent overgrowth of a luxuriant imagination, the leading ideas of really primitive cosmogonies are extremely simple.

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  • Alone among the older writers he was endowed with the gifts of a poetical imagination and animated with enthusiasm for a great ideal.

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  • His lack of imagination and his narrow patriotism made him the natural leader of the reaction against the new Hellenic culture.

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  • The Roman oratory of the law courts had to deal not with petty questions of disputed property, of fraud, or violence, but with great imperial questions, with matters affecting the well-being of large provinces and the honour and safety of the republic; and no man ever lived who, in these respects, was better fitted than Cicero to be the representative of the type of oratory demanded by the condition of the later republic. To his great artistic accomplishment, perfected by practice and elaborate study, to the power of his patriotic, his moral, and personal sympathies, and his passionate emotional nature, must be added his vivid imagination and the rich and copious stream of his language, in which he had no rival among Roman writers or speakers.

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  • The higher poetical imagination had appeared only in Ennius, and had been called forth in him by sympathy with the grandeur of the national life and the great personal qualities of its representative men.

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  • His greatest contribution to poetic art consisted in the perfection which he attained in the phalaecian, the pure iambic, and the scazon metres, and in the ease and grace with which he used the language of familiar intercourse, as distinct from that of the creative imagination, of the rostra, and of the schools, to give at once a lifelike and an artistic expression to his feelings.

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  • All that the age longed for seemed to be embodied in a man who had both in his own person and by inheritance the natural spell which sways the imagination of the world.

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  • For that work the Augustan age, as the end of one great cycle of events and the beginning of another, was eminently suited, and a writer who, by his gifts of imagination and sympathy, was perhaps better fitted than any other man of antiquity for the task, and who through the whole of this period lived a life of literary leisure, was found to do justice to the subject.

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  • In the Eclogues and Georgics Virgil is the idealizing poet of the old simple and hardy life of Italy, as the imagination could conceive of it in an altered world.

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  • A poet of more strength and more powerful imagination.

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  • The value of the work consists not in any power of critical investigation or weighing of historical evidence but in the intense sympathy of the writer with the national ideal, and the vivid imagination with which under the influence of this sympathy he gives life to the events and personages, the wars and political struggles, of times remote from his own.

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  • The prose style of Rome, as a vehicle for the continuous narration of events coloured by a rich and picturesque imagination and instinct with dignified emotion, attained its perfection in Livy.

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  • It is written with the force and fervour of extreme youth and with the literary ambition of a race as yet new to the discipline of intellectual culture, and is characterized by rhetorical rather than poetical imagination.

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  • His Morte d'Arthur, printed by Caxton in 1485, epitomizes the rich mythology which Geoffrey's work had first called into life, and gave the Arthurian story a lasting place in the English imagination.

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  • Crystal pictures, however, are commonly dismissed as mere results of "imagination," a theory which, of course, is of no real assistance to psychology.

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  • Imagination >>

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  • If we go back in imagination to the beginning of the Victorian era and ask what was then known of the history of Ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia and Asia Minor, we find ourselves confronted with a startling paucity of knowledge.

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  • He made the world of men and things his study, learned to write his mother-tongue with idiomatic conciseness, and nourished his imagination on the masterpieces of the Romans.

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  • If matter is extended and fills space, the same mental operation by which we recognize the divisibility of space may be applied, in imagination at least, to the matter which occupies space.

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  • It was about this time that Grimm extolled Garrick as the first and only actor who came up to the demands of his imagination; and it was in a reply to a pamphlet occasioned by Garrick's visit that Diderot first gave expression to the views expounded in his Paradoxe sur le comedien.

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  • Though one of the worst of ministers, Bute was by no means the worst of men or the despicable and detestable person represented by the popular imagination.

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  • That these purely mechanical arrangements have any psychic, occult or predictive meaning is a fantastic imagination, which seems to have a peculiar attraction for certain types of mind, and as there can be no fundamental hypothesis of correlation, its discussion does not lie within the province of reason.

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  • In Jewish apocalypses especially, the imagination ran riot on the rank, classes and names of angels; and such works as the various books of Enoch and Deut.

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  • Seldom has any man united so many and such various gifts in his own person and carried them so easily - a playful wit, a vivid imagination, oratorical and literary eloquence and, above all, a profound knowledge of human nature both male and female, of every class and rank, from the king to the meanest citizen.

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  • The many floating and fragmentary notes of various dates that have found a place in the account of his reign in the book of Kings (q.v.) show how much Hebrew tradition was occupied with the monarch under whom the throne of Israel reached its highest glory; and that time only magnified in popular imagination the proportions of so striking a figure appears from the opinions entertained of him in subsequent writings.

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  • Peckham's zeal was not tempered by discernment, and he had little gift of sympathy or imagination.

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  • According to an alternative explanation, the heavenly Ram, placed as leader in front of the flock of the stars, merely embodied a spontaneous figure of the popular imagination.

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  • The best known of such works are Rules for the Conduct of Kings, translated from the Bali, and The Maxims of Phra Ruang, the national hero-king, on whose wonderful sayings and doings the imagination of Siamese youth is fed.

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  • Belief, however, just because it rests, as has been said, on custom and the influence of the imagination, survives such demonstrations.

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  • Passing to the more indirect influence of Laud on his times, we can observe a narrowness of mind and aim which separates him from a man of such high imagination and idealism as Strafford, however closely identified their policies may have been for the moment.

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  • Early distinguished by her excellence as a pianist, organist and singer, she also showed considerable ability in painting and illuminating; but a lively poetic imagination led her to the path of literature, and more especially to poetry, folk-lore and ballads.

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  • The cherub-images, where such occur, represent to the imagination the supernatural bearers of Yahweh's throne or chariot, or the guardians of His abode; the cherub-carvings at least symbolize His presence, and communicate some degree of His sanctity.

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  • At the same time various details (as comparison with the Book of Kings shows) are relatively old and, on a priori grounds, it is extremely unlikely that the unhistorical elements are necessarily due to deliberate imagination or perversion rather than to the development of earlier traditions.

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  • Great fluency and ease of diction, considerable warmth of imagination and moral sentiment, and a sharp eye to discover any oddity of style or violation of the accepted canons of good taste, made his criticisms pungent and effective.

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  • Besides this, all their evidence is but approximate, often only stating quantities to a half or quarter of the amount, and seldom nearer than 5 or 10%; hence they are entirely worthless for all the closer questions of the approximation or original identity of standards in different countries; and it is just in this line that the imagination of writers has led them into the greatest speculations, unchecked by accurate evidence of the original standards.

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  • If he will not allow his thought to be determined by experience, he falls a victim to his imagination.

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  • Still, as we cannot allow every fancy of the subjective reason to assert itself, we require some new and potent principle to keep the imagination within bounds.

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  • Only it could not describe the nature of this highest good; and therefore it had to abandon itself to imagination and aesthetic impressions.

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  • Palaeontology both borrows from and sheds light upon geology and other branches of the physical history of the earth, each of which, such as palaeogeography or palaeometeorology, is the more fascinating because of the large element of the unknown, the need for constructive imagination, the appeal to other branches of biological and physical investigation for supplementary evidence, and the necessity of constant comparison with the present aspects of nature.

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  • All the fossil plants and animals of every kind are brought from this continent into a great museum; the latitude, longitude and relative elevation of each specimen are precisely recorded; a corps of investigators, having the most exact and thorough training in zoology and botany, and gifted with imagination, will soon begin to restore the geographic and physiographic outlines of the continent, its fresh, brackish and salt-water confines, its seas, rivers and lakes, its forests, uplands, plains, meadows and swamps, also to a certain extent the cosmic relations of this continent, the amount and duration of its sunshine, as well as something of the chemical constitution of its atmosphere and the waters of its rivers and seas; they will trace the progressive changes which took place in the outlines of the continent and its surrounding oceans, following the invasion§ of the land by the sea and the re-emergence of the land and retreatal of the seashore; they will outline the shoals and deeps of its border seas, and trace the barriers which prevented intermingling of the inhabitants of the various provinces of the continent and the surrounding seas.

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  • The brilliant theories of the palaeobotanist, Oswald Heer, as to the extension of a sub-tropical climate to Europe and even to extreme northern latitudes in Tertiary time, which have appealed to the imagination and found their way so widely into literature, are now challenged by J.

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  • It is based upon revelation, which even at the present time is imparted to the individual, upon the more or less convincing force of the religious imagination and speculations of a few leaders, upon the voluntary and unstable grouping of the schools round the master.

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  • In these confused records of human imagination gone mad, we possess a veritable herbarium of all possible Gnostic ideas, which were once active and now rest peacefully side by side.

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  • Her whole history rests on the flimsiest authority, but her alleged prophecies have had from the 17th century until quite recently an extraordinary hold on the popular imagination.

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  • Grenfell and Hunt conclude therefore - " So great indeed are the divergences between this account and the extant and no doubt well-informed authorities with regard to the topography and ritual of the Temple that it is hardly possible to avoid the conclusion that much of the local colour is due to the imagination of the author who was aiming chiefly at dramatic effect and was not really well acquainted with the Temple.

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  • His imagination, thus kindled, animated him to those severe labours of which his great discoveries were the fruit.

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  • It is plain that fairies and Jan are practically identical, a curious proof of the uniformity of the working of imagination in peoples widely separated in race and religion.

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  • They were companions of St Columba and their efforts to convert the folk to Christianity seem to have impressed the popular imagination, for several islands bear the epithet "Papa" in commemoration of the preachers.

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  • This intellectual discovery requires sensation and retention of sensation; so that sense (ea-Ono-Ls) receives impressions, imagination (0avravLa) retains them as images, intellect (Van) generalizes the universal, and, when it is intelligence of essence, is always true.

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  • To merely subjective idealism, sense percepts differ from ideas of imagination in degree, not in kind; both belong to the individual mind.

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  • On the other hand, Osiris with Isis and Horus was everywhere honoured and popular, and while the artificer Ptah, the god of the great native capital of Egypt, made no appeal to the imagination, the Apis bull, an incarnation of Ptah, threw Ptah himself altogether into the shade in the popular estimation.

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  • The imagination and the breadth of view necessary to a statesman of the highest order were not part of his endowment, nor had he the power of working harmoniously with his subordinates.

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  • In mastery of prose language he has never been surpassed, when he chose to curb his florid imagination and his discursive eagerness of soul.

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  • The announcement of the first discoveries made through the application of spectroscopy, then called spectrum analysis, appealed to the imagination of the scientific world because it revealed a method of investigating the chemical nature of substances independently of their distances: a new science was thus created, inasmuch as chemical analysis could =rT?

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  • We wait, however, for the Epistles of his captivity at Rome to find the full meaning of the idea of the church dawning u p on his imagination.

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  • It appears to his imagination that the affinity of two atoms of hydrogen to one of oxygen, the attraction of the spermatozoon to the ovum, and the elective affinity of d pair of lovers are all alike due to sensation and will.

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  • It becomes necessary, therefore, to determine how far Fechner derived his psychophysics from experience, how far from fallacies of inference, from his romantic imagination and from his theosophic metaphysics, which indeed coloured his whole book on psychophysics.

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  • The first question he answered from his imagination by supposing that, while the external world is stimulus of the nervous process, the nervous process is the immediate stimulus of the sensation, and that the sensation increases by a constant fraction of the previous stimulus in the nervous system, when Weber's law proves only that it increases by a constant fraction of the previous stimulus in the external world.

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  • Further, on his own account, he identifies apperception with the process of attention, and regards it as an act necessary to the general formation of compound ideas, to all association of ideas, to all imagination and understanding.

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  • These beings are doubtless due in part to poetic imagination, but underlying this there may be a substratum of primitive religious belief.

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  • to work upon the imagination of the infidels by an expedition into Syria.

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  • To Plotinus God lies beyond sense and imagination: all the theologian can do is to point the way in which the thinker must travel.

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  • Henry's power impressed the imagination of his contemporaries, who credited him with aiming at the conquest of France and the acquisition of the imperial title.

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  • It is worth noticing that it was in this manner that this remarkable property of the circle, with which, in fact, abstract geometry was inaugurated, presented itself to the imagination of Dante: " 0 se del mezzo cerchio far si puote Triangol si, ch'un retto non avesse."

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  • The reiterated reports of the actual existence of a wandering being, who retained in his memory the details of the crucifixion, show how the idea had fixed itself in popular imagination and found its way into the 19th-century collections of German legends.

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  • This combination of eternal punishment with restless wandering has attracted the imagination of innumerable writers in almost all European tongues.

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  • The latter is one of his best essays on criticism, defining with perfect lucidity what is meant by "action" in works of the imagination, and distinguishing the action of the fable from that of the epic and the drama.

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  • In this case the carbonaceous beds-coal-seams-naturally appealed most strongly to the imagination, and the name is a good one, notwithstanding the fact that coal-seams occupy but a small fraction of the total thickness of the Carboniferous system; and although subsequent investigations have demonstrated the existence of coal in other geological formations, in none of these does it play so prominent a part.

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  • All our knowledge is but the sum of our conscious experience, and is consequently material for imagination.

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  • " Let us fix our attention out of ourselves as much as possible; let us chase our imagination to the heavens or to the utmost limits of the universe; we never really advance a step beyond ourselves, nor can conceive any kind of existence, but those perceptions which have appeared in that narrow compass.

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  • This is the universe of the imagination, nor have we any idea but what is there produced."

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  • These principles of association determine the imagination to combine ideas in various modes, and by this mechanical combination Hume, for a time, endeavoured to explain what are otherwise called judgments of relation.

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  • Evidently upon his and view of conscious experience, of the world of imagination, ti such infinite divisibility must be a fiction.

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  • Now this is an appeal to the general appearances of objects to the imagination or senses " (iv.

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  • geometry) much excels, both in universality and exactness, the loose judgments of the senses and imagination, yet [it] never attains a perfect precision and exactness " (i.

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  • The poet of reason rather than of imagination, he recognized his own province, and was rarely tempted to flights of fancy beyond his powers.

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  • Bancroft's imagination and enthusiasm were alike exuberant.

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  • The descriptions of South American scenery in Westward Ho!, of the Egyptian desert in Hypatia, of the North Devon scenery in Two Years Ago, are among the most brilliant pieces of wordpainting in English prose-writing; and the American scenery is even more vividly and more truthfully described when he had seen it only by the eye of his imagination than in his work At Last, which was written after he had visited the tropics.

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  • Under the influence of his disease, his senses became morbidly torpid, and his imagination morbidly active.

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  • These containedelaborateprovisions for supervising the universities and muzzling the press, laying down that no constitution inconsistent with the monarchical principle should be granted, and setting up a central commission at Mainz to inquire into the machinations of the great revolutionary secret society which existed only in the imagination of the authorities.

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  • to take possession of this territory, and the visit of a German prince to the emperor of China strongly appealed to the popular imagination.

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  • But he will often be struck, especially in the older pieces, by a wild force of passion, and a vigorous, if not rich, imagination.

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  • Since Mahomet's strength lay in his enthusiastic and fiery imagination rather than in the wealth of ideas and clearness of abstract thought on which exact reasoning depends, it follows that the older suras, in which the former qualities have free scope, must be more attractive to us than the later.

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  • He was famed in antiquity for the richness and splendour of his imagination and his style, although Quintilian censures his redundancy and Hermogenes remarks on the excessive sweetness that results from his abundant use of epithets.

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  • It is especially those long ages, during which Egypt was an independent centre of culture and government, before its absorption in the Persian empire in the 6th century B.C., that make the most powerful appeal to the imagination and can often justify this appeal by the splendour of the monuments representing them.

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  • It is apparently through the funeral that Osiris so early took a firm hold on the imagination of people; for at a very ancient date he was identified with y dead king, and it needed but a slight extension of this idea iakehim into a king of the dead.

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  • that persisted in the imagination of the Egyptians longer than.

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  • Portraiture, with its limited demand on imagination and lack of ideals, w ~s the form of art which flourished latest.

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  • He was a consummate artist in verse, and his impressions are given with the most delicate exactitude of phrase, and in a very fine strain of imagination.

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  • His exquisite strains, in which pure imagination is blended with most accurate and realistic descriptions of scenery and rural life, have an extraordinary charm not easily described.

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  • His mythological or pastoral dramas, his great satiric epos of Adam Homo (1841-1848), his comedies, his lyrics, and above all his noble philosophic tragedy of Kalanus, prove the immense breadth of his compass, and the inexhaustible riches of his imagination.

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  • Alexander's grandiose imagination was, however, more strongly attracted by the great questions of European politics than by attempts at domestic reform which, on the whole, wounded his pride by proving to him the narrow limits of absolute power.

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  • Napoleon knew well how to appeal to the exuberant imagination of his new-found friend.

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  • Indefatigable in sifting original documents, Aubigne had amassed a wealth of authentic information; but his desire to give in all cases a full and graphic picture, assisted by a vivid imagination, betrayed him into excess of detail concerning minor events, and in a few cases into filling up a narrative by inference from later conditions.

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  • He was always at his best when his imagination was set to work upon a solid framework of fact.

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  • The resplendent medieval colouring of the subject, the essentially heroic character of Joan of Arc, gave Schiller an admirable opportunity for the display of his rich imagination and rhetorical gifts; and by an ingenious alteration of the historical tradition, he was able to make the drama a vehicle for his own imperturbable moral optimism.

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  • In proportion as the figure of Nero again ceased to dominate the imagination of the faithful, the wholly unhistorical, unpolitical and anti-Jewish conception of Antichrist, which based itself more especially on 2 Thess.

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  • 4) may have given an impulse to the prophet's imagination.

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  • From his father, whose stern, somewhat pedantic nature repelled warmer feelings on the part of the children, Goethe inherited that "holy earnestness" and stability of character which brought him unscathed through temptations and passions, and held the balance to his all too powerful imagination.

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  • He records how it was burnt into him by pictures which filled his boyish imagination.

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  • The reformer had been expecting it ever since the Disputation at Leipzig, and had resolved to answer it by one striking act which would impress the imagination of every man.

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  • But the invasion of Timur left no permanent impress upon the history of India, except in so far as its memory fired the imagination of Baber, the founder of the Mogul dynasty.

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  • But to the Europeans of the i 5th century India was practically an unknown land, which powerfully attracted the imagination of spirits stimulated by the Renaissance and ardent for discovery.

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  • To frustrate the possibility of a French invasion of India, led by Napoleon in person, was the governing idea of Wellesley's foreign policy; for France at this time, and for many years later, filled the place afterwards occupied by Russia in the imagination of British statesmen.

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  • Since the battle of Plassey no event so greatly impressed the native imagination as the capture of Seringapatam, which won for General Harris a peerage and for Wellesley an Irish marquisate.

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  • At the same time his psychology, though maintaining his empiricism, contained some seeds of conceptual logic, and indirectly of formal logic. Intellectual development, which according to the logic of the Analytics consists of sense, memory, experience, induction and intellect, according to the psychology of the De Anima consists of sense, imagination and intellect, and one division of intellect is into conception of the undivided and combination of conceptions as one (De An.

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  • To a certain extent this second consciousness applies to other operations: for example, we are conscious of the process of association by which various mental causes recall ideas in the imagination.

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  • In a correspondence with Mill, Brentano rejoined that the centaur exists in imagination; Bradley says, " inside our heads."

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  • The idea of the centaur does exist in our imagination, and inside our heads, and the name of it in our mouths.

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  • In especial he showed clear understanding of the functions of hypothesis and verification in the investigations of the solitary worker, with his facts still in course of accumulation and needing to be lighted up by the scientific imagination.

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  • We know that we need to pass from what Spinoza terms experientia y oga,' where imagination with its fragmentary apprehension is liable to error and neither necessity nor impossibility can be predicated, right up to that which fictionem terminat - namely, intellectio.

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  • The composition of the history displays much ability; but Boece's imagination was, however, stronger than his judgment: of the extent of the historian's credulity, his narrative exhibits many unequivocal proofs; and of deliberate invention or distortion of facts not a few, though the latter are less flagrant and intentional than early 19th-century criticism has assumed.

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  • 3 Excavators know how the popular mind associates their labours with search for hidden treasure, and no doubt the wealth of dead civilizations often stimulated the imagination of subsequent generations.

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  • The Semitic peoples were essentially theocratic in their religion; they used the forms of the sensuous imagination in setting forth the realities of the unseen world.

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  • Such truth can be apprehended by the multitude only in symbols which guide the will through the imagination, and through historic facts which are embodiment of ideas.

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  • - Those portions of the poem that are summarized above - that is to say, those which relate the career of the hero in progressive order - contain a lucid and well-constructed story, told with a vividness of imagination and a degree of narrative skill that may with little exaggeration be called Homeric. And yet it is probable that there are few readers of Beowulf who have not felt - and there are many who after repeated perusal continue to feel - that the general impression produced by it is that of a bewildering chaos.

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  • It does not include those two institutions which more than any others stand in popular imagination as genuinely medieval - the papal monarchy and the Holy Roman Empire.

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  • There is much in the imperial and papal histories that is merely spectacular and romantic; much that appeals to the imagination and lends itself to myth; and since the sources are abundant - the papal archives inexhaustible and the German chronicles easily accessible - an undue emphasis has been placed upon them.

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  • Thus in studying the flight of a stone through the air we replace the body in imagination by a mathematical point endowed with a masscoefficient.

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  • For by giving the body (in imagination) a displacement of translation we learn that the sum of the resolved parts of the forces in any assigned direction is zero, and by giving it a displacement of pure rotation we learn that the sum of the moments about any assigned axis is zero.

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  • These new elements in the narrative are evidently due not only to the natural growth of legend in a people highly endowed with imagination, but in a large proportion also to the new 1 See D.

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  • The splendid patronage of letters by the successors of Alexander, and especially the great institutions which had been founded at Alexandria and Pergamum, had made an impression on the imagination of learned men which was reflected in the current notions of the ancient despots.

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  • Wilson remarks," notwithstanding the acknowledged purport of this worship, it is but justice to state that it is unattended in Upper India by any indecent or indelicate ceremonies, and it requires a rather lively imagination to trace any resemblance in its symbols to the objects they are supposed to represent."In spite, however, of its wide diffusion, and the vast number of shrines dedicated to it, the worship of Siva has never assumed a really popular character, especially in northern India, being attended with scarcely any solemnity or display of emotional spirit.

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  • Although it is true that there is a certain amount of gradation in the degree of development to which these organs have attained in the various orders, yet it is hardly sufficient to enable the imagination to bridge over the gap which separates Amphioxus from the lowest fishes in regard to this feature of organization.

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  • The great need of the age was authority; and authority was most likely to strike the imagination of the faithful if it found a vivid concrete embodiment in the person of the pope.

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  • Aristotle, it is said, called him the father of rhetoric. But it was as at once statesman, prophet, physicist, physician and reformer that he most impressed the popular imagination.

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  • He looked on poetry as a vent for overcharged feeling, or a full imagination, or some imaginative regret, which had not found their natural outlet in life and action.

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  • Almost at the same date that visionary revival of the Western Empire, which had imposed for six centuries upon the imagination of medieval Europe, hampering Italy and impeding the consolidation of Germany, ceased to reckon among political actualities; while its more robust rival, the Roman Church, seemed likely to sink into the rank of a petty Italian principality.

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  • The Fraticelli spiritualists, and similar sects who fed their imagination with his doctrine, expired in the flames to which Fra Dolcino Longino and Margharita were consigned.

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  • Humanism implied the rejection of those visions of a future and imagined state of souls as the only absolute reality, which had fascinated the imagination of the middle ages.

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  • His incommensurable and indescribable masterpiece of mingled humour, wisdom, satire, erudition, indecency, profundity, levity, imagination, realism, reflects the whole age in its mirror of hyperAristophanic farce.

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  • Opponents of this accidentalism maintain that what seems to be the result of chance is in reality due to a cause or causes which, owing to the lack of imagination, knowledge or scientific instruments, we are unable to detect.

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  • In public he was of magnificent bearing, possessing the true oratorical temperament, the nervous exaltation that makes the orator feel and appear a superior being, transfusing his thought, passion and will into the mind and heart of the listener; but his imagination frequently ran away with his understanding, while his imperious temper and ardent combativeness hurried him and his party into disadvantageous positions.

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  • The most interesting, and in many respects the most remarkable, is the philosophic romance, the New Atlantis, a description of an ideal state in which the principles of the new philosophy are carried out by political machinery and under state guidance, and where many of the results contemplated by Bacon are in imagination attained.

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  • All human knowledge, it is there laid down, may be referred to man's memory or imagination or reason.

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  • There will still be room for the scientific use of the imagination and for the creative flashes of genius.3 If, then, Bacon himself made no contributions to science, if no discovery can be shown to be due to the use of his rules, if his method be logically defective, and the problem to which it was applied one from its nature incapable of adequate solution, it may not unreasonably be asked, How has he come to be looked upon as the great leader in the reformation of modern science?

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  • He brings against Bacon, of all men, the accusations of making induction start from the undetermined perceptions of the senses, of using imagination, and of putting a quite arbitrary interpretation on phenomena.

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  • Yet the framing of hypothesis is no mere random guesswork; it is left not to the imagination alone, but to the scientific imagination.

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  • Dr Thomas Sprat (1635-1713), bishop of Rochester and first historian of the society, says that Bacon of all others " had the true imagination of the whole extent " of the enterprise, and that in his works are to be found the best arguments for the experimental method of natural philosophy (Hist.

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  • The bonds, rigorous and strange as they often appear to others, were a sacrament enshrined in the imagination of the lowliest follower of the Talmud.

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  • As an oriental work among an oriental people the moral and spiritual influence of the Talmud has rested upon its connexion with a history which appealed to the imagination and the feelings, upon its heterogeneity of contents suitable for all moods and minds, and upon the unifying and regulative effects of its legalism.

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  • We may be forced to conclude that the interest of the whole affair, so far as authentic history is concerned, is really nugatory, and that the romantic imagination has created a mystery in a fact of no importance.

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  • As a man, Ballanche was warm-hearted and enthusiastic, but he was endowed with a too-vivid imagination and his strange thoughts are expressed in equally bizarre language.

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  • He may well remark that imagination itself is incapable of conceiving a higher degree of inconsistency in the affairs of men (compare Blackstone, iii.

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  • With undiminished hold on the imagination and devotion of his followers he was nominated for president in 1884.

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  • It was, they said, "a devout imagination."

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  • Gustavus, whose lively imagination was easily excited by religious ardour, enormously magnified clerical influence in Poland and frequently scented dangers where only difficulties existed.

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  • There was free scope given for the indulgence of that political imagination which revels in revolution and chafes at prescriptive bondage.

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  • Where some slight historical records of the heroic age were still obtainable poetical imagination seized upon them at once; where no traditions at all were forthcoming fiction pure and simple asserted its right; and thus the national epopee gave way to the epic story, andsubstituting prose for verseto the novel and the fairy tale.

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  • Models of the former class are the various Iskandarndmas, or Books of Alexander the Great, the oldest and most original of which is that of Nizaml of Ganja, the modern Elizavetpol (completed about 1202; 599 A.H.); the latter begins with the Kitab-i-Samak lyar, a novel in three volumes (about 1189; 585 A.H.), and reaches its climax in the Bstan-i-Khayal, or Garden of Imagination, a prose romance of fifteen large volumes, by Mahommed Tal~l Khayal, written between 1742 and 1756 (1155 and 1169 A.H.).

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  • The latter, who died in 1325 (725 A.H.), two years before his friend IJasan, occupies the foremost place among all the Persian poets of India by the richness of his imagination, his graphic style, and the historical interest attached to his writings.

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  • His aim, however, had been to find a via media between the old and new; his temper was essentially conservative, his imagination held captive by the splendid traditions of the medieval church, and he had no sympathy with the revolutionary attitude of the Reformers.

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  • His vast learning was the result of a powerful memory and unwearied industry, and he lacked the creative imagination necessary to mould this material into new forms. He was a powerful debater, but his victories were those of a dialectician rather than a convincing reasoner, and in him depth of insight and conviction were ill replaced by the controversial violence characteristic of the age.

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  • Of no one can it be more emphatically said that at his highest he was "of imagination all compact."

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  • we receive but what we give, And in our life alone does nature live; Ours is her wedding garment, ours her shroud," with the passage which follows, contain more vividly, perhaps, than anything which Coleridge has written, the expression of the shaping and colouring function which he assigns, in the Biographia Literaria, to imagination.

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  • This remarkable series, every volume of which was a work at once of imagination and of research, was not even yet finished, but the later volumes exhibit a certain falling off.

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  • His inquiry into manuscript and printed authorities was most laborious, but his lively imagination, and his strong religious and political prejudices, made him regard all things from a singularly personal point of view.

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  • It is not in comparison with the picturesque beauty of European Alpine scenery that the Himalaya appeals to the imagination, for amongst the hills of the outer Himalaya - the hills which are known to the majority of European residents and visitors - there is often a striking absence of those varied incidents and sharp contrasts which are essential to picturesqueness in mountain landscape.

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  • From the astronomers the Stoics borrowed their picture of the universe - a plenum in the form of a series of layers or concentric rings, first the elements, then the planetary and stellar spheres, massed round the earth as centre - a picture which dominated the imagination of men from the days of Eudoxus down to those of Dante or even Copernicus.

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  • Its chief employment was to lay things bare and sever them from their surroundings, in order that they might be contemplated in their simplicity, with rigid exactness, as objects of thought, apart from the illusion and exaggeration that attends them when presented to sense and imagination.

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  • He admired the classic style, the exquisite purity of language, the flights of imagination, but he admired above all the philosophy.

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  • The life and death of Cato fired the imagination of a degenerate age in which he stood out both as a Roman and a Stoic. To a long line of illustrious successors, men like Thrasea Paetus and Helvidius Priscus, Cato bequeathed his resolute opposition to the dominant power of the times; unsympathetic, impracticable, but fearless in demeanour, they were a standing reproach to the corruption and tyranny of their age.

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  • Joao; in Patria he evoked in a series of dramatic scenes and lashed with satire the kings of the Braganza dynasty, and in Os Simples he interprets in sonorous stanzas the life of country-folk by the light of his powerful imagination and pantheistic tendencies.

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  • Originality of conception, vividness of presentation, fertility of imagination, wide knowledge of Scripture and a happy faculty of applying it, intense spiritual fervour, a striking physique and a powerful voice made him a great pulpit force.

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  • To political bias was added family pride, for the gratification of which the archives of the great houses, the funeral panegyrics, or the imagination of the writer himself supplied an ample store of doubtful material.

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  • What they found written they copied; the gaps they supplied, where personal experience failed, by imagination.

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  • It calls upon the imagination and the literary gifts of expression.

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  • But we are still largely in the realm of imagination.

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  • Refuse the good models, even those which are sacred in the imagination of men.

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  • But the genius from which it came - the swift faculty of perception, the lofty imagination, the idealizing spirit enamoured of reality - was the secret source of all Emerson's greatness as a speaker and as a writer.

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  • Such facts as that dogs " hunt in dreams," make it likely that their minds are not only sensible to actual events, present and past, but can, like our minds, combine revived sensations into ideal scenes in which they are actors, - that is to say, they have the faculty of imagination.

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  • These frescoes, however, often exhibit considerable skill, and are indicative of the lively imagination of their painters.

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  • This conception has been extended by analogy to phenomena different in kind, such as the activities of masses of water or of air, or of machinery, or by another analogy, to the duration of a composite structure, and by imagination to real or supposed phenomena such as the manifestations of incorporeal entities.

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  • The special characteristics of his generalship were imagination, fiery energy, and a tactical resolution which was rare indeed in the 18th century.

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  • In time, however, he perceives that behind the fantastic garb of language there is an earnest and vigorous mind, an imagination that harbours fire within its cloudy folds, and an insight into the mysteries of spiritual life which is often startling.

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  • Unluckily it is to written records and to imagination that we have to trust exclusively for our picture.

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  • We may then say that psychology is occupied with the natural function of Intellection, seeking to discover its laws and distinguishing its various modes (perception, representative imagination, conception, &c.) according to the various circumstances in which the laws are found at work.

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  • The certainties of religious faith are matter of feeling or immediate assurance, and are expressed in the pictorial language of imagination.

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  • The secret of success, here as elsewhere, is the writer's marvellous imperturbability in paradox, his teeming imagination and his rigid logic. Grant his premises, and all the rest follows; his world may be turned topsy-turvy, but the relative situation of its contents is unchanged.

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  • Within certain limits, his imagination and invention are as active as those of the most creative poets.

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  • Bringing his imagination back to America, he next applied himself to the elaboration of an Indian legend.

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  • xii.) - monstrous serpents with the heads of crocodiles - are natural products of the Egyptian imagination.

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  • Echegaray succeeded to the literary inheritance of Lopez de Ayala and of Tamayo y Baus; and though he possesses neither the poetic imagination of the first nor the instinctive tact of the second, it is impossible to deny that he has reached a larger audience than either.

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  • These are valuable gifts in their way, andEchegaray has, moreover, a powerful, gloomy imagination, which is momentarily impressive.

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  • Radulescu (1802-1872), a man of immense activity, of great power of initiative and of still greater imagination.

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  • which testify to their great popularity; in the popular songs one finds many traces of their influence upon the people's imagination.

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  • It is not wonderful, therefore, that a lad to whom nature had given a powerful imagination and sensibility which amounted to a disease, should have been early haunted by religious terrors.

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  • It may be observed that his imagination was strongly impressed by the glimpse which he had caught of the pomp of war.

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  • Soon the irresistible charm of a book which gratified the imagination of the reader with all the action and scenery of a fairy tale, which exercised his ingenuity by setting him to discover a multitude of curious analogies, which interested his feelings for human beings, frail like himself, and struggling with temptations from within and from without, which every moment drew a smile from him by some stroke of quaint yet simple pleasantry, and nevertheless left on his mind a sentiment of reverence for God and of sympathy for man, began to produce its effect.

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  • There now ensued a second struggle in Gotama's mind, described with all the wealth of poetry and imagination of which the Indian mind is master.

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  • But this "design" has been attributed rather to the imagination of Sully himself than to the more practical policy of the king.

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  • I want the people I represent to look as if they really belonged to their station, so that imagination cannot conceive of their ever being anything else.

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  • He understood it to be the first duty of an exegete to ascertain the meaning of the writer, and he showed that this could be done by the use of grammar and history and the historical imagination.

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  • After a long trial, carried out with elaborate formality and great unfairness, the unhappy Joan was found guilty of proclaiming as divine visions what were delusions of the evil one, or of her own vain imagination, and when she persisted in maintaining their reality she was declared a relapsed heretic, and burnt at Rouen on the 30th of May 1431.

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  • All high imagination, all devotion to the public weal, seemed laid asleep. But the political instinct was not dead, and it would one day express itself for better ends than an.

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  • With a well-intentioned but narrow mind, he had nothing in him to strike the imagination of his subjects.

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  • The early enthusiasm of the disfranchised classes for French principles had cooled with the later developments of the Revolution; the attempted invasions had roused the national spirit; and in the public imagination the sinister figure of Bonaparte, the rapacious conqueror, was beginning to loom large to the exclusion of lesser issues.

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  • Disraeliwhose oriental imagination was excited by the triumph incurred some ridicule by his bombastic declaration that the standard of St George was hoisted upon th~ mountains of Rasselas.

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  • Ten years before, her jubilee had been the occasion of enthusiastic rejoicings, and the queens progress through London to a service of thanksgiving at Westminster bad impressed the imagination of her subjects and proved the affection of her people.

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  • Angelo, Tyran de Padoue (1835), the last of the tragic triad to which their creator denied the transfiguration of tragic verse, is inferior to neither in power of imagination and of style, in skill of invention and construction, and in mastery over all natural and noble sources of pity and of terror.

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  • Opening with a vision of Eve in Paradise which eclipses Milton's in beauty no less than in sublimity - a dream of the mother of mankind at the hour when she knew the first sense of dawning motherhood, it closes with a vision of the trumpet to be sounded on the day of judgment which transcends the imagination of Dante by right of a realized idea which was utterly impossible of conception to a believer in Dante's creed: the idea of real and final equity; the concept of absolute and abstract righteousness.

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  • Next year the exile of Guernsey published his third great romance, Les Travailleurs de la mer, a work unsurpassed even among the works of its author for splendour of imagination and of style, for pathos and sublimity of truth.

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  • The unfinished poems, Dieu and La Fin de Satan, are full to overflowing of such magnificent work, such wise simplicity of noble thought, such heroic and pathetic imagination, such reverent and daring faith, as no other poet has ever cast into deathless words and set to deathless music. Les Jumeaux, an unfinished tragedy, would possibly have been the very greatest of his works if it had been completed on the same scale and on the same lines as it was begun and carried forward to the point at which it was cut short for ever.

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  • There was something in this external dignity which went with Burke's imperious spirit, his spacious imagination, his turn for all things stately and imposing.

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  • That derives its immense power from other sources; from passion, intensity, imagination, size, truth, cogency of logical reason.

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  • They were, moreover, concentrated in individual cases, which exercised Burke's passionate imagination to its profoundest depths, and raised it to such a glow of fiery intensity as has never been rivalled in our history.

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  • One of the most common charges against Burke was that he allowed his imagination and pity to be touched only by the sorrows of kings and queens, and forgot the thousands of oppressed and famine-stricken toilers of the land.

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  • The humiliation of the king and queen after their capture at Varennes; the compulsory acceptance of the constitution; the plain incompetence of the new Legislative Assembly; the growing violence of the Parisian mob, and the ascendency of the Jacobins at the Common Hall; the fierce day of the 20th of June (1792), when the mob flooded the Tuileries, and the bloodier day of the 10th of August, when the Swiss guard was massacred and the royal family flung into prison; the murders in the prisons in September; the trial and execution of the king in January (1793); the proscription of the Girondins in June, the execution of the queen in October - if we realize the impression likely to be made upon the sober and homely English imagination by such a heightening of horror by horror, we may easily understand how people came to listen to Burke's voice as the voice of inspiration, and to look on his burning anger as the holy fervour of a prophet of the Lord.

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  • They glow with passion, and yet with all their rapidity is such steadfastness, the fervour of imagination is so skilfully tempered by close and plausible reasoning, and the whole is wrought with such strength and fire, that we hardly know where else to look either in Burke's own writings or elsewhere for such an exhibition of the rhetorical resources of our language.

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  • His writings and speeches, which abound in sparkling passages, displaying great fertility of imagination, were collected andublished, with a memoir of the author, in 1809, by the Rev. Dr J.

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  • The practice has a well-ascertained tendency to excite the imagination; and in so far as it disturbs that healthy and wellbalanced interaction of body and mind which is the best or at least the normal condition for the practice of virtue, it is to be deprecated rather than encouraged (Theologische Ethik, sec. 873-875).

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