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horn

horn

horn Sentence Examples

  • Somewhere in the distance a horn honked.

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  • A car horn outside woke him in less than five minutes.

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  • Then from that spot came the sound of a horn, with the signal agreed on in case of a fight.

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  • She hung on to the horn, talking to the horse.

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  • And when you get around to wondering, Lori had enough respect for you and I that she wouldn't horn in on our relationship, either.

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  • Grabbing the saddle horn, she vaulted into the saddle and kicked the horse into a run.

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  • He lifted a canteen from the saddle horn and took a drink.

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  • She pulled Ed to a stop and curled a knee around the saddle horn, watching the scene.

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  • He finally glanced down at Pete and straightened in the saddle, removing his leg from the horn and placing it in the stirrup.

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  • Wrapping the rope around the saddle horn, he nudged Ed into motion, tugging the fallen tree downstream.

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  • Untying the reins, he threw the rope over the saddle horn and mounted in one fluid movement.

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  • Untying the reins, he threw the rope over the saddle horn and mounted in one fluid movement.

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  • He followed her slowly, but a couple of horn toots coaxed him to move along.

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  • Spencer, "Mammalia of the Horn Expedition" (1896); "Wynyardia, a Fossil Marsupial from Tasmania," Proc. Zool.

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  • The "Severn" failed to round the Horn and returned home.

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  • It was funny; he knew who blew horn with Coltrane, who played bass for Mulligan and even remembered the date Gerry's set was recorded—August 1955.

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  • Carmen barely had the rope unwrapped from the horn before water and debris shoved the tree further.

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  • The young college-aged waitress inserted the tack, placed a quarter beneath it for weight and sounded a horn to call attention.

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  • He folded his hands over the saddle horn and gazed down at her.

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  • Bordeaux slung a long leg around his saddle horn and tucked the glasses into his saddlebag.

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  • Was that a farmer's noon horn which sounded from beyond the woods just now?

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  • Howie had difficulty locating the apartment and nothing untoward occurred before he was awoken by the sound of a horn, seventeen minutes later.

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  • Dupin de Francueil, a farmer-general of the revenue, who married the widow of Count Horn, a natural son of Louis XV., she in her turn being the natural daughter of Maurice de Saxe, the most famous of the many illegitimate children of Augustus the Strong, by the lovely countess of Konigsmarck.

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  • Having straightened his coat and fastened on his hunting knives and horn, he mounted his good, sleek, well-fed, and comfortable horse, Viflyanka, which was turning gray, like himself.

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  • c. rothschildi also has a large frontal horn and white legs, but the spots in the bulls are very dark and those of the females jagged.

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  • The northern horn of the bay is formed by Filey Brigg, a narrow and abrupt promontory, continued seaward by dangerous reefs.

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  • The northern horn of the bay is formed by Filey Brigg, a narrow and abrupt promontory, continued seaward by dangerous reefs.

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  • After the cry of the hounds came the deep tones of the wolf call from Daniel's hunting horn; the pack joined the first three hounds and they could be heard in full cry, with that peculiar lift in the note that indicates that they are after a wolf.

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  • In America cattle suffer much from the horn fly (Haematobia serrata).

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  • During the second voyage Cook visited Easter Island, discovered several islands of the New Hebrides and New Caledonia; and on his way home by Cape Horn, in March 1774, he discovered the Sandwich Island group and described South Georgia.

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  • Passing through the strait of Lemaire they came to the southern extremity of Tierra del Fuego, which was named Cape Horn, in honour of the town of Hoorn in West Friesland, of which Schouten was a native.

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  • The river Awe, issuing from the north-western horn of the loch, affords excellent trout and salmon fishing.

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  • In the Alps and Vosges this resinous semi-fluid is collected by climbing the trees and pressing out the contents of the natural receptacles of the bark into horn or tin vessels held beneath them.

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  • Yet, in the preface to the score Wagner speaks very strongly of the loss of the original character of the horn in the hands of ordinary players; and goes so far as to say that, if experience had not shown that they could be trained to play nearly as smoothly as the classical players, he would have renounced all the advantages of the new mechanism.) 3 trumpets.

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  • Winding the reins around the saddle horn, he shook out his rope and tied it to the bridle.

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  • c. antiquorum, are characterized by the large frontal horn of the bulls, the white legs, the network type of coloration and the pale tint.

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  • Magnificent examples are Mozart's trio for pianoforte, clarinet and viola, his quintet for pianoforte, oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon (imitated by Beethoven), his quintet for clarinet and strings, Brahms's clarinet-quintet for the same combination, and his trio for pianoforte, violin and horn.

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  • c. antiquorum, are characterized by the large frontal horn of the bulls, the white legs, the network type of coloration and the pale tint.

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  • Wollaston Horn E 60° snow-crowned peaks.

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  • The town manufactures combs and horn goods, brass and iron wares, leather, malt, bricks and ropes.

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  • Alex directed Carmen as he quickly detached the rope from his saddle horn.

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  • Princess followed Ed up the steep trail with an eager stride that kept Carmen clinging to the saddle horn.

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  • He put a foot in the stirrup and grabbed the saddle horn.

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  • He placed a foot in the stirrup and grabbed the saddle horn.

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  • Horn.

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  • Peta y .), %vs ePaQCv yhvTCoX6yoc; Origen, Horn.

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  • caper, a goat, and cornu, a horn.

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  • They have a passion for fine clothes and ornaments, tricking themselves out with glass trinkets, rings and articles of ivory and horn.

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  • On the 2nd of July 1704, with the assistance of a bribing fund, Charles's ambassador at Warsaw, Count Arvid Bernard Horn, succeeded in forcing through the election of Charles's candidate to the Polish throne, Stanislaus Leszczynski, who could not be crowned however till the 24th of September 1705, by which time the Saxons had again been defeated at Punitz.

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  • Young Nick's Head, the southern horn of the bay, was named from Nicholas Young, his ship's boy, who first observed it.

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  • ix.; De Guerne, Mission scientifique du Cap Horn (1891),(1891), vol vi.; Michaelsen, Jahrb.

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  • Like Fortune, with whom she is often coupled in inscriptions on Roman tombstones, she was also represented with the cornu copiae (horn of plenty).

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  • The name cerargyrite is a Greek form (from itpas, horn, and a pyvpos, silver) of the older name hornsilver, which was used by K.

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  • They are soft (H= 21-) and sectile to a high degree, being readily cut with a knife like horn.

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  • With their resinous to adamantine lustre and their translucency they also present somewhat the appearance of horn; hence the name hornsilver.

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  • The purpose served by the tusk - or "horn" - is not known; and little is known of the habits of narwhals.

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  • It is also known as the " Eastern Horn of Africa," because it projects somewhat sharply eastwards into the Indian Ocean, and is the only section of the continent which can be spoken of as a peninsula.

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  • Cape Guardafui is in 110 75' N., 51° 26' 32" E., and forms, as it were, the tip of the Horn of Africa.

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  • James, The Unknown Horn of Africa (London, 1888); H.

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  • It results from this that the horn has the appearance of a mass of agglutinated hairs, which, in the newly growing part at the base, readily fray out on destruction of the softer intermediate substance; but the fibres differ from true hairs in growing from a free papilla of the derm, and not within a follicular involution of the same.

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  • palaeindicus, represent Rhinoceros proper, in which front teeth are present, but there is only one horn.

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  • A hump on the forehead probably indicates the existence of a large frontal horn.

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  • The neolithic station of Butmir, near Ilidze, was probably a lake-dwellers' colony, and has yielded numerous stone and horn implements, clay figures and pottery.

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  • KEpas, a horn), the chief constituent of horny material, occurs in hair, nails, hoofs and feathers.

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  • It melts at 485° and solidifies on cooling to a translucent, horn-like mass; an early name for it was plumbum corneum, horn lead.

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  • 6.45; 9.63, 66; 13.92), subsequently by Origen (Horn.

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  • The former he traces to a mistaken interpretation of Origen (Horn.

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  • 7), and subsequently among the Manichaeans, and is frequently quoted from Origen downwards (Horn.

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  • This gospel, which Origen knew (Horn.

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  • He is called by the townspeople Jean de Nivelles, a celebrated baron of the 15th century whose title eventually became merged in that of the count de Homes (Horn).

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  • It must be remembered that the Arabs, who inhabit an extremely hot country, are very fully clothed, while the Fuegians at the extremity, of Cape Horn, exposed to all the rigours of an antarctic climate, have, as sole protection, a skin attached to the body by cords, so that it can be shifted to either side according to the direction of the wind.

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  • For the speedy removal of burning houses each ward was to provide a strong iron hook, with a wooden handle, two chains and two strong cords, which were to be left in the charge of the bedel of the ward, who was also provided with a good horn, " loudly sounding."

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  • Dublin, Ireland, on the rocky hill of Howth, which forms the northern horn of Dublin Bay, 9 m.

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  • 1915, a special inducement offered to the Allies for acting in this quarter - any threat to Stambul and the Golden Horn must tend to take pressure off the Russian army in Armenia which was at the moment believed to be in some peril.

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  • The dull green was followed successively by amber, white opal, blue opal, straw opal, sea-green, horn colour and various pale tints of soda-lime glass, ranging from yellow to blue.

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  • James holds that this book is referred to by Origen (Horn.

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  • BOVIDAE, the name of the family of hollow-horned ruminant mammals typified by the common ox (Bos taurus), and specially characterized by the presence on the skulls of the males or of both sexes of a pair of bony projections, or cores, covered in life with hollow sheaths of horn, which are never branched, and at all events after a very early stage of existence are permanently retained.

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  • The latter is the more serious, as in addition to the actual damage done by the beetle the holes afford entrance to fungus spores, &c. Under the name " horn worms " are included the larvae or caterpillars of species of Protoparce.

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  • OLIVER ELLSWORTH (1745-1807), American statesman and jurist, was horn at Windsor, Connecticut, on the 29th of April 1745.

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  • Horn, Lebensand Heldengeschichte Friedrichs des Streitbaren (Leipzig, 1733).

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  • Famous heroes who are specially connected with England are Alfred the Great, Richard Cceur-de-Lion, King Horn, Havelok the Dane, Guy of Warwick, Sir Bevis of Hampton (or Southampton), Robin Hood and his companions.

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  • It had complete control over the Euxine grain-trade; the absence of tides and the depth of its harbour rendered its quays accessible to vessels of large burden; while the tunny and other fisheries were so lucrative that the curved inlet near which it stood became known as the Golden Horn.

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  • or, probably, in the United States; its 65 manufactories, with a capital of $4,572,726 and with a product for the year valued at $7,501,720 (39% more than in 1900), produced celluloid and horn work (the manufacture of which is a more important industry here than elsewhere in the United States), celluloid combs, furniture, paper, buttons, pianos and piano-cases,.

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  • Living rhinoceroses may be arranged in three groups: (1) With a single nasal horn, and very thick skin, which is raised into strong, definitely arranged ridges or folds.

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  • at the shoulder and is blackish grey in colour; the horn rarely exceeds a foot in length, but one in the British Museum measures 19 in.

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  • The horn in the female is little developed, if not altogether absent.

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  • In the second section there is a well-developed nasal, and a small frontal horn separated by an interval.

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  • Specimens in which the posterior horn has attained a length as great as or greater than the anterior have been separated under the name of R.

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  • When a small calf accompanies its mother, it always runs in front and she appears to guide it by holding the point of her horn upon the little animal's rump; and it is perfectly wonderful to note how in all sudden changes of pace, from a trot to a gallop, or vice versa, the same position is always exactly maintained.

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  • According to tradition and to St Chrysostom (Horn.

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  • It has also been found convenient to take the boundary between the Atlantic and Pacific, as the shortest line across Drake Strait, from Cape Horn through Snow Island to Cape Gunnar, instead of the meridian of Cape Horn.

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  • Considerable numbers of bone or horn awls were found in the ashes, as well as fragments of pottery, but no "ceremonial" objects.

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  • The forward edge of the tub carries a projecting pin or horn, with a notch into which the chain falls which drags the tub forward.

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  • Seen from the Adriatic, Monte Corno, as it is someti, mes called, from its resemblance to a horn, affords a magnificent spectacle; the Alpine region beneath its summit is still the home of the wild boar, and here and there are dense woods of beech and pine.

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  • In the first, which was fought on the 5th and 6th of September 1634, the hitherto invincible Swedish army, commanded by Duke Bernhard of Saxe Weimar and Marshal Horn, was defeated with great loss by a somewhat superior army of Imperialists and Spaniards under General Gallas, Horn and 3000 men being made prisoners and 6000 killed or mortally wounded.

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  • The Eskimo engraved poorly, the Dene (Tinneh) embroidered in quill, the North Pacific tribes carved skilfully in horn, slate and cedar, the California tribes had nimble fingers for basketry, the Sioux gloried in feathers and painted parfleche.

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  • The quotations from the hymn in the pseudo-Athanasian De Virginitate, and in Chrysostom (Horn.

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  • TAPIR, any existing representative of the perissodactyle section of ungulate mammals with five front and three hind toes, and no horn.

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  • He wrestles with Achelous for Deianeira (" destructive to husband "), daughter of Oeneus, king of Calydon, vanquishes the river god, and breaks off one of his horns, which as a horn of plenty is found as an attribute of Hercules in art.

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  • His attributes are a pitcher, cornucopiae (", horn of plenty"), rushes, marine animals and a sceptre.

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  • Custer was sent up the Rosebud, and on the morning of the 25th passed over the divide of the Little Big Horn, where the Sioux were soon discovered.

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  • The implements found in the relic bed under it were axe-heads of stone, with their haftings of stag's horn and wood; a flint saw, set in a handle of fir wood and fastened with asphalt; flint flakes and arrow-heads; harpoons of stag's horn with barbs; awls, needles, chisels, fish-hooks and other implements of bone; a comb of yew wood 5 in.

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  • Among the tools of bone and stag's horn were awls, needles, harpoons, scraping tools and haftings for stone axe-heads.

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  • They were fixed by the butt in a socket of stag's horn, mortised into a handle of wood.

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  • The seaward horn of this bay, however, is formed by a narrow protruding bank of sand and stones, thrown up by a southward current along the Yorkshire coast, and known as Spurn Head.

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  • On its flags were fought out many feuds between rival gilds; Egmont and Horn, and many other gallant men whose names have been forgotten, were executed here under the shadow of its ancient buildings, and in more recent times Dumouriez proclaimed the French Republic where the dukes of Brabant and Burgundy were wont to hold their jousts.

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  • Egmont and Horn were sentenced in the hotel de vile, and passed their last night in the Maison du Roi.

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  • In the rue de la Regence are the new picture gallery, a fine building with an exceedingly good collection of pictures, the palace of the count of Flanders, and the garden of the Petit Sablon, which contains statues of Egmont and Horn, and a large number of statuettes representing the various gilds and handicrafts.

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  • The commercial salt is known as salvolatile or salt of hartshorn and was formerly obtained by the dry distillation of nitrogenous organic matter such as hair, horn, decomposed urine, &c., but is now obtained by heating a mixture of sal-ammoniac, or ammonium sulphate and chalk, to redness in iron retorts, the vapours being condensed in leaden receivers.

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  • With the possible exception of Horn, Tristan is by far the most accomplished hero in the whole range of knightly romance; a finished musician, linguist and chess-player, no one can rival him in more knightly arts, in horsemanship or fencing.

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  • After a careful education, completed by the usual grand tour, Magnus learned the art of war under Gustavus Horn, and during the reign of Christina (1644-16J4), whose prime favourite he became, though the liaison was innocent enough, he was raised to the highest offices in the state and loaded with distinctions.

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  • 147; Origen, Horn.

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  • The southern boundary is generally regarded as the parallel of 40° S., but sometimes the part of the great Southern Ocean (40 0 to 662° S.) between the meridians passing through South Cape in Tasmania and Cape Horn is included.

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  • Close to Roermond on the west is the village of Horn, once the seat of a lordship of the same name, which is first mentioned in a document of 1166.

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  • The lordship of Horn was a fief of the counts of Loon, and after 1361 of the bishop of Liege; but in 1450 it was raised to a countship by the Emperor Frederick II.

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  • On the extinction of the house of Horn in 1540, the countship passed to the famous Philip of Montmorency, who, with the count of Egmont, was executed in Brussels in 1568 by order of the duke of Alva.

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  • g P Y g the century the ports of Yucatan and Central America were frequently raided, and in 1682 Tampico suffered a like disaster; in May 1683 Vera Cruz itself was captured through stratagem by two buccaneers, Van Horn and Laurent, who plundered the town for ten days, committed shocking outrages, and escaped as the Spanish fleet arrived.

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  • The ibex are connected with the wild goat by means of Capra nubiana, in which the front edge of the horns is thinner than in either the European C. ibex or the Asiatic C. sibirica; while the Spanish C. pyrenaica shows how the ibex-type of horn may pass into the spirally twisted one distinctive of the markhor, C. falconeri.

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  • Soc. (1885); Horn, "Gesch.

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  • ARVID BERNHARD HORN, Count (1664-1742), Swedish statesman, was born at Vuorentaka in Finland on the 6th of April 1664, of a noble but indigent family.

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  • Transferred to the central point of the administration, he had ample opportunity of regarding with other eyes the situation of the kingdom, and in consequence of his remonstrances he fell rapidly in the favour of Charles Both in 1710 and 1713 Horn was in favour of summoning the estates, but when in 1714 the diet adopted an anti-monarchical attitude, he gravely warned and ultimately dissolved it.

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  • In Charles XII.'s later years Horn had little to do with the administration.

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  • For the next eighteen years he so absolutely controlled both the foreign and the domestic affairs of Sweden that the period between 1720 and 1738 has well been called the Horn period.

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  • In his foreign policy Horn was extremely wary and cautious, yet without compromising either the independence or the self-respect of his country.

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  • Not till 1731 was there any appearance of opposition in the diet to Horn's "system"; but Horn, piqued by the growing coolness of the king, the same year offered his resignation, which was not accepted.

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  • again appeared upon the scene as a candidate for the Polish throne; but Horn was still strong enough to prevent a rupture with Russia.

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  • Horn in many respects greatly resembled his contemporary Walpole.

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  • Svedelius, Arvid Bernard Horn (Stockholm, 1879); R.

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  • Horn, A.

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  • Horn: hans lefnad (Stockholm, 1852).

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  • Philip De Montmorency, Count Of Horn >>

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  • Bitche), a town of Germany, in Alsace-Lorraine, on the Horn, at the foot of the northern slope of the Vosges between Hagenau and Saargemiind.

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  • Horn, Das Buch von der Konigin Luise (Berlin, 1883); A.

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  • The remarkable North American Ceratogaulus, with a large bony nasal horn, belongs to the same family.

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  • The second thoracic ring is humped, and there is a spine-like horn or protuberance at the tail.

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  • Fibroin, which is analogous to horn, hair and like dermal products, constitutes about 75 to 82% of the entire mass, and has a composition represented by the formula C15H23 506.

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  • Although the diffusion of epic poetry in England did not actually inspire any new chansons de geste, it developed the taste for this class of literature, and the epic style in which the tales of Horn, of Bovon de Hampton, of Guy of Warwick (still unpublished), of Waldef (still unpublished), and of Fulk Fitz Warine are treated, is certainly partly due to this circumstance.

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  • The custom of blowing the wakeman's horn every night at nine o'clock is said to have originated about A.D.

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  • A horn with a baldric and the motto "Except the Lord keep the city the watchman waketh but in vain" forms the mayor's badge.

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  • Trumpets (horn, swegelhorn, byme) appear to have been used chiefly as signals.

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  • Apart from the salt-mines, its industries include toys and other small articles of wood, horn and ivory, for which the place has long been famous.

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  • from the figures of warriors on the inscribed golden horn found at Gallehus (Jutland) in 1734.

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  • Here the mountains seized him, and he became a constant visitor and one of the most intrepid and most resolute of explorers; among other feats of climbing he was the first to ascend the Weiss - horn (1861).

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  • (1742) were horn at Cesena.

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  • It was in defiance of this right that Alva refused the claim of Counts Egmont and Horn to be tried by the knights of the Fleece in 1568.

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  • The knights wore a collar of golden hunting horns, whence the order was also known as the Order of the Horn.

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  • In this the feathers of the top of the head are very singular, looking like glossy curled shavings of black horn or whalebone, the effect being due to the dilatation of the shaft and its coalescence with the consolidated barbs.

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  • Horn, hoof-parings, woollen rags, fish, blubber and blood, after treatment with sulphuric acid, are all good manures, and should be utilized if readily obtainable.

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  • Sow also in heat mustard and cress for salads, onions for salads; tomatoes, celery to be pricked out for an early crop; and Early Horn carrot and kidney-beans on slight hotbeds.

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  • Sow also Early Horn carrot; Early Purple-top Munich turnip; onions for a full crop in light soils, with a few leeks and some parsley.

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  • - Sow main crops of wrinkled marrow peas; Longpod and Windsor beans; cabbage, onions, leeks, Early Horn carrots, parsnips, salsafy, scorzonera, Brussels sprouts, borecoles, lettuces and spinach.

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  • Sow Early Horn carrot; also kidney beans and radishes, on hotbeds.

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  • German novels also exist on the subject, by Franz Horn, Oeklers, Laun and Schucking, tragedies by Klinemann, Haushofer and Zedlitz.

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  • Other kinds are taken from the South Pacific and South Atlantic Oceans, around Cape Horn, the Falkland Islands up to Lobos Islands at the entrance of the La Plata river, off the Cape of Good Hope and Crozet Isles.

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  • Specimens in the museum at Tervueren near Brussels show that in fully adult males the horns are subtriangular and inclined somewhat backwards; each being capped with a small polished epiphysis, which projects through the skin investing the rest of the horn.

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  • Horn Pond Mountain and Indian Hill are about 320 ft.

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  • 4), implying but not absolutely stating that there was a fixed order of such lessons just as there was of the Psalms. St Basil the Great mentions fixed lessons on certain occasions taken from Isaiah, Proverbs, St Matthew and Acts (Horn.

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  • From Chrysostom (Horn.

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  • The method declaring a person a rebel was by giving three blasts on a horn and publicly proclaiming the fact; hence the expression, "put to the horn."

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  • Early tradition connects Peter with Antioch, of which he is said to have been the first bishop. The first writer to mention it is Origen (Horn.

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  • in Lucarn), but it is also found in the Clementine Homilies and Recognitions (Horn.

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  • voice in the direction of affairs, the military command being divided between the Swedish general Horn and Bernhard, duke of Saxe-Weiinar.

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  • The Marine Society was organized in 1799, its membership being limited to "persons who have actually navigated the seas beyond the Cape of Good Hope or Cape Horn, as masters or supercargoes of vessels belonging to Salem"; it assists the widows and children of members.

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  • The bow was always of wood, in one piece in the prehistoric and early times, also of two horns in the 1st Dynasty; but the compound bow of horn is rarely found, only as an importation, in the XVIIIth Dynasty.

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  • Horn, Peder Syv (Copenhagen, 1878).

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  • Horn, History of the Scandinavian North from the most ancient times to the present (English translation by Rasmus B.

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  • 21 f., IIb-13, the statement that Yahweh came down on the third day, and that a long blast was blown on the trumpet (or ram's horn [5n', as opposed to lie E]).

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  • King Rhydderich gave one to Merlin, and Rimenhild made a similar gift to Child Horn.

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  • 2 Sivatherium there are two pairs of such appendages, of which the hinder are large and were probably covered during life either with skin or thin horn.

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  • The third type of horn is presented by the American prongbuck, or pronghorn, in which bony processes, or " cores," corresponding to the horns of the giraffe, have acquired a horny sheath, in place of skin; the sheath being in this instance forked, and annually shed and renewed, although the core is simple.

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  • 2), the horny sheath (or true horn ") forms a simple unbranched cone, which may be compressed, spirally twisted, or curved in one or more directions, but is permanently retained and continues to grow throughout life from the base, while it becomes worn away at the tip. Rarely, as in the four-horned antelope, there are two pairs of horns.

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  • The specific gravity of this "horn" thallium is 7.02.

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  • 1585) and Carl Horn (d.

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  • Strutt also gives an engraving, assigned by him to the 14th century, in which three hunters, one of whom blows a horn, are represented as unearthing a fox, which is pursued by a single hound.

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  • With this horn he hunted the first pack of foxhounds then in England fifty-five years.

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  • If, for example, it is the habit of the huntsman to give a single note on his horn when hounds are drawing a covert, and a double note when a fox is found, the pack speedily understand the significance.

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  • 10, it is said that the little horn "waxed great, even to the host of heaven; and cast down some of the host and of the stars to the ground."

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  • Of the rhinoceros, three distinct varieties are enumerated, two with a single and one with a double horn.

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  • It has but one horn, and is covered with!massive folds of naked skin.

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  • It sometimes attains a height of 6 ft.; its horn, which is much prized by the natives for medicinal purposes,.

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  • It also has but one horn, and mainly differs from the foregoing in being smaller, and having less prominent " shields."

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  • 1910 with the avowed intention of carrying out oceanographical work in the South Atlantic and of proceeding round Cape Horn to Bering Strait, where he proposed to repeat Nansen's drift across the Arctic sea from a more easterly starting-place.

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  • Bone or horn, too, was used.

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  • " In 1899 a court in Larnaca, Cyprus, awarded 80 (Turkish) as damages for the loss of a snake's horn which had been lent to cure a certain disease " (Murison, p. 117, n.

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  • The state charitable and penal institutions consist of the Wyoming General Hospital at Rock Springs, with one branch at Sheridan and another branch at Casper; the Big Horn Hot Springs at Thermopolis, the Wyoming State Hospital for the Insane at Evanston, the Wyoming Home for the Feeble-Minded and Epileptic at Lander, the Wyoming Soldiers' and Sailors' Home near Buffalo, and the State Penitentiary at Rawlins.

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  • Naumann, Vom Goldenen Horn, &c. (1893).

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  • Horn, St Etienne, roi apostolique de Hongrie (Paris, 1899); W.

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  • At the Scandinavian sacrificial feasts a horn consecrated to Bragi was used as a drinkingcup by the guests, who then vowed to do some great deed which would be worthy of being immortalized in verse.

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  • The strait is very rarely frozen over, though history records a few instances; and the Golden Horn, the inlet on either side of which Constantinople lies, has been partially frozen over occasionally in modern times.

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  • According to another story, Zeus himself broke off the horn and gave it to Amaltheia, promising that it would supply whatever she desired in abundance.

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  • Amaltheia gave it to Achelous (her reputed brother), who exchanged it for his own horn which had been broken off in his contest with Heracles for the possession of Deianeira.

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  • According to ancient mythology, the owners of the horn were many and various.

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  • The term "horn of Amaltheia" is applied to a fertile district, and an estate belonging to Titus Pomponius Atticus was called Amaltheum.

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  • His father, a ship's carpenter, was frequently out of work owing to illness and the decline of his trade, and his mother had to go out to work soon after her son was horn.

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  • PHILIP DE MONTMORENCY HORN, COUNT OF (1518-1568), a man of illustrious descent and great possessions in the Netherlands, became in succession under Charles V.

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  • Orange fled from the country, but Egmont and Horn, despite his warning, decided to remain and face the storm.

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  • Horn (Hero) >>

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  • This animal is hunted and killed for its skin and its horn.

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  • The horn is sacred in the eyes of the natives.

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  • He was promptly "blown to the horn" at the Cross there as an outlaw, but escaped to Dundee, and commenced public preaching in the chief towns of central Scotland.

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  • At first this cumbrous and complicated instrument of government worked tolerably well under the firm but cautious control of the chancellor, Count Arvid Beernhard Horn Political (q.v.).

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  • abroad, Horn reversed the traditional policy of Hats and Sweden by keeping France at a distance and draw- caps.

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  • The Hats carried everything before them; and the aged Horn was finally compelled to retire from a scene where, for three and thirty years, he had played a leading part.

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  • Horn had clearly perceived this; and his cautious neutrality was therefore the soundest statesmanship. But the politicians who had ousted Horn thought differently.

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  • (For map see Argentina.) It extends from the northern boundary of the province of Tacna, about 17° 25' S., to Cape Horn at the extreme southern point of the Fuegian archipelago in 55° 58' 40" S., with an extreme meridian length of 2661 m., and with a coast line considerably exceeding that figure owing to a westward curve of about 31° and an eastward trend south of 50° S.

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  • to Cape Horn, the grouping of which.

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  • of Cape Horn, in lat.

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  • South of Antofagasta the old rocks form a nearly continuous band along the coast, extending as far as Cape Horn and Staten Island, and occupying the greater part of the islands of southern Chile.

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  • Till the 18th century ships were not allowed to sail round Cape Horn, so that the Chileans had to trade indirectly through Peru and the Argentine.

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  • The first ten homilies, which form one division completed in 337, are without polemical reference; Horn.

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  • See also P. Horn, Geschichte der persischen Litteratur (1901).

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  • For the fame of Paphian oil see Horn.

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  • Now, however effective against Plato's contemporary Cynics or Atomists, the reasoning is thrown away upon the Stoics, who take boldly the one horn of this dilemma.

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  • Among the celebrities of Hoorn are William Schouten, who discovered in 1616 the passage round Cape Horn, or Hoorn, as he named it in honour of his birthplace; Abel Janszoon Tasman, whose fame is associated with Tasmania; and Jan Pietersz Coen, governorgeneral of the Dutch East Indies.

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  • AGOSTINO DEPRETIS (1813-1887), Italian statesman, was horn at Mezzana Corte, in the province of Stradella on the 31st of January 1813.

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  • The leading silver minerals are native silver; argentite or silver glance, Ag 2 S, usually containing small amounts of lead, copper and tin; dyscrasite or antimonial silver, Ag 2 Sb to Ag,3Sb, an isomorphous mixture of silver and antimony; proustite or light red silver ore, Ag 3 AsS 3; pyrargyrite or dark red silver ore, Ag 3 SbS 3; stephanite, Ag 5 SbS 4; miargyrite, AgSbS2; stromeyerite, CuAgS; polybasite, 9(Cu 2 S,Ag 2 S) (Sb 2 S 3, As 2 S 3); cerargyrite or horn silver, AgCI; bromite or bromargyrite, AgBr; embolite, Ag(C1,Br); iodite or iodargyrite, AgI.

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  • Silver chloride, AgC1, constitutes the mineral cerargyrite or horn silver; mixed with clay it is the butter-milk ore of the German miners.

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  • Of about the size of a turkey, it is remarkable for the curious " horn " or slender caruncle, more than three inches long, it bears on its crown, the two sharp spurs with which each wing is armed, and its elongated toes.

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  • This bird inhabits the lagoons and swamps of Paraguay and Southern Brazil, where it is called " Chaja " or " Chaka," and is smaller than the preceding, wanting its " horn," but having its head furnished with a dependent crest of feathers; while the plumage is grey.

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  • ANDERS JOHAN, COUNT VON HOPKEN (1712-1789), Swedish statesman, was the son of Daniel Niklas Hopken, one of Arvid Horn's most determined opponents and a founder of the Hat party.

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  • She is represented in works of art, often together with Ceres, with a cornucopia (horn of plenty) in her arm, and a ship's prow in the background, indicating the transport of grain over the sea.

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  • (Horn.

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  • We need not, therefore, see a reference to the Apostle's laxity on this crucial point in the story (Horn.

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  • As to the use of bad language, people in the 2nd century were glad to avail themselves of such missiles as iliev&aurooroXot, which had been manufactured for them in the 1st (Horn.

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  • The reference is to the recantation in Horn.

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  • the Haoma (Horn) Yasht (9, i i) and the ancient confession of faith (12), which is of value as a document for the history of civilization.

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  • Moreover, the co-existence of man with a fauna now extinct or confined to other districts was brought to yet clearer demonstration by the discovery in these caves of certain drawings and carvings of the animals done by the ancient inhabitants themselves, such as a group of reindeer on a piece of reindeer horn, and a sketch of a mammoth, showing the elephant's long hair, on a piece of a mammoth's tusk from La Madeleine (Lartet and Christy, Reliquiae Aquitanicae, ed.

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  • 4 There can be no doubt, for example, that in the "Little Horn" of vii.

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  • It is now generally recognized that the king symbolized by the Little Horn, of whom it is said that he shall come of one of four kingdoms which shall be formed from the Greek empire after the death of its first king (Alexander), can be none other than Antiochus Epiphanes, and in like manner the references in ix.

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  • and S.E., between Capes Pillar (Desolation Island) and Horn, and for about 270 m.

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  • between Capes Horn and San Diego, east of which extends Staten Island, which terminates in Cape St John.

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  • The division of the archipelago to the south of Beagle Channel includes the islands of Hoste, Navarin, Gordon, Londonderry, Stewart, Wollaston and numerous islets, disposed in triangular form with the base on Beagle Channel and the apex at the rocky headland of Cape Horn.

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  • Partial exploration in this region was conducted by the French Mission du Cap Horn in 1882-1883, and the geological foundations are granite and basic volcanic rocks.

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  • In 1578 Sir Francis Drake first sighted the point which in 1616 was named Cape Hoorn (anglicized Horn) by the Dutch navigators Jacob Lemaire and Willem Cornelis Schouten (1615-1617).

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  • This section was written before 161 B.C., for "the great horn," who is Judas the Maccabee, was still warring when the author was writing.

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  • (Dillmann, Schiirer and others take the great horn to be John Hyrcanus, but this interpretation does violence to the text.) These chapters recount three visions: the first two deal with the first-world judgment; the third with the entire history of the world till the final judgment.

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  • His personal attributes are an ivy wreath, the thyrsus (a staff with pine cone at the end), the laurel, the pine, a drinking cup, and sometimes the horn of a bull on his forehead.

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  • Rumania begins on the seaward side with a band of territory called the Dobrudja; and broadens westward into the form of a blunted crescent, its northern horn being called Moldavia, its southern Walachia.

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  • At the northern horn of the bay stands Spizza, an Austrian military station.

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  • Never short of silver and gold, but often in want of the necessaries of life, they continued their practices for a little longer; then, evading the risk of recrossing the isthmus, they boldly cleared Cape Horn, and arrived in the Indies.

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  • Again, in 1683, numbers of them under John Cook departed for the South Sea by way of Cape Horn.

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  • In 1688 Davis cleared Cape Horn and arrived in the West Indies, while Swan's ship, the "Cygnet," was abandoned as unseaworthy, after sailing as far as Madagascar.

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  • The shortwool breeds are the Oxford Down, Southdown, Shropshire, Hampshire Down, Suffolk, Ryeland, Dorset and Somerset Horn, Kerry Hill, Radnor and Clun Forest.

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  • The coiled horns lie more closely to the head than in the Dorset and Somerset Horn breed.

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  • The Dorset and Somerset Horn is an old west-country breed of sheep. The fleece is fine in quality, of close texture, and the wool is intermediate between long and short, whilst the head carries a forelock.

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  • The Merino resemble the Dorset Horn breed.

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  • Perrier ("Travailleur" and "Talisman," Cape Horn and Monaco Expeditions), P. H.

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  • In every direction English influence penetrated, and Englishmen before 1603 might be found in every quarter of the globe, following Drakes lead into the Pacific, painfully breaking the ice in search of a north-east or a north-west passage, hunting for slaves in the wilds of Africa, journeying in caravans across the steppes of Russia into central Asia, bargaining with the Turks on the shores of the Golden Horn, or with the Greeks in the Levant, laying the foundations of the East India Company, or of the colonies of Virginia and Newfoundland.

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  • Guanaco are found throughout the southern half of South America, from Peru in the north to Cape Horn in the south, but occur in greatest abundance in Patagonia.

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  • The sixth grade, for civilians an egret, for the military a tiger-cat with a mother-of-pearl clasp. The seventh grade, for civilians a mandarin duck, for the military a mottled bear with a silver clasp. The eighth grade, for civilians a quail, for the military a seal with a clear horn clasp. The ninth grade, for civilians a long-tailed jay, for the military a rhinoceros with a buffalo-horn clasp.

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