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furrow

furrow

furrow Sentence Examples

  • "ploughing his furrow alone," as he afterwards phrased it.

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  • Between the Takht Mountain and the Siwaliks, the intervening belt of ridge and furrow has been greatly denuded by transverse drainage - a system of drainage which we now know to have existed before the formation of the hills, and to have continued to cut through them as they gradually rose above the plain level.

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  • A narrow deep furrow is usually run immediately in advance of the planter, to break up the soil under the seed.

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  • Following in the furrow of an ordinary plough it breaks through the sub-soil to a depth of several inches, making it porous and penetrable by plant roots.

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  • (I) The right and left carotids converge towards the middle and extend up the neck, imbedded in a furrow along the ventral surface of the cervical vertebrae.

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  • vast majority of snakes are further characterized by having the right and left halves of the under-jaws connected by an elastic band; a median, longitudinal furrow in the skin below and behind the chin; the whole palatal apparatus is but loosely connected with the skull, nowhere articulating with it.

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  • Similarly we may note the caldron or small steep depression of a round outline, and the furrow or long narrow groove in the continental shelf.

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  • Beneath each food-groove was a radial water-vessel and probably a nerve and blood-vessel, all which structures passed either between certain regularly arranged thecal plates, or along a furrow floored by those plates, which were then in two alternating series.

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  • A piece of iron called the slade is bolted to the bottom of the frame, and this, running along the sole of the furrow, acts as a base to the whole implement.

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  • c, Furrow, in which the narrow D, Ventral view of a more exfoot is concealed.

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  • But there exists a striking difference between the crests of the Astin-tagh and those of the ranges which give rise to the gigantic ridge and furrow arrangement on the Tibetan plateau.

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  • Using these buoys to guide the direction of tow, a grapnel, a species of fivepronged anchor, attached to a strong compound rope formed of strands of steel and manila, is lowered to the bottom and dragged at a slow speed, as it were ploughing a furrow in the sea bottom, in a line at right angles to the cable route, until the behaviour of the dynamometer shows that the cable is hooked.

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  • - One, or a few, of the posterior maxillary teeth have a groove or furrow in front, which conducts the secretion of the enlarged upper labial glands.

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  • Beyond, again, lies a broad furrow, or ` longitudinal fold,' as geologists call it, parallel to the ridges, and then rises the last elevation, a belt of low calcareous hills, on which, here and there among the waves of beech forest, purple or blue with distance, a white cliff retains its local colour and shines like a patch of fresh snow.

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  • In the operation of ploughing the furrow slice is separated from the soil below, and although in humid soils this layer may be left to settle by degrees, in semi-arid regions this loosened layer becomes.

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  • In operation the coulter makes a perpendicular cut separating the furrow-slice which is divided from the "sole" of the furrow Crested Furrow.

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  • The Taurus solar interpretation of the sign goes back to the far off time when the year began with Taurus, and the sun was conceived of as a bull entering upon the great furrow of heaven as he ploughed his way among the stars.

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  • During the greater part of the 19th century the ideal of ploughing was to preserve the furrow-slice unbroken, and this object was attained by the use of long mould-boards which turned the slices gently and gradually, laying them over against one another at an angle of 45°, thus providing drainage at the bottom of the furrow, and exposing the greatest possible surface to the influences of the weather.

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  • For example, the country gone over is seldom level springy turf; it is up hill and down dale, across ridge and furrow, over ground studded with ant-hills (which, unlike mole-hills, are often very hard), over ploughed or boggy land.

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  • A deep furrow ran across his forehead, and standing by a window he stared over his spectacles seeing no one.

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  • In the cortical tissue beneatJI each furrow a wide intercellular space is present running the length of the internode, and called the (C, D, E from Strasburger's Lehrbuch der Bolanik, by permission of Gustav Fischer.) FIG.

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  • Thus are formed the " mud-holes " of the Hudson Furrow so welcome as guides telling their position to ship captains making New York harbour in a fog.

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  • By means of them the depth and width of the furrow are regulated, whereas in the case of "swing" or wheelless ploughs these points depend chiefly on the skill of the ploughman.

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  • The land wheel and the forward furrow wheel are adjustable vertically with reference to the frame, for the purpose of controlling the action of the plough.

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  • The division between the lobes is marked on the face of the anther by a groove or furrow, and there is usually on the face a suture, indicating the line of dehiscence.

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  • Each sar, month and hour was represented at once visibly and symbolically by a twelfth part of the " furrow " drawn by the solar Bull across the heavens.

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  • What we do find is a slight transverse furrow on each side of the head, close to the tip, but the most careful examination of sections made through the tissues of the head and brain shows the absence of any further apparatus comparable to that described above.

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  • Amongst the best known of the furrows of the continental shelf are the Cape Breton Deep, in the Bay of Biscay, the Hudson Furrow, southward of New York, the so-called Congo Canon, the Swatch of No Ground off the Ganges delta, the Bottomless Pit off the Niger delta, and numerous similar furrows on the west coast of North America and outside the fjords of Norway, Iceland and the west of Scotland, as well as in the.

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  • The form of a furrow is regulated by the shape and width of the share, working in combination with a proper shaped breast.

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  • The ripe fruit or grain, sometimes called the "berry," the matured state of the ovary and its contents, is oblong or ovoid, with a longitudinal furrow on one side.

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  • If the snow lies deep, they strap on his snowshoes, and, with the giant plow, plow a furrow from the mountains to the seaboard, in which the cars, like a following drill-barrow, sprinkle all the restless men and floating merchandise in the country for seed.

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  • A "crested" furrow is obtained by the use of a share, the wing of which is set at a higher altitude than the point, but this type of furrow is less generally found than the "rectangular" form obtained by a level-edged share, which leaves a flat bottom.

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  • The furrow wheels are placed on inclined axles, the plough beam being carried on swing links, operated by a hand lever when it is necessary to raise the plough out of the furrow.

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  • There is often a furrow running along the edges of the octahedron, or across the edges of the cube, and this indicates that the apparently simple crystal may really consist of eight individuals meeting at the centre; or, what comes to the same thing, of two individuals interpenetrating and projecting through each other.

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  • At intermediate stations the roofs are often carried on brackets fixed to the walls of the station buildings, and project only to the edge of the platforms. At larger stations where both the platforms and the tracks are covered in, there are two broad types of construction, with many intermediate variations: the roof may either be comparatively low, of the " ridge and furrow " pattern, borne on a number of rows of pillars, or it may consist of a single lofty span extending clear across the area from the side walls.

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  • It occurs in two different forms. In the Ratitae, except Rhea, it consists mainly of a right and left united half (corpora fibrosa), with a deep longitudinal furrow on the dorsal side, and much resembles the same organ in crocodiles and tortoises.

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  • There is very little grey matter in the cortex of the hemispheres, the surface of which is devoid of convolutions, mostly quite smooth; in others, for instance pigeons, fowls and birds of prey, a very slight furrow might be compared with the Sylvian fissure.

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  • North of Bhutan, between the Himalayan crest and Lhasa, this formation is approximately maintained; farther east, although the same natural forces first resulted in the same effect of successive folds of the earth's crust, forming extensive curves of ridge and furrow, the abundant rainfall and the totally distinct climatic conditions which govern the processes of denudation subsequently led to the erosion of deeper valleys enclosed between forest-covered ranges which rise steeply from the river banks.

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  • Subsequently the digging plough came into vogue; the share being wider, a wider furrow is cut, while the slice is inverted by a short concave mould-board with a sharp turn which at the same time breaks up and pulverizes the soil after the fashion of a spade.

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  • In 1892, at Warwick, the competitions related to ploughs - single furrow (a) for light land, (b) for strong land, (c) for press drill and broad-cast sowing; two-furrow; three-furrow; digging (a) for light land, (b) for heavy land; and one-way ploughs.

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  • Only in one species, Carinella inexpectata, a step in advance has been made, in so far as in connexion with the furrow just mentioned, which is here also somewhat more complicated in its arrangement, a ciliated tube leads into the brain, there to end blindly amidst the nervecells.

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  • furrow cultivation was also detected.

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  • In Valencinia there is nothing but a circular opening without furrow.

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  • Her blood smelled sweet, and the oddly charged aura around her made his brow furrow.

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  • A depression of small extent when steep-sided is termed a " caldron," and a long narrow depression crossing a part of the continental border is termed a " furrow."

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  • The side-cap, iron fixed to the land-side of the frame, is intended to keep the edge of the unploughed soil vertical and prevent it from falling into the furrow.

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  • Rectangular Furrow.

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  • The process is indicated in the illustration of different types of furrow.

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  • In this form of plough the frame is mounted on three wheels, one of which runs on the land, and the other two in the furrow.

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  • As the machine is drawn forward the disk revolves and cuts deeply into the ground, and by reason of its inclination crowds the earth outwards and thus turns a furrow.

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  • The ground is then left unworked and open to the crumbling influence of frost till towards the end of winter, when it is stirred with the cultivator followed by the harrows, or in some cases ploughed with a shallow furrow.

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  • According to the story, during the ploughing of a field near Tarquinii a being of boyish appearance sprang out of the furrow.

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  • It frequently extends downwards a little on the rachilla, forming with the latter a swollen callus, which is separated from the free portion by a furrow.

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  • In cases of doubt, evidence may be obtained from traces of organic structure, from the presence of carbonaceous matter, or, as Zeiller has pointed out, by the remains of animals such as Bryozoa being attached to the cast, showing that it represents a solid body and not a mere cavity or furrow.

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  • The idea that it bothered him enough to provoke a deal made her brow furrow.

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  • chasealdo and Rooney spend most of the game chasing long balls into the channels while Ruud plows a lone furrow up front.

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  • cleavage furrow in mammalian cells was largely unknown.

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  • Some ridge and furrow appears to occupy old crofts.

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  • A ring ditch and evidence for ridge and furrow cultivation were also detected.

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  • Medieval ridge and furrow earthworks and three post medieval tree stumps were recorded within the development area.

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  • They didn't see us plow a lonely furrow in the Fourth under Harry Gregg.

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  • It had cut a long furrow across the face of Io, leaving a trail of smoking wreckage in its wake.

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  • This will make a small furrow suitable for sowing your seeds in, which will be perfectly straight.

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  • Alexander Frei looked particularly sharp for the Swiss, despite plowing a lone furrow up front.

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  • Peacock was left to plow a lone furrow up front with his fellow forward supplementing a packed midfield.

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  • Drill: Narrow, straight furrow in the soil, used for sowing seeds.

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  • Each had its own plot of land divided from its neighbor by a deep furrow.

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  • Determined to plow her own furrow she dug herself deeper into a hole.

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  • furrow earthworks and three post medieval tree stumps were recorded within the development area.

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  • furrow plow.

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  • furrow field systems.

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  • furrow system is to be restored in the new works.

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  • The mechanism by which the microtubules communicated the positioning of the cleavage furrow in mammalian cells was largely unknown.

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  • lonely furrow in the Fourth under Harry Gregg.

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  • plough didn't see us plow a lonely furrow in the Fourth under Harry Gregg.

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  • ploughnd, the Fordson pulls a single furrow plow.

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  • plowing a lone furrow up front.

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  • 2 h), whose appendicular nature is shown only by a median furrow and by short, cylindrical palps (fig.

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  • " furrow-long"), a measure of length, originally the length of a furrow in the "common field" system.

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  • Along this band a median furrow appears, and a mass of cells sinks within, the one-layered germ band thus becoming transformed into a band of two cell-layers (fig.

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  • On this view Wheeler, however, compares with the " dorsal organ " the peculiar the entire food-canal in most Hexapoda must be regarded as of extra embryonic membrane or indusium which he has observed ectodermal origin, the " endoblast " represents mesoderm only, between serosa and amnion in the embryo of the grasshopper and the median furrow whence it arises can be no longer compared Xiphidium.

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  • The skim-coulter is shaped like a miniature plough, substituted for or fixed in front of the coulter; it is used chiefly on lea land, to pare off the surface of the soil together with the vegetation thereon, and turn it into the previous furrow, where it is immediately buried by the furrow slice.

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  • During the greater part of the 19th century the ideal of ploughing was to preserve the furrow-slice unbroken, and this object was attained by the use of long mould-boards which turned the slices gently and gradually, laying them over against one another at an angle of 45°, thus providing drainage at the bottom of the furrow, and exposing the greatest possible surface to the influences of the weather.

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  • Double furrow or multiple ploughs are a combination of two or more ploughs arranged in echelon so as to plough two or more furrows.

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  • The advantage of this plough over the ordinary form is in the absence of sliding friction, and in the mellow and porous condition in which it leaves the bottom of the furrow.

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  • A duct leads to the furrow or canal of the tooth.

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  • It may be noted that in some traditions he is called the son of Dysaules (possibly identical with diaulos, the "double furrow" traced by the ox), and that, according to the Latin poets (e.g.

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  • B; lam ??`0` asserted, however, time, is produced in this way (monodisk strobilization); a circular furrow cuts off the upper, tentacle-bearing portion from the lower half of the scyphistoma (fig.

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  • The cultivated lands of Britain being disposed in ridges which usually lie in the line of greatest ascent, it became customary to form the drains in each furrow, or in each alternate, or third or fourth one, as the case might require, or views of economy dictate and hence the system soon came to be popularly called "furrow draining."

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  • A plowman and his great plow, now standing idle in the furrow, had in a day wrought a terrible havoc.

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  • Once the soil is prepared, dig a furrow about four inches wide and about 6 to 12 inches deep.

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  • By the end of the first season, the furrow should be filled to the top.

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