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error

error

error Sentence Examples

  • Lana had never seen this error message before.

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  • This omission is sometimes believed to be an error.

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  • Though hibernating, the Tesla generator displayed no error messages.

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  • To avoid such error Dawes used double wires, not spider webs, placing the image of the star symmetrically between these wires, as in fig.

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  • She erased the error message.

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  • The only system error is … five sensors were tripped when the field was disengaged, she murmured with a frown.

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  • In 1890 he tells us how a grievous error had been committed in one of the first steps, and pathetically adds, "My spirit in the work was broken, and I have never heartily proceeded with it since."

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  • When he'd slowed to the shoulder he was surprised to discover his error as a uniformed female emerged from the vehicle.

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  • What error or evil can there be in my wishing to do good, and even doing a little--though I did very little and did it very badly?

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  • His shrewd sense of political expediency and his loyalty to constitutional principles saved .him from the error of obstructing the advent and driving into an aati-dynastic attitude politicians who had succeeded in winning popular favor.

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  • The observed heat of combustion of sugar is, however, 1354000, so that the error of the rule is here 20 per cent.

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  • Apart from that, the chief source of our error in this matter is due to the fact that in the historical accounts a whole series of innumerable, diverse, and petty events, such for instance as all those which led the French armies to Russia, is generalized into one event in accord with the result produced by that series of events.

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  • The following table gives the heats of neutralization of the commoner strong monobasic acids with soda: - Hydrochloric acid Hydrobromic acid Hydriodic acid Nitric acid Chloric acid Bromic acid Within the error of experiment these numbers are identical.

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  • Modern writers have perpetuated the error that the Cassiterides were definite spots, and have made many attempts to identify them.

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  • This makes a great deal of sense: If nutrition isn't governed by universal laws (as physics is) and instead affects different people differently, then the way you will know certain things is by learning through trial and error, through your own experience.

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  • Excluded from parliament by the fatal error of his youth, he was compelled to resort to indirect means of working out his plans by influencing public men.

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  • Excluded from parliament by the fatal error of his youth, he was compelled to resort to indirect means of working out his plans by influencing public men.

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  • Those whose stubborn persistence in error survived all these inducements to repent were sent into exile.

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  • But in OS measures index error can be eliminated by bisecting both stars with the same web (or different webs of known interval fixed on the same frame), and not employing the fixed web at all.

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  • But in OS measures index error can be eliminated by bisecting both stars with the same web (or different webs of known interval fixed on the same frame), and not employing the fixed web at all.

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  • Still we live meanly, like ants; though the fable tells us that we were long ago changed into men; like pygmies we fight with cranes; it is error upon error, and clout upon clout, and our best virtue has for its occasion a superfluous and evitable wretchedness.

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  • What evil and error are there in it, if people were dying of disease without help while material assistance could so easily be rendered, and I supplied them with a doctor, a hospital, and an asylum for the aged?

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  • (d) Infallibility is the guarantee against error, not in all matters, but only in the matter of dogma and morality; everything else is beyond its power, not only truths of another order, but even discipline and the ecclesiastical laws, government and administration, &c.

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  • The name is often in popular literature written Cambalu, and is by Longfellow accented in verse Cambeilic. But this spelling originates in an accidental error in Ramusio's Italian version, which was the chief channel through which Marco Polo's book was popularly known.

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  • To cut Alexander's communications with the rear, Darius now committed the error of entangling his large force in the mountain defiles.

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  • The error was discovered, after eighteen years, by the explorations of Mr Babbage and Major Warburton in 1858, while Mr Stuart, about the same time, gained a more complete knowledge of the same district.

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  • Since thermochemical measurements of this type may be frequently performed with an error due to other causes of much less than i per cent., the error introduced by either of these assumptions is the chief cause of uncertainty in the method.

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  • The error was discovered, after eighteen years, by the explorations of Mr Babbage and Major Warburton in 1858, while Mr Stuart, about the same time, gained a more complete knowledge of the same district.

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  • Since thermochemical measurements of this type may be frequently performed with an error due to other causes of much less than i per cent., the error introduced by either of these assumptions is the chief cause of uncertainty in the method.

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  • This involves a loss of accuracy because, with a spiderline micrometer, the accidental error of pointing is of the order of o I" of arc.

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  • In the language of the Christian Church the word " infallibility " is used in a more absolute sense, as the freedom from all possibility of error guaranteed by the direct action of the Spirit of God.

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  • He will therefore devote all his care to examine and distinguish these three means of knowledge; and seeing that truth and error can, properly speaking, be only in the intellect, and that the two other modes of knowledge are only occasions, he will carefully avoid whatever can lead him astray."

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  • The modus operandi is briefly as follows: The position of the fracture is determined by electrical tests from both ends, with more or less accuracy, depending on the nature of the fracture, but with a probable error not exceeding a few miles.

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  • Despite all this, one must not fall into the easy error of exaggerating the degeneration into which the Jewries of the world fell from the middle of the 17th till the middle of the 18th century.

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  • The result has been that wind velocities published in many official publications have of ten been in error by nearly 5 0%.

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  • (a) Copernicanism has won its battles and the Church of Rome would fain have its error forgotten.

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  • Finally I noticed a very obvious error in the sequence and for an instant I concentrated my attention on the lesson and tried to think how I should have arranged the beads.

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  • The broadest and most prevalent error requires the most disinterested virtue to sustain it.

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  • The detectives kidded that the last time she had made an error, she wore stockings and her dress was new.

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  • It is a vulgar error to suppose that you have tasted huckleberries who never plucked them.

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  • Fred suggested that one of the letters might be in error so the group continued to look at the puzzle on the basis Cynthia had first suggested.

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  • Fred suggested that one of the letters might be in error so the group continued to look at the puzzle on the basis Cynthia had first suggested.

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  • Embracing the whole philosophic movement under the name of "the Cartesian system," Reid detects its fundamental error in the unproved assumption shared by these thinkers "that all the objects of my knowledge are ideas in my own mind."

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  • " Scarcely any supposition," 2 he says, " can be made from which the same result, though possibly with greater difficulty, might not be deduced by the same laws of nature; for since, in virtue of these laws, matter successively assumes all the forms of which it is capable, if we consider these forms in order, we shall at one point or other reach the existing form of the world, so that no error need here be feared from a false supposition."

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  • Weinel); the church supernaturally guided (R.C. apologetic; in a modified degree High Church apologetic); essential - not necessarily exclusive - truth of Paulinism, essential error in first principles of Catholicism (Protestant apologetic).

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  • (with a possible error of 30 ft.

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  • Most frequently he will be required either to protect a good bowl or to rectify a possible error of the leader.

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  • During the draft riots in July he proclaimed the city and county of New York in a state of insurrection, but in a speech to the rioters adopted a tone of conciliation - a political error which injured his career.

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  • In no modern country is error or incompetence on the part of administrators more swiftly followed by retribution.

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  • Most frequently he will be required either to protect a good bowl or to rectify a possible error of the leader.

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  • The second methodology error that futurists often commit is the exact opposite of the first.

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  • I thought I might be able to fix the time setting by trial and error but I was at a loss establishing a location.

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  • Partly to satisfy public opinion, partly in order to profit by the favorable disposition of the British government, and partly in the hope of remedying the error committed in 1882 by refusal to co-operate with Great Britain in Egypt, the Italian government in January 1885 despatched an expedition under Admiral Caimi and Colonel Saletta to occupy Massawa and Beilul.

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  • The seeds are harvested from various grasses, especially from Aristida oligantha, a species known as " ant rice," which often grows in quantity close to the site selected for the nest, but the statement that the ants deliberately sow this grass is an error, due, according to Wheeler, to the sprouting of germinating seeds.

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  • 2 35 51.997 With these three independent values, all falling within a range of os.25, it is improbable that the mean value has an error as large as os.10.

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  • Rowland and others, necessitated by modern requirements, have shown that it is in error, but by less than 1%.

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  • Only by watching closely moment by moment the movement of that flow and comparing it with the movement of the ship do we convince ourselves that every bit of it is occasioned by the forward movement of the ship, and that we were led into error by the fact that we ourselves were imperceptibly moving.

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  • The others, one's neighbors, le prochain, as you and Princess Mary call it, are the chief source of all error and evil.

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  • The first error is to assert that history unfolds in a basically linear fashion, that there is a fundamental continuity between the past, present, and future.

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  • He muttered some lame excuse, feigning making an error.

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  • He would simply have to learn by trial and error.

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  • Even if the slide itself is mechanically perfect, the irregularity in the thickness of the lubricating oil between the bearing surfaces of the slide is apt to produce a variable error.

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  • The error brought him into fresh disgrace lasting till his death.

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  • Of English plays, the interlude called Jack Juggler (between 1547 and 1553) was based on the Amphitruo, and the lost play called the Historie of Error (acted in 1577) was probably based on the Menae-chmi; Nicholas Udall's Ralph Royster Doyster, the first English comedy (acted before 1551, first printed 1566), is founded on the Miles gloriosus; Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors (about 1591) is an adaptation of the Menaechmi; and his Falstaff may be regarded as an idealized reproduction or development of the braggart soldier of Plautus and Terence - a type of character which reappears in other forms not only in English literature (e.g.

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  • One does not suggest that this concentration was an error.

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  • Constant use, increased friction (m o r e especially at high speeds), and damage to the rotator will alter an ascertained log error; head or following seas, strong winds, currents and tidal streams also FIG.

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  • since the initial and final temperatures, which alone determine the variation in the thermal effect, are in almost all cases within the ordinary laboratory range of a few degrees, this influence may in general be neglected without serious error.

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  • Differences of opinion there must be; but "heresy is not an error of the understanding but an error of the will."

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  • They are in error who hold the opinion that the negligence and bad husbandry of the former owner is good for his successor.

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  • From this follows the necessity for the created spirit, after apostasy, error and sin, to return always to its origin in God.

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  • Thus it became possible for almost any diligent reader without much chance of error to refer to its proper place nearly every bird he was likely to meet with.

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  • It has passed through a far greater number of editions than any other work on natural history in the whole world, and has become emphatically an English classic - the graceful simplicity of its style, the elevating tone of its spirit, and the sympathetic chords it strikes recommending it to every lover of Nature, while the severely scientific reader can scarcely find an error in any statement it contains, whether of matter of fact or opinion.

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  • By the numbers prefixed it would look as if there should be four new members of this order; but that seems to be due rather to a slip of the pen or to a printer's error.

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  • something like Aptal or Haptal, but the initial N of the third is believed to be a clerical error.

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  • (pp. 1-22), which is sometimes designated De Utilitate Scientiarum, treats of the four offendicula, or causes of error.

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  • The last error is the most dangerous, and is, in a sense, the cause of all the others.

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  • First appears to have come the treatise now called Compendium Studii Philosophiae (Brewer pp. 393-519), containing an account of the causes of error, and then entering at length upon grammar.

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  • The mass becomes unduly sanguine or weakly surrenders to panic. Hence the law of error does not apply, and speculation by the public may unsteady prices.

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  • Who can still affirm that all which in this realm appears as striking rests only on deception and error?

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  • Partly by contact with the Byzantines, partly by conflict with the Mahommedans, the Franks learned new methods 1 Authors like Heeren (Versuch einer Entwickelung der Folgen der Kreuzziige) and Michaud (in the last volume of his Histoire des croisades) fall into the error of assigning all things to the Crusades.

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  • This can be then compared with the observed scale reading and the error of the ammeter noted.'

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  • He intended fully to restrain within legal bounds the opposition which the excise on domestic spirits had provoked, but he made the serious mistake of not allowing sufficiently for the character of the backwoods population When legal resistance developed into insurrection, Gallatin did his best to retrieve his error and prevent open war.

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  • This view was modified by Liebig, who regarded ether as ethyl oxide, and alcohol as the hydrate of ethyl oxide; here, however, he was in error, for he attributed to alcohol a molecular weight double its true value.

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  • Latitudes from the observations of travellers may generally be trusted, but longitudes should be accepted with caution; for so competent an observer as Captain Speke placed the capital of Uganda in longitude 32° 44' E., when its true longitude as determined by more trustworthy observations is 32° 26' E., an error of 18'.

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  • It should be noted that he places Syene only two degrees to the east of Alexandria instead of three degrees, the actual meridian distance between the two places; a difference which would result from an error of only 7° is the orientation of the map used by Ptolemy.

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  • An even graver source of error was Ptolemy's acceptance of a degree of Soo instead of 700 stadia.

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  • io08), Zarkala (Azarchel), who determined the meridian distance between his observatory in Toledo and Bagdad to amount to 51° 30', an error of 3° only, as compared with Ptolemy's error of 18°, and Abul Hassan (1230) who reduced the great axis of the Mediterranean to 44°.

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  • There exists, however, a serious error of orientation, due, according to Professor H.

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  • 24), still adheres to the erroneous Ptolemaic delineation of southern Asia, and the same error is perpetuated by Henricus Marvellus Germanus on a rough map showing the Portuguese discoveries up to 1489.

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  • Such an error could never have arisen had the old compilers of maps taken the trouble to plan Marco Polo's routes.

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  • The is-i is omitted by a through a simple scribal error.

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  • It figured in astronomical tables until the time of Copernicus, but is now known to have no foundation in fact, being based on an error in Ptolemy's determination of precession.

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  • cap. Ioi), confesses the error into which he thus fell.

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  • As an exponent of Plato he suffered from the fatal error of confounding Plato with the later Platonists.

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  • The true site can be determined, if at all, by excavation only; identifications based on mere outward similarity of names have always been fruitful sources of error.

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  • "There cannot be a greater error than the fear so generally prevalent as to the overissue of assignats.

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  • The enemy, having everything to gain and nothing to lose thereby, agreed finally to a six weeks' suspension of arms. This was perhaps the gravest military error of Napoleon's whole career, and his excuse for it, " want of adequate cavalry," is the strongest testimony as to the value of that arm.

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  • The next day Massena turned the Sierra by the Boyalva Pass and Sardao, which latter place, owing to an error, had not been occupied by the Portuguese, and Wellington then retreated by Coimbra and Leiria to the lines, which he entered on the 11th of October, having within them fully ioo,000 able-bodied men.

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  • In 1536 Hamburg joined the league of Schmalkalden, for which error it had to pay a heavy fine in 1547 when the league had been defeated.

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  • The determination of the true relation between the length of a pendulum and the time of its oscillation; the invention of the theory of evolutes; the discovery, hence ensuing, that the cycloid is its own evolute, and is strictly isochronous; the ingenious although practically inoperative idea of correcting the "circular error" of the pendulum by applying cycloidal cheeks to clocks - were all contained in this remarkable treatise.

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  • The latest result is 299,860 kilometres per second, with a probable error of perhaps 30 kilometres - that is, about the ten-thousandth part of the quantity itself.

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  • Unfortunately these eclipses are not sudden but slowly changing phenomena, so that they cannot be observed without an error of at least several seconds, and not infrequently important fractions of a minute.

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  • As the entire time required for light to pass over the radius of the earth's orbit is only about 500 seconds, this error is fatal to the method.

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  • In each case the results of the observations may be systematically in error, not only from the uncertain diameter of the moon, but in a still greater degree from the varying effect of irradiation and the personal equation of the observers.

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  • 8.818" The question of the possible or probable error of these results is one on which there is a marked divergence of opinion among investigators.

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  • Curves of magnetization (which express the relation of I to H) have a close resemblance to those of induction; and, indeed, since B = H+47r1, and 47rI (except in extreme fields) greatly exceeds H in numerical value, we may generally, without serious error, put I = B /47r, and transform curves of induction into curves of magnetization by merely altering the scale to which the ordinates are referred.

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  • 14000 B goo I 75] at the right-hand side of the diagram, the greatest error introduced by neglecting H/47r not exceeding o 6%.

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  • Soc., 1886, 40, 495 or by reversals - the source of error due to the transverse cut thus being avoided.

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  • With this arrangement it is possible to find the actual value of the magnetizing force, corrected for the effects of joints and other sources of error.

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  • The values assigned to H were calculated from H= 2ni/r, and ranged from 3.9 to 585, but inasmuch as no account was taken of any 2 Since in most practicable experiments H 2 is negligible in comparison with B 2, the force may be taken as B 2 /87r without sensible= error.

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  • Thus the magnetization which the sample of Swedish iron received in a field of 1490 was not increased (beyond the limits of experimental error) when the intensity of the field was multiplied more than thirteen-fold, though the induction was nearly doubled.

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  • 6 Many of the figures which, through an error, were inaccurately stated in the first paper are corrected in the second.

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  • Bidwell," who, adopting special precautions against sources of error by which former work was probably affected, measured the changes of thermo-electric force for iron, steel, nickel and cobalt produced by magnetic fields up to I Soo units.

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  • In the case of iron and nickel it was found that, when correction was made for mechanical stress due to magnetization, magnetic change of thermo-electric force was, within the limits of experimental error, proportional to magnetic change of length.

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  • The results of experiments as to the effect of magnetization were for long discordant and inconclusive, sufficient care not having been taken to avoid sources of error, while the effects of hysteresis were altogether disregarded.

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  • The confusion has arisen through a textual error in an early edition of Ptolemy's Geography.

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  • Though but faintly pictured in the Vedic hymns, he is there invoked with Ormazd, or Ahuramazda, the god of the sky, and is clearly a divinity of light, the protector of truth and the enemy of error and falsehood.

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  • In the porch of the church is the most interesting of the extant old tombs, namely, the recumbent effigy of Alexander Stewart, the Wolf of Badenoch (1 3431405; the inscription refers his death to 1394, but this is said to be an error).

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  • The Schoolmen had no historical sense and little historical information; hence they fell into one error after another on the essentials in the rite of ordination.

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  • The hypostatizing of abstractions is the error against which Occam is continually fighting.

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  • The device known as the method of least squares, for reducing numerous equations of condition to the number of unknown quantities to be determined, had been adopted as a practically convenient rule by Gauss and Legendre; but Laplace first treated it as a problem in probabilities, and proved by an intricate and difficult course of reasoning that it was also the most advantageous, the mean of the probabilities of error in the determination of the elements being thereby reduced to a minimum.

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  • This is the foundation of the use of recurring decimals; thus we can replace = s s = 1 o o /(' - 1 + 0 -)1 by .363636(=36/102 +36/ 104 +3 6 / 106), with an error (in defect) of only 36/(10 6.99).

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  • 1 The anatomical error in reference to the auricles of Reptiles and Batrachians on the part of Linnaeus is extremely interesting, since it shows to what an extent the most patent facts may escape the observation of even the greatest observers, and what an amount of repeated dissection and unprejudiced attention has been necessary before the structure of the commonest animals has become known.

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  • When f attains a certain value, say the extreme error of phase to be compensated falls to X.

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  • But, as we have seen, such an error of phase causes no sensible deterioration in the definition; so that from this point onwards the lens is useless, as only improving an image already sensibly as perfect as the aperture admits of.

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  • The question is whether, when the adjustment of focus is correct for the central rays of the spectrum, the error of phase for the most extreme rays (which it is necessary to consider) amounts to a quarter of a wave-length.

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  • An admissible error of phase of 4X will correspond to an error of IX in a reflecting and 2X in a (glass) refracting surface, the incidence in both cases being perpendicular.

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  • We have seen that in perpendicular reflection a surface error not exceeding IX may be admissible.

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  • 5) is QQ'- QS = BD sec 4:,(I - cos SQQ') = BD sec cI)(1 +cos 20) = 2BD cos 4); from which it follows that an error of given magnitude in the figure of a surface is less important in oblique than in perpendicular reflection.

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  • But, to obtain an equally good result in the m th spectrum, the error must be less than I/m of the above amount.'

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  • and, as we have just seen, the term in x 2 corresponds to a linear error in the spacing.

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  • The error thus arising may be compensated by a rotation of the object-glass about one of the diameters y= =x.

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  • A linear error in the spacing, and a general curvature of the lines, are eliminated in the ordinary use of a grating.

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  • If the semi-angular aperture (w) be T 36, and tan 0' might be as great as four millions before the error of phase would reach 4X.

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  • Claudius Ptolemy (130) rectified this error, and in the so-called syntonous or intense diatonic scale reduced the proportions of his tetrachord to s, iii, f, -i.

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  • According to Eusebius, they were convinced of their error by Origen, and renounced it at a council held about A.D.

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  • Otric, suspecting that Gerbert erred in his classification of the sciences, sent one of his own pupils to Reims to take notes of his lectures, and, finding his suspicions correct, accused him of his error before Otto II.

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  • In England, on the other hand, it was thought by most people that if a firm enough attitude were adopted Mr Kruger would " climb down," and the effect of this error was shown partly in the whole course of the negotiations, partly in the tone personally adopted by Mr Chamberlain.

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  • "When many were subdued to error through persecution, our fathers through God were steadfast and stood out manfully, and this blessed city has never been defiled by the error of Nazareth."

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  • Similarly (in a iothcentury form of renunciation of Bogomil error preserved in a Vienna codex 1) we hear of Peter "the founder of the heresy of the Messalians or Lycopetrians or Fundaitae and Bogomils who called himself Christ and promised to rise again after death."

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  • Though the Hippocratic medicine was so largely founded on observation, it would be an error to suppose that dogma or theory had no place.

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  • Little is known of him, and Timaeus even doubted his existence, but it is now generally agreed that this is an error.

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  • On the other hand in the case of uncertain and irregular deposits, the value of which varies between very wide limits, as, for example - in most metal mines and especially mines of gold and silver - a very large number of samples must be taken - sometimes not more than two or three feet apart - in order that the average value of the ore may be known within reasonable limits of error.

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  • The reading of " 9 soss and 36 years," which gives the total 576 years, he suggested was a scribal error for " 6 soss and 39 years "; he thus reduced the length of Dynasty III.

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  • By a pure error, or perhaps through a confusion in the traditions, Achish the Philistine (of Gath, I Sam.

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  • Somewhat curiously, but very naturally, Enoch the son of Cain is confused with the Enoch who was translated to heaven - an error which the author of the Old English Genesis avoids, though (according to the existing text) he confounds the names of Enoch and Enos.

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  • Their theological teaching is misty and perplexing; their earliest writings contain no error, and the hymns of their great St Ephrem, still sung in their services, are positively antagonistic to "Nestorianism"; their theology dating from the schism is not so satisfactory.

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  • His eleventh-hour conversion could not avert the conflict of interests which led to the war of 1904-5, from which Russia emerged defeated, but enabled him to veil a serious diplomatic error by relinquishing the odium of failure to his successor, Rosen.

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  • It was in the stronghold ("cave" is a scribal error) of this town that David took refuge on two occasions (I Sam.

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  • Without scientific training 01 any kind Matsumoto and his followers produced works in which the eye of science cannot detect any error.

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  • It is therefore an error to assert that KiOto has no longer a title to be called a great ceramic centre.

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  • It has been generally assumed that the ecclesiastical authority was always competent to determine what are the fundamental articles of the Christian faith, and to detect any departures from them; but it is necessary to admit the possibility that the error was in the church, and the truth was with the heresy.

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  • (ii.) There cannot be any heresy where there is no orthodoxy, and, therefore, in the definition it is assumed that the church has declared what is the truth or the error in any matter.

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  • Origen indulged in many speculations which were afterwards condemned, but, as these matters were still open questions in his day, he was not reckoned a heretic. (iii.) In accordance with the New Testament use of the term heresy, it is assumed that moral defect accompanies the intellectual error, that the false view is held pertinaciously, in spite of warning, remonstrance and rebuke; aggressively to win over others, and so factiously, to cause division in the church, a breach in its unity.

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  • When the Christian faith is being formulated, undue emphasis may be put on one aspect, and thus so partial a statement of truth may result in error.

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  • the Roman Catholic Church," heresy was defined as "error which is voluntarily held in contradiction to a doctrine which has been clearly stated in the creed, and has become part of the defined faith of the church," and which is "persisted in by a member of the church."

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  • It was regarded not only as an error, but also as a crime to be detected and punished.

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  • c. 12, § 2, enacts that" if any person ecclesiastical, or which shall have an ecclesiastical living, shall advisedly maintain or affirm any doctrine directly contrary or repugnant to any of the said articles, and by conventicle before the bishop of the diocese, or the ordinary, or before the queen's highness's commissioners in matters ecclesiastical, shall persist therein or not revoke his error, or after such revocation eftsoons affirm such untrue doctrine,"he shall be deprived of his ecclesiastical promotions.

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  • of temperature (o' - o") is small, the figure ABCD may be regarded as a parallelogram, and its area W as equal to the rectangle BE XEC. This is accurately true in the limit when (0' - 0") is infinitesimal, but in practice it is necessary to measure specific heats, &c., over finite ranges of temperature, and the error involved is generally negligible if the range does not exceed a few degrees.

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  • As a preacher, his message was apparently simple; his two great convictions were the fatherhood of God, and that all religious systems which had any stability lasted because of a portion of truth which had to be disentangled from the error differentiating them from.

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  • If the creed-phrases needed sharpening against the revived Nestorian error of the Adoptianists, it is scarcely likely to have been written during the generation following the condemnation of Nestorius in 431.

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  • But the addition was very far from being an improvement on the work of Calippus; for instead of a difference of only five hours and fifty-three minutes between the places of the sun and moon, which was the whole error of the Calippic period, this difference, in the period of eighty-four years, amounted to one day, six hours and forty-one minutes.

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  • "For the Church of England," he there says, "I am persuaded that the constant doctrine of it is so pure and orthodox, that whosoever believes it, and lives according to it, undoubtedly he shall be saved, and that there is no error in it which may necessitate or warrant any man to disturb the peace or renounce the communion of it.

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  • We must be careful, however, not to fall into the error of supposing that he wrote it with the sole object of meeting an occasional emergency.

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  • This, we submit, was a deep-seated error in his theory of life, an error to which may be ascribed the numerous stumbling-blocks and rocks of offence in his more serious writings.

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  • 55) was measured on four nights; the probable error of a measure on one night was 0" 44.

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  • From a series of measures of the angle between Jupiter's satellites and the planet, made in June and July 1794 and in August and September 1795, Schur finds the mass of Jupiter =I / Io 4 8.55 1.45, a result which accords well within the limits of its probable error with the received value of the mass derived from modern researches.

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  • 5, p. iv.) he found that the index error of the scale changed systematically in different position angles by quantities which were independent of the direction of gravity relative to the position angle under measurement, but which depended solely on the direction of the measured position angle relative to a fixed radius of the object-glass.

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  • 105-115) to determine the division error of every line on both scales with a probable error corresponding to 0 " 0092 arc.

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  • If measures are made by placing the image of a star in the centre of the disk of a planet, the observer may have a tendency to do so systematically in error from some acquired habit or from natural astigmatism of the eye.

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  • But by rotating the prism 90° the image is presented entirely reversed to the eye, so that in the mean of measures made in two such positions personal error is eliminated.

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  • The measures can be made on both sides of zero for eliminating index error.

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  • Particularly steep slopes are found in the case of submarine domes, usually incomplete volcanic cones, and there have been cases in which after such a dome has been discovered by the soundings of a surveying ship it could not be found again as its whole area was so small and the deep floor of the ocean from which it rose so flat that an error of 2 or 3 m.

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  • They had been preceded by others under various signatures such as "Candor," "Father of Candor," "Anti-Sejanus," "Lucius," "Nemesis," which have all been attributed, some of them certainly in error, to one and the same hand.

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  • are very large, then, for all states except an infinitesimal fraction of the whole number, the values of u, v, w lie within ranges such that (i) the values of u (and similarly of v, w) are distributed among the s molecules of the first kind according to the law of trial and error; and similarly of course for the molecules of other kinds: (ii) E2mu2 E2mv 2 E2mw2 ?2aie12 s S s s s s - s E s' S' s' - - s' ' See Jeans, Dynamical Theory of Gases (1904), ch.

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  • Since the volume at constant pressure is exactly proportional to the absolute temperature, it follows that the coefficients of expansion of all gases ought, to within the limits of error introduced by the assumptions on which we are working, to have the same value 1/273.

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  • The dates assigned by Jerome for his birth and death are 148 and 103 or 102 B.C. But it is impossible to reconcile the first of these dates with other facts recorded of him, and the date given by Jerome must be due to an error, the true date being about 180 B.C. We learn from Velleius Paterculus that he served under Scipio at the siege of Numantia in 134.

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  • But with these advances came the danger of falling into error from which common-sense dualism and naturalistic monism were free.

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  • But if it is an error to treat the unity of the world as its only real aspect, it is equally an error to treat its differences as something ultimately irreducible.

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  • If the scale is only slightly out of the perpendicular, a few taps of the hammer will modify any trifling error."

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  • Tilt of sights in field guns owing to the sinking of one wheel had long been recognized as a source of error, and allowed for by a rule-of-thumb correction, depending on the fact that the track of the wheels of British field artillery gun-carriages is 60", so that, for every inch one wheel is lower than the other, the whole system is turned through one degree - a_ hXl ?

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  • Personal error is to a great extent eliminated, power of vision extended, the sight is self-contained, there is no fore-sight, a fine pointer in the telescope being aligned on the target.

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  • Also quoted as having appeared 1745, but that is an error; he quotes F.

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  • The report on this census contained a very valuable exposition of the difficulties involved in such operations and the numerous sources of error latent in an apparently simple set of questions.

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  • Efforts to invalidate the census returns by comparison with the registration records of Massachusetts cannot be deemed conclusive, since in the United States, as in Great Britain, the census must be deemed more accurate and less subject to error than registration records.

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  • The census of agriculture is also liable to a wide margin of error, owing to defects in farm accounts and the inability of many farmers to state the amount or the value even of the leading crops.

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  • Another source of error in the manufacturing census of the United States is that the words of the census law are construed as requiring an enumeration of the various trades and handicrafts, such as carpentering.

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  • (b) It must, however, be remembered that in all practical applications of formulae the data have first to be ascertained by direct or indirect measurement; and this measurement involves a certain margin of error.

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  • The two sources of error mentioned under (a) and (b) above are closely related.

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  • (iii) In dealing with cases where actual measurements are involved, the error (i) due to inaccuracy of the formula will often be negligible in comparison with the error (ii) due to inaccuracy of the data.

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  • The main mistake is in giving the result as true to a small fraction of a square inch; but, if this degree of accuracy had been possible, it would have been wrong to give 7r a value which is in error by more than 1 in 2000.

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  • The volume of a frustum of a cone, for instance, can be expressed in terms of certain magnitudes by a certain formula; but not only will there be some error in the measurement of these magnitudes, but there is not any material figure which is an exact cone.

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  • The error was discovered, and the Delians applied to Plato for his advice, and Plato referred them to Eudoxus.

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  • But in working out the consequences of this view Say is not free from obscurities and inconsistencies; and by his comprehension of these immaterial products within the domain of economics he is confirmed in the error of regarding that science as filling the whole sphere which really belongs to sociology.

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  • with a probable error estimated at o Io metre.

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  • Some curious examples of echo are given in Herschel's article on " Sound " in the Encyclopaedia Metropolitana, but it appears that he is in error in one case.

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  • With sixteen teeth the pitch was well defined; with nine teeth it was fairly determinate; and even with two teeth it could be assigned with no great error.

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  • The use of "Adam" (וחוה) as a proper name is an early error.

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  • 19), and may correct in an award any clerical mistake or error arising from an accidental slip or omission.

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  • Any error of this kind will merely affect the form of the frame; if, however, another member be introduced between A and D, then if BC be shortened AD will be strained so as to extend it, and the four other members will be compressed; if G CB is lengthened AD will thereby be compressed, and the four other members extended; if the workman does not make CB and AD of exactly the right length they and all the members will be permanently strained.

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  • Through an error, in many recent maps and Assyriological publications Eridu is described as located in the alluvial plain, between the Tigris and the Euphrates.

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  • This beautiful picture of the Christian life as a realized ideal, and of Christians as "the soul" of the world, owes its inclusion to a double error: first, to the accidental attachment at the end of another fragment (§ II), which opens with the writer's claim to stand forth as a teaclier as being "a disciple of apostles"; and next, to mistaken exegesis of this phrase as implying personal relations with apostles, rather than knowledge of their teaching, written or oral.

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  • - A gas meter which has an error of more than 2% in favour of the seller or 3% in favour of the customer is not passed for use.

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  • Out of nearly 700 current motor meters of various makes tested at Munich in 1902, only 319 had an error of less than 4%, whilst 259 had errors varying from 42 to io%.

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  • But even this error benefited science; some well directed excavations at Alaise brought many Roman remains to light, which were subsequently sent to enrich the museum at Besancon.

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  • It has been repeatedly claimed for Mayer that he calculated the value of the dynamical equivalent of heat, indirectly, no doubt, but in a manner altogether free from error, and with a result according almost exactly with that obtained by J.

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  • Even Julien Gamier could discover that Erasmus "falls in his haste into grievous error in his Latin version of St Basil, though his Latinity is superior to that of the other translators" (Pref.

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  • In view of this difficulty, it was claimed that the apostles had appointed the bishops as their successors, and that the latter were in possession of special divine grace enabling them to transmit and to interpret without error the teaching of the apostles committed to them.

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  • Aristotle is commonly supposed to be the first author who mentions a parrot; but this is an error, for nearly a century earlier Ctesias in his Indica (cap. 3),2 under the name of fib-Taws (Bittacus), so neatly described a bird which could speak an "Indian" language - naturally, as he seems to have thought - or Greek - if it had been taught so to do - about as big as a sparrow-hawk (Hierax), with a purple face and a black beard, otherwise blue-green (cyaneus) and vermilion in colour, so that there cannot be much risk in declaring that he must have had before him a male example of what is now commonly known as the Blossom-headed parakeet, and to ornithologists as Palaeornis cyanocephalus, an inhabitant of many parts of India.

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  • While refusing to acknowledge the Roman Church as the true church, he allowed it to be a true church and a branch of the Catholic body, at the same time emphasizing the perils of knowingly associating with error; and with regard to the English Church he denied that the acceptance of all its articles was necessary.

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  • 184, 254) also deserve mention, as well as his discussions of the rotation of Mars, by which he deduced its period with a probable error of 0 9.005.

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  • After all care has been taken in laying and pointing, in accordance with the rules of theory and practice, absolute certainty of hitting the same spot every time is unattainable, as causes of error exist which cannot be eliminated, such as variations in the air and in the muzzle-velocity, and also in the steadiness of the shot in flight.

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  • If then the amperemeter scale reading was 100 it would show an error of that scale reading of minus 1.9 amperes or nearly 2%.

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  • The aim of scientific Old Testament criticism is to obtain, through discrimination between truth and error, a full appreciation of the literature which constitutes the Old Testament, of the life out of which it grew, and the secret of the influence which these have exerted and still exert.

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  • Lehmann holds that there are reasons for believing that the engraver, by error, put a stroke too many, and that 2200 should be read instead of 3200.5 The real Biblical date.

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  • If these dates are correct, there must be some error in the ages assigned to Ahaz and Hezekiah at their accession, viz.

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  • But, though the fact of there being errors in the Biblical figures is patent, it is not equally clear at what points the error lies, or how the available years ought to be redistributed between the various reigns.

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  • With the methods of history, these writers were naturally exposed to the risks and chances of error attendant upon those methods.

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  • The obvious solution would be to say that where two agree their reading is probably correct, but the followers of WH maintain that the agreement of the Western and Eastern is often an agreement in error.

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  • It is difficult to see how texts, geographically so wide apart as the Old Latin and Old Syriac would seem to be, are likely to agree in error, but it is certainly true that some readings found in both texts seem to have little probability.

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  • 25; or (ii.) St Luke has made here a second error in chronology, caused perhaps in this case by reckoning back from the Crucifixion, and only allowing one year to the ministry of Christ.

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  • 29 - from being to any wide extent in error.

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  • His other statements of saton = 56 or 50 sextaria remain unexplained, unless this be an error for bath = 56 or 50 Syr.

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  • In the verification of weights and measures a margin of error is permitted to manufacturers and scale-makers, as it is found to be impossible to make two weights, or two measures, so identical that between them some difference may not be found either by the balance or the microscope.

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  • For common weights and measures this margin (tolerance, remedy or allowance, as it is also called) has been set out by the Board of Trade for all the various kinds of weights and measures in use for commercial purposes in the United Kingdom, and similar margins of error are recognized in other countries.

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  • Even those who do not fall into the error of making Smith the creator of the science, often separate him too broadly from Quesnay and his followers, and represent the history of modern economics as consisting of the successive rise and reign of three doctrines - the mercantile, the physiocratic and the Smithian.

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  • It was formerly wrongly supposed, and even Locke and Montesquieu did not escape this error, that the fall in the value of the precious metals consequent on the discovery of the American mines was the real cause of the general lowering of the rate of interest in Europe.

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  • Some valuable notes are added by the translator, in one of which he shows the accuracy of the method employed by Napier in his calculations, and explains the origin of a small error which occurs in Napier's table.

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  • He was generally, by a curious error, regarded as the first emperor of Rome,' and representing as he did in the popular mind the glory of Rome, by an easy transition he became a pillar of the Church.

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  • The census of 1895 increased the whites to 22%, which was apparently an error, the mixed bloods to 47%, and reduced the Indians to 31%.

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  • It is an error of the Spanish authorities to pretend that the Pipil civilization in Guatemala and Salvador is not older than the time of King Ahuitzotl (c. 1482-1486).

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  • He that shall do contrary to this shall likewise be punished as a favourer of heresy and error."

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  • As no attempt was made to stop him in the Straits of Gibraltar, he passed them on the 16th of May, and though the rawness of his crews and his own error in wasting time in pursuit of prizes delayed his passage, he reached the mouth of the Delaware on the 8th of July unopposed.

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  • Probably Saladin made his worst strategical error in neglecting to conquer it before winter.

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  • The original one, made by Newton and Pullan, is obviously in error in many respects; and that of Oldfield, though to be preferred for its lightness (the Mausoleum was said anciently to be "suspended in mid-air"), does not satisfy the conditions postulated by the remains.

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  • In the rubric in question words are altered here and there in a way which shows that its reappearance can hardly be a mere printer's error; but in any case its importance is very slight, for the Act of Uniformity specially provides that the English service alone is to be used for the Eucharist.

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  • In the course of history the demons sought to bind men to themselves by means of sensuality, error and false religions (among which is to be reckoned above all the religion of Moses and the prophets), while the spirits of light carried on their process of distillation with the view of gaining the pure light which exists in the world.

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  • From Catholicism, which he very probably had no detailed knowledge of, he borrowed nothing, rejecting it as devilish error.

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  • This sort of dual control works with less friction and delay than might have been expected, but better appointments would probably be secured if responsibility were more fully and more clearly fixed on the president alone, though there would no doubt be a risk that the president might make a serious error.

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  • As peculiarities of arrangement may be noticed the position of the kitchen (Q), between the refectory and calefactory, and of the infirmary (W) (unless there is some error in its designation) above the river to the west, adjoining the guest-houses (XX).

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  • and produced it to meet the tangent at A in E; and then his assertion (not established by him) was that AE was nearly equal to the arc AC, the error being in defect.

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  • He was killed by natives at Nukapu, in the Santa Cruz group, on the 10th of September 1871, the victim of a tragic error.

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  • It is largely due to the overlooking of this phase of the question that an American statistician has fallen into the error of stating that about 16s.

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  • Z will be the archetype of all our existing MSS., and we may embody our results in a pedigree of manuscripts or stemma codicum as follows: A 13 C D If we have done our work properly, the texts that we arrive at for X and for Y will be freer from error than the texts of the separate members of the families B, C and D, and E, F, G respectively, and that of Z freer from error than that authenticated by any existing MS.

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  • Proper names, technical expressions, quotations from foreign languages, and frequent change of subject, are all likely to cause difficulty to a scribe and error in his work.

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  • Secondly, since different scribes are prone to different kinds of error, we must ever bear in mind the particular failings of the scribes responsible for the transmission of our text as these failings are revealed in the apparatus criticus.

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  • Is a scribe, who recognizes under a corruption the word certainly intended, to perpetuate the error of the exemplar?

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  • And the price is that the reader's perception of the signification of the word or words so wrested is dimmed and impaired, and his power of discriminating and understanding them when he meets them again is shot with doubt and error.

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  • The proper course would be not to mention the first conjecturer or to mention him only for his error.

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  • Much depends on the precision with which an error can be corrected: wherever there are more plausible ways than one of doing this, the faulty reading must be allowed to remain.

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