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episcopal

episcopal

episcopal Sentence Examples

  • The pope when teaching ex cathedra acts as head of the whole episcopal body and of the whole Church.

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  • crociarius, the bearer of the episcopal crook (Med.

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  • Norfolk is the see of a Protestant Episcopal bishopric. The city has a public park of 110 acres and various smaller ones, and in the vicinity are several summer resorts, notably Virginia Beach, Ocean View, Old Point Comfort, Pine Beach and Willoughby Beach.

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  • The old episcopal palace of Kongsgaard is now a Latin school.

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  • building and St Paul's Episcopal, the Second Presbyterian and St Mary's (Roman Catholic) churches.

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  • LEON, the capital of the department of Leon, Nicaragua, an episcopal see, and the largest city in the republic, situated midway between Lake Managua and the Pacific Ocean, 50 m.

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  • In return they usually had a house near the episcopal palace, a domain within and without the city, and sometimes the right to levy certain dues on the city.

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  • It is the seat of the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station and of Hobart College (nonsectarian), which was first planned in 1812, was founded in 1822 (the majority of its incorporators being members of the Protestant Episcopal church) as successor to Geneva Academy, received a full charter as Geneva College in 1825, and was renamed Hobart Free College in 1852 and Hobart College in 1860, in honour of Bishop John Henry Hobart.

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  • Delaware is the seat of the Ohio Wesleyan University (co-educational), founded by the Ohio Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1841, and opened as a college in 1844; it includes a college of liberal arts (1844), an academic department (1841), a school of music (1877), a school of fine arts (1877), a school of oratory (1894), a business school (1895), and a college of medicine (the Cleveland College of Physicians and Surgeons, at Cleveland, Ohio; founded as the Charity Hospital Medical College in 1863, and the medical department of the university of Wooster until 1896, when, under its present name, it became a part of Ohio Wesleyan University).

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  • The old (1678) and new (1873) episcopal palaces, the hospital, the university and the barracks (formerly a Franciscan monastery) are noteworthy examples of Spanish colonial architecture.

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  • For the Rhine provinces not incorporated in Prussia, with the special object of regulating episcopal elections; concerned Wurttemberg, Baden, Hesse, Saxony, Nassau, Frankfort, the Hanseatic towns, Oldenburg and Waldeck.

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  • Near the cathedral is the episcopal palace, and in the same part of the town is the Batthyaneum, founded by Bishop Count Batthyany in 1794.

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  • west of the city is the North Alabama Conference College (Methodist Episcopal South), opened in 1897.

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  • by the Presbyterian Churches accepting the episcopal model.

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  • THE System Described As compared with the Church of England (Episcopal) in which there are three orders of clergy - bishops, priests and deacons, Order.

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  • The work of the presbytery is episcopal.

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  • The immigrants from England took with them, in like manner, their attachment to the Episcopal Church.

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  • Within the Episcopal Church and supported by its endowments, Robert Blair, John Livingstone and other ministers maintained a Scottish Presbyterian communion.

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  • The Church Act of 186g which disestablished and disendowed the Irish Episcopal Church took away the Presbyterian regium donum.

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  • Shields (1825-1904), who afterwards entered the Protestant Episcopal Church, republished and urged the adoption of the Book of Common Prayer as amended by the Westminster Divines in the royal commission of 1661; and Henry Van Dyke was prominent in the latter stage of the movement for a liturgy.

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  • Dr Briggs remained a member of the Union Seminary faculty but left the Presbyterian Church to enter the Protestant Episcopal.

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  • PARMA, a town and episcopal see of Emilia, Italy, capital of the province of Parma, situated on the Parma, a tributary of the Po, 55 m.

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  • The episcopal palace shows traces of the building of 1232.

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  • Jacopo alla Lungara, and (probably) the magnificent episcopal throne and choir-screen in S.

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  • His ancestor, Richard Seymour, a Protestant Episcopal ` clergyman, was an early settler at Hartford, Connecticut, and his father, Henry Seymour, who removed from Connecticut to New York, was prominent in the Democratic party in the state, being a member of the "Albany Regency" and serving as state senator in1816-1819and in 1822, and as canal commissioner in 1819-1831.

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  • He constructed "Morton's Dyke" across the fens from Wisbech to Peterborough, repaired the episcopal palace at Hatfield and the school of canon law and St Mary's Church at Oxford.

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  • Other buildings of note are the massive episcopal palace (1470-1500), afterwards a royal palace, and the old gymnasium founded by Gustavus Adolphus in 1627, which contains the valuable library of old books and manuscripts belonging to the diocese and state college, and collection of coins and antiquities.

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  • Tuskegee is chiefly known for its educational institutions - the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute and the Alabama Conference Female College (Methodist Episcopal Church, South; opened 1856).

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  • Two other bastards were placed on the episcopal throne of Liege, an illegitimate brother on that of Cambrai.

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  • SESSA AURUNCA, a town and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, on the S.W.

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  • Although thoroughly devoted to the ideals of monasticism, he discharged his episcopal duties with remarkable zeal and fidelity.

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  • an episcopal inquiry the pontifical commission in view of his beatification was instituted by decree of the 21st of July 1626, a celerity unique in the annals of the Congregation of Rites.

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  • It has also an episcopal see.

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  • 74 sees immediately subject to the Holy See, of which 12 are archiepiscopal and 61 episcopal.

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  • From the general confiscation were exempted the buildings actually used for public worship, as episcopal residences or seminaries, &c., or which had been appropriated to the use of schools, poorhouses, hospitals, &c.; as well as the buildings, appurtenances, and movable property of the abbeys of Monte Casino, Della Cava dci Tirreni, San Martino della Scala, Monneale, Certosa near Pavia, and other establishments of the same kind of importance as architectural or historical monuments.

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  • It was the custom for the archbishop elect to take two oaths, the first of episcopal allegiance to the pope, and the second in recognition of the royal supremacy.

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  • ACERRA, a town and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, 9 m.

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  • Paul, notwithstanding his deposition, kept possession of the episcopal residence.

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  • The episcopal judgment was to be equivalent to that of the emperor and irreversible, and the civil authorities were to see to its execution.

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  • Where the faithful had had recourse to the bishop, no appeal was to be allowed, and the judges were to command execution of the episcopal decree.

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  • The first trace of system is in the limited right of appeal given by the first oecumenical council of Nicaea and its provision that episcopal sentences or those of provincial synods on appeal were to be recognized throughout the world.

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  • Still examination must be had whether persons have been expelled from the congregation by any episcopal small-mindedness (µucpokxia), or contentious spirit, or such-like harshness (evibia).

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  • There is to be no " stay of execution "; the episcopal sentence is to prevail until the provincial synod otherwise decide.

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  • to clerics and laymen from episcopal excommunications is extended.

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  • If there be no appeal, that judge is to give execution to the episcopal award.

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  • provides that a recent decree of the usurper John should be disregarded and that clerks whom he had brought before secular judges should be reserved for the episcopal jurisdictions," since it is not lawful to subject the ministers of the divine office to the arbitrament of temporal powers."

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  • From a peculiar jurisdiction ranking as episcopal the appeal lay to the court of the metropolitan.

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  • Van Espen says: " The whole right of appeal to the Roman pontiff omisso medio had undoubtedly its origin in this principle, that the Roman pontiff is ordinary of ordinaries, or, in other words, has immediate episcopal authority in all particular churches, and this principle had its own beginning from the False Decretals."

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  • It is a Presbyterian system, and the Scottish Episcopal Church is a disestablished and voluntary body since 1690.

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  • For the episcopal churches of Sweden and Finland the first constitution or " Church order " was formed in 1571.

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  • In addition there are training schools for teachers, an episcopal seminary, a conservatoire and an art academy with a fine collection of pictures mainly taken from the religious houses of the city on their suppression in 1795.

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  • Here is situated the Randolph-Macon College (Methodist Episcopal, South), one of the oldest Methodist Episcopal colleges in the United States.

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  • Just south of the city is Kemper Hall, a Protestant Episcopal school for girls, under the charge of the Sisters of St Mary, opened in 1870 as a memorial to Jackson Kemper (1789-1870), the first missionary bishop (1835-1859), and the first bishop of Wisconsin (1854-1870) of the Protestant Episcopal Church.

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  • high, and St Luke's (Protestant Episcopal) Cathedral.

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  • In the next century members of the episcopal order were sometimes addressed in this manner: thus Cyprian is styled papas or papa by his Roman correspondents.

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  • The most important are: Bezerros (17,484), Bom Jardim (40,160), Brejo da Madre de Deus (13,655), a town of the higher agreste region, Cabo (13,337), Caruaru (17,844), Escada (9331), Garanhuns (32,788, covering six towns and villages), Gloria de Goyta (24,554), Goyanna, Limoeiro (21,576), Olinda (8080), the old colonial capital and episcopal see, Rio Formosa (6080), Timbauba (9514) and Victoria (32,422).

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  • It was at first an independent episcopal see: Gregory the Great united it with that of Cumae.

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  • NICASTRO, a town and episcopal see of Calabria, Italy, in the province of Catanzaro, 17 m.

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  • ORIHUELA, a town and episcopal see of eastern Spain, in the province of Alicante; 13 m.

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  • There are remains of a Moorish fort on the hill commanding the town; and the north gateway - the Puerta del Colegio - is a fine lofty arch, surmounted by an emblematic statue and the city arms. The most prominent buildings are the episcopal palace (1733), with a frontage of a 600 ft.; the town house (1843), containing important archives; and the cathedral, a small Gothic structure built on the site of a former mosque in the 14th century, and enlarged and tastelessly restored in 1829.

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  • Several bishops of Lichfield are buried here, as Eccleshall Castle was the episcopal residence from the 13th century until 1867.

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  • In this way the Moravian orders were maintained; the "ecclesiola" became an independent body, and the British parliament recognized the Brethren as "an ancient Protestant Episcopal Church" (1 749, 22 Geo.

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  • In response the Moravians, at the General Synod (1909), welcomed the offer, but also declared their wish (a) to preserve their independence as a "Protestant Episcopal Church"; (b) to co-operate freely as heretofore with other Evangelical Churches.

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  • ALGHERO, a seaport and episcopal see on the W.

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  • The public buildings include the cathedral (1760), the government palace, the municipal palace, the episcopal palace, the church of Santa Ana, a national theatre, a school of arts and trades, a foreign hospital, the former administration building of the Canal Company, Santo Tomas Hospital, the pesthouse of Punta Mala and various asylums. The houses are mostly of stone, with red tile roofs, two or three storeys high, built in the Spanish style around central patios, or courts, and with balconies projecting far over the narrow streets; in such houses the lowest floor is often rented to a poorer family.

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  • On the 20th of October 1349 Clement published a bull commanding the bishops and inquisitors to stamp out the growing heresy, and in pursuance of the pope's orders numbers of the sectaries perished at the stake or in the cells of the inquisitors and the episcopal justices.

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  • That event frustrated Grindal's proposed elevation to the episcopal bench and he did not consider himself bound to await the evils which he had foretold.

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  • CONEGLIANO, a town and episcopal see of Venetia, Italy, in the province of Treviso, 17 m.

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  • In his episcopal capacity he attended several diets of the empire, as well as the opening meetings of the council of Trent; and the influence of his father, now chancellor, led to his being entrusted with many difficult and delicate pieces of public business, in the execution of which he developed a rare talent for diplomacy, and at the same time acquired an intimate acquaintance with most of the currents of European politics.

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  • Cyprian, although inspired by lofty notions of the prerogatives of the church, and inclined to severity of opinion towards heretics, and especially heretical dissentients from the belief in the divine authorship of the episcopal order and the unity of Christendom, was leniently disposed towards those who had temporarily fallen from the faith.

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  • All Cyprian's literary works were written in connexion with his episcopal office; almost all his treatises and many of his letters have the character of pastoral epistles, and their form occasionally betrays the fact that they were intended as addresses.

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  • The former episcopal see of Samland was founded by Pope Innocent IV.

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  • REGGIO NELL' EMILIA, a city and episcopal see of Emilia, Italy, the capital of the province of Reggio nell' Emilia (till 1859 part of the duchy of Modena), 38 m.

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  • Parkersburg is the see of a Protestant Episcopal bishop. Oil, coal, natural gas and fire-clay abound in the neighbouring region, and the city is engaged in the refining of oil and the manufacture of pottery, brick and tile, glass, lumber, furniture, flour, steel, and foundry and machine-shop products.

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  • ADRIA (anc. Atria; the form Adria or Hadria is less correct: Hatria was a town in Picenum, the modern Atri), a town and episcopal see of Venetia, Italy, in the province of Rovigo, 15 m.

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  • ORVIETO (anc. Volsinii, later Urbs Vetus, whence the modern name), a town and episcopal see of the province of Perugia, Italy, on the Paglia, 78 m.

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  • abbots and religious superiors, who are withdrawn from the ordinary diocesan jurisdiction and themselves possess episcopal jurisdiction (jurisdictio quasi episcopalis).

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  • Theword "prelacy," meaning no more originally than the office and dignity of a prelate, came to be applied in Presbyterian Scotland and Puritan England - especially during the 17th century - to the episcopal form of church government, being used in a..

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  • In episcopal administration he far excelled most of his contemporaries.

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  • From this conference dates the actual beginning of the "Methodist Episcopal Church of the United States of America."

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  • In 1785, at Abingdon, Maryland, he laid the corner-stone of Cokesbury College, the project of Dr Coke and the first Methodist Episcopal college in America; the college building was burned in 1795, and the college was then removed to Baltimore, where in 1796, after another fire, it closed, and in 1816 was succeeded by Asbury College, which lived for about fifteen years.

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  • The origin and antiquity of the episcopal mitre have been the subject of much debate.

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  • With the episcopal mitre the Jewish miznephet, translated " mitre " in the Authorized Version (Exod.

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  • It was not till the 12th century that the mitre came to be regarded as specifically episcopal, and meanwhile the custom had grown up of granting it honoris causa to other dignitaries besides bishops.

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  • From this time onward papal bulls bestowing mitres, together with other episcopal insignia, on abbots become increasingly frequent.

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  • Mitres with horns on either side seem to have been worn till about the end of the 12th century, and Father Braun gives examples of their appearances on episcopal seals in France until far into the 13th.

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  • The tradition of the mitre as an episcopal ornament has, nevertheless, been continuous in the Church of England, " and that on three lines: (i) heraldic usage; (2) its presence on the head of effigies of bishops, of which a number are extant, of the 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th centuries; (3) its presence in funeral processions, where 1 In Father Braun's opinion, expressed to the writer, this mitre, which was formerly at Sens, belongs probably to the 13th century.

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  • Taganrog is an episcopal see of the Orthodox Greek Church, and has tanneries, tallow works and tobacco manufactures.

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  • In 1642 he was appointed lecturer at St Margaret's, Westminster, and delivered a series of addresses to the Commons in which he advocated episcopal and liturgical reform.

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  • His episcopal labours were still more arduous.

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  • FOSSOMBRONE (anc. Forum Sempronii), a town and episcopal see of the Marches, Italy, in the province of Pesaro and Urbino, 11 m.

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  • CITTA DELLA PIEVE, a town and episcopal see of Umbria, Italy, in the province of Perugia, situated 1666 ft.

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  • more especially the care of the sick and the arrangement of the externals of divine worship. Even thus early their close relation to the bishop and their employment in matters of episcopal administration gave them, though only in deacons' orders, great importance, which continually developed.

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  • In the Episcopal church of America the office of archdeacon exists in only one or two dioceses.

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  • At the end of the 3rd century it appears as a colony, and in the 5th century it became an episcopal see, which (jointly with Teano since 1818) it still is, though it is now a mere village.

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  • The cathedral, of the 12th century, has a carved portal and three apses decorated with small arches and pilasters, and contains a fine pulpit and episcopal throne in marble mosaic. Near it are two grottos 1 To the period after 335 belong numerous silver and bronze coins with the legend Caleno.

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  • MONTEPULCIANO, a town and episcopal see of the province of Siena, Tuscany, Italy, 44 m.

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  • In 1561 it became an episcopal see.

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  • But he employed Nordin quite differently from his episcopal colleague Olaf Wallqvist.

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  • St John's Episcopal church, built in 1740 (and sub sequently much enlarged), is noted especially as the meetingplace of the Virginia Convention of March 1775, before which Patrick Henry made a famous speech, ending, " I know not what course others may take, but as for me, Give me liberty, or give me death !"

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  • Many of the reformers wanted no bishops at all, while the Catholics wanted those of the old dispensation, and the queen herself grudged episcopal privilege until she discovered in it one of the chief bulwarks of the royal supremacy.

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  • The priesthood has three grades: (I) the Sh'kanda or deacon is generally chosen from episcopal or priestly families, and must be without bodily blemish.

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  • CATANZARO, a town and episcopal see of Calabria, Italy, capital of the province of Catanzaro, 1125 ft.

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  • FORLI (anc. Forum Livii), a town and episcopal see of Emilia, Italy, the capital of the province of Forli, 40 m.

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  • A young sub-deacon was elected bishop, vested in the episcopal insignia (except the mitre) and conducted by his fellows to the sanctuary.

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  • In it are the Scoville Memorial Library (about 8000 volumes in 1910); the Hotchkiss preparatory school (opened in 1892, for boys); the Salisbury School (Protestant Episcopal, for boys), removed to Salisbury from Staten Island in 1901 and formerly St Austin's school; the Taconic School (1896, for girls); and the Connecticut School for Imbeciles (established as a private institution in 1858).

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  • The original King's chapel (1688, present building 1749-1754) was the first Episcopal church of Boston, which bitterly resented the action of the royal governor in 1687 in using the Old South for the services of the Church of England.

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  • Rogers, the first president; Boston University (chartered in 1869; Methodist Episcopal; co-educational); the New England Conservatory of Music (co-educational; private; 1867, incorporated 1880), the largest in the United States, having 2400 students in 1905-1906; the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy (1852); the Massachusetts Normal Art School (1873); the School of Drawing and Painting (1876) of the Museum of Fine Arts; Boston College (1860), Roman Catholic, but open to all denominations; St John's Theological Seminary (1880), Roman Catholic; Simmons College (1899) for women, and several departments of Harvard University.

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  • In 1782 King's chapel (Episcopal) became Unitarian, and in 1805 one of that faith was made professor of divinity in Harvard.

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  • Among the public buildings and places of interest are the three churches on the Green, built in 5854; Center Church (Congregational), in the rear of which is the grave of John Dixwell (1608-1689), one of the regicides; United (formerly known as North) Church (Congregational), and Trinity Church, which belongs to one of the oldest Protestant Episcopal congregations in Connecticut.

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  • At Peekskill are the Peekskill military academy (1833, nonsectarian); St Mary's school, Mount St Gabriel (Protestant Episcopal), a school for girls established by the sisterhood of St Mary; the Field memorial library; St Joseph's home (Roman Catholic); the Peekskill hospital, and several sanatoria.

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  • The other public buildings include an episcopal palace, a townhall and numerous churches.

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  • In 1906 the Baptists were the strongest religious denomination; the Methodists ranked second, while the Roman Catholic, Presbyterian and Protestant Episcopal churches were of relatively minor importance.

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  • Stetson University at De Land (Baptist); Rollins College (1885) at Winter Park (non-sectarian), with a collegiate department, an academy, a school of music, a school of expression, a school of fine arts, a school of domestic and industrial arts, and a business school; Southern College (1901), at Sutherland (Methodist Episcopal, South); the Presbyterian College of Florida (1905), at Eustis; Jasper Normal Institute (1890), at Jasper, and the Florida Normal Institute at Madison.

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  • TERAMO, an episcopal see of the Abruzzi, Italy, the capital of the province of Teramo, 16 m.

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  • This seems to have led to the decline of the city, and it does not seem to have been of great importance in the Roman period, though it became an episcopal see.

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  • The principal other buildings are the court house, government buildings (formerly a Jesuit monastery), episcopal palace, grammar school (once attended by Erasmus), a prison, hospitals, arsenal and barracks.

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  • With James Madison and Thomas Jefferson, Mason carried through the Virginia legislature measures disestablishing the Episcopal Church and protecting all forms of worship. In politics he was a radical republican, who believed that local government should be kept strong and central government weak; his democratic theories had much influence in Virginia and other southern and western states.

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  • Narnia), a town and episcopal see of the province of Perugia, Italy, 65 m.

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  • Nevertheless, he remained in the comparative obscurity of his episcopal see until the death of Cardinal Antonelli; but in 1877, when the important papal office of camerlengo became vacant, Pius IX.

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  • 14), considered to have been the episcopal cathedra, with a bench for the clergy on each side.

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  • NOLA, a city and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, pleasantly situated in the plain between Mount Vesuvius and the Apennines, 164 m.

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  • NEPI (anc. Nepet or Nepete), a town and episcopal see of Italy, in the province of Rome, 72 m.

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  • Coni), a town and episcopal see of Piedmont, Italy, the capital of the province of Cuneo, 55 m.

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  • In the Church of England, however, it was retained among the episcopal ornaments prescribed by the first Prayerbook of Edward VI., and, though omitted in the second Prayerbook, its use seemed once more to be enjoined under the Ornaments Rubric of Elizabeth's Prayer-book.

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  • BISCEGLIE (perhaps anc. Natiolum), a seaport and episcopal see of Apulia, Italy, on the E.S.E.

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  • Salem is the seat of Willamette University (Methodist Episcopal, 1844), an outgrowth of the mission work of the Methodist Episcopal church begun in 1834 about 10 m.

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  • It is the seat of Blinn Memorial College (German Methodist Episcopal), opened as "Mission Institute" in 1883, and renamed in 1889 in honour of the Rev. Christian Blinn, of New York, a liberal benefactor; of Brenham Evangelical Lutheran College, and of a German-American institute (1898).

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  • In 1904 he visited Canada and the United States, and was present at the triennial general convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church of the United States and Canada.

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  • Other higher educational institutions in Minnesota are Hamline University (Methodist Episcopal), with a college of liberal arts at St Paul, and a college of medicine at Minneapolis; Macalester College (Presbyterian) at St Paul; Augsburg Seminary (Lutheran) at Minneapolis; Carleton College (non-sectarian, founded in 1866) and St Olaf College (Lutheran, founded in 1874) at Northfield; Gustavus Adolphus College (Lutheran) at St Peter; Parker College (Free Baptist, 1888) at Winnebago City; St John's University (Roman Catholic) at Collegeville, Stearns county; and Albert Lea College for women (Presbyterian, founded 1884) at Albert Lea.

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  • The city council (Rath), first mentioned in 1190, had jurisdiction over both the episcopal and the new town.

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  • MONTEFIASCONE, a town and episcopal see of the province of Rome, Italy, built on a hill (2077 ft.) on the S.E.

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  • Georgetown is the seat of the Southwestern University (Methodist Episcopal, South, co-educational), formed in 1873 (chartered 1875) by the combination of Ruterville College (Methodist Episcopal, at Ruterville, Texas, chartered in 1840, and closed in 1850), McKenzie College (at Clarksville, Texas, founded in 1841 and closed in 1872), Wesleyan College at San Augustine (chartered in 1844, burned a few years later, and not rebuilt), and Soule University at Chapel Hill (chartered in 1856, but closed in 1870).

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  • erected it into a bishopric in 1150, and it is still a see of the Episcopal Church of Scotland.

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  • Besides these historical buildings the principal public structures include Smith's school, the municipal buildings, the free library, the episcopal library (founded by Bishop Forbes, who, as well as Bishop AbernethyDrummond, presented a large number of volumes).

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  • ALESSANDRIA, a city and episcopal see of Piedmont, Italy, capital of a province which bears its name, situated on the river Tanaro, 57 m.

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  • LUCERA, a town and episcopal see of Apulia, Italy, 122 m.

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  • Its principal building, the former episcopal residence, rebuilt by Cardinal de Rohan in 1779, is now used as barracks.

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  • It suffered much from the ravages of the Thirty Years' War, but the episcopal castle, then destroyed, was subsequently rebuilt, and in 1852 was converted by Louis Napoleon into a place of residence for widows of knights of the Legion of Honour.

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  • After his return to his native country he resided at the episcopal palace of Heilsberg as his uncle's physician until the latter's death on the 29th of March 1512.

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  • TRANI, a seaport and episcopal see of Apulia, Italy, on the Adriatic, in the province of Bari, and 26 m.

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  • CITTA DI CASTELLO, a town and episcopal see of Umbria, Italy, in the province of Perugia, 38 m.

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  • Naupactus is an episcopal see; pop. about 2500.

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  • PAMPLONA, or Pampeluna, the capital of the Spanish province of Navarre, and an episcopal see; situated 1378 ft.

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  • The most imposing structure belonging to the Scottish Episcopal Church is St Mary's cathedral, built on ground and chiefly from funds left by the Misses Walker of Coates, and opened for worship in 1879.

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  • St John's Episcopal church at the west end of Princes Street was the scene of the ministrations of Dean Ramsay, and St Paul's Episcopal church of the Rev. Archibald Alison, father of the historian.

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  • Tarracina, Volsc. Anxur), a town and episcopal see of the province of Rome, Italy, 76 m.

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  • Eugubium), a town and episcopal see of Umbria, Italy, in the province of Perugia, from which it is 23 m.

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  • The interior contains some good pictures by Umbrian artists, a fine episcopal throne in carved wood, and a fine Flemish cope given by Pope Marcellus II.

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  • The episcopal rule in this new sense probably arose in the lifetime of St John, and may have had his sanction.

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  • St Jerome (Ep. 1 4 6) tells us that as late as the middle of the 3rd century the presbyters of Alexandria, when the see was vacant, used to elect one of their own number and without any further ordination set him in the episcopal office.

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  • 4 The canon law fixes the thirtieth year as the lowest age for episcopal consecration.

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  • In Scandinavia they are under episcopal rule.

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  • We may say, however, that Mr Nicholson has presented a strong case for the preservation of episcopal succession in the Swedish Church.

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  • If the Swedish Church has preserved the episcopal succession, it does not make much of that advantage, for it is in communion with the Danish and Norwegian bodies, which can advance no such claim.

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  • On the other hand, the Church of England adheres closely to the episcopal constitution.

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  • Therein we are told that the threefold ministry of bishops, priests and deacons may be traced back to apostolic times, and in the final revision of 1662 a clause was added to the effect that no one is to be accounted " a lawful bishop, priest or deacon in the Church of England," unless he has had episcopal consecration or ordination.

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  • The Roman Catholic Church has 4 archbishops; Esztergom (Gran), Kalocsa, Eger (Erlau) and Zagrab (Agram), and 17 diocesan bishops; to the latter must be added the chief abbot of Pannonhalma, who likewise enjoys episcopal rights.

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  • 'RAMNICUVALCEA(Rimnicu' Valcea), or Rymnik, an episcopal city and the capital of the department of Valcea, Rumania; situated at the foot of the Carpathians, on the right bank of the river Olt, and on the railway from Caracal to Hermannstadt in Transylvania.

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  • In the winter of 1608 Richelieu went out to his poverty-stricken little bishopric, and for the next six years devoted himself seriously to his episcopal duties.

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  • In the fully developed episcopal system the bishop sums up in his own person the collective powers of the Church in his diocese, not by delegation of these powers from below, but by divinely bestowed authority from above.

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  • "Febronius," indeed, was in favour of a frank recognition of this national basis of ecclesiastical organization, and saw in Episcopacy the best means of reuniting the dissidents to the Catholic Church, which was to consist, as it were, of a free federation of episcopal churches under the presidency of the bishop of Rome.

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  • The modern Roman Catholic Church is episcopal, for it preserves the bishops, whose potestas ordinis not even the pope can exercise until he has been duly consecrated; but the bishops as such are now but subordinate elements in a system for which "Episcopacy" is certainly no longer an appropriate term.

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  • The word Episcopacy has, in fact, since the Reformation, been more especially associated with those churches which, while ceasing to be in communion with Rome, have preserved the episcopal model.

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  • Certainly, in the 16th and 17th centuries, the Church of England, while rigorously enforcing the episcopal model at home, and even endeavouring to extend it to Presbyterian Scotland, did not regard foreign non-episcopal Churches otherwise than as sister communions.

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  • Of the reformed Churches of the continent of Europe only the Lutheran Churches of Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Sweden and Finland preserve the episcopal system in anything of its historical sense; and of these only the two last can lay claim to the possession of bishops in the unbroken line of episcopal succession.

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  • 4 The superintendents (variously entitled also archpriests, deans, provosts, ephors) of the Evangelical (Lutheran) Church, as established in the several states of Germany and in Austria, are not bishops in any canonical sense, though their jurisdictions are known as dioceses and they exercise many episcopal functions.

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  • In the case of the former, claim is laid to the unbroken episcopal succession through the Waldenses, and the question of their eventual intercommunion with the Anglican of the Sermon against Wilful Rebellion," ed.

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  • The bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church, on the other hand, derive their orders from Thomas Coke, a presbyter of the Church of England, who in 1784 was ordained by John Wesley, assisted by two other presbyters, "superintendent" of the Methodist Society in America.

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  • The German Reformed Church, the French Reformed, the English Episcopal, the English Reformed, the Roman Catholic, and the Baptist are all recognized by the state.

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  • Belley is of Roman origin, and in the 5th century became an episcopal see.

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  • AQUINO, a town and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta; it is 56 m.

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  • Until Bishop Stubbs found it necessary to devote all his time to his episcopal duties, he pursued historical study with unremitting diligence.

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  • His right to be held as an authority on ecclesiastical history was proved in 1858 by his Registrum sacrum anglicanum, which sets forth episcopal succession in England, by many other later works, and particularly by his share in Councils and Ecclesiastical Documents, edited in co-operation with the Rev. A.

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  • Nevertheless he fulfilled all his episcopal duties with diligence, and threw all his heart into the performance of those of a specially spiritual nature, such as his addresses at confirmations and to those on whom he conferred orders.

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  • After the death of Marcel, he tried, unsuccessfully, to deliver Laon, his episcopal town, to the king of Navarre, and he was excluded from the amnesty promised in the treaty of Calais (1360) by King John to the partisans of Charles the Bad.

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  • The episcopal seminaries are usually good, especially the one at Caracas.

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  • The castle is alleged to have been built by William I., and was converted from a fortress in the fens into an episcopal palace between 1471 and 1473.

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  • The growth of Wisbech depended on its position and episcopal patronage.

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  • A series of resolutions provided in detail for the organized suppression of heresy and for the institution of the episcopal inquisition (Canon 3).

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  • Damasus, to whom they appealed for help, was unable to be of much service to them, the more so because that episcopal group, viewed askance by St Athanasius and his successor Peter, was incessantly combated at the papal court by the inveterate hatred of Alexandria.

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  • CREMONA, a city and episcopal see of Lombardy, Italy, the capital of the province of Cremona, situated on the N.

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  • the seat of a bishopric, with an episcopal seminary, and has many churches.

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  • TUAM, a market town and episcopal city of Co.

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  • An abbey was founded here towards the end of the 5th century, and in the beginning of the 6th an episcopal see by St Jarlath.

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  • high; the cathedral of All Saints (Protestant Episcopal), an English Gothic structure of pink sandstone designed by R.

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  • Gibson and begun in 1883; St Peter's Episcopal Church (French Gothic), of Hudson River bluestone; Emmanuel Baptist Church, of white granite; the Madison Avenue Reformed Church; and St Joseph's (Roman Catholic), of bluestone and Caen stone with marble trimmings.

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  • TREVISO (anc. Tarvisium), a town and episcopal see of Venetia, Italy, capital of the province of Treviso, 49 ft.

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  • At his consecration the bishop-elect is, according to the rubric, presented to the consecrating bishops vested in a rochet only; after the "laying on of hands" he retires and puts on "the rest of the episcopal habit," i.e.

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  • In the Episcopal cemetery two monuments mark the graves of Charles Louis Napoleon Achille Murat (1801-1847), the eldest son of Joachim Murat, and of his wife Catherine (1803-1867), the daughter of Col.

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  • VICENZA, a town and episcopal see of Venetia, Italy, capital of the province of Vicenza, 42 m.

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  • It has been an episcopal see since the 5th century.

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  • IVREA (anc. Eporedia), a town and episcopal see of Piedmont, Italy, in the province of Turin, from which it is 38 m.

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  • The bishops are always celibates and are chosen from episcopal families.

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  • PASSAU, a town and episcopal see of Germany, in the kingdom of Bavaria, picturesquely situated at the confluence of the Danube, the Inn and the Ilz, close to the Austrian frontier, 89 m.

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  • Opposite is the Bishop's Palace, and not far off is the Episcopal Seminary (built on the ruins of a 6th-century monastic foundation).

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  • The episcopal see is first mentioned in 452, but probably existed a century earlier.

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  • The professional schools include a school of civil and mining engineering at Lima (created 1876), a military school at Chorrillos under the direction of French instructors, a naval school at Callao, nine episcopal seminaries (one for each diocese), a national agricultural school in the vicinity of Lima (created 1902), and a few commercial schools.

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  • (3) During the period of episcopal supremacy Padua does not appear to have been either very important or very active.

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  • MONTE SAN GIULIANO, a town and episcopal see of Sicily, in the province of Trapani, 2 m.

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  • Mayence) a city, episcopal see and fortress of Germany, situated on the left bank of the Rhine, almost opposite the influx of the Main, at the junction of the important main lines of railway from Cologne to Mannheim and Frankfort-onMain, 25 m.

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  • The educational and scientific institutions of Mainz include an episcopal seminary, two gymnasia and other schools, a society for literature and art, a musical society, and an antiquarian society.

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  • Since 1861-1862 there has been an independent Episcopal Native Church; but the Church Missionary Society, which in 1804 sent out the first missionaries to Sierra Leone, still maintains various agencies.

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  • Among its many charitable institutions are a Masonic Home and School (1893), a Home for the Homeless (1867), St Elizabeth's Home (1886), St Luke's Home (1869), a Home for Aged Men and Couples (1879), Utica Orphan Asylum (1830), St Joseph's Infant Home (1893) and St John's Female Orphan Asylum (1834), both under the Sisters of Charity; the House of the Good Shepherd (1872; Protestant Episcopal); and the General (1873; City of Utica), Homeopathic (1895), St Luke's (1869; supported by the Protestant Episcopal Churches), St Elizabeth's (1866; Sisters of the Third Order of St Francis) and Faxton (1873) hospitals.

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  • The first newspaper, the Gazette, began publication in the same year, and the first church, Trinity (Protestant Episcopal), was built.

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  • FIESOLE (anc. Faesulae, q.v.), a town and episcopal see of Tuscany, Italy, in the province of Florence, from which it is 3 m.

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  • Flodoard had been given charge of the episcopal archives, and constructed his history out of the original texts, which he generally reproduces in full; the documents for the period of Hincmar being especially valuable.

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  • VERONA, a city and episcopal see of Venetia, Italy, the capital of the province of Verona, situated 194 ft.

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  • The episcopal palace contains the ancient and valuable chapter library, of about 12,000 volumes and over 500 MSS., among them the palimpsest of the Institutiones of Gaius which Niebuhr discovered.

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  • EICHSTATT, a town and episcopal see of Germany, in the kingdom of Bavaria, in the deep and romantic valley of the Altmuhl, 35 m.

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  • There are an episcopal lyceum, a clerical seminary, a classical and a modern school, and numerous religious houses.

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  • RIETI (anc. Reate), a city and episcopal see of Italy, in the province of Perugia, 252 m.

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  • It is the chief town of the Gallura, and has been an episcopal see since the 19th century (with Ampurias).

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  • FRANCAVILLA FONTANA, a town and episcopal see of Apulia, Italy, in the province of Lecce, 22 m.

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  • COTRONE (anc. Croto, Crotona), a seaport and episcopal see on the E.

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  • Other serials of this class are the Protestant Episcopal Quarterly Review (1854), the Presbyterian Magazine (1851-1860), the Catholic World (1865), the Southern Review (1867), the New' Jerusalem Magazine (1827), American Baptist Magazine (1817), the Church Review (1848), the Christian Review (1836), the Universalist Quarterly (1844).

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  • Other buildings are the episcopal palace, to which is attached a museum of Roman antiquities, the county hall, the convent of the Dominicans and the seminary for Roman Catholic priests.

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  • ALBA, a town and episcopal see of Piedmont, Italy, on the river Tanaro, in the province of Cuneo.

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  • It became an episcopal see dependent on Milan in the 4th century.

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  • Cyprian was the first to proclaim the identity of heretics and schismatics by making a man's Christianity depend on his belonging to the great episcopal church confederation.

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  • There are iron foundries, a match factory, &c. At Ostrabo, the episcopal residence without the town, the poet Esaias Tegner died in 1846, and he is buried in the town cemetery.

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  • In 1252 the countship was sold to the bishops of Munster; but their rule soon became little more than nominal, and in Emden itself the family of Abdena, the episcopal provosts and castellans, established their practical independence.

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  • The harsh treatment of the Hanoverian demands was inspired by him, and won favour with the queen, while Oxford's influence declined; and by his support of the Schism Bill in May 1714, a violent Tory measure forbidding all education by dissenters by making an episcopal licence obligatory for schoolmasters, he probably intended to compel Oxford to give up the game.

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  • IMOLA (anc. Forum Cornelii), a town and episcopal see of Emilia, Italy, in the province of Bologna, from which it is 21 m.

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  • SANKT POLTEN, an old town and episcopal see of Austria, in Lower Austria, 38 m.

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  • In, e.g., the Scottish and American episcopal churches, however, the metropolitan is the senior bishop pro tern.

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  • He may, however, exercise his purely episcopal functions.

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  • CORTONA, a town and episcopal see of Italy, in the province of Arezzo, 18 m.

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  • In 1741 Challoner was raised to the episcopal dignity at Hammersmith, and nominated coadjutor with right of succession to Bishop Benjamin Petre, vicar-apostolic of the London district, whom he succeeded in 1758.

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  • Through the influence of Samuel Wilberforce, he was offered the post of sub-almoner to Queen Victoria, always recognized as a stepping-stone to the episcopal bench, and his refusal of it was honourably consonant with all else in his career as an Anglican dignitary, in which he united pastoral diligence with an asceticism that was then quite exceptional.

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  • TERNI (anc. Interamna Nahars), a town, episcopal see, and the seat of a sub-prefecture of the province of Perugia, Italy, situated among the Apennines, but only 426 ft.

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  • CHRISTIAN CONNECTION, a denomination of Christians in North America formed by secession, under James O'Kelly (1735-1826), of members of the Methodist Episcopal Church in North Carolina in 1793.

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  • CEFALU (anc. Cephaloedium), a seaport and episcopal see of the province of Palermo, Sicily, 42 m.

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  • COMO (anc. Comum), a city and episcopal see of Lombardy, Italy, the capital of the province of Como, situated at the S.

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  • ANCONA, a seaport and episcopal see of the Marches, Italy, capital of the province of Ancona, situated on the N.E.

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  • In the dilapidated episcopal palace Pope Pius II.

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  • How and when the term beneficia came to be applied to these episcopal grants is uncertain, but they are designged by that term in a canon of the council of Mainz, 813.

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  • METZ, a town, first-class fortress and episcopal see of Germany, in the imperial province of Alsace-Lorraine, capital of (German) Lorraine, on the Moselle, 99 m.

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  • It is the seat of the Columbia Institute for girls (under Protestant Episcopal control), founded in 1836, and of the Columbia Military Academy.

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  • The town is the seat of the Kentucky Wesleyan College (co-educational; Methodist Episcopal, South), opened in 1866, and of the Winchester Trades and Industrial School (1900).

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  • ASCOLI PICEN0 1 (anc. Asculum), a town and episcopal see of the Marches, Italy, the capital of the province of Ascoli Piceno, 17 m.

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  • Remarkable among the other old buildings are the town-hall, of the 14th century and restored in the 17th century, with a crypt, and the Petershof, formerly the episcopal palace, but now utilized as law courts and a prison.

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  • SUTRI (anc. Sutrium), a town and episcopal see of Italy, in the province of Rome, 4 m.

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  • FREDERIC DAN HUNTINGTON (1819-1904), American clergyman, first Protestant Episcopal bishop of central New York, was born in Hadley, Massachusetts, on the 28th of May 1819.

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  • The principal churches, in order of their membership were, in 1890, the Methodist Episcopal, Presbyterian, Protestant Episcopal, Baptist, Roman Catholic, Quaker and Lutheran.

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  • In 1530 Constance (whose bishop had been forced to flee in 1527 to Meersburg, on the other side of the lake, and from that time the episcopal residence) joined, with Strassburg, Memmingen and Lindau, the Schmalkalden League.

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  • FELTRE (anc. Feltria), a town and episcopal see of Venetia, Italy, in the province of Belluno, 20 m.

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  • REGENSBURG (RATISBON), a city and episcopal see of Germany, in the kingdom of Bavaria, and the capital of the government district of the Upper Palatinate.

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  • The educational establishments include two gymnasia, an episcopal clerical seminary, a seminary for boys and a school of church music. Among the chief manufactures are iron and steel wares, pottery, parquet flooring, tobacco, and lead pencils.

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  • AVELLINO, a city and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, the capital of the province of Avellino,' 50 ft.

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  • WILLIAM MEADE (1789-1862), American Protestant Episcopal bishop, the son of Richard Kidder Meade (1746-1805), one of General Washington's aides during the War of Independence, was born on the 11th of November 1789, near Millwood, in that part of Frederick county which is now Clarke county, Virginia.

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  • He became assistant bishop of Virginia in 1829; was pastor of Christ Church, Norfolk, in 1834-1836; in 1841 became bishop of Virginia; and in1842-1862was president of the Protestant Episcopal Theological Seminary in Virginia, near Alexandria, delivering an annual course of lectures on pastoral theology.

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  • He had been prominent in the work of the Education Society, which was organized in 1818 to advance funds to needy students for the ministry of the American Episcopal Church, and in the establishment of the Theological Seminary near Alexandria, as he was afterwards in the work of the American Tract Society, and the Bible Society.

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  • Among his publications, besides many sermons, were A Brief Review of the Episcopal Church in Virginia (1845); Wilberforce, Cranmer, Jewett and the Prayer Book on the Incarnation (1850); Reasons for Loving the Episcopal Church (1852); and Old Churches, Ministers and Families of Virginia (1857); a storehouse of material on the ecclesiastical history of the state.

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  • of the river, and the more important buildings are clustered round the two eminences known as the Domberg (cathedral hill) and the Schlossberg (castle hill), which in the middle ages were occupied by the citadel, the cathedral and the episcopal palace.

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  • Vernon; Western College (United Brethren, 1856) at Toledo; Upper Iowa University (Methodist Episcopal, 1857) at Fayette; Leander Clark College (United Brethren, 1857) at Toledo; Lenox College (Presbyterian, 1859) at Hopkinton; Luther College (Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran, 1861) at Decorah; Des Moines College (Baptist, 1865) at Des Moines; Tabor College (Congregational, 1866) at Tabor; Simpson College (Methodist, 1867) at Indianola; Wartburg Kollege (Lutheran, 1868) at Clinton; Amity College (Non-sectarian, 1872) at College Springs; German College (Methodist Episcopal, 1873) at Mt.

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  • Pleasant; Penn College (Friends, 1873) at Oskaloosa; St Joseph's College (Roman Catholic, 1873) at Dubuque; Parsons College (Presbyterian, 1875) at Fairfield; Coe College (Presbyterian, 1881) at Cedar Rapids; Drake University (Disciples of Christ, 1881) at Des Moines; Palmer College (Disciples of Christ, 1889) at Legrand; Buena Vista College (Presbyterian, 1891) at Storm Lake; Charles City College (Methodist Episcopal, 1891) at Charles City; Morningside College (Methodist Episcopal, 1894) at Sioux City; Graceland College (Reorganized Church of Latter Day Saints, 1895) at Lamoni.

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  • of Alexandria is the Protestant Episcopal Theological Seminary in Virginia, opened here in 1823 and chartered in 1854; in 1906-1907 the Seminary had a faculty of 7 and 46 students.

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  • In some instances the old episcopal power passed more or less into the hands of the civil magistrate (a state of matters which was highly approved by Erastus and his followers), in other cases it was conceded to the presbyterial courts.

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  • BELLUNO (anc. Bellunum), a city and episcopal see of Venetia, Italy, the capital of the province of Belluno, N.

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  • 1654), for whom the episcopal see of Paris was erected into an archbishopric in 1622, and by his great-nephew, Jean Francois Paul de Gondi, the famous cardinal de Retz.

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  • The principal educational institutions are the University of Southern California (Methodist Episcopal, 1880), the Maclay College of Theology and a preparatory school; Occidental College (Presbyterian, 1887), St Vincent's College (Roman Catholic, founded 1865; chartered 1869) and the Los Angeles State Normal School (1882).

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  • All Church property was to be restored, and, perhaps most important of all, the jurisdiction of the Imperial court (Reichskammergericht), which was naturally Catholic in its sympathies, was extended to appeals involving the seizure of ecclesiastical benefices, contempt of episcopal decisions and other matters deeply affecting the Protestants.

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  • The Dominicans and, later, members of the newly born Order of Jesus, were conspicuous, among the 1 The episcopal office was retained, but the " succession " broken, the new Lutheran bishops being consecrated by Buggenhagen, who was only in priest's orders.

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  • 2 The episcopal system and succession were maintained, and the Mass vestments " (i.e.

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  • San Jose is the seat of the University of the Pacific (Methodist Episcopal), which was founded at Santa Clara in 1851, removed to its present site just outside the city in 1871, and had 358 students in all departments in 1909-1910; of the College of Notre Dame (1851; Roman Catholic), and of a State Normal School.

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  • Boston University (Methodist Episcopal, 1867); Tufts College (1852), a few miles from Boston in Medford, originally a Universalist school; Clark University (1889, devoted wholly to graduate instruction until 1902, when Clark College was added), at Worcester, are important institutions.

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  • There are schools, of theology at Cambridge (Protestant Episcopal), Newton (Baptist) and Waltham (New Church), as well as in connexion with Boston University (Methodist), Tufts College (Universalist) and Harvard (non-sectarian, and the affiliated Congregational Andover Theological Seminary at Cambridge).

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  • The revocation of the charter aroused the strongest fears of the colonists Andros speedily met determined opposition by measures undertaken relative to taxation and land titles, by efforts to secure a church for Episcopal service, and an attempt to curb the town meetings.

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  • Its gradual acquisition of civic rights followed the same line of development as in the German episcopal cities.

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  • In the nth century a burgrave (chatelain, castellanus), who was an episcopal officer, is found exercising jurisdiction in the city as well as the Vogt.

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  • As the 13th century advanced, the council, representing the wealthy and powerful gild of merchants, began to take a larger share in the government, and to restrict more and more the direct exercise of the episcopal authority.

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  • Two aldermen, later styled burgomasters, were to preside, the one over the Schepenen, the other over the Raad, sharing this presidency with two episcopal officials.

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  • The two chief aldermen of the gilds, with the two episcopal official presidents above mentioned, together were to form the supreme government of the city.

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  • SEBENICO (Serbo-Croatian, Sibenik), an episcopal city, and the centre of an administrative district in Dalmatia, Austria; at the end of a branch railway from Knin.

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  • This doxology is also used in the Protestant Episcopal and Methodist Episcopal churches of America, as indeed in most Protestant churches at the eucharist.

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  • This last is the optional rule of the American Episcopal Church.

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  • The archbishop was a strenuous upholder of episcopal independence in the Gallican sense, and involved himself in a controversy with Rome by his endeavours to suppress the jurisdiction of the Jesuits and other religious orders within his diocese.

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  • Its principal buildings are an old palace, formerly the residence of the bishops of Augsburg and now government offices, a royal gymnasium, a Latin school with a library of 75,000 volumes, seven churches (six Roman Catholic), two episcopal seminaries, a Capuchin monastery, a Franciscan convent and a deaf and dumb asylum.

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  • SALUZZO, a city and episcopal see of Piedmont, Italy, in the province of Cuneo, 42 m.

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  • MELFI, a city and episcopal see of Basilicata, Italy, in the province of Potenza, 30 m.

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  • HILDESHEIM, a town and episcopal see of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, beautifully situated at the north foot of the Harz Mountains, on the right bank of the Innerste, 18 m.

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  • It is not possible to trace the episcopal see of Puteoli with any certainty further back than the beginning of the 4th century.

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  • These, the bishops in the first instance of provincial capitals, gradually acquired a control over their episcopal brethren in lesser cities, analogous to that of the civil governor over other provincial officials.

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  • by episcopal ], but freely and purely.

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  • whether Episcopal or Presbyterian, its own latent capacity for co-operation has been evoked by actual needs to a degree never before realized in England.

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  • Columbia University and Cornell University (q.v.), are: Union University (1795, non-sectarian), at Schenectady; Hamilton College (1812, non-sectarian), at Clinton; Colgate University (1819, non-sectarian), at Hamilton; Hobart College (1822, non-sectarian), at Geneva: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (1824, non-sectarian), at Troy; New York University (1832, non-sectarian), in New York City; Alfred University (1836, non-sectarian), at Alfred; Fordham University (1841, Roman Catholic), in New York City; College of St Francis Xavier (1847, Roman Catholic), in New York City; College of the City of New York (1849, city); University of Rochester (1850, Baptist), at Rochester; Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn (1854, non-sectarian), at Brooklyn; Niagara University (1856, Roman Catholic), at Niagara Falls; St Lawrence University (1858, non-sectarian), at Canton; St Bonaventure's College (1859, Roman Catholic), at St Bonaventure; St Stephen's College (1860, Protestant Episcopal), at Annandale; Manhattan College (1863, Roman Catholic), at New York City; St John's College (1870, Roman Catholic), at Brooklyn; Canisius College (1870, Roman Catholic), at Buffalo; Syracuse University (1871, Methodist Episcopal), at Syracuse; Adelphi College (1896, non-sectarian), at Brooklyn; and Clarkson School of Technology (1896, non-sectarian), at Potsdam.

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  • POTENZA (anc. Potentia), a town and episcopal see of Basilicata, Italy, capital of the province of Potenza, 103 m.

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  • Davenport is an episcopal see of the Roman Catholic and the Protestant Episcopal churches.

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  • The city has a Protestant Episcopal cathedral, the Grafton Hall school for girls, and St Agnes hospital and convent, and a public library with about 25,000 volumes in 1908.

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  • Whitman College (Congregational, 1866) at Walla Walla, Gonzaga College (Roman Catholic, 1887) at Spokane, Whitworth College (Presbyterian, 1890) at Tacoma and the University of Puget Sound (Methodist Episcopal, 1903) at Tacoma are institutions of higher learning maintained and controlled by their respective denominations.

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  • The African Methodist Episcopal (Ethiopian) Church had 4110 members, of whom only two were whites.

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  • JOHN HENRY HOBART (1775-1830), American Protestant Episcopal bishop, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on the 14th of September 1775, being fifth in direct descent from Edmund Hobart, a founder of Hingham, Massachusetts.

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  • Hobart's zeal for the General Seminary and the General Convention led him to oppose the plan of Philander Chase, bishop of Ohio, for an Episcopal seminary in that diocese; but the Ohio seminary was made directly responsible to the House of Bishops, and Hobart approved the plan.

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  • His strong opposition to "dissenting churches" was nowhere so clearly shown as in a pamphlet published in 1816 to dissuade all Episcopalians from joining the American Bible Society, which he thought the Protestant Episcopal Church had not the numerical or the financial strength to control.

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  • He delivered episcopal charges to the clergy of Connecticut and New York entitled The Churchman (5859) and The High Churchman Vindicated (1826), in which he accepted the name "high churchman," and stated and explained his principles "in distinction from the corruptions of the Church of Rome and from the Errors of Certain Protestant Sects."

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  • The town was for several centuries an episcopal see.

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  • The episcopal see was founded in A.D.

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  • It is in answer to A Defence of the Government established in the Church of Englande, by Dr. John Bridges, dean of Salisbury, itself a reply to earlier puritan works, and besides attacking the episcopal office in general assails certain prelates with much personal abuse.

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  • The notice in the Chronicon Paschale preserves one slight reminiscence of the historical facts, namely, that Hippolytus's episcopal see was situated at Portus near Rome.

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  • Denominational colleges are Yankton College (1882) and Redfield College (1887), both Congregational; Huron College (1883, Presbyterian), and Dakota Wesleyan University (1885; Methodist Episcopal) at Mitchell.

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  • In Milwaukee are St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral and All Saints Protestant Episcopal Cathedral - the city is the see of a Roman Catholic archbishopric (established in 1892) and of a Protestant Episcopal bishopric. Among other church structures are Plymouth Congregational, Westminster Presbyterian, Church of Gesu (Roman Catholic) and Trinity Lutheran.

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  • CALTAGIRONE, a city and episcopal see of the province of Catania, Sicily, situated 1999 ft.

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  • To the curial system, so evolved, and continually fortifying its position in the domains of theology, ecclesiastical law and politics, the episcopal system stands in diametrical opposition.

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  • It is the seat of the Montana Wesleyan University (Methodist Episcopal), founded in 1890; St Aloysius College and St Vincent's Academy (Roman Catholic); and has a public library with about 35,000 volumes, the Montana state library with about 40,000 volumes, and the state law library with about 24,000 volumes.

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  • Lexington is the seat of the Lexington College for Young Women (Baptist, established 1855), the Central College for Women (Methodist Episcopal, South; opened 1869), and the Wentworth Military Academy (1880).

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  • CASERTA, a town and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, the capital of the province of Caserta, situated 21 m.

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  • Meanwhile his interests were not wholly confined to law: for some time (1840-1843) he wrote for The Times and the British Critic; he made a plunge into patristic learning, from which he soon recoiled; he was much interested in the controversies which distracted the Church on the subject of Tract 90; in the treatment of the Episcopal Church in Canada by the Canadian government and the Colonial Office; in the establishment by the crown, in conjunction with the king of Prussia, of the Jerusalem bishopric; and in the contest for the professorship of poetry at Oxford on Keble's retirement.

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  • AREZZO (anc. Arretium), a town and episcopal see of Tuscany, Italy, the capital of the province of Arezzo, 54 m.

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  • FAENZA (anc. Faventia), a city and episcopal see of Emilia, Italy, in the province of Ravenna, from which it is 31 m.

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  • The Methodist Episcopal Church maintains Wesley College near Grand Forks (formerly the Red River Valley University at Wahpeton), affiliated with the state university.

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  • There is a Roman Catholic Cathedral, and the city is the see of a Roman Catholic and of a Protestant Episcopal bishop. The Prudential Life Insurance Company and the Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company have fine office buildings.

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  • The town was governed largely after the Mosaic law and continued essentially Puritan for fifty years or more; about 1730 Presbyterianism superseded Congregationalism, and in 1734 Colonel Josiah Ogden, having caused a schism in the preceding year, by saving his wheat one dry Sunday in a wet season, founded with several followers the first Episcopal or Church of England Society in Newark - Trinity Church.

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  • VOLTERRA (anc. Volaterrae), a town and episcopal see of Tuscany, Italy, in the province of Pisa, from which it is 51 m.

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  • Cartagena is an episcopal see, and its cathedral dates from colonial times.

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  • In the course of this struggle (and especially after the last episcopal vidomne had left the town in 1526) the municipal authorities of the city greatly developed, a grand conseil of 200 members being set up in imitation of those at Bern and at Fribourg, while within the larger assembly there was a petit conseil of 60 members for more confidential business.

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  • In 1819 the canton (the new portions of which were inhabited mainly by Romanists) was annexed to the bishopric of Lausanne, the bishop in 1821 being authorized to add "and of Geneva" to his episcopal style.

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  • This is most clearly recognizable in the case of churches which arose alongside the episcopal cathedrals.

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  • By this act were laid the foundations of the Scottish' Episcopal church.

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  • The city has a Carnegie library, De Veaux College (Protestant Episcopal, chartered in 1853), and Niagara University, a Roman Catholic institution, founded in 1856 by the priests of the Congregation of the Mission and incorporated in 1863 as the Seminary of Our Lady of Angels, a name still used for the theological department, but displaced, since the charter of the university in 1883, by the present name.

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  • SARZANA, a town and episcopal see of Liguria, Italy, in the province of Genoa, 9 m.

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  • S.E.; the first mention of it is found in 983, and in 1202 the episcopal see was transferred hither.

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  • The place was deserted in 1138, and the episcopal see was transferred to Grosseto.

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  • high), Second Presbyterian (1872), Central Christian (1869), St Paul's Methodist Episcopal (1870), and St Paul's Protestant Episcopal procathedral (185r), are also worthy of mention, and in the residential suburbs there are many fine churches.

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  • Cincinnati is the seat of a Roman Catholic archbishopric and a Protestant Episcopal and Methodist Episcopal bishopric. The Masonic temple (195 ft.

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  • The city has large publishing interests, and various religious (Methodist Episcopal and Roman Catholic) and fraternal periodicals, and several technical journals and trade papers are published here.

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  • Gallaudet; the retreat for the insane (opened for patients in 1824); the Hartford hospital; St Francis hospital; St Thomas's seminary (Roman Catholic); La Salette seminary (Roman Catholic); Trinity college (founded by members of the Protestant Episcopal church, and now non-sectarian), which was chartered as Washington College in 1823, opened in 1824, renamed Trinity College in 1845, and in 1907-1908 had 27 instructors and 208 students; the Hartford Theological seminary, a Congregational institution, which was founded at East Windsor Hill in 1834 as the Theological Institute of Connecticut, was removed to Hartford in 1865, and adopted its present name in 1885; and, affiliated with the last mentioned institution, the Hartford School of Religious Pedagogy.

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  • Vidin is an episcopal see and the headquarters of a brigade; it was formerly a stronghold of some importance, and was rendered difficult to besiege by the surrounding marshes, formed where the Topolovitza and other streams join the Danube.

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  • Roermond is the seat of a Roman Catholic episcopal see.

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  • PALMA, Or PALMA DE Mallorca, the capital of the Spanish province of the Balearic Islands, the residence of a captaingeneral, an episcopal see, and a flourishing seaport, situated 135 m.

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  • The more conspicuous buildings are the cathedral, the exchange, the royal palace, now occupied by the captain-general, and the law courts, the episcopal palace, a handsome late Renaissance building (1616), the general hospital (1456), the town-house (end of the 16th century), the picture gallery, and the college.

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  • Among the educational institutions are Morningside College (Methodist Episcopal, 18 94), 3 m.

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  • The strictly enforced episcopal constitution, the creation of a clerical order, and the formation of the New Testament canon accomplished the overthrow of the prophets.

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  • In 1846, however, he resigned; and then accepted the wardenship of Trinity College, Glenalmond, the new Scottish Episcopal public school and divinity college, where he remained from 1847 to 1854, having great educational success in all respects; though his views on Scottish Church questions brought him into opposition at some important points to W.

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  • PRATO, a town and episcopal see of Tuscany, Italy, in the province of Florence, 1 r m.

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  • The city is an episcopal see and has a cathedral.

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  • The Anglican catechism with occasional modification, especially in the sacramental section, is used not only in the Church of England but in the Episcopal churches of Ireland, Scotland, the British dominions and the United States of America.

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  • In its compilation representatives of the Episcopal Church in Scotland co-operated, and the book though " not designed to supersede the distinctive catechisms officially recognized by the several churches for the instruction of their own children," certainly " commends itself as suitable for use in schools where children of various churches are taught together."

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  • Gelasius fled to Gaeta, where he was ordained priest on the 9th of March and on the following day received episcopal consecration.

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  • Having decided to enter the Episcopal Church, Strachan was ordained on the 22nd of May 1803, and was immediately afterwards appointed to the parish of Cornwall.

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  • The break-up of the Liverpool ministry in 1827 interrupted the successful development of Strachan's plans for placing virtually the whole of the government endowments for religion and education under the control of the Episcopal Church.

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  • Strachan at once took steps to found another university which should be completely under the control of the Episcopal Church, hence the establishment of Trinity University, which was opened in 1852.

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  • Bishop Strachan devoted the latter years of his long life entirely to his episcopal duties, and by introducing the diocesan synod he furnished the Episcopal Church in Canada with a more democratic organ of government.

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  • Tacoma is the seat of Whitworth College (1890, Presbyterian), the University of Puget Sound (1903, Methodist Episcopal), the Annie Wright Seminary (1884), a boarding and day school for girls, and the Pacific Lutheran Academy and Business College.

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  • (6) It has been pointed out that reservation for the sick prevails in the Scottish Episcopal Church, the doctrinal standards of which correspond with those of the Church of England.

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  • But it must be remembered that the Scottish Episcopal Church has an additional order of its own for the Holy Communion, and that consequently its clergy are not restricted to the services in the Book of Common Prayer.

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  • It is the seat of Cornell College (Methodist Episcopal; coeducational), which was opened as the Iowa Conference Seminary in 1853, and was chartered in 1857 under its present name, adopted in honour of William W.

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  • The last years of his life were spent in the faithful discharge of his episcopal duties; his death took place at Clermont on the 18th of September 1742.

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  • Krakau), a town and episcopal see of Austria, in Galicia, 212 m.

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  • The ether three sides are occupied by the episcopal and municipal palaces, and the Palazzo Piccolomini; the last, resembling the Palazzo Rucellai at Florence, is the finest, and in front of it is a beautiful fountain.

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  • The episcopal palace contains a museum with some fine ecclesiastical vestments, enamels and other works of art.

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  • Syracuse University, whose campus (of zoo acres) in the south-east part of the city commands a fine view of the lake, is a co-educational institution largely under Methodist Episcopal control, but not sectarian, which in1908-1909had 239 instructors and 3205 students (1336 in the college of liberal arts; 189 in the summer school; 62 in the library school; 933 in the college of fine arts; 147 in the college of medicine; 179 in the college of law; 401 in the college of applied science; and 78 in the teachers' college).

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  • Other educational institutions are the Syracuse Teachers' training school, Christian Brothers' academy (Roman Catholic), St John's Catholic academy, Travis preparatory school (non-sectarian), and at Manlius (pop. 1905, 1236), a suburb, St John's military academy (Protestant Episcopal, 1869).

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  • Many of the Protestant bodies have abandoned the rite, but it remains among the Lutherans (who, whether episcopal or not, attach great importance to it) and in the group of Churches in communion with the Church of England.

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  • Guadalajara is an episcopal see, and its cathedral, built between 1571 and 1618, is one of the largest and most elaborately decorated churches in Mexico.

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  • Other important edifices and institutions are the university, with its schools of law and medicine, the mint, built in 1811, the modern national college and high schools, a public library of over 28,000 volumes, an episcopal seminary, an academy of fine arts, the Teatro Degollado, and the large modern granite building of the penitentiary.

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  • In the episcopal church of the United States churchwardens discharge much the same duties as those performed by the English officials; their duties, however, are regulated by canons of the diocese, not by canons general.

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  • From about 1276 it ranked as the most important place in the episcopal principality of Kamin, and from 1284 it was a member of the Hanseatic League.

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  • CONVERSANO, a town and episcopal see of Apulia, Italy, in the province of Bari, 17 m.

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  • CAGLI, a town and (with Pergola) an episcopal see of the Marches, Italy, in the province of Pesaro and Urbino, 18 m.

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  • BOSA, a seaport and episcopal see on the W.

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  • Craven, History of the Episcopal Church in Orkney (1883); J.

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  • ARIANO DI PUGLIA, a town and episcopal see, which, despite its name, now belongs to Campania, Italy, in the province of Avellino, 1509 ft.

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  • Of historical interest is St Paul's church (Protestant Episcopal); the present building was erected in 1819 and is the third St Paul's church on the same site.

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  • It became an episcopal see in the 6th century.

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  • ANDRIA, a town and episcopal see of Apulia, Italy, in the province of Bari; 35m.

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  • The Methodist, Baptist, Roman Catholic and Protestant Episcopal Churches, and the Hebrews of the state also support homes for orphans.

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  • Captured by the Crusaders in the 11 th century, Bethlehem was made an episcopal see; but the bishopric soon sank to a titular dignity.

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  • LEITMERITZ (Czech, Litomerice), a town and episcopal see of Bohemia, 45 m.

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  • The library of the episcopal palace, built between 1694 and 1701, possesses the oldest maps of Bohemia made in 1518 by Nicolaus Claudianus of Jung-Bunzlau.

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  • The episcopal seminary on Castle Hill, called the " Seminario Episcopal de Sao Jose," founded in 1739 and devoted exclusively to the education of priests, is the best classical school in the city.

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  • The district conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church granted her a local preacher's licence, and she held pastorates at Hingham and East Dennis, Mass., remaining in the latter place seven years, until 1885.

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  • Wiley University was founded in 1873 by the Freedman's Aid Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and Bishop College, was founded in 1881 by the American Baptist Home Mission Society and incorporated in 1885.

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  • PISTOIA, or Pistoja (anc. Pistoriae), a town and episcopal see of Tuscany, Italy, in the province of Florence, from which it is 21 m.

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  • Among the educational institutions in San Antonio are the San Antonio Female College (Methodist Episcopal, South; 1894), the West Texas Military Academy; Peacock Military School; St Mary's Hall (Roman Catholic); St Louis College; and the Academy of Our Lady of the Lake (under the Sisters of Divine Providence, who have a convent here).

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  • The city is the see of Protestant Episcopal and 1 The cathedral is the centre of the city according to the charter, which describes the city as including "six miles square, of which the sides shall be equi-distant from what is known as the cupola of the cathedral of San Fernando and three miles therefrom."

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  • The Roman Catholics are mostly gathered around the episcopal sees of Hildesheim and Osnabruck and close to Munster (in Westphalia) on the western border, and the Jews in the towns.

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  • There are many handsome churches, including St Joseph's (Roman Catholic) and St Paul's (Protestant Episcopal) cathedrals, and Trinity (Protestant Episcopal), the Westminster Presbyterian, the Delaware Avenue Baptist, and the First Presbyterian churches.

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  • 21 Evangelical, 6 Roman Catholic, a Reformed, a Russian, an English(erected byGilbert Scott) with a graceful spire, a Scottish (Presbyterian), and an American (Episcopal) church, the last a handsome building, with a pretty parsonage attached.

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  • He was ordained a priest of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 1899.

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  • At the north of the city are St John's episcopal buildings, including St John's College and boys' school.

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  • FOGGIA, a town and episcopal see (since 1855) of Apulia, Italy, the capital of the province of Foggia, situated 243 ft.

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  • His father, Rev Henry Lyon Davis (1775-1836), was a prominent Protestant Episcopal clergyman of Maryland, and for some years president of St John's College at Annapolis.

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  • three bishops in episcopal consecration.

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  • Without entering into controversy it must suffice to point out that, from the point of view of all episcopal churches, the ministry of the bishops succeeding the ministry of the apostles, however it came to pass, was for fif teen centuries accepted as the pledge of unity.

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  • Jerusalem, as early as the time of Eusebius, rejoiced in the possession of the episcopal chair of James the Just (Hist.

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  • Amongst other buildings are the episcopal palace, with a museum of Roman and medieval antiquities, several convents, and the principal deaf and dumb institute in the country.

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  • He graduated in 1856 at the Biblical Institute at Concord, New Hampshire (now a part of Boston University), became a minister in the Episcopal Church in 1857, and during the next three years was a rector first at North Adams, and then at Newton Lower Falls, Mass.

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  • In the 4th century the Donatist party was in open schism; the orthodox party had the upper hand in the time of Aurelius and Augustine; the regular meeting of the councils further increased the corporate cohesion of the African Episcopal body.

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  • In Gaul there was no chief metropolitan; but the king's court became, even sooner than that of Spain, the centre of episcopal affairs.

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  • The pope-elect was then put in possession of the episcopal house, and after waiting till the next Sunday his consecration was proceeded with.

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  • The visible symptom of this decadence of the archiepiscopal power was the growing frequency during the Hildebrandine conflict of episcopal confirmations and consecrations made by the popes themselves or their legates.

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  • Even in the cities, the seats of the episcopal power, the reformation encouraged the attempts at revolt or autonomy which tended everywhere to diminish that power.

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  • It was seldom that an episcopal election took place without a division in the chapter, in which resided the electoral right.

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  • installed himself with great state in the episcopal palace, hard by the cathedral.

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  • He created a special Congregation to deal with episcopal affairs, and organized the Congregation of the Index, instituted by Pius V.

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  • Latimer was prohibited from preaching in the university or in any pulpits of the diocese, and on his occupying the pulpit of the Augustinian monastery, which enjoyed immunity from episcopal control, he was summoned to answer for his opinions before Wolsey, who, however, was so sensible of the value of such discourses that he gave him special licence to preach throughout England.

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  • Other institutions for higher education are the University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia (1749), an endowed institution which receives very little support from the state; the University of Pittsburgh (1819), at Pittsburg (q.v.); Dickinson College (Methodist Episcopal, 1783), at Carlisle; Haveriord College (Society of Friends, 1833), at Haverford; Franklin and Marshall {German Reformed, 1853), at Lancaster; Washington and Jefferson {Presbyterian, 1802), at Washington; Lafayette (Presbyterian, 1832), at Easton; Bucknell University (Baptist, 1846), at Lewisburg; Waynesburg (Cumberland Presbyterian, 1851), at Waynesburg; Ursinus (German Reformed, 1870), at Collegeville; Allegheny College (Methodist Episcopal, 1815), at Meadville; Swarthmore (Society of Friends (Hicksites), 1866), at Swarthmore; Muhlenberg (Lutheran, 1867), at Allentown; Lehigh University (non-sectarian) 1867), at Bethlehem; and for women Bryn Mawr College (Society of Friends, 1885), at Bryn Mawr; the Allentown College (German Reformed, 1867), at Allentown; Wilson College (Presbyterian, 1870), and the Pennsylvania College for women (1869), at Pittsburg.

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  • There are theological seminaries at Pittsburg, the Allegheny Seminary (United Presbyterian, 1825), Reformed Presbyterian (1856), and Western Theological Seminary (Presbyterian, 1827); at Lancaster (German Reformed, 1827); at Meadville (Unitarian, 18 44); at Bethlehem (Moravian, 1807); at Chester, the Crozer Theological Seminary (Baptist, 1868); at Gettysburg (Lutheran, 1826); and in Philadelphia several schools, notably the Protestant Episcopal Church divinity school (1862) and a Lutheran seminary (1864), at Mount Airy.

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  • in 1908 entrusted to this Congregation the supervision of the general discipline of the secular clergy and the faithful laity, empowering it to deal with matters concerning the precepts of the Church, festivals, foundations, church property, benefices, provincial councils and episcopal assemblies.

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  • But the constitution "Sapienti" of 1908 withdrew from the Propaganda and put under the common law of the Church most of those parts in which the episcopal hierarchy had been re-established, i.e.

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  • Under the jurisdiction of the Rota, in addition to cases of first instance submitted to it by the pope, are such judgments of episcopal courts as are strictly speaking subject to appeal; for petitions against non-judicial decisions are referred to the Congregations.

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  • It is the seat of Fort Worth University (coeducational), a Methodist Episcopal institution, which was established as the Texas Wesleyan College in 1881, received its present name in 1889, comprises an academy, a college of liberal arts and sciences, a conservatory of music, a law school, a medical school, a school of commerce, and a department of oratory and elocution, and in 1907 had 802 students; the Polytechnic College (coeducational; Methodist Episcopal, South), which was established in 1890, has preparatory, collegiate, normal, commercial, and fine arts departments and a summer school, and in 1906 had 12 instructors and (altogether) 696 students; the Texas masonic manual training school; a kindergarten training school; St Andrews school (Protestant Episcopal), and St Ignatius Academy (Roman Catholic).

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  • At first there was no separate episcopal ordination, and the one rite of elder or priest (Armen.

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  • Dalmatic and tunicle are never worn by priests, as priests, but both are worn by bishops under the chasuble (never under the cope) and also by those prelates, not being bishops, to whom the pope has conceded the right to wear the episcopal vestments.

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  • CESENA (anc. Caesena), a town and episcopal see of Emilia, Italy, in the province of Forli, 12 m.

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  • There is no natural harbour, but traces of ruins near the shore mark the site of the old Maiuma Gazae or Port of Gaza, now called el Minch, which in the 5th century was a separate town and episcopal see, under the title Constantia or Limena Gaza.

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  • Gaza is an episcopal see both of the Greek and the Armenian church.

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  • Among modern public buildings the principal are St Ninian's Episcopal Cathedral, in the Early Middle Pointed style, an important example (completed 1890) of the work of William Butterfield (1814-1900); the municipal buildings (1881); the city-hall; the Marshall Memorial Hall (1823), housing the public library and the museum of the Perth Literary and Antiquarian Society; the Perthshire natural history museum; the Sandeman public library (1898), founded by a bequest of Professor Sandeman of Owens College, Manchester.

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  • CASTELLAMMARE DI STABIA (anc. Stabiae), a seaport and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Naples, 17 m.

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  • ASTI (anc. Hasta), 2 town and episcopal see of Piedmont, Italy, in the province of Alessandria, situated on the Tanaro; it is 22 m.

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  • He cannot, however, exercise the functions proper to the episcopal order (potestas ordinis) until his consecration, which ordinarily takes place within three months of his confirmation.

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  • In his twenty-first year he took orders in the Scottish Episcopal Church, and was ordained to the pastoral charge of a congregation at Pittenweem, Fife, whence he removed in 1790 to Stirling.

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  • In 1844 he was ordained deacon and priest in the English Church, and held curacies at Aston, Rowant and St Thomas's, Oxford; but being naturally attracted to the Episcopal Church of his native land, then recovering from long depression, he removed in 1846 to Stonehaven, the chief town of Kincardineshire.

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  • He removed the episcopal residence to Dundee, where he resided till his death, combining the pastoral charge of the congregation with the duties of the see.

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  • Of the six sons, four - Phillips, Frederic, Arthur and John Cotton - entered the ministry of the Protestant Episcopal Church.

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  • After a short and unsuccessful experience as a teacher in the Boston Latin school, he began in 1856 to study for the ministry of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the theological seminary at Alexandria, Virginia.

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  • His sympathy with men of other ways and thought, and with the truth in other ecclesiastical systems gained for him the confidence and affection of men of varied habits of mind and religious traditions, and was thus a great factor in gaining increasing support for the Episcopal Church.

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  • fessor of ecclesiastical history, Episcopal Theological school, Cambridge, Mass., who in 1907 published at New York, in a single volume, Phillips Brooks, an abbreviation and revision of the earlier biography.

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  • During the administration of Governor Edward Hyde, Lord Cornbury, many members joined the Episcopal Church and others removed to New Jersey.

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  • the springs of the Pader), a town and episcopal see of Germany, in the Prussian province of Westphalia, 63 m.

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  • - The surplice was prescribed by the second Prayer-Book of Edward VI., as, with the tippet or the academical hood, the sole vestment of the minister of the church at "all times of their ministration," the rochet being practically regarded as the episcopal surplice.

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  • The most conspicuous building of the town is the Episcopal palace, in Byzantine style, built in 1864-1875, which is adorned with a high tower and possesses a magnificent reception hall.

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  • The city is the seat of Lawrence college (changed from university in 1908), an interdenominational (originally a Methodist Episcopal) co-educational institution, founded in 1847 as the Lawrence Institute of Wisconsin and named in honour of Amos Adams Lawrence (1814-1886) of Boston, son of Amos Lawrence, and giver of $io,000 for the founding of the Institute.

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  • Methodist Episcopal Church Missionary Society.

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  • Foreign Missions of the Protestant Episcopal Church.

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  • Methodist Episcopal Church (South).

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  • The older American societies, especially the American Board (Congregational), the Presbyterian Boards, the Methodist Episcopal Church Society, the Baptist Missionary Union, and the Missionary Society of the Protestant Episcopal Church, have much extended their work.

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  • priests with similar powers, but without episcopal rank).

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  • There are five dioceses, and in 1897 an episcopal conference was held in Shanghai.

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  • The reopening of the country came in 1859, largely through American pressure, and in May of that year two agents of the Protestant Episcopal Church began work at Nagasaki.

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  • The Methodist Episcopal Church and the Presbyterian Board, both of America, entered the country in 1885, and were soon joined by similar agencies from Canada and Australia.

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  • The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel and the Methodist Episcopal Church work in and around Rangoon.

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  • Bishop Whipple of Minnesota was justly called the Apostle of the Indians, so far as the work of the American Episcopal Church was concerned.

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  • The city is the see of a Protestant Episcopal bishop. Wilmington is chiefly a commercial city, and ships large quantities of cotton, lumber, naval stores, rice, marketgarden produce and turpentine; in 1909 the value of its exports was $23,310,070 and the value of its imports $1,282,724.

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  • SAMUEL SEABURY (1729-1796), American Protestant Episcopal bishop, was born on the 30th of November 1729, in Ledyard, Groton, Connecticut.

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  • These three "Farmer's Letters" - a fourth was advertised but apparently was never published - were forcible presentations of the pro-British claim,, written in a plain, hard-headed style; their authorship was long in question, but it is certain that Seabury claimed them in England in 1783 when he was seeking episcopal consecration.

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  • On the 25th of March 1783 he was chosen their bishop by ten episcopal clergymen of Connecticut, meeting in Woodbury; as he could not take the British oath of allegiance, Seabury was shut out from consecration by the English bishops, and he was consecrated by Scotch bishops at Aberdeen on the 14th of November 1784.

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  • Down to the I 5th century an episcopal prefect, or burgrave, had his seat in the city, his authority extending over the neighbouring districts known as the Gorecht.

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  • Gradually, however, the burghers, aided by the neighbouring Frisians, succeeded in freeing themselves from the episcopal yoke.

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  • Printing and publishing are of some importance: Charlotte is the publication headquarters of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church; and several textile trade journals and two medical periodicals are published here.

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  • Gregory sought to protect the monks from episcopal oppression by issuing privilegia, or charters in restraint of abuses, in accordance with which the jurisdiction of the bishops over the monasteries was confined to spiritual matters, all illegal aggressions being strictly prohibited.

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  • BERGAMO (anc. Bergomum), a city and episcopal see of Lombardy, Italy, capital of the province of Bergamo, situated at the foot of the Alps, at the junction of the Brembo and Serio, 331 m.

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  • In 1764 the foundations were laid of the present St Paul's (Protestant Episcopal), which was used through a part of the American War of Independence as a British military hospital.

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  • VELLETRI (anc. Velitrae), a town and episcopal see of the province of Rome, Italy, at the south-east foot of the outer ring wall of the Alban crater, 26 m.

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  • Reformed Episcopal Church >>

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  • Further mountain torrents (of greater volume than those higher up) fall into the Rhone as it rolls along in a south-westerly direction towards Martigny: the Visp (left), coming from the Zermatt valley, falls in at Visp, at Gampel the Lonza (right), from the Ldtschen valley, at Leuk the Dala (right), from the Gemmi Pass, at Sierre the Navizen (left), from the Einfisch or Anniviers valley, at Sion, the capital of the Valais, the Borgne (left) from the Val d'Herens; soon the Rhone is joined by the Morge (right), flowing from the Sanetsch Pass, and the boundary in the middle ages between Episcopal Valais to the east and Savoyard Valais to the west, and at Martigny by the Dranse (left), its chief Alpine tributary, from the Great St Bernard and the Val de Bagnes.

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  • It is the seat of Livingstone College (African Methodist Episcopal, removed from Concord to Salisbury in 1882, chartered 1885).

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  • (1); (7) Valladolid, University Library, 229; (8) the MS. in the Episcopal Library at Osma, in Old Castile.

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  • There are several American Protestant churches in the city, notably a Protestant Episcopal cathedral and training schools for native teachers.

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  • BRESCIA (anc. Brixia), a city and episcopal see of Lombardy, Italy, the capital of the province of Brescia, finely situated at the foot of the Alps, 52 m.

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  • CIVITA VECCHIA, a seaport town and episcopal see of Italy, in the province of Rome, 50 m.

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  • Giffard, although inclined to nepotism, was a benefactor to his cathedral, and completed and fortified the episcopal castle at Hartlebury.

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  • Thomas, Survey of Worcester Cathedral; Episcopal Registers; Register of Bishop Godfrey Giffard, edited by J.

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  • His charities were large and his private life blameless; he was constantly visiting his diocese, correcting offenders and discharging other episcopal duties; and he compelled neighbouring landholders to restore estates which rightly belonged to the see of Hereford.

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  • In 1905 the Cantilupe Society was founded to publish the episcopal registers of Hereford, of which Cantilupe's is the first in existence.

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  • AUGSBURG, a city and episcopal see of Germany, in the kingdom of Bavaria, chief town of the district of Swabia.

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  • The Tithe Acts do not apply to the city of London, which has always had its own peculiar customary payment regulated by episcopal constitutions of 13 Hen.

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  • Among the educational institutions are the well-known St Paul's school for boys (Protestant Episcopal, 1853), about 2 m.

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  • of the city, and St Mary's school for girls (Protestant Episcopal, 1885).

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  • From 1847 to 1867 Concord was the seat of the Biblical Institute (Methodist Episcopal), founded in Newbury, Vermont, in 1841, removed to Boston as the Boston Theological Seminary in 1867, and after 1871 a part of Boston University.

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  • 429; in the Notitia nearly a hundred and seventy episcopal sees are enumerated here, but we must remember that numbers of these were mere villages.

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  • It is quite possible that an error of a few years has crept into the Eusebian chronology, which is probably largely based on early episcopal lists, and therefore many scholars are inclined to think that 64 is a more probable date than 67.

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  • If this view be, rejected and it is necessary to fall back on the choice between 64 and 67, the problem is perhaps insoluble, but 64 has somewhat more intrinsic probability, and 67 can be explained as due to an artificial system of chronology which postulated for Peter an episcopate of Rome of twenty-five years - a number which comes so often in the early episcopal lists that it seems to mean little more than "a long time," just as "forty years" does in the Old Testament.

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  • Seven years before, at Eger in July 1213, he had made extensive concessions to the church, undertaking to take no part in episcopal elections, thus surrendering the advantages gained by the concordat of Worms, and to allow to German bishops the right of appeal to Rome.

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  • part of the city is Albion College (Methodist Episcopal; co-educational), embracing a College of Liberal Arts, a preparatory department, a conservatory of music, a school of art, a school of oratory, a normal course, and a commercial department.

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  • RAGUSA (Serbo-Croatian Dubrovnik), an episcopal city, and the centre of an administrative district in Dalmatia, Austria.

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  • His father died in 1817, and the son passed several years (1820-1824) in Ohio with his uncle, Bishop Philander Chase (1775-1852), the foremost pioneer of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the West, the first bishop of Ohio (1819-1831), and after 1835 bishop of Illinois.

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  • Although he attended the meetings of parliament with great regularity he did not neglect his episcopal duties, and the fabric of the cathedral of Aberdeen owes much to his care.

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  • Trenton is the see of Protestant Episcopal and Roman Catholic bishops.

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  • A Methodist Episcopal institutional church, admirably equipped, was opened in 1906.

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  • The city is the see of a Protestant Episcopal bishop. The principal industrial interests are trade in leaf tobacco and cotton raised in the vicinity, and the manufacture of cotton goods, phosphate fertilizers, foundry and machine-shop products, wooden-ware, &c. The Seaboard Air Line and the Raleigh & Southport railways have repair shops here.

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  • On the one hand the famous Gorham judgment was the outcome of his refusal to institute to the living of Brampford Speke a clergyman George Cornelius Gorham (1787-1857), who had openly disavowed his belief in baptismal regeneration; on the other he denounced the equally famous Tract XC. in his episcopal charge of 1843.

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  • GAETA (anc. Caietae Portus), a seaport and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Caserta, from which it is 53 m.

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  • 1410) of Borculo-Koevorden was deposed by Bishop Frederick of Utrecht, and the country was henceforth administered by an episcopal official (amptrnan), who was, however, generally a native.

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  • The three ensuing years were especially favourable for the Reformation, as during that time the king had unlooked-for opportunities for filling the vacant episcopal sees with men after his own heart, and at heart he was a Lutheran.

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  • Prejudice and real or imaginary legal obstacles stood in the way of the erection of episcopal sees in the colonies; and though in the 17th century Archbishop Laud had attempted to obtain a bishop for Virginia, up to the time of the American revolution the churchmen of the colonies had to make the best of the legal fiction that their spiritual needs were looked after by the bishop of London, who occasionally sent commissaries to visit them and ordained candidates for the ministry sent to England for the purpose.

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  • Thus down to 1840 there were but ten colonial bishops; and of these several were so hampered by civil regulations that they were little more than government chaplains in episcopal orders.

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  • In April of that year, however, Bishop Blomfield of London published his famous letter to the archbishop of Canterbury, declaring that "an episcopal church without a bishop is a contradiction in terms," and strenuously advocating a great effort for the extension of the episcopate.

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  • Thus, instead of the ten colonial jurisdictions of 1841, there are now about a hundred foreign and colonial jurisdictions, in addition to those of the Protestant Episcopal Church of the United States.

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  • the diocese Honolulu (Hawaii), previously under the jurisdiction of the archbishop of Canterbury, was transferred in 1900 to the Episcopal Church in the United States on account of political changes.

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  • (3) The Scottish Episcopal Church, with 7 dioceses.

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  • (4) The Protestant Episcopal Church of the United States, with 89 dioceses and missionary jurisdictions, including North Tokyo, Kyoto, Shanghai, Cape Palmas, and the independent dioceses of Hayti and Brazil.

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  • The history, which had an apologetic aim, is no longer extant, but copious extracts from it are to be found in the Chronicon of Eusebius, who used it extensively in compiling the early episcopal lists.

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  • FOLIGNO (anc. Fulginiae, q.v.), a town and episcopal see of Umbria, Italy, 771 ft.

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  • Thus the old episcopal titles are all derived from cities.

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  • The city is the see of Roman Catholic and Protestant Episcopal bishops.

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  • NOCERA UMBRA (anc. Nuceria Camellaria), a town and episcopal see in the province of Perugia, Italy, 12 M.

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  • The Church of Scotland and the United Free Church each possess their training colleges for teachers, the Episcopal Church supports one and the Roman Catholic Church one.

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  • The Episcopal Church of Scotland, which is in communion with the Church of England, claims to represent the ancient Catholic Church of the country.

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  • See Scotland, Church of; also Free Church of Scotland; United Presbyterian Church; Presbyterianism; and Scotland, Episcopal Church of.

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  • If there were " believing Scots " in Ireland before the first bishop was ordained, their ecclesiastical constitution cannot have been episcopal.

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  • In the English parliament the Jacobites managed to secure a measure of toleration for the Episcopal clergy, after one of them, Mr Greenshields, had long lain in prison for his use of the liturgy (1711).

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  • TODI (anc. Tuder), a town and episcopal see of the province of Perugia, Italy, 28 m.

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  • In the former group Stanley would, without doubt or hesitation, have placed all questions connected with Episcopal or Presbyterian orders, or that deal only with the outward forms or ceremonies of religion, or with the authorship or age of the books of the Old Testament.

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  • Christianity penetrated to Khorasan and Bactria at an early date; episcopal sees are said to have existed at Mer y and Samarkand in the 4th and 5th centuries, and Cosmas (c. 545) testifies to the spread of Christianity among the Bactrians and Huns.

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  • Among the public buildings are the governor's and bishop's palaces, townhall, cathedral and 9 churches, national college, episcopal seminary and schools of law and medicine, theatre, two hospitals, custom-house, and several asylums and charitable institutions.

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  • BERTINORO, a town and episcopal see of Emilia, Italy, in the province of Forli, 8 m.

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  • In 1906 it was estimated that the total number of communicants of all denominations was 2,077,197, and that of this total 932,084 were Roman Catholics, 263,344 were Methodist (235,092 of the Northern Church, 7198 of the Southern Church, 9833 of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, 5512 of the Methodist Protestant Church, and 3597 of the Free Methodist Church of North America), 202,566 were Lutherans (113,527 of the Evangelical Lutheran Synodical 2 See the so-called McLean County Case (67 Ill.

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  • (The order of merit at the examination for the licentiateship existed in Paris till quite recently.) Each successful candidate was then required to maintain a thesis chosen by himself (quodlibetica) in St Julian's church, and was finally submitted to a purely formal public examination (collatio) at either the episcopal palace or the abbey of Ste Genevieve, before receiving from the chancellor, in the name of the Trinity, the licence to incept or begin to teach in the faculty of arts.

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