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editor

editor

editor Sentence Examples

  • Her first apprenticeship was served under Delatouche, the editor of Figaro.

  • Some sensible observations by the editor were added to the original biography.

  • In 1821 Mr John Scott, the editor of the London Magazine, was killed in a duel, and that periodical passed into the hands of some friends of Hood, who proposed to make him sub-editor.

  • The chief names in this advanced theology connected with Cartesian doctrines are Ludwig Meyer, the friend and editor of Spinoza, author of a work termed Philosophia scripturae interpres (1666); Balthasar Bekker, whose World Bewitched helped to discredit the superstitious fancies about the devil; and Spinoza, whose Tractatus theologico-politicus is in some respects the classical type of rational criticism up to the present day.

  • As an editor of the Greek classics, Ernesti hardly deserves to be named beside his Dutch contemporaries, Tiberius Hemsterhuis (1685-1766), L.

  • The late specific tendency in favour of Jerusalem agrees with the Deuteronomic editor of Kings who condemns the sanctuaries of Dan and Bethel for -, calf-worship (1 Kings xii.

  • Gregory, the editor of the journal, which lasted until the premature death of the latter in 1844.

  • Of the latter journal he was principal editor for some time previous to his death.

  • Land (1891-1893, for which a recently discovered MS. was consulted); see also the same editor's Arnold Geulincx and seine Philosophie (1895), and article (translated) in Mind, xvi.

  • He was editor of the Yale Review, 1896-1910.

  • Julius Kaftan - Balfour's German editor, and a highly influential theologian, occupying a position of modified Ritschlianism - is also a very thoroughgoing empiricist.

  • The latest editor, F.

  • 1832), a liberal, and editor of the Pentateuch and Mahzor; N.

  • Educated at Toronto University, he became a lecturer in English at the Toronto Collegiate Institute and held that post until 1885, when he gave up teaching for journalism, being editor and proprietor of the Lindsay Warder from 1885 to 1897.

  • In 1827, with Stephen Elliott (1771-1830), the naturalist, he founded the Southern Review, of which he was the sole editor after Elliott's death until 1834, when it was discontinued, and to which he contributed articles on law, travel, and modern and classical literature.

  • One editor of his De Consolatione, Bertius, thinks that he bore the praenomen of Flavius, but there is no authority for this supposition.

  • One editor, Godofredus Friedlein, thinks that there are only two manuscripts which can at all lay claim to contain the work of Boetius.

  • In 1868 he founded and edited the Allgemeine evang.-lutherische Kirchenzeitung, with its supplement the Theologisches Litteraturblatt, and in 1880 became editor of the Zeitschrift fiir kirchl.

  • In 1901 he became editor of East and West.

  • On the death of Mamiani in 1885 he became editor of the Filosofia delle scuole italiane, the title of which he changed to Rivista italiana di filosofia.

  • Edwards took over in 1844 from Edward Robinson, who had founded it in 1843, and of which Park was assistant editor until 1851 and editor-in-chief from 1851 to 1884.

  • In 1802 he was appointed editor of the Gentlemen's Diary, and in 1818 editor of the Ladies' Diary and superintendent of the almanacs of the Stationers' Company.

  • In 1839 Ward became the editor of the British Critic, the organ of the Tractarian party, and he excited suspicion among the adherents of the Tractarians themselves by his violent denunciations of the Church to which he still belonged.

  • In 1868 he became editor of the Dublin Review.

  • Hence it is noteworthy that the late editor of Judges has given the first place to Othniel, a Kenizzite, and therefore of Edomite affinity, though subsequently reckoned as a Judaean (Judg i.

  • They could be, and indeed had been made more edifying; but the very noteworthy conservatism of even the last compiler or editor, in contrast to the re-shaping and re-writing of the material in the book of Jubilees, indicates that the Priestly spirit was not that of the whole community.

  • They included his version of Christ's Kirk (u.s.) and a remarkable pastiche by the editor entitled the Vision.

  • His chief place is, however, as an editor.

  • Gichtel (1638-1710), the first editor of his complete works, became the founder of a sect called the Angel-Brethren.

  • He is best known as the author of a Life of Bentley (1830) and as the editor (with C. J.

  • The complete edition of the works by Sir William Hamilton, published in two volumes with notes and supplementary dissertations by the editor (6th ed.

  • In 1902 he became editor of the newspaper of the Agrarian League and later entered the Sobranje.

  • (fn4) (Additional footnote from the editor of the online version) Please note this is Frederick of Saxony (1474-1510), not Frederick III, Elector of Saxony (1463-1525).

  • He began literary work in 1799 as a regular contributor to the Edinburgh Magazine, of which he acted as editor at the age of twenty.

  • The work was strongest in the scientific department, and many of its most valuable articles were from the pen of the editor.

  • Brewster's relations as editor brought.

  • Thompson (1823-1873), widely known in his day as a poet and as the editor of the Southern Literary Messenger in 1847-59.

  • In 1835 Sir William Molesworth founded the London Review with Mill as editor; it was amalgamated with the Wesminster (as the London and Westminster Review) in 1836, and Mill continued editor (latterly proprietor also) till 1840.

  • He supplied part of the money for carrying it on, contributed several articles, and assisted the editor, Fraser Rae, with his advice.

  • Miscellanies, preceded by a full Memoir by the Editor.

  • The fulness and accuracy of the text, combined with the neat beauty of its coloured plates, have gone far to promote the study of ornithology in Germany, and while essentially a popular work, since it is suited to the comprehension of all readers, it is throughout written with a simple dignity that commends it to the serious and scientific. Its twelfth and last volume was published in 1844 - by no means too long a period for so arduous and honest a performance, and a supplement was begun in 1847; but, the editor - or author as he may be fairly called - dying in 1857, this continuation was finished in 1860 by the joint efforts of J.

  • Macleay indeed never pretended to a high position in this branch of science, his tastes lying in the direction of Entomology; but few of their countrymen knew more of birds than did Swainson and Vigors; and, while the latter, as editor for many years of the Zoological Journal, and the first secretary of the Zoological Society, has especial claims to the regard of all zoologists, so the former's indefatigable pursuit of Natural History, and conscientious labour in its behalf-among other ways by means of his graceful pencil-deserve to be remembered as a set-off against the injury he unwittingly caused.

  • Some of the most eminent of them have written scarcely a line on the birds of their own country, as Cabanis (editor since 1853 of the Journal fiir Ornithologie), Finsch, Hartlaub, Prince Max of Wied, A.

  • 5 It is significant that notwithstanding this he did not figure the pterylosis of any one of them, and the thought suggests itself that, though his editor assures us he had convinced himself that the group must be here shoved in (eingeschoben is the word used), the intrusion is rather due to the necessity which Nitzsch, in common with most men of his time (the Quinarians excepted), felt for deploying the whole series of birds into line, in which case the proceeding may be defensible on the score of convenience.

  • Guthrie had occasionally contributed papers to Good Words, and, about the time of his retirement from the ministry, he became first editor of the Sunday Magazine, himself contributing several series of papers which were afterwards published separately.

  • He taught in a country school for a year, read law for a short time, worked in a newspaper office, and in 1884 became editor and proprietor of the Marion Star.

  • Kuenen was also the author of many articles, papers and reviews; a series on the Hexateuch, which appeared in the Theologisch Tijdschrift, of which in 1866 he became joint editor, is one of the finest products of modern criticism.

  • For a time Ranke was now engaged in an occupation of a different nature, for he was appointed editor of a periodical in which Friedrich Perthes designed to defend the Prussian government against the democratic press.

  • Twothirds of the matter had been contributed by the editor, and the two stout volumes in which the numbers were collected contained the best political thought which had for long appeared in Germany.

  • Gilbert, the editor of Gilberts Annalen der Physik, in 1824.

  • Poggendorff immediately put himself in communication with the publisher, Barth of Leipzig, with the result that he was installed as editor of a scientific journal, Annalen der Physik and Cheinie, which was to be a continuation of Gilberts Annalen on a somewhat extended plan.

  • He (or an editor) adds (vii.

  • 1-3, 12-15) quite in the style of the book of Proverbs, some of them contrasting the wise man and the fool; these appear to be the insertions of an editor.

  • In 1819 he removed to Liverpool, being appointed editor of the Imperial Magazine, then newly established, and in 1821 to London, the business being then transferred to the capital.

  • Here he filled the post of editor till his death, and had also the supervision of all works issued from the Caxton Press.

  • He became in 1898 editor of La Lantern.

  • Here he came under the influence of certain terrorist prisoners, notably of Lebois, editor of the Journal de l'egalite, afterwards of the Ami du peuple, papers which carried on the traditions of Marat.

  • Walsh ("Stonehenge"), who did so much towards establishing the first dog shows and field trials, having never forsaken it: the work he began was carried on by its kennel editor, Rawdon B.

  • - Charles, The Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs translated from the Editor's Greek Text (1908).

  • In 1789 he married his first wife, Catherine Stuart, whose brother Daniel afterwards became editor of the Morning Post.

  • 1 being regarded as a transition or connecting section inserted by an editor).

  • The two parts are distinguished by difference of style; the Hebrew principle of parallelism of clauses is employed far more in the first than in the second, which has a number of plain prose passages, and is also rich in uncommon compound terms. In view of these differences there is ground for holding that the second part is a separate production which has been united with the first by an editor, an historical haggadic sketch, a midrash, full of imaginative additions to the Biblical narrative, and enlivened by many striking ethical reflections.

  • In 1881 he was called to the bar at the Inner Temple and joined the staff of the Pall Mall Gazette under John Morley, becoming assistant editor under W.

  • In 1895 he became managing editor of the Cosmopolitan Magazine; but in less than a year he retired that he might have more time for writing.

  • His Manual of the Law of Scotland (1839) brought him into notice; he joined Sir John Bowring in editing the works of Jeremy Bentham, and for a short time was editor of the Scotsman, which he committed to the cause of free trade.

  • In 1873 he first met Mr Sidney Colvin, who was to prove the closest of his friends and at last the loyal and admirable editor of his works and his correspondence; and to this time are attributed several of the most valuable friendships of Stevenson's life.

  • The Works of John Home were collected and published by Henry Mackenzie in 1822 with "An Account of the Life and Writings of Mr John Home," which also appeared separately in the same year, but several of his smaller poems seem to have escaped the editor's observation.

  • He brought out in 1865 an edition of Wheaton's International Law, his notes constituting a most learned and valuable authority on international law and its bearings on American history and diplomacy; but immediately after its publication Dana was charged by the editor of two earlier editions, William Beach Lawrence, with infringing his copyright, and was involved in litigation which was continued for thirteen years.

  • He is best remembered as the general editor of the Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges.

  • He had already taken to journalism, and in 1832 he became joint founder and editor of a daily newspaper, the Boston Atlas.

  • In 1838 he resumed his editorial duties on the Atlas, but in 1840 removed, on account of his health, to British Guiana, where he lived for three years and was editor of two weekly newspapers in succession at Georgetown.

  • As editor of the Omaha World-Herald he then championed the cause of bimetallism in the press as vigorously as he had in Congress and on the platform, his articles being widely quoted and discussed.

  • Hassencamp (1743-1797) the editor (J.

  • Either Florence or a later editor of his work made considerable borrowings from the first four books of Eadmer's Historia novorum.

  • In Dean cemetery, partly laid out on the banks of the Water of Leith, and considered the most beautiful in the city (opened 1845), were interred Lords Cockburn, Jeffrey and Rutherford; " Christopher North," Professor Aytoun, Edward Forbes the naturalist, John Goodsir the anatomist; Sir William Allan, L Sam Bough, George Paul Chalmers, the painters; George Combe, the phrenologist; Playfair, the architect; Alexander Russel, editor of the Scotsman; Sir Archibald Alison, the historian; Captain John Grant, the last survivor of the old Peninsular Gordon Highlanders; Captain Charles Gray, of the Royal Marines, writer of Scottish songs; Lieutenant John Irving, of the Franklin expedition, whose remains were sent home many years after his death by Lieut.

  • In the past the Edinburgh Evening Courant, the chief organ of the Tory party, of which James Hannay was editor for a few years, had a high reputation.

  • It has been argued, though by no means conclusively, that the "editor" was John Ramsay, the scribe of the Edinburgh MS. and of the companion Edinburgh MS. of the Brus by John Barbour.

  • Sir John Robinson, the first premier of Natal under responsible government, was the editor of the Mercury from 1860 until he became prime minister in 1893.

  • Prentice, the historian of the Anti-Corn-Law League, who was then editor of the Manchester Times, describes how, in the year 1835, he received for publication in his paper a series of admirably written letters, under the signature of "Libra," discussing commercial and economical questions with rare ability.

  • In 1863 he was appointed professor at Freiburg; in 1866, at the outbreak of war, his sympathies with Prussia were so strong that he went to Berlin, became a Prussian subject, and was appointed editor of the Preussische Jahrbilcher.

  • On Sybel's death he succeeded him as editor of the Historische Zeitschrift.

  • Public interest in the movement was stimulated in 1825 by the new Journal of the Bohemian Museum (Casopis ceskeho Musea) of which Palacky was the first editor.

  • He became book-keeper at Montbeliard ironworks, and subsequently (1745) secretary to Professor Iselin, the editor of a newspaper at Basel, who three years later recommended him as private tutor to the family of Count A.

  • documents, mainly concerned with the Slovaks; Rene Gonnard, La Hongrie au XX e siecle (Paris, 1908), an admirable description of the country and its people, mainly from the point of view of economic development and social conditions; Geoffrey Drage, Austria-Hungary (London, 1909), a very useful book of reference; P. Alden (editor), Hungary of To-day, by members of the Hungarian Government (London, 1909); see also " The Problem of Hungary " in the Edinburgh Review (No.

  • 7 A copy, with the autograph of the editor, is in the British Museum.

  • The prime movers in this action were Dr. Trumbic, a leading Dalmatian advocate and mayor of Spalato, and Mr. Supilo, also a Dalmatian, the editor of the Novi List at Fiume.

  • 1845), who became well known as a scientific writer and lecturer, editor of the Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science from 1853 to 1871, and from 1862, in succession to Thomas Wakley, coroner for Central Middlesex.

  • The editor dying, this passed into the hands of M.

  • This is not due to the authors of the individual psalms, but to an editor; for Ps.

  • But if we remove them we get a continuous body of Levitical Elohim psalms, or rather two collections, the first Korahitic and the second Asaphic, to which there have been added by way of appendix by a non-Elohistic editor a supplementary group of Korahite psalms and one psalm (certainly late) ascribed to David.

  • McLean, Halle, 1883) is attributed to./ lfric by its editor.

  • He was eminent alike in ecclesiastical history, as an editor of texts and as the historian of the English constitution.

  • In Parthey's edition (Berlin, 1850) other recipes for the manufacture of kuphi, by Galen and Dioscorides, are given; also some results of the editor's own experiments.

  • From 1878 till his death Curtius was general editor of the Leipziger Studien zur classischen Philologie.

  • Previously to their holding office, Daniel Manning (1831-1887), secretary of the treasury in President Cleveland's cabinet, was president of the Argus company, and Daniel Scott Lamont (1851-1905), secretary of war during President Cleveland's second administration, was managing editor of the newspaper.

  • From 1870 he was editor of the Journal fiir praktische Chemie, in which many trenchant criticisms of contemporary chemists and their doctrines appeared from his pen.

  • Messerschmidt, editor of the best collection of Hittite texts up to date, made a tabula rasa of all systems of decipherment, asserting that only one sign out of two hundred the bisected oval, determinative of divinity - had been interpreted with any certainty; and in view of this opinion, coupled with the steady refusal of historians to apply the results of any Hittite decipherment, and the obvious lack of satisfactory verification, without which the piling of hypothesis on hypothesis may only lead further from probability, there is no choice but to suspend judgment for some time longer as to the inscriptions and all deductions drawn from them.

  • We must, therefore, assume a number of independent sources put together by an editor or else that the book is on the whole the work of one author who made use of independent writings but failed to blend them into one harmonious whole.

  • Its editor is of opinion that it was written by a Jewish Christian in Egypt in the 2nd century A.D., but that it embodies legends of an earlier date, and that it received its present form in the 9th or 10th century.

  • From 1870 to 1877 he was assistant professor of history at Harvard and from 1870 to 1876 was editor of the North American Review.

  • The 9th-century poem on the Gospel history, to which its first editor, J.

  • the arrest of the editor of the Constanzer Seeblatt, a friend of Hecker's, in Karlsruhe station on the 8th of April), inspired Hecker with the idea of an armed rising under pretext of the foundation of the German republic. The 9th to the 11th of April was secretly spent in preliminaries.

  • It is, however, illustrated in Pegge's Anecdotes of the English Language (1803) and confirmed by the editor of the 3rd edition (1844), pp. 65-66.

  • So late as the 16th century, Bossuet delivered a panegyric upon her, and it was the action of Dom Deforis, the Benedictine editor of his works, in criticizing the accuracy of the data on which this was based, that first discredited the legend.

  • At Leipzig he was one of the founders of the Akademisch-philosophische Verein, and was the first editor of the Vierteljahrsschrift fiir wissenschaftliche Philosophie.

  • The seven books of the institutions have separate titles given to them either by the author or by a later editor.

  • JOHN ANDREW DOYLE (1844-1907), English historian, the son of Andrew Doyle, editor of The Morning Chronicle, was born on the 14th of May 1844.

  • The next editor was Le Brun des Marettes (2 vols.

  • He also took a deep interest in religious matters, was a prominent member of the Church of the Disciples (Unitarian; founded in Boston by the Rev. James Freeman Clarke), and was assistant editor for some time of The Christian World, a weekly religious paper.

  • The convention, was, however, captured by politicians who converted the whole affair into a farce by nominating Horace Greeley, editor of the New York Tribune, who represented almost anything rather than the object for which the convention had been called together.

  • In the same year Duff took part in founding the Calcutta Review, of which from 1845 to 1849 he was editor.

  • On his advice Hugh Miller was appointed editor of the Witness, the powerful Free Church organ.

  • Edward Field (Editor), State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantation at the end of the Century: A History (3 vols., Boston, 1902), is valuable for the more recent history of the state.

  • Coquerel, as editor of Le Lien, a post which he held till 1870.

  • At first his literary activity was limited to sectional publications, and he addressed his public, now as editor and now as leading contributor, in the Monthly Repository, the Christian Reformer, the Prospective, the Westminster and the National Review.

  • It was followed, in 1864, by the Shimbun-shi (News), which was published in Yokohama, witl~ Kishida GinkO for editor and John Hiko for sub-editor.

  • H~ retained a knowledge of spoken Japanese, but the ideographic script was a sealed book to him, and his editorial part was limited to ora translations from American journals which the editor committee to writing.

  • it waspublished twice a month and might possibl3 have created a demand for its wares had not the editor and sub editor left for America after the issue of the 10th number.

  • The Nichi Nichi Shimbun had an editor of codspicuous literary ability in Fukuchi GenichirO, and the Hoc/il Shimbun, its chief rival, received assistance from such men as Yano Fumio, Fujita Makichi, Inukai Ki and Minoura Katsundo.

  • So strenuous did this campaign become that, in 1875, a press law was enacted empowering the minister of home affairs and the police to suspend or suppress a journal and to fine or imprison its editor without public trial.

  • Many suffered under this law, but the ultimate effect was to invest the press with new popularity, and very soon the newspapers conceived a device which effectually protected their literary staff, for they employed dummy editors whose sole function was to go to prison in lieu of the true editor.

  • The Memoirs of Literature, the first English review consisting entirely of original matter, published in London from 1710 to 1714, had for editor Michel de la Roche, a French Protestant refugee, who also edited at Amsterdam the Bibliotheque angloise (1717-1719), and subsequently Memoires litte'raires de la Grande Bretagne (1720-1724).

  • The first editor was Sydney Smith, then Jeffrey for many years, and later editors were Macvey Napier, William Empson, Sir G.

  • The monthly reviews include the Christian Observer (1802-1857), conducted by members of the established church upon evangelical principles, with Zachary Macaulay as the first editor; Monthlies.

  • Defoe's Review (1704-1713) dealt chiefly with politics and commerce, but the introduction in it of what its editor fittingly termed the "scandalous club " was another step nearer the papers of Steele and the periodical essayists, the first attempts to create an organized popular opinion in matters of taste and manners.

  • Irving (for some time the editor), Paulding, and the ornithologist Wilson.

  • Everett became the editor; his brother Alexander acquired the property in 1829.

  • It lingered nine years under the new editor, who was replaced in 1675 by the abbe de la Roque, and the latter in his turn by the president Cousin, in 1686.

  • He was succeeded as editor by La Roque, Barrin, Bernard and Leclerc. Bayle's method was followed in an equally meritorious periodical, the Histoire des ouvrages des Savants (1687-1704) of H.

  • The Gundlingiana of the latter person, published at Halle (1715-1732), and written partly in Latin and partly in German by the editor, contained a miscellaneous collection of juridical, historical and theological observations and dissertations.

  • Lilienthal, the former of whom began with Gelehrtes Preussen (1722), continued under different titles down to 1729; the latter helped with the Erldutertes Preussen (1724), and was the sole editor of the Acta borussica (1730-1732).

  • Fox's time at St Anne's was largely spent in gardening, in the enjoyment of the country, and in correspondence on literary subjects with his nephew, the 3rd Lord Holland, and with Gilbert Wakefield, the editor of Euripides.

  • He was senior editor of the Congregationalist (1849-1855), and an associate editor of the Christian Union from 1870.

  • SAID PASHA (c. 1830 -), surnamed Kuchuk, Turkish statesman, was at one time editor of the Turkish newspaper Jeride-i-Havadis.

  • His name first appears in the Ladies' Diary (a poetical and mathematical almanac which was begun in 1704, and lasted till 1871) in 1764; ten years later he was appointed editor of the almanac, a post which he retained till 1817.

  • Becq de Fouquieres and was issued in 1862, but rearranged and greatly improved by the editor in 1872.

  • 60) was the first critical editor of Latin texts.

  • An early expression of reviving Lithuanian national consciousness was the appearance of the newspaper" Ausra,"which, printed in East Prussia, lived for three years, though even in that short period its editor, banished from Germany, had to take refuge at Prague.

  • In 1860 Macleod was appointed editor of the new monthly magazine Good Words.

  • Settling in Augusta, Maine, in 1854, he became editor of the Kennebec Journal, and subsequently of the Portland Advertiser.

  • Among other works with which Britton was associated either as author or editor are Historical Account of Redcliffe Church, Bristol (1813); Illustrations of Fonthill Abbey (1823); Architectural Antiquities of Normandy, with illustrations by Pugin (1825-1827); Picturesque Antiquities of English Cities (1830); and History of the Palace and Houses of Parliament at Westminster (1834-1836), the joint work of Britton and Brayley.

  • From 1839 to 1841 Maurice was editor of the Education Magazine.

  • A follower of the positive philosophy, but in conflict with Richard Congreve as to details, he led the Positivists who split off and founded Newton Hall in 1881, and he was president of the English Positivist Committee from 1880 to 1905; he was also editor and part author of the Positivist New Calendar of Great Men (1892), and wrote much on Comte and Positivism.

  • He was editor of the Ars Conjectandi of his uncle Jacques.

  • He afterwards became a royal privy councillor, and remained so till his death, which took place suddenly at Paris in February 1603, but in what manner we do not know; Anderson, the editor of his scientific writings, speaks only of a "praeceps et immaturum autoris fatum."

  • In this an editor incorporated a Caligula apocalypse, and a subsequent editor revised the existing work in many passages and made considerable additions, especially in the later chapters.

  • As editor of the Evangelical Magazine and author of Village Sermons, he commanded a wide influence.

  • He was appointed secretary of the Labour party in 1900 and held the position for r r years; and editor of the " Socialist Library " in 1905.

  • There he became convinced that it was only through the House of Savoy that Italy could be liberated, and he expounded his views in Cavour's paper Il Risorgimento, in La Frusta and Il Piemonte, of which latter he was at one time editor.

  • With him in France were his grandsons, William Temple Franklin, William Franklin's natural son, who acted as private secretary to his grandfather, and Benjamin Franklin Bache (1769-1798), Sarah's son, whom he sent to Geneva to be educated, for whom he later asked public office of Washington, and who became editor of the Aurora, one of the leading journals in the Republican attacks on Washington.

  • John Wesley made great use of it in compiling his Expository Notes upon the New Testament (1755) Besides the two works already described, Bengel was the editor or author of many others, classical, patristic, ecclesiastical and expository.

  • Recognizing the value of an intellectual centre, he made Reykjavik not only the political, but the spiritual capital of Iceland by removing all the chief institutions of learning to that city; he was the soul of many literary and political societies, and the chief editor of the Ny Felagsrit, which has done more than any other Icelandic periodical to promote the cause of civilization and progress in Iceland.

  • Geiger also contributed frequently on Hebrew, Samaritan and Syriac subjects to the Zeitschrift der deutschen morgenldndischen Gesellschaft, and from 1862 until his death (on the 23rd of October 1874) he was editor of a periodical entitled Ji dische Zeitschrift fiir Wissenschaft and Leben.

  • Some recent critics,' however, are inclined to place them in the post-exilic period, in which case a late editor has substituted them for earlier, probably less edifying, oracles.

  • The penitent and God-fearing Jews of the post-exilic age needed some softening appendix, and this the editor provided.

  • Dr Smith contributed articles on Calvin, Kant, Pantheism, Miracles, Reformed Churches, Schelling and Hegel to the American Cyclopaedia, and contributed to McClintock and Strong's Cyclopaedia; and was editor of the American Theological Review (1859 sqq.), both in its original form and after it became the American Presbyterian and Theological Review and, later, the Presbyterian Quarterly and Princeton Review.

  • Zopffel in the preparation of a small Lexikon fiir Theologie and Kirchenwesen (1882; 3rd ed., 1895), and in 1893 became editor of the Theol.

  • In 1881 Mr Reitz had, in conjunction with Mr Steyn, come under the influence of a clever German named Borckenhagen, the editor of the Bloemfontein Express.

  • It was published seven years (until the 20th of September 1841), and was never profitable, but it was widely popular, and it gave Greeley, who was its sole editor, much prominence.

  • From a personal friend, James Coggeshall, he borrowed $1000, on which capital and the editor's reputation The Tribune was founded.

  • The readers of this weekly paper acquired a personal affection for its editor, and he was thus for many years the American writer most widely known and most popular among the rural classes.

  • Mason, who, in The Christian's Magazine, of which he was editor, had attacked the Episcopacy in general and in particular Hobart's Collection of Essays on the Subject of Episcopacy (1 806).

  • And it is not so likely that Mark should have mistaken it for a distinct incident as that an editor of his Gospel should have done so.

  • Early in 1909 he became a "contributing editor" of the Outlook.

  • Mlle de Gournay thereupon set to work to produce a new and final edition with a zeal and energy which would have done credit to any editor of any date.

  • A closer examination of those parts of Ezra and Nehemiah which are not extracted from earlier documents or original memoirs leads to the conclusion that Chronicles-Ezra-Nehemiah was originally one work, displaying throughout the peculiarities of language and thought of a single editor, who, however, cannot be Ezra himself as tradition would have it.

  • In 1875 Waitz removed to Berlin to succeed Pertz as principal editor of the Monumenta Germaniae historica.

  • In spite of advancing years the new editor threw himself into the work with all his former vigour, and took journeys to England, France and Italy to collate works preserved in these countries.

  • Cotelier published at Paris the writings current under the names of Barnabas, Clement of Rome, Hermas, Ignatius and Polycarp. But the name itself is due to their next editor, Thomas Ittig (1643-1710), in his Bibliotheca Patrum Apostolicorum (1699), who, however, included under this title only Clement, Ignatius and Polycarp. Here already appears the doubt as to how many writers can claim the title, a doubt which has continued ever since, and makes the contents of the "Apostolic Fathers" differ so much from editor to editor.

  • In 1858 he became editor of the Zeitschrift fiir wissenschaftliche Theologie.

  • In the course of his labours as editor of this volume he was struck by the unity which was presented by Christian hymnody, "binding together by the force of a common attraction, more powerful than all causes of difference, times ancient and modern, nations of various race and language, Churchmen and Nonconformists, Churches reformed and unreformed" (Preface).

  • Besides his labours as an author, he was for fourteen years editor of Fraser's Magazine.

  • modified form of which was elaborated by Dr Adolf Engler of Berlin, the principal editor of Die naturliche Pflanzenfamilien.

  • Erasmus declined all, and in November 1521 settled permanently at Basel, in the capacity of general editor and literary adviser of Froben's press.

  • Besides his work as editor, he was always writing himself some book or pamphlet called for by the event of the day, some general fray in which he was compelled to mingle, or some personal assault which it was necessary to repel.

  • the Latin Josephus of 1524 to which Erasmus only contributed one translation of 14 pages; or the Aristotle of 1531, of which Simon Grynaeus was the real editor.

  • (iv.) Finally a later Christian editor incorporated the two sections iii.

  • Part of the original work omitted by the final editor of our book is preserved in the Opus imperfectum, which goes back not to our text, but to the original Martyrdom.

  • This archetype differs in many respects from the form in which it was republished by the editor of the entire work.

  • We may, in short, put this complex matter as follows: The conditions of the problem are sufficiently satisfied by supposing a single editor, who had three works at his disposal, the Martyrdom of Isaiah, of Jewish origin, and the Testament of Hezekiah and the Vision of Isaiah, of Christian origin.

  • Felix Jezierski, the previous editor of the above-mentioned journal, published in it translr tions of parts of Homer, and is also the author of an excellent version of Faust.

  • 1850), being a well-known author and editor of the Saturday Review from 1883 to 1894.

  • About this time Dbllinger brought upon himself the animadversion of Heine, who was then editor of a Munich paper.

  • The Times (semi-weekly 1817; daily 1841) was one of the most powerful Democratic organs in the period before the middle of the, 9th century, and had Gideon Wells for editor 1826-1836.

  • Among the letters in volume iii., we have one to the editor of the Ada Leipsica, giving the decipherment of two letters in secret characters.

  • This having fallen out of print, permission was sought by the editor of Crelle to reproduce it in the pages of that journal.

  • Hobbes argues in the case of the Pentateuch that two authors are distinguishable - Moses and a much later compiler and editor.

  • It is an event of no small importance for criticism that so eminent a scholar as Prof. Harnack should have come round to the view, almost universally prevalent in England, that St Luke himself was the final editor and author of both the Third Gospel and the Acts.

  • In 1675 John Fell, dean of Christ Church, published the Elzevir text with an enlarged apparatus, but even more important was the help and advice which he gave to the next important editor - Mill.

  • As a collector and publisher of evidence Tischendorf was marvellous, but as an editor of the text he added little to the principles of Lachmann, and like Lachmann does not seem to have appreciated the value of the Griesbachian system of grouping MSS.

  • During his professoriate he wrote many scientific and popular works, besides contributing largely to the Botanical Register, of which he was editor for many years, and to the Gardener's Chronicle, in which he had charge of the horticultural department from 1841.

  • At the outset the Review was not under the charge of any special editor.

  • The first three numbers were, however, practically edited by Sydney Smith, and on his leaving for England the work devolved chiefly on Jeffrey, who, by an arrangement with Constable, the publisher, was eventually appointed editor at a fixed salary.

  • The Edinburgh Review, on the other hand, enlisted a brilliant and independent staff of contributors, guided by the editor, not the publisher.

  • While at college he was the chief editor of The Lyceum, the earliest in the series of college journals published at the American Cambridge.

  • His sermons attracted wide attention in that community, and he gained a considerable reputation as a theologian and a controversialist by his publication in 1814 of a volume entitled Defence of Christianity, written in answer to a work, The Grounds of Christianity Examined (1813), by George Bethune English (1787-1828), an adventurer, who, born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was in turn a student of law and of theology, an editor of a newspaper, and a soldier of fortune in Egypt.

  • Petavel, La Bible en France, p. 152) To meet the cost of publishing the Finn Bible in 1685, the editor, J.

  • In 1701 at Frankfort-on-Main there appeared a quarto edition of the Ethiopic Psalter, whose editor, H.

  • viii., 1892; and a new translation by the same in Koptische-gnostische Schriften, i.) which, contrary to the opinion of their editor and translator, the present writer believes to represent, in their existing form, a still later period and a still more advanced stage in the decadence of Gnosticism.

  • Seler, Mexico and Guatemala (Berlin, 1896); Justo Serra (editor), Mexico: Its Social Evolution, &c. (2 vols., Mexico, 1904); J.

  • ened by a rival edition published in 1539 in folio and quarto by " John Byddell for Thomas Barthlet " with Richard Taverner as editor.

  • - Dr William Lindsay Alexander (1808-1884), congregational minister; Thomas Chenery (1826-1884), professor of Arabic at Oxford, and afterwards (1877) editor of The Times; Frederick Charles Cook (1810-1889), canon of Exeter; Professor A.

  • He became secretary of the American Oriental Society and editor of its Journal, to which he contributed many valuable papers, especially on numerical and temporal categories in early Sanskrit literature.

  • From 1843 to 1868 he was the chief of the Liberal party in Barcelona, and as proprietor and editor of El Conseller did much to promote the growth of local patriotism in Catalonia.

  • He was for a time editor of Good Words for the Young, and lectured successfully in America in 1872-1873.

  • The Abbe Ferland Was An Enthusiastic Editor And Historian, And Etienne Parent Should.

  • 1797), the hydrographer; Malcolm Laing (1762-1818), author of the History of Scotland from the Union of the Crowns to the Union of the Kingdoms; Mary Brunton (1778-1818), author of Self-Control, Discipline and other novels; Samuel Laing (1780-1868), author of A Residence in Norway, and translator of the Heimskringla, the Icelandic chronicle of the kings of Norway; Thomas Stewart Traill (1781-1862), professor of medical jurisprudence in Edinburgh University and editor of the 8th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica; Samuel Laing (1812-1897), chairman of the London, Brighton & South Coast railway, and introducer of the system of "parliamentary" trains with fares of one penny a mile; Dr John Rae (1813-1893), the Arctic explorer; and William Balfour Baikie (1825-1864), the African traveller.

  • An editor of a corrupt and disputed text may reasonably adopt either of two methods of procedure.

  • On the other method the editor will provide all necessary information about the evidence for the text in the notes of his critical apparatus; but in the text itself he will give whatever in each case is supported by the balance of the probabilities.

  • When it is conscientiously obtained, it is arrived at by handi capping, more or less heavily, intrinsic probability as compared with documental probability, or by raising the minimum of probability which shall qualify a reading for admission into the text until it is in agreement with the notions of the editor.

  • The text will suffer whichever course is adopted, and it will suffer the more the more conservative is the editor, as may easily be shown.

  • This and other applications of the science of nature to the science of all being induced the commentators to adopt this order, and entitle the science of being the Sequel to the Physics (re, But Aristotle knew nothing of this title, the first known use of which was by Nicolaus Damascenus, a younger contemporary of Andronicus, the editor of the Aristotelian writings, and Andronicus was probably the originator of the title, and of the order.

  • On the other hand, Aristotle entitles the science of all being " Primary Philosophy " (irpcori OeXoaoOla), and the science of physical being " Secondary Philosophy " (SEUTEpa 49eXoa041a), which suggests that his order is from Metaphysics to Physics, the reverse of his editor's order from Physics to Metaphysics.

  • Kenyon, who has the proud distinction of having been the first modern editor of the 'AB7) vaicov 7roX rda.

  • Pettenkofer gave vigorous expression to his views on hygiene and disease in numerous books and papers; he was an editor of the Zeitschrift far Biologie from 1865 to 1882, and of the Archiv far Hygiene from 1883 to 1894.

  • When the revolution of 1848 broke out he took an active part as one of the leaders of the republican party in his native city, both as popular orator and as editor of one of the local papers.

  • Henschel (Paris, 1840-1850) includes these supplements and also further additions by the editor, and this has been improved and published in ten volumes by Leopold Favre (Niort, 1883-1887).

  • She was the author of The Story of a Pioneer (1915, with Elizabeth Jordan) and joint editor of The Yellow Ribbon Speaker (1891, with Alice Stone Blackwell and Lucy Elmira Anthony).

  • He then wrote for Loudon's Magazine of Architecture, and verses of his were inserted in Messrs Smith & Elder's Friendship's Of f ering, by the editor, T.

  • Four lectures on this topic appeared in the Cornhill Magazine until the public disapproval led the editor, then W.

  • BASIL LANNEAU GILDERSLEEVE (1831-), American classical scholar, was born in Charleston, South Carolina, on the 23rd of October 1831, son of Benjamin Gildersleeve (1791-1875) a Presbyterian evangelist, and editor of the Charleston Christian Observer in 1826-1845, of the Richmond (Va.) Watchman and Observer in 1845-1856, and of The Central Presbyterian in 1856-1860.

  • From 1880 to 1890 he was an editor of the Presbyterian Review.

  • It was printed at Paris without date, but, according to the editor, J.

  • Nevertheless, there is a common tendency in them, and in the university of Oxford, towards the belief that, to use the words of the editor, " We are free moral agents in a sense which cannot apply to what is merely natural."

  • Rathbone (1819-1901) in 1861-1862, taught in the Albany Academy in 1862-1865, and was editor of the Albany Express in 1865-1870; joined the staff of the Albany Journal in 1870, and was editor-in-chief of this paper from 1876 to 1880.

  • From 1880 until his death he was editor and part proprietor of the Philadelphia Press.

  • After serving as chaplain in two Massachusetts regiments during the first two years of the Civil War, he became editor (1863) of The Christian Times in New York, and subsequently edited The Episcopalian and The Magazine of American History.

  • Phillips, the editor of the Annals of Philosophy, wrote for that journal an historical sketch of electro-magnetism, and he repeated almost all the experiments he described.

  • There he remained till the visit to that city of the hereditary grand-duke (afterwards Alexander II.), accompanied by the poet Joukofsky, led to his being allowed to quit Viatka for Vladimir, where he was appointed editor of the official gazette of that city.

  • He was the first editor of the university official Gazette (1870), and of the Student's Handbook to the University.

  • (1790) (called by the editor "the first genuine edition," because printed from the Advocates' Library text, but carelessly); Jamieson (1820); Cosmo Innes (Spalding Club, 1856); W.

  • Skeat (Early English Text Society, 1870-1889; reprinted, after revision by the editor, by the Scottish Text Society, 1893-1895).

  • But the greatest literary influence of Le Clerc was probably that which he exercised over his contemporaries by means of the serials, or, if one may so call them, reviews, of which he was editor.

  • He is best known as the editor of the Archives et correspondence de la maison d'Orange (12 vols., 1835-1845), a great work of patient erudition, which procured for him the title of the "Dutch Gachard."

  • 3) the Sidonians are mentioned among the oppressors of Israel; but there is no record of any invasion of Israel by the Phoenicians, and the statement is due to the postexilic editor who introduced generalizations of ancient history into the book of Judges.

  • Sinclair, A Dissertation on the Authenticity of the Poems of Ossian (1806); Transactions of the Ossianic Society (Dublin, 1854-1861); Cours de litterature celtique, by Arbois de Jubainville, editor of the Revue celtique (1883, &c.); A.

  • at Paris, with Vatablus and le Mercier, attracted, among other foreigners, Giustiniani, bishop of Nebbio, the editor of the Genoa psalter of 1516.

  • Bliss, editor of the Encyclopaedia of Missions.

  • (2) An application from the editor of the Encyclopaedia Britannica - who might, 1 suppose, as in Macaulay's time, almost command the services of the most eminent scholars and historians of the country - to me, a mere poet, proposing that I should contribute to that great repository of erudition the biography of Mary Queen of Scots.

  • The Brethren started a periodical, The Christian Witness, continued from 1849 as The Present Testimony, with Harris as editor and Darby as the most important contributor.

  • Liouville) (Paris, 1850), which contains also Gauss's Memoir, "Disquisitiones generales circa superficies curvas," and some valuable notes by the editor.

  • In retirement of Sir Leslie Stephen in 1891 succeeded him as editor.

  • The first editor of La Jeune Belgique was M.

  • He left the army, married a Japanese lady, and in 1881 founded the Japan Mail, of which he was proprietor and editor till his death.

  • His editors have contented themselves with republishing his "Practical Works," and his ethical, philosophical, historical and political writings still await a competent editor.

  • He succeeded Clemenceau as editor of the Aurore, in which Zola's letter "J'accuse" had appeared, and was president of the Association of Republican Journalists.

  • C. Wilkes, editor's supplement).

  • At the outbreak of the Revolution he turned to journalism, becoming editor of the Mercure international.

  • Many of Kekule's papers appeared in the Annalen der Chemie, of which he was editor, and he also published an important work, Lehrbuch der organischen Chemie, of which the first three volumes are dated 1861, 1866 and 1882, while of the fourth only one small section was issued in 1887.

  • I may be accounted for by the supposition that the commencement of the narrative had been omitted by the editor of xvi.

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