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easter

easter

easter Sentence Examples

  • She twisted in her chair to see a man near the dark windows whose eyes were the color of her bright purple Easter dress.

  • Focusing on the present, Carmen straightened Destiny's frilly yellow Easter dress and brushed the thumb from her mouth.

  • It's Easter morning and we're on our way to church.

  • Sunday morning had always been a contemplative time for Carmen, but Easter Sunday was something special.

  • Sunday night Alex left again, but this time with a promise to come back for Easter.

  • So when Lori picked him up again Easter Sunday morning, Carmen said nothing - except a prayer that Josh wouldn't catch him.

  • Don't wait up for the Easter Bunny for that one.

  • On Monday, three Colombians were brutally murdered in Philadelphia and their dis­membered body parts scattered like Easter eggs around the city of Brotherly Love.

  • It was a warm morning, with the promise of spring lurking in the Easter lilies she had planted along the fence line.

  • The concordat was solemnly promulgated on Easter Day 1802, but the government had added to it unilateral provisions of Gallican tendencies, which were known as the Organic Articles.

  • Marconi's success in bridging the English Channel at Easter in 1899 with electric waves and establishing practical wireless telegraphy between ships and the shore by this means drew public attention to the value of the new means of communication.

  • He evaded the request and secured a truce until Easter was passed.

  • lenzin, lengizin, lenzo, probably from the same root as "long" and referring to "the lengthening days"), in the Christian Church, the period of fasting preparatory to the festival of Easter.

  • equivalent reQaapa?coo-n) (now superseded by the term p roTEta " the fast"), are derived from the Sunday which was the fortieth day before Easter, as Quinquagesima and Sexagesima are the fiftieth and sixtieth, Quadragesima being until the 7th century the capul jejunii or first day of the fast.

  • In the time of Irenaeus the fast before Easter was very short, but very severe; thus some ate nothing for forty hours between the afternoon of Good Friday and the morning of Easter.

  • About the same time the cycle of paschal solemnities was extended to the ninth week before Easter by the institution of stational masses for Septuagesima, Sexagesima and Quinquagesima Sundays.

  • At Constantinople, too, three Sundays were added and associated with the Easter festival in the same way as the Sundays in Lent proper.

  • The oldest of the vigils is that of Easter Eve, those of Pentecost and Christmas being instituted somewhat later.

  • In the Roman Catholic Church the vigil is now usually celebrated on the morning of the day preceding the festival, except at Christmas, when a midnight mass is celebrated, and on Easter Eve.

  • The Church of England has reverted to early custom in so far as only "Easter Even" is distinguished by a special collect, gospel and epistle.

  • In 1721 Jacob Roggewein was despatched on a voyage of some importance across the Pacific by the Dutch West India Company, during which he discovered Easter Island on the 6th of April 1722.

  • During the second voyage Cook visited Easter Island, discovered several islands of the New Hebrides and New Caledonia; and on his way home by Cape Horn, in March 1774, he discovered the Sandwich Island group and described South Georgia.

  • After touching at Concepcion in Chile and at Easter Island, La Perouse proceeded to Hawaii and thence to the coast of California, of which he has given a very interesting account.

  • William the Conqueror in 1084 celebrated Easter at Abingdon, and left his son, afterwards Henry I., to be educated at the abbey.

  • The slaughter of a lamb at the Passover or Easter season, whose blood was smeared on the door-post, as described in Ex.

  • Soon after their return Anne was found to be pregnant, and in consequence Henry married her about the 25th of January 15333 (the exact date is unknown), their union not being made public till the following Easter.

  • He submitted to the opinion of the episcopate in the various parts of Christendom the divergence between the Easter usage of Rome and that of the bishops of Asia.

  • EASTER, the annual festival observed throughout Christendom in commemoration of the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

  • There is no indication of the observance of the Easter festival in the New Testament, or in the writings of the apostolic Fathers.

  • He says: "The apostles had no thought of appointing festival days, but of promoting a life of blamelessness and piety"; and he attributes the observance of Easter by the church to the perpetuation of an old usage, "just as many other customs have been established."

  • Thus the Passover, with a new conception added to it of Christ as the true Paschal Lamb and the first fruits from the dead, continued to be observed, and became the Christian Easter.

  • Although the observance of Easter was at a very early period the practice of the Christian church, a serious difference as to the day for its observance soon arose between the Christians of Jewish and those of Gentile descent, which led to a long and bitter controversy.

  • With the Jewish Christians, whose leading thought was the death of Christ as the Paschal Lamb, the fast ended at the same time as that of the Jews, on the fourteenth day of the moon at evening, and the Easter festival immediately followed, without regard to the day of the week.

  • Generally speaking, the Western churches kept Easter on the first day of the week, while the Eastern churches followed the Jewish rule, and kept Easter on the fourteenth day.

  • The correct date of the Easter festival was to be calculated at Alexandria, the home of astronomical science, and the bishop of that see was to announce it yearly to the churches under his jurisdiction, and also to the occupant of the Roman see, by whom it was to be communicated to the Western churches.

  • Briefly, it may be explained here that Easter day is the first Sunday after the full moon following the vernal equinox.

  • This, of course, varies in different longitudes, while a further difficulty occurred in the attempt to fix the correct time of Easter by means of cycles of years, when the changes of the sun and moon more or less exactly repeat themselves.

  • Owing to this lack of decision as to the accurate finding of Easter, St Augustine tells us (Epist.

  • 23) that in the year 387 the churches of Gaul kept Easter on the 21st of March, those of Italy on the 18th of April, and those of Egypt on the 25th of April; and it appears from a letter of Leo the Great (Epist.

  • 64, ad Marcian.) that in 455 there was a difference of eight days between the Roman and the Alexandrine Easter.

  • Gregory of Tours relates that in 577 "there was a doubt about Easter.

  • In Gaul we with many other cities kept Easter on the fourteenth calends of May, others, as the Spaniards, on the twelfth calends of April."

  • These latter unfairly attempted to fix the stigma of the Quartodeciman observance on the British and Celtic churches, and they are even now sometimes ignorantly spoken of as having followed the Asiatic practice as to Easter.

  • The British and Celtic churches always kept Easter according to the Nicene decree on a Sunday.

  • The difference between them and the Roman Church, at this period, was that they still followed the 84 years' cycle in computing Easter, which had been abandoned at Rome for the more accurate cycle of 532 years.

  • This difference of calculation led to Easter being observed on different Sundays, in certain years, in England, by the adherents of the two churches.

  • Thus Bede records that in a certain year (which must have been 645, 647, 648 or 651) Queen Eanfleda, who had received her instruction from a Kentish priest of the Roman obedience, was fasting and keeping Palm Sunday, while her husband, Oswy, king of Northumbria, following the rule of the British church, was celebrating the Easter festival.

  • So far as Western Christendom is concerned the corrected calendar is now universally accepted, and Easter is kept on the same day, but it was not until 1752 that the Gregorian reformation of the calendar was adopted in Great Britain and Ireland.

  • Jealousy of everything emanating from Rome still keeps the Eastern churches from correcting the calendar according to the Gregorian reformation, and thus their Easter usually falls before, or after, that of the Western churches, and only very rarely, as was the case in 1865, do the two coincide.

  • Easter, as commemorating the central fact of the Christian religion, has always been regarded as the chief festival of the Christian year, and according to a regulation of Constantine it was to be the first day of the year.

  • the observance of Easter, viz.

  • (r) the preparatory fast of the forty days of Lent; (2) the fifteen days, beginning with the Sunday before and ending with the Sunday after Easter, during which the ceremonies of Holy Week and the services of the Octave of Easter were observed; this period, called by the French the Quinzaine de Pdques, was specially observed in that.

  • country; (3) the Octave of Easter, during which the newlybaptized wore their white garments, which they laid aside on the Sunday after Easter, known as Dominica in albis depositis from this custom; another name for this Sunday was Pascha clausum, or the close of Easter, and from a clipping of the word "close" the English name of "Low" Sunday is believed to be derived; (4) Eastertide proper, or the paschal season beginning at Easter and lasting till Whit Sunday, during the whole of which time the festival character of the Easter season was maintained.

  • Many ecclesiastical ceremonies, growing up from early times, clustered round the celebration of the Easter festival.

  • churches at Rome the paschal candlesticks were fixtures, but elsewhere they were usually movable, and were brought into the church and set up on the Thursday before Easter.

  • The burning of the paschal candle still forms part of the Easter ceremonial of the Roman Catholic Church.

  • The liturgical colour for Easter was everywhere white, as the sign of joy, light and purity, and the churches and altars were adorned with the best ornaments that each possessed.

  • It is not the purpose of this article to enter on the wide subject of the popular observances, such as the giving and sending of Pasch or Easter eggs as presents.

  • Easter Island >>

  • It is noteworthy that British representatives assented to Canon I., providing that Easter be everywhere celebrated on the same day: the later divergence between Rome and the Celtic church is due to improvements in the supputatio Romana adopted at Rome in 343 and subsequently.

  • On the Thursday before Easter a special church service is celebrated, and the wells are beautifully ornamented with flowers, prayers being offered at each.

  • The justices were authorized to fix wages at the Easter quarter sessions.

  • In Easter term 1510 he went to Oxford, where Foxe says he was entered of Magdalen Hall.

  • In Germany it was the solemn national diet of Mainz (Easter 1188) which "swore the expedition" to the Holy Land; in France and England the agreement of the two kings decided upon a joint Crusade.

  • There were medieval Baedekers in abundance for the use of the annual flow of tourists, who were carried every Easter by the vessels of the Italian towns or of the Orders to visit the Holy Land and to bathe in Jordan, to gather palms, and to see the miracle of fire at the Sepulchre.

  • A crisis was brought on by his sermon on the resurrection, preached at Easter 1771; and in November 1773 a prosecution was instituted against him in the consistory court of Gloucester.

  • Soon after Easter Day he came in sight of the coast of Florida, probably near the mouth of the St Johns river.

  • His encyclical issued at Easter 1902, and described by himself as a kind of will, was mainly a reiteration of earlier condemnations of the Reformation, and of modern philosophical systems, which for their atheism and materialism he makes responsible for all existing moral and political disorders.

  • The cathedral occupies the site of the wooden church in which King Edwin was baptized by Paulinus on Easter Day 627.

  • Up to the Nicene Council the Church kept Easter coincident with the Jewish Passover, but after that period took elaborate precautions to dissociate the two.

  • The story in picturesque fashion makes Patrick challenge the royal authority by lighting the Paschal fire on the hill of Slane on the night of Easter Eve.

  • The season was soon after Easter; the year may be safely deduced from the fact that the first nine canons are intended to repair havoc wrought in the church by persecution, which ceased after the overthrow of Maximinus in 313.

  • White is also worn during the octaves of these festivals, on ordinary days (for which no special colour is provided) between Easter and Whitsuntide, at certain special masses connected with the saints falling under the above category, and at bridal masses.

  • None of the colossal structures hitherto described appears to have been erected by the present Melanesian or Polynesian peoples, while their wide diffusion, extending as far as Easter Island, within 400 m.

  • On Easter day an altar was erected, mass celebrated in presence of the natives, the country declared an apanage of Portugal, and a stone cross erected in commemoration of the event.

  • Beyond the walls lay the burghs of Calton, Easter and Wester Portsburgh, the villages of St Cuthbert's, Moutrie'sHill,Broughton,Canonmills, SilvermillsandDeanhaugh - all successively swallowed up in the extension of the modern city.

  • Holy orders are to be conferred on the Ember Saturdays, on the Saturday before Passion Sunday or on Holy Saturday (Easter Eve).

  • On every Christian, of either sex, arrived at years of discretion, the duty was imposed of confessing at least once annually and of receiving the Eucharist at least at Easter (Canon 21).

  • The meetings took place either in the Rathaus, or town hall, or, when they were held - as was usually the case - on Sunday, in the church; and three times a year, at Easter, Whitsuntide and Christmas, special festivals and singing competitions were instituted.

  • in 1024 he gave his support to Conrad II., who along with his consort was crowned with great pomp at St Peter's in Easter of 1027.

  • The answer was given at Easter 1880, when the Liberals were returned by an overwhelming majority over Tories and Home Rulers combined.

  • The former, which was the original nucleus of all the commercial prosperity of the city, begins on the second Wednesday before Easter; and the latter on the second Wednesday before the 8th of September.

  • It comprises the royal and police burghs of Anstruther Easter (pop. 1190), Anstruther Wester (501) and Kilrenny (2542), and lies 9 m.

  • In Umbrian villages on Easter Sunday the images of Jesus and His Mother are carried in rival processions from their respective chapels, and are made to bow when they meet face to face.

  • In France, under the third race of kings, it was usual to begin the year with Easter; and this practice continued at least till the middle of the 16th century, for an edict was issued by Charles IX.

  • In the second case the year has been supposed to begin with the 25th of March, or perhaps with Easter; consequently the first three months of the year 814, reckoning from the ist of January, would be referred to the end of the year 813.

  • For this purpose they adopted a cycle of eighty-four years, which is mentioned by several of the ancient fathers of the church, and which the early Christians borrowed from them for the regulation of Easter.

  • Buccherius places the beginning of this cycle in the year 162 B.C.; Prideaux in the year 291 B.C. According to the account of Prideaux, the fifth cycle must have begun in the year 46 of our era; and it was in this year, according to St Prosperus, that the Christians began to employ the Jewish cycle of eighty-four years, which they followed, though not uniformly, for the regulation of Easter, till the time of the Council of Nice.

  • In their civil affairs the Armenians follow the ancient vague year of the Egyptians; but their ecclesiastical year, which begins on the 1 1th of August, is regulated in the same manner as the Julian year, every fourth year consisting of 366 days, so that Easter and the other festivals are retained at the same place in the seasons as well as in the civil year.

  • Gerberga and her children were delivered up and disappear from history; the siege of Pavia was undertaken; and at Easter 774 the king left the seat of war and visited Rome, where he was received with great respect.

  • At Easter 781, Carloman, his second son by Hildegarde, was renamed Pippin and crowned king of Italy by Pope Adrian, and his youngest son Louis was crowned king of Aquitaine; but no mention was made at the time of his eldest son Charles, who was doubtless intended to be king of the Franks.

  • Ready by the 3rd of January 1553, the bulk of the impression was privately consigned to Lyons and Frankfort for the Easter market.

  • The Pacific Ocean consists mainly of one enormous basin bounded on the west by New Zealand and the Tonga, Marshall aid Marianne ridges, on the north by the festoons of islands marking off the North Pacific fringing seas, on the east by the coast of North America and the great Easter Island Rise and on the south by the Antarctic Shelf.

  • The south-eastern part of the Pacific is mainly occupied by the Easter Island Rise with depths rarely so great as 2000 fathoms; but close to the continent of South America the Atacama Trench is a typical example of the deepest form of depression culminating with 4175 fathoms in 25° 42' S., 71° 31.5' W.

  • 24), gives as the reason for the journey the fact that differences existed between Asia and Rome "with regard to certain things" and especially about the time of the Easter festival.

  • But unfortunately all he says is that with regard' to the certain things the two bishops speedily came to an understanding, while as to the time of Easter, each adhered to his own custom, without breaking off communion with the other.

  • Among the principal buildings are the town hall, court house, public hall, Easter Ross combination poorhouse, and the academy (opened in 1812).

  • Within a few weeks :similar communities were formed at Leipzig, Dresden, Berlin, [[[Offenbach]], Worms, Wiesbaden and elsewhere; and at a `"council" convened at Leipzig at Easter 1845, twenty-seven congregations were represented by delegates, of whom only two or at most three were in clerical orders.

  • On Easter Sunday the queen ventured to display her personal preference for the Protestant conception of the eucharist by forbidding the celebrant in her chapel to elevate the host.

  • In a great sermon on the 10th of April (Easter week) 1588, he stoutly vindicated the Protestantism of the Church of England against the Romanists, and, oddly enough, adduced "Mr Calvin" as a new writer, with lavish praise and affection.

  • Until the end of the 11th century its use was confined to bishops, and to priests at Easter and on their installation.

  • An annual pleasure fair is held on Easter Monday, and a regatta in August or September.

  • This sacrifice of local autonomy was in a measure prepared for by an earlier centralizing movement proper to the churches themselves, whereby those in certain areas met in conference or " synod " to formulate a common policy on local problems. Such inter-church meetings cannot be traced back beyond the latter half of the 2nd century, and were purely ad hoc and informal, called to consider specific questions like Montanism and Easter observance.

  • One of his first public acts was to hold the well-known Easter synod of 1049, at which celibacy of the clergy (down to the rank of subdeacon) was anew enjoined, and where he at least succeeded in making clear his own convictions against every kind of simony.

  • After his return to Rome he held (29th April 1050) another Easter synod, which was occupied largely with the controversy about the teachings of Berengarius of Tours; in the same year he presided over provincial synods at Salerno, Siponto and Vercelli, and in September revisited Germany, returning to Rome in time for a third Easter synod, at which the question of the reordination of those who had been ordained by simonists was considered.

  • After a fourth Easter synod in 1053 Leo set out against the Normans in the south with an army of Italians and German volunteers, but his forces sustained a total defeat at Astagnum near Civitella (18th June 1053); on going out, however, from the city to meet the enemy he was received with every token of submission, relief from the pressure of his ban was implored and fidelity and homage were sworn.

  • No later than the end of the 2nd century Bishop Victor made an attempt to establish this position during the discussions regarding the date of the Easter festival.

  • Frederick, on his side, invaded the Papal States and prevented the assembling of a general council convoked for Easter 1241.

  • In matters of ritual they agreed with the Western Church on the continent, save in a few particulars such as the precise time of keeping Easter and manner of tonsure.

  • From about the beginning of the 12th century, when it became usual to baptize infants soon after their birth instead of at stated times (Easter and Pentecost), the ceremony of scrutiny was incorporated with that of the actual baptism.

  • Taking advantage of the Easter recess, when most of the malcontents were out of town, they suddenly, on the 3rd of May, brought the whole question before the diet and demanded urgency for it.

  • An impressive announcement of the Easter Communion Service, made by the Rev. Pryce Davies, vicar of Talgarth, on the 30.th of March 1735, was the means of awakening Howell Harris (1714-1773) of Trevecca, and he immediately began to hold services in his own house.

  • The influence of the priests kept up the fanaticism of the peasants, and a great manifestation of religious feeling took place on Easter eve, but the republican soldiers taken prisoners were often maltreated and even tortured.

  • in 1271, and fairs were held on Easter Monday, on August 26 and November 8.

  • The following islands may be classified as oceanic, but not with any of the three main divisions: the Bonin Islands, north of the Marianas, belonging to Japan; Lord Howe and Norfolk Islands (to New South Wales); Easter Island (to Chile); the Galapagos Islands (to Ecuador).

  • The Dutchman Jacob Roggeveen, in the course of a voyage round the world in 1721-1722, crossed the Pacific from east to west, and discovered Easter Island, some of the northern islands of the Paumotu Archipelago, and (as is generally supposed) a part of the Samoan group. The voyage of Commodore George (afterwards Lord) Anson in 1740-1744 was for purposes rather of war than of exploration, and Commodore John Byron's voyage in 1765 had little result beyond gaining some additional knowledge of the Paumotu Archipelago.

  • Within the limits of the area under notice, his first voyage (1769) included visits to Tahiti and the Society group generally, to New Zealand and to the east coast of Australia, his second (1773-1774) to New Zealand, the Paumotu Archipelago, the Society Islands, Tonga and subsequently Easter Island, the Marquesas and the New Hebrides; and his third (1777-1778) to Tonga, the Cook or Norway group, and the Hawaiian Islands, of which, even if they were previously known to the Spaniards, he may be called the discoverer, and where he was subsequently killed.

  • In 1786 Jean Francois Galoup de La Perouse, in the course of the famous voyage from which he never returned, visited Easter Island, Samoa and Tonga.

  • The most remarkable of these are on Easter Island, where immense platforms built of dressed stone without mortar are found, together with stone images.

  • Stone axes, remains of carved stone pillars similar to those of Easter Island, and skeletons with a pearl-mussel beneath the head have been found in the island, though it was uninhabited when discovered by Philip Carteret in 1767.

  • A court-leet and view of frank pledge used to be held half-yearly at Easter and Michaelmas, and a court-baron in May.

  • From the beginning the sermons of Oecolampadius centred in the Atonement, and his first reformatory zeal showed itself in a protest (De risu paschali, 1518) against the introduction of humorous stories into Easter sermons.

  • In the Easter of this year !Ethelred died, perhaps of wounds received in the wars against the Danes, and was buried at Wimborne.

  • In Easter Island a form of the house-god is the lizard; it is also a tutelary deity in Madagascar.

  • A fresh charter was granted in 1207 by King John to the inhabitants of Dublin, who had not yet made their peace with the neighbourhood, but, like the settlers in other towns, were at constant feud with the native Irish; so that two years after the date of this charter, whilst the citizens of Dublin were celebrating Easter at Cullenswood, they were set upon by the Irish of the neighbouring mountains, and 500 of them killed.

  • The scene of slaughter is still called the Bloody Fields, and Easter Monday denominated Black Monday.

  • In the first place, there were in early days far more bishops in proportion to the number of believers than is the custom now; and, secondly, it was the rule (except in cases of emergency) to baptize only in the season from Easter to Pentecost, and the bishop was always present and laid his hands on the newly baptized.

  • In general, churchwardens are appointed in Easter week, usually Easter Monday or Easter Tuesday, but in new parishes the first appointment must be within twenty-one days after the consecration of the church, or two calendar months after the formation of the parish, subsequent appointments taking place at the usual time for the appointment of parish officers.

  • So Early As The Znd Century Of Our Era, Great Disputes Had Arisen Among The Christians Respecting The Proper Time Of Celebrating Easter, Which Governs All The Other Movable Feasts.

  • Most Christian Sects Agreed That Easter Should Be Celebrated On A Sunday.

  • In Order To Terminate Dissensions, Which Produced Both Scandal And Schism In The Church, The Council Of Nicaea, Which Was Held In The Year 325, Ordained That The Celebration Of Easter Should Thenceforth Always Take Place On The Sunday Which Immediately Follows The Full Moon That Happens Upon, Or Next After, The Day Of The Vernal Equinox.

  • Should The 14Th Of The Moon, Which Is Regarded As The Day Of Full Moon, Happen On A Sunday, The Celebration Of Easter Was Deferred To The Sunday Following, In Order To Avoid Concurrence With The Jews And The Above Mentioned Heretics.

  • The Observance Of This Rule Renders It Necessary To Reconcile Three Periods Which Have No Common Measure, Namely, The Week, The Lunar Month, And The Solar Year; And As This Can Only Be Done Approximately, And Within Certain Limits, The Determination Of Easter Is An Affair Of Considerable Nicety And Complication.

  • It Is To Be Regretted That The Reverend Fathers Who Formed The Council Of Nicaea Did Not Abandon The Moon Altogether, And Appoint The First Or Second Sunday Of April For The Celebration Of The Easter Festival.

  • This is called the Dionysian or Great Paschal Period, from its having been employed by Dionysius Exiguus, familiarly styled " Denys the Little," in determining Easter Sunday.

  • The Next, And Indeed The Principal Use Of The Calendar, Is To Find Easter, Which, According To The Traditional Regulation Of The Council Of Nice, Must Be Determined From The Following Conditions: 1St, Easter Must Be Celebrated On A Sunday; 2Nd, This Sunday Must Follow The 14Th Day Of The Paschal Moon, So That If The 14Th Of The Paschal Moon Falls On A Sunday Then Easter Must Be Celebrated On The Sunday Following; 3Rd, The Paschal In This Case The 18Th Of April Is Sunday, Then Easter Must Be Celebrated On The Following Sunday, Or The 25Th Of April.

  • Hence Easter Sunday Cannot Happen Earlier Than The 22Nd Of March, Or Later Than The 25Th Of April.

  • Hence We Derive The Following Rule For Finding Easter Sunday From The Tables: 1St, Find The Golden Number, And, From Table Iii., The Epact Of The Proposed Year.

  • The Dominical Letter Of The Year, And Observe In The Calendar The First Day, After The Fourteenth Of The Moon, Which Corresponds To The Dominical Letter; This Will Be Easter Sunday.

  • Required the day on which Easter Sunday falls in the year 1840 ?

  • From these conditions it follows that the paschal full moon, or the 14th of the paschal moon, cannot happen before the 21st of March, and that Easter in consequence cannot happen before the 22nd of March.

  • Therefore, in 1840, Easter Sunday falls on the 19th of April.

  • Such is the very complicated and artificial, though highly ingenious method, invented by Lilius, for the determination of Easter and the other movable feasts.

  • Its principal, though perhaps least obvious advantage, consists in its being entirely independent of astronomical tables, or indeed of any celestial phenomena whatever; so that all chances of disagreement arising from the inevitable errors of tables, or the uncertainty of observation, are avoided, and Easter determined without the possibility of mistake.

  • Perpetual Table, Showing Easter.

  • The Epacts Are Also Placed So As To Indicate The Full Moons Generally One Or Two Days After The True Full Moons; But This Was Done Purposely, To Avoid The Chance Of Concurring With The Jewish Passover, Which The Framers Of The Calendar Seem To Have Considered A Greater Evil Than That Of Celebrating Easter A Week Too Late.

  • Having Determined The Epact Of The Year, It Only Remains To Find Easter Sunday From The Conditions Already Laid Down.

  • Let P = The Number Of Days From The 21St Of March To The 15Th Of The Paschal Moon, Which Is The First Day On Which Easter Sunday Can Fall; P= The Number Of Days From The 21St Of March To Easter Sunday; L = The Number Of The Dominical Letter Of The Year; 1 = Letter Belonging To The Day On Which The 15Th Of The Moon Falls: Then, Since Easter Is The Sunday Following The 14Th Of The Moon, We Have P=P (L 1), Which Is Commonly Called The Number Of Direction.

  • P= 54 E 1=57 E, Or (57 E) 7 R' By Substituting One Or Other Of These Values Of P And 1, According A; The Case May Be, In The Formula P = P (L L), We Shall Have P, Orthe Number Of Days From The 21St Of March To Easter Sunday.

  • By Means Of The Formulae Which We Have Now Given For The Dominical Letter, The Golden Number And The Epact, Easter Sunday May Be Computed For Any Year After The Reformation, Without The Assistance Of Any Tables Whatever.

  • As An Example, Suppose It Were Required To Compute Easter For The Year 1840.

  • For The Golden Number We Have N = (401 $ 1) R; Therefore L = Before Easter.

  • After Easter.

  • Instead, However, Of Employing The Golden Numbers And Epacts For The Determination Of Easter And The Movable Feasts, It Was Resolved That The Equinox And The Paschal Moon Should Be Found By Astronomical Computation From The Rudolphine Tables.

  • E) R (57726) R (7)R3, Consequently, Since P =P (L L), P =28 (43) =29; That Is To Say, Easter Happens Twenty Nine Days After The 21St Of March, Or On The 19Th April, The Same Result As Was Before Found From The Tables.

  • The Principal Church Feasts Depending On Easter, And The Times Of Their Celebration Are As Follows: Septuagesima Sunday.

  • With Respect To The Movable Feasts, Easter Is Determined By The Rule Laid Down By The Council Of Nice; But Instead Of Employing The New Moons And Epacts, The Golden Numbers Are Prefixed To The Days Of The Full Moons.

  • The Golden Numbers Have Been Placed So That Easter May Fall On The Same Day As In The Gregorian Calendar.

  • He was one of the disputants selected to confute the Romanists at the conference of Westminster after Easter 1J59; he was select preacher at St Paul's cross on the 15th of June; and in the autumn was engaged as one of the royal visitors of the western counties.

  • A certain king, Alchfrith, is said to have given the site of the town to Eata, abbot of Melrose, to found a monastery, but before it was completed Eata was deposed for refusing to celebrate Easter according to the Roman usage, and St Wilfrid was appointed the first abbot.

  • 190), on the question of the celebration of the festival of Easter.

  • At the beginning of the struggle Julius had to endure many a hard blow; but his courage never failed - or, at most, but for a moment - even after the French victory at Ravenna, on Easter Sunday 1512.

  • At its very commencement, the pope in his first encyclical (Easter 1878) proclaimed the necessity of a temporal hierarchy.

  • Chalcedon was repudiated afresh, union with the Jacobites instituted, use of water and leaven in the Eucharist condemned, the five days' preliminary fast before Lent restored, Saturday as well as Sunday made a day of feasting and synaxis, any but the orthodox excluded from the Maundy Thursday Communion, the first communion of the new catechumens; union of the Baptismal and Christmas feasts was restored, and the faithful forbidden to fast on Fridays from Easter until Pentecost.

  • The charter of 1576 confirms this market and fair to the burgesses, and grants them two new fairs each continuing for two days, on Tuesday after Easter and on the feast of St Matthew the Apostle.

  • HUGO GROTIUS (1583-1645), in his native country Huig van Groot, but known to the rest of Europe by the latinized form of the name, Dutch publicist and statesman, was born at Delft on Easter day, the 10th of April 1583.

  • FEAST OF THE ASCENSION, one of the oecumenical festivals of the Christian Church, ranking in solemnity with those of Christmas, of Easter and of Pentecost.

  • It is held forty days after Easter, or ten days before Whitsunday, in celebration of Christ's ascension into heaven forty days after the resurrection.

  • This candle, lighted at every mass for the forty days after Easter, symbolizes the presence of Christ with his disciples, and its extinction his parting from them.

  • In the Anglican Church Ascension Day and its octave continue to be observed as a great festival, for which a special preface to the consecration prayer in the communion service is provided, as in the case of Christmas, Easter, Whitsunday, and Trinity Sunday.

  • After two clumsy attempts had been made to poison him at Perez's table, he was killed by bravos on the night of Easter Monday, the 31st of March 1578.

  • Easter: Leipzig, Germany General furs.

  • GOOD FRIDAY (probably "God's Friday"), the English name for the Friday before Easter, kept as the anniversary of the Crucifixion.

  • (See Easter.) From its earliest observance, the day was marked by a specially rigorous fast, and also, on the whole, by a tendency to greater simplicity in the services of the church.

  • Alaric was an Arian Christian who trusted to the sanctity of Easter for immunity from attack, and the enemies of Stilicho reproached him for having gained his victory by taking an unfair advantage of the great Christian festival.

  • PALM SUNDAY (Dominica palmarum), the Sunday before Easter, so called from the custom, still observed in the Roman Catholic Church, of blessing palm branches and carrying them in procession in commemoration of Christ's triumphal entry into Jerusalem.

  • The intention of the compilers cf the Prayer-book seems to have been to restore the "Sunday next before Easter," as it is styled, to its earlier Western character of Passion Sunday, the second lesson at matins (Matt.

  • The cardinals, however, "propter honorem Communis Januae," determined to carry out this consecration on the Sunday after Easter.

  • a book of discourses on all the Gospels, from Ash Wednesday to the Tuesday after Easter; and a treatise called "Marialis, qui totus est de B.

  • The book itself, however, falls into five sections: - (a) from Advent to Christmas (cc. 1-5); (b) from Christmas to Septuagesima (6-30); (c) from Septuagesima to Easter (31-53) (d) from Easter Day to the octave of Pentecost (54-76); (e) from the octave of Pentecost to Advent (77-180).

  • &c.) we learn that Genesis was read in Lent, Job and Jonah in Passion Week, the Acts of the Apostles in Eastertide, lessons on the Passion on Good Friday and on the Resurrection on Easter Day.

  • On Easter Eve 1777 some persons, deputed by a meeting which consisted of forty of the first booksellers in London, called upon him.

  • mandatuna, commandment, in allusion to Christ's words: "A new commandment give I unto you," after he had washed the disciples' feet at the Last Supper), the Thursday before Easter.

  • Maundy Thursday is sometimes known as Sheer or Chare Thursday, either in allusion, it is thought, to the "shearing" of heads and beards in preparation for Easter, or more probably in the word's Middle English sense of "pure," in allusion to the ablutions of the day.

  • The period of the hot winds, called the khamsin, that is, the fifties, is calculated from the day after the Coptic Easter, and terminates on the day of Pentecost, and the Moslems observe the Wednesday preceding this period, called Jobs Wednesday, as well as its first day, when many go into the country from Cairo, to smell the air.

  • by wood and swamp, and after Easter he.

  • The incorporation charter of 1605 recites that the burgesses are chiefly engaged in agriculture, and grants them a fair, which still continues every year on Tuesday in Easter week.

  • Penalties are set on the refusal to celebrate Easter in accordance with the Nicene decree, as well as on leaving a church before the service of the Eucharist is completed.

  • EASTER ISLAND (Rapanui, i.e.

  • Admiral Roggeveen reached it on Easter day 1722; in 1774 Captain Cook discovered it anew and called it Teapi or Waihu.

  • Easter Island is famous for its wonderful archaeological remains.

  • The present inhabitants of Easter Island know nothing of the construction of these remarkable works; and the entire subject of their existence in this small and remote island is a mystery.

  • The Celtic church, unluckily, differed from the Roman on the question of the method of calculating the date of Easter, the form of the tonsure, and other usages, one of them apparently relating to a detail in the celebration of the Holy Communion.

  • Certain obscure religious usages, as regards Lent, the Communion, the non-observance of Sunday, non-communicating at Easter, and the Forbidden Degrees in marriage, were brought into conformity with western Christendom.

  • He postponed the threat till Easter 1625, but, says Calderwood, " The Lord removed him out of the way fourteen days before the Easter Communion."

  • from 1600 to ioo in Manahiki; from 1400 to 1000 in Tubuai; and from 600 to ioo in Easter Island.

  • in 1606 granted a charter of incorporation with an annual fair in Easter week and a market.

  • He had induced Peter to make good his somewhat shadowy claims to the crown of Sicily, but while preparations were being made for the expedition, the popular rising known as the Sicilian Vespers, which resulted in the massacre of nearly all the French in the island, broke out at Palermo on Easter Day 1282.

  • It was one of the old quarter-days, being equivalent to midsummer, the others being Martinmas, equivalent to Michaelmas, Candlemas (Christmas) and Whitsuntide (Easter).

  • More than once at Easter he is said to have had a convenient illness which dispensed him from granting absolution to Louis XIV.

  • canonizata, du Cange], ultima, poenosa, luctuosa, nigra, inofficiosa, muta, crucis, lamentationum, indulgentiae), in the Christian ecclesiastical year the week immediately preceding Easter.

  • Next came the Sabbatum Magnum (Holy Saturday or Easter Eve) with its vigil, which in the early church was associated with an expectation that the second advent would occur on an Easter Sunday.

  • See also Easter, Good Friday, Maundy Thursday, Palm Sunday and Passion Week.

  • (Easter, 1905), granting liberty of worship, produced a movement in the direction of Rome; but this appears to have been checked by the refusal of the government, even now, to recognize in Russia a Roman Catholic Church of the Greek rite.

  • In Easter term r810 he had obtained double first class honours, a distinction which had been obtained only once before, by Sir Robert Peel.

  • In spite of some extraordinary blunders in topography and history, his observant and detailed record, marked by evident good faith, is among the most valuable of medieval documents relating to Palestine: it is also important in the history of the Russian language, and in the study of ritual and liturgy (from its description of the Easter services in Jerusalem, the Descent of the Holy Fire, &c.).

  • Several Russian friends and companions, from Kiev and Old Novgorod, are recorded by Daniel as present with him at the Easter Eve "miracle," in the church of the Holy Sepulchre.

  • These famous articles were: (I) That the communion should be received kneeling; (2) That it might be administered in private; (3) That baptism might be in the home; (4) That children of eight should be taken to the bishop for examination and his blessing; (5) That Christmas, Good Friday, Easter and Whitsunday should be observed.

  • Schopenhauer took up the subject in earnest, and the result of his reflexions (and a few elementary observations) soon after appeared (Easter 1816) as a monograph, Ober das Sehen and die Farben (ed.

  • He succeeded in keeping in touch with the extreme elements in Ireland and in arranging with them the rebellion planned for Easter week 1916, of which he himself proposed to take the lead.

  • 56° 25' S., is the Diego Ramirez group of small, rocky islands, the most southern possession of the republic. Its westernmost possessions are Sala-yGomez and Easter islands, the former in about 27° S., 105° W., and the latter, the easternmost inhabited Polynesian island, in 27° 6' S., 109° 17' W.

  • as well as the moral evils which had infected the church, to the sympathy of Persian Christians with the cause of the Roman empire, to the condition of early monastic institutions, to the practice of the Syriac church in regard to Easter, &c.

  • At the beginning stands the usual introductory matter, such as the tables for determining the date of Easter, the calendar, and the general rubrics.

  • On Easter Eve the new fire, symbol of the light of the newly risen Christ, is produced, and from this are kindled all the lights used throughout the Christian year until, in the gathering darkness (tenebrae) of the Passion, they are gradually extinguished.

  • On Easter Eve new fire is made 3 with a flint and steel, and blessed; from this three candles are lighted, the lumen Christi, and from these again the Paschal Candle.

  • Pilgrims from all parts of the East flock to Jerusalem to obtain the " new fire " on Easter Eve at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.

  • They were probably at first merely the fasts preparatory to the three great festivals of Christmas, Easter and Pentecost.

  • Amongst them may be mentioned a history of the dispute with Palamas; biographies of his uncle and early instructor John, metropolitan of Heraclea, and of the martyr Codratus of Antioch; funeral orations for Theodore Metochita, and the two emperors Andronicus; commentaries on the wanderings of Odysseus and on Synesius's treatise on dreams; tracts on orthography and on words of doubtful meaning; a philosophical dialogue called Florentius or Concerning Wisdom; astronomical treatises on the date of Easter and the preparation of the astrolabe; and an extensive correspondence.

  • While on a mission to the court of King Aldfrith of Northumberland in 686, he was led to adopt the Roman rules with regard to the time for celebrating Easter and the tonsure, and on his return to Iona he tried without success to enforce the change upon the monks.

  • The commonest form of medieval historical writing was the chronicle, which reaches all t he way from monastic annals, mere notes on Easter tables, to the dignity of national monuments.

  • Festivals, such as Easter, fall a week later than in western Europe.

  • Every Sunday from Michaelmas till Easter was a public day with Gilpin.

  • granted two fairs on Basingstoke Down at Easter and on the Loth and 11th of September.

  • On Easter Eve 1519, feeling that the end was near, he made his will.

  • Easter >>

  • After wandering under an assumed name for three months through Modena, Milan and Turin, he at last reached Geneva, where he enjoyed the friendship of the most distinguished citizens, and was on excellent terms with the great publishing firms. But in an evil hour he was induced to visit a Catholic village within Sardinian territory in order to hear mass on Easter day, where he was kidnapped by the agents of the Sardinian government, conveyed to the castle of Miolans and thence successively transferred to Ceva and Turin.

  • A letter of Pope Boniface helped to decide him, and after consulting his friends and counsellors, of whom the priest Coifi afterwards took a prominent part in destroying the temple at Goodmanham, he was baptized with his people and nobles at York, at Easter 627.

  • 10); after which there follows a series of miscellaneous regulations for Easter and Pentecost (ii.

  • Before it was introduced he went to Belfast in Easter week, and at a great demonstration, presided over by Sir Edward Carson, encouraged the Ulstermen to trust to themselves; Belfast was again, he said, a besieged city; the Government by the Parliament Act had erected a boom against them - they would burst that boom; and it would be said of them that they had saved themselves by their exertions, and would save the Empire by their example.

  • The piece is obviously connected with the Easter cycle of liturgical drama, and the subject is treated in the York and Townley plays.

  • 14); the direction to observe Easter according to the Jewish computation is changed into the exact contrary for the same reason (v.

  • He was a Scythian by birth, and did not come to Rome till after 496; his learning was considerable for his times, and to him we owe the employment of the Christian era and a new way of reckoning Easter.

  • Leith cemetery is situated at Seafield and the Eastern cemetery in Easter Road.

  • Baptisms were usually conferred at Easter and in the season of Pentecost which ensued, and by the bishop or by priests and deacons commissioned by him.

  • We hear of all three feasts being habitually chosen in Jerusalem early in the 4th century, but fifty years later baptisms seem to have been almost confined to Easter.

  • LOW SUNDAY, the first Sunday after Easter, so called because of its proximity to the "highest" of all feasts and Sundays, Easter.

  • It was also known formerly as White Sunday, being still officially termed by the Roman Catholic Church Dominica in albis, " Sunday in white garments," in allusion to the white garments anciently worn on this day by those who had been baptized and received into the Church just before Easter.

  • Penitents, therefore (as a rule), were excused the painful ordeal of public humiliation, but performed their penances in secret; only at the end they were publicly reconciled by the bishop. This was at Rome and Milan appointed to be done on the Thursday before Easter, and gradually became a regular practice, the same penitent year after year doing penance during Lent, and being publicly restored to communion in Holy Week.

  • At Easter, nothing having, been yet obtained from the king, an army headed by five earls, forty barons, and Giles Braose, bishop of Hereford, mustered at Stamford and marched on.

  • 877), and also of a "quadragesimal " fast before Easter.

  • In that treatise (c. 15) he approves indeed of the church practice of not fasting on Saturdays and Sundays (as elsewhere, De corona, c. 3, he had expressed his concurrence in the other practice of observing the entire period between Easter and Pentecost as a season of joy); but otherwise he evinces great dissatisfaction with the indifference of the church as to the number, duration and severity of her fasts.'

  • The synod of Hippo (393 A.D.) enacted that the sacrament of the altar should always be taken fasting, except on the Thursday before Easter.

  • The Romans fasted three weeks continuously before Easter (Saturdays and Sundays excepted).

  • Others (the Constantinopolitans) began their fasts seven weeks before Easter, but fasted only on alternate weeks, five days at a time.

  • All Wednesdays and Fridays are also fast days except those that occur in the period between Easter and Whitsunday.

  • The following are simply days of abstinence, that is to say, days on which flesh at all events must not be eaten: - The Sundays in Lent, the three Rogation days, the feast of St Mark (unless it falls in Easter week), and all Fridays which are not days of fasting.

  • The evens or vigils before Christmas, the Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Easter day, Ascension day, Pentecost, St Matthias, the Nativity of St John Baptist, St Peter, St James, St Bartholomew, St Matthew, St Simon and St Jude, St Andrew, St Thomas, and All Saints are also recognized as " fast days."

  • Easter Gledstanes, the seat of the family from the 13th to the 17th century, and the estate of Arthurshiels, occupied by them for nearly a hundred years more, are situated about 31 m.

  • It commanded that the laity communicate at Christmas, Easter and Whitsuntide.

  • When Louis tried to leave the Tuileries for St Cloud at Easter 1791, in order to enjoy the ministrations of a nonjuring priest, the National Guards of Paris would not let him budge.

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