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dijon

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dijon

dijon Sentence Examples

  • Dijon.

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  • The Paris-Lyon-MditerranCe, connecting Paris with Marseilles via Moret, Laroche, Dijon, Macon and Lyons, and with NImes via Moret, Nevers and Clermont-Ferrand.

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  • Cenis Tunnel) and via Dijon and Pontarlier (for the Simplon), and also has a direct line along the Mediterranean coast from Marseilles to Genoa via Toulon and Nice.

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  • CTE-DOR Dijon .

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  • DIJoN -..

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  • DIJoN.

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  • At Dijon his compositions attracted the attention of an inspector, who had him placed (1814) in the normal school, Paris.

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  • CLAUDIUS JAMES RICH (1787-1821), English traveller and scholar, was born near Dijon on the 28th of March 1787.

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  • In April disturbances arose at Dijon, and early in May took place those extraordinary bread-riots known as the" guerre des farines,"which may be looked upon as a first sample of the Revolution, so carefully were they organized.

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  • It should be noted that this name occurs again in the middle ages in Burgundy, not far from Dijon; in all probability a detachment of this people had settled in that spot in the 5th or 6th century.

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  • PIERRE HENRI LARCHER (1726-1812), French classical scholar and archaeologist, was born at Dijon on the 12th of October 1726.

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  • HUGUES-BERNARD MARET, Duc DE Bassano (1763-1839), French statesman and publicist, was born at Dijon.

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  • of Dijon by the Paris-Lyon railway.

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  • As a fortress Besancon forms one of a group which includes Dijon, Langres and Belfort; these are designed to secure Franche Comte and to cover a field army operating on the left flank of a German army of invasion.

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  • Trained for the scholastic profession, he was appointed assistant professor at the Academy of Paris in 1831, professor of mathematics at Lyons in 1834, rector of the Academy of Grenoble in 1835, inspector-general of studies in 1838, rector of the Academy of Dijon and honorary inspectorgeneral in 1854, retiring in 1862.

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  • JOHN (1371-1419), called the Fearless (Sans Peur), duke of Burgundy, son of Philip the Bold, duke of Burgundy, and Margaret of Flanders, was born at Dijon on the 28th of May 1371.

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  • Hs body was first buried at Montereau and afterwards removed to the Chartreuse of Dijon and placed in a magnificent tomb sculptured by Juan de la Huerta; the tomb was afterwards transferred to the museum in the hotel de ville.

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  • DIJON, a town of eastern France, capital of the department of Cote d'Or and formerly capital of the province of Burgundy, 195 m.

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  • The great strategic importance of Dijon as a centre of railways and roads, and its position with reference to an invasion of France from the Rhine, have led to the creation of a fortress forming part of the Langres group. There is no enceinte, but on the east side detached forts, 3 to 4 m.

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  • to the N.W.) protecting the water-supply of Dijon, there are eight forts, besides the groups above mentioned.

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  • The old churches and historic buildings of Dijon are to be found in the irregular streets of the old town, but industrial and commercial activity has been transferred to the new quarters beyond its limits.

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  • c. 1540), a native of Dijon, and pupil of Leonardo da Vinci, but the sculpture of the portals, including "The Last Judgment" on the tympanum of the main portal, is probably from his hand.

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  • These were transferred from the Chartreuse of Dijon (or of Champmol), built by Philip the Bold as a mausoleum, now replaced by a lunatic asylum.

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  • Dijon possesses several houses of the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries, notably the Maison Richard in the Gothic, and the Hotel Vogue in the Renaissance style.

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  • There are also monuments to those inhabitants of Dijon who fell in the engagement before the town in 1870, and to President Carnot and Garibaldi.

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  • Dijon is well known for its mustard, and for the black currant liqueur called cassis de Dijon; its industries include the manufacture of machinery, automobiles, bicycles, soap, biscuits, brandy, leather, boots and shoes, candles and hosiery.

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  • Dijon has considerable trade in cereals and wool, and is the second market for the wines of Burgundy.

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  • Under the Romans Dijon (Divonense castrum) was a vicus in the civitas of Langres.

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  • During the middle ages the fortunes of Dijon followed those of Burgundy, the dukes of which acquired it early in the 11 th century.

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  • The union of the duchy with the crown in 1477 deprived Dijon of the splendour of the ducal court; but to cbunterbalance this loss it was made the capital of the province and seat of a parlement.

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  • In the wars of religion Dijon sided with the League, and only opened its gates to Henry IV.

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  • Chabeuf, Dijon a travers les ages (Dijon, 1897), and Dijon, monuments et souvenirs (Dijon, 1894).

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  • Among works of value illustrative of Herodotus may be mentioned Bouhier, Recherches sur Herodote (Dijon, 1746); Rennell, Geography of Herodotus (London, 1800); Niebuhr, Geography of Herodotus and Scythia (Eng.

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  • Tissot, Memoires historiques et militaires sur Carnot (Paris, 1824); Arago, Biographic de Carnot (Paris, 1850); Hippolyte Carnot, Memoires sur Carnot (Paris, 1863); C. Remond, Notice biographique sur le grand Carnot (Dijon 1880); A.

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  • This silly libel so enraged the performers at the Opera that they hanged and burned with him, the Dijon academy, which had founded his fame, announced the subject of "The Origin of Inequality," on which he wrote a discourse which was unsuccessful, but at least equal to the former in merit.

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  • In 1784 he ran away from school to enlist in the artillery, but was brought back and sent to study law at Lyons and Dijon.

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  • In the 1 1th century a similar task was undertaken by Lanfranc, archbishop of Canterbury (1069-1089); in the 12th century by Stephen Harding (1109), third abbot of Citeaux, and by Cardinal Nicolaus Maniacoria (1150), whose corrected Bible is preserved in the public library at Dijon.

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  • Hearing that the Roman province was threatened, he marched westward, defeated Vercingetorix near Dijon and shut him up in Alesia (Mont-Auxois),which he surrounded with lines of circumvallation.

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  • Under Napoleon, of whom in 1806 he made a nude statue now at Dijon, Houdon received little employment; he was, however, commissioned to execute the colossal reliefs intended for the decoration of the column of the "Grand Army" at Boulogne (which ultimately found a different destination); he also produced a statue of Cicero for the senate, and various busts, amongst which may be cited those of Marshal Ney, of Josephine and of Napoleon himself, by whom Houdon was rewarded with the legion of honour.

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  • SIMON FOUCHER (1644-1696), French philosopher, was born at Dijon on the 1st of March 1644.

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  • For some years he held the position of honorary canon at Dijon, but this he resigned in order to take up his residence in Paris.

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  • of Dijon on the Paris-Lyon railway to Belfort.

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  • PHILIP THE GOOD (1396-1467), duke of Burgundy, son of John the Fearless, duke of Burgundy, and Margaret of Bavaria, was born at Dijon on the 13th of June 1396, and succeeded his father on the 10th of September 1419.

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  • The old duke died at Bruges on the 15th of June 1467, and was buried at Dijon.

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  • He supported the parlements against the ministry, was especially active in his hostility to Turgot, and was suspected of aiding a rising which took place at Dijon in 1775.

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  • The fortifications of Epinal are connected to the southward with Belfort, Dijon and Besancon, by the fortified line of the Moselle, and north of it lies the unfortified zone called the Trouee d'Epinal, a gap designedly left open to the invaders between Epinal and Toul, another great fortress which is itself connected by the Meuse forts d'arret with Verdun and the places of the north-east.

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  • of Dijon on the main line of the Paris-Lyon railway.

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  • The engineer under whose direction the tower was constructed was Alexandre Gustave Eiffel (born at Dijon on the 15th of December 1832), who had already had a wide experience in the construction of large metal bridges, and who designed the huge sluices for the Panama Canal, when it was under the French company.

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  • Ligier (Dijon, 1880) and W.

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  • For several years Lacordaire studied at Dijon, showing a marked talent for rhetoric; this led him to the pursuit of law, and in the local debates of the advocates he attained a high celebrity.

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  • EDME MARIOTTE (c. 1620-1684), French physicist, spent most of his life at Dijon, where he was prior of St Martin sous Beaune.

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  • It was the speeches of Ledru-Rollin and Louis Blanc at working-men's banquets in Lille, Dijon and Chalons that really heralded the revolution.

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  • Thus were created successively the parlements of Toulouse, Grenoble, Bordeaux, Dijon, Rouen, Aix, Rennes, Pau, Metz, Douai,.

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  • On the third Sunday in Advent 1329, and afterwards in public consistory, John had preached that the souls of those who have died in a state of grace go into Abraham's bosom, sub altari Dei, and do not enjoy the beatific vision (visio facie ad faciem) of the Lord until after the Last Judgment and the Resurrection; and he had even instructed a Minorite friar, Gauthier of Dijon, to collect the passages in the Fathers which were in favour of this doctrine.

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  • of Dijon on the Paris-Lyon railway to Nevers.

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  • Ferrandi opera (Dijon, 1694); reproduced in Migne, Patr.

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  • A pupil of the great jurist Jacques Cujas at Bourges, he was an advocate at Dijon in 1569 and became councillor and then president of the parlement of Burgundy.

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  • (1850); P(ierre) S(aumaise), Eloge sur la vie de Pierre Janin (Dijon, 1623); Sainte-Beuve, Causeries du lundi, t.

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  • CHARLES GRAVIER VERGENNES, COMTE DE (1717-1787), French statesman, was born at Dijon on the 10th of December 1717.

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  • He had traversed the fertile country of Flanders; he had visited the rich commercial and industrial republics of Bruges and Ghent, which had escaped the disasters of the Hundred Years War; and, finally, he had enjoyed a hospitality as princely as it was self-interested at Brussels and at Dijon, the two capitals, where he had seen the brilliancy of a court unique in Europe for the ideal of chivalric life it offered.

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  • Thus he procured money at all costs, with an extremely crude fiscal judgment which ended by exasperating the people; hence numerous insurrections of the poverty-stricken; Dijon rose in revolt against the aides in 1630, Provence against the tax-officers (lus) in 1631, Paris and Lyons in 1632, and Bordeaux against the increase of customs in 1635.

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  • In Burgundy, Dijon saw her municipal liberties restricted in 1631; the provincial assembly of Dauphin was suppressed from 1628 onward, and that of Languedoc in 1629; that of Provence was in 1639 replaced by communal assemblies, and that of Normandy was prorogued from 1639 to 1642.

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  • CHARLES, called THE Bold (1433-1477), duke of Burgundy, son of Philip the Good of Burgundy and Isabella of Portugal, was born at Dijon on the 10th of November 1433.

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  • Prieur died at Dijon on the 11th of August 183 2.

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  • After studying law at Dijon he went to Paris, where he was called to the bar, and entered into close relations with Gambetta, collaborating with him in 1868 in the foundation of the Revue politique.

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  • double-header events at Spa-Francorchamps, Sachsenring, Zandvoort and Dijon.

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  • In a small bowl, combine the Dijon mustard, coarse mustard, yogurt, mayonnaise and honey.

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  • Mix together 1 tsp of honey and 1 tsp of Dijon mustard, then brush over the chop.

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  • Desprez's Dijon double podium keeps his title hopes alive.

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  • Whisk together Dijon mustard and honey to make a tasty topper for these burgers.

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  • The historic town of Dijon is the capital of the Côte d'Or with its world famous vineyards.

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  • In 1870 he formed a fresh volunteer corps and went to the aid of France, defeating the German troops at Chatillon, Autun and Dijon.

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  • In concert with Jeanne Francoise Fremyot (1572-1641), widow of the baron de Chantal, whose acquaintance he made while preaching through Lent at Dijon in 1604, he founded the order of the Visitation, in favour of "strong souls with weak bodies," as he said, deterred from entering the orders already existing, by their inability to undertake severe corporal austerities.

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  • Bismarck, moreover, was indignant at the connivance of the Italian government in the Garibaldian expedition to Dijon, and was irritated by Visconti-Venostas plea in the Italian parliament for the integrity of French territory.

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  • It falls within the educational circumscription (academie) of Dijon and the military circumscription of the XX.

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  • Of more or less isolated thinkers may be mentioned Francois de la Mothe le Vayer (1588-1672), whose Cinq Dialogues appeared after his death under the pseudonym of Orosius Tubero; Samuel Sorbiere (1615-1670), who translated the Hypotyposes Pyrrhoneae of Sextus Empiricus; Simon Foucher (1644-1696), canon of Dijon, who wrote a History of the Academics, and combated Descartes and Malebranche from a sceptical standpoint.

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  • You will also visit Dijon, which is a city known for its wineries and cheeses, and to Halles de Lyon, a famous market in Lyon.

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  • The plant is a cross with a Dijon Tea, and of freely rambling habit, well suited to pillars, arches, pergolas, and either to train against tree-trunks or pegged along the ground.

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  • Domaine Claude Dugat is located in Gevrey Chambertin, a wine village of the Cote de Nuits that sits south of Dijon.

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  • Combine turkey, salt, Worcestershire sauce, and Dijon mustard, and mix well.

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  • Toss the greens with a dressing made with olive oil, maple syrup, Dijon mustard, and white wine vinegar.

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  • You can add a bit of Dijon mustard to create a savory topping.

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  • A simple vinaigrette of red wine vinegar, Dijon mustard, sugar, salt, pepper, and olive oil ensures you always have a recipe for tasty salad dressing.

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  • Make a sauce for the sandwich by combining a tablespoon of mayonnaise, a dash of Dijon mustard, and minced garlic.

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