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derision

derision

derision Sentence Examples

  • I concluded that he laughed in derision of my efforts, confident of his own resources.

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  • The applause of the vulgar was mingled with the derision of the court party.

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  • The name, as has often been the case with party designations, was at first given in derision, and by an enemy.

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  • The crowd greeted their arrival with mockery and derision, and being treated as the envoys of heretics they escaped without having obtained a hearing.

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  • Ingrid made a sound of derision.

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  • Ingrid made a sound of derision.

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  • The derision goes to Lucas' preference for effect over storytelling and character development.

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  • The Snuggie is yet another in a long, long series of trends that take off unexpectedly and are massively popular despite a flurry of derision.

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  • Marcus Antonius, nicknamed Creticus in derision.

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  • In England's Confusion, published on the 30th of May 1659, in the True and Full Narrative, and in The Brief Necessary Vindication, he gave long accounts of the attempt to enter the house and of his ejection, while in the Curtaine Drawne he held up the claims of the Rump to derision.

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  • At last, after years of completely undeserved derision, Godzilla can now be seen for the masterpiece it is.

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  • Four of the five vamps he'd chosen as bodyguards were exchanging looks of derision behind his back, and the vamp he tried to interrogate was openly ridiculing him.

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  • Four of the five vamps he'd chosen as bodyguards were exchanging looks of derision behind his back, and the vamp he tried to interrogate was openly ridiculing him.

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  • Do not bluster about dead theology or throw Calvin's name around in derision, just read the words themselves in the Bible.

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  • But instead of attracting derision, this became Stellastarr* 's attraction.

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  • There are notorious examples of public art, such as those entered for the Turner prize, which cause derision or outrage.

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  • An amalgam of mysticism, psychotherapy and pure science fiction, the content invited the derision which was inevitably forthcoming.

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  • His words would have met derision and large guffaws!

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  • Here was a spectacle to excite the derision or pity of the gods.

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  • The fact that Franchise include people who have received refunds and been sent a season ticket was the subject of much derision.

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  • Whatever the reason, a journalist whose story turns out to be inaccurate, unfair or untrue will very justifiably earn public derision.

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  • The hapless EU minister Denis MacShane will demand the European Army intervene, to universal derision.

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  • The Matrix Revolutions found itself on the wrong end of more critical derision than any decent film in quite some time.

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  • The party's attempts to carve out distinctive policy positions on public services have met with widespread derision.

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  • derision in some quarters.

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  • hoots of derision from some of his listeners.

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  • howls of derision produced a U-turn within hours on Thursday.

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  • She broke taboos, risking ostracism and derision in the process.

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  • snorts of derision from some corners.

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  • snorting with derision every time my kids open their mouths.

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  • The name "Methodist" was given in derision to those Oxford students who in company with the Wesleys used to meet together for spiritual fellowship; and later on when John Wesley had organized his followers into "societies" the name was applied to them in the same spirit.

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  • "Roundhead" appears to have been first used as a term of derision towards the end of 1641 when the debates in parlia ment on the Bishops Exclusion Bill were causing riots at Westminster.

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  • Yet they rejected with scorn and derision the pacific overtures of their political opponents, the Potoccy, the Radziwillowie, and the Braniscy, Prince Michal openly declaring that of two tyrannies he preferred the tyranny of the Muscovite to the 2 Michal Kazimierz Radziwill alone was worth thirty millions.

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  • On the 15th of June 1.566 the unfortunate youth, bruised and bleeding from shocking ill-treatment, was placed upon a wretched hack, with a crown of straw on his head, and led in derision through the streets of Stockholm.

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  • to Varennes, he published a pamphlet, L'Acephocratie, in which he demanded the establishment of a federal republic. On the 1st of July, in a speech at the Jacobin club he spoke of a republic, and the reference called out the stormy derision of the partisans of the constitutional monarchy; but repeating his demand for a republic on the 15th of the same month, the speech was ordered to be printed and to be sent to the branch societies throughout France.

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  • His popular name of Der Gutige (the good sort of man) expressed as much derision as affection.

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  • As he passed through the streets of Athens, his curls and long garment reaching to his ankles drew on him the derision of some masons, who were putting on the roof of the new temple of Apollo Delphinius: "Why," they asked, "was such a pretty girl out alone?"

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  • Marcus Antonius, nicknamed Creticus in derision.

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  • The crowd greeted their arrival with mockery and derision, and being treated as the envoys of heretics they escaped without having obtained a hearing.

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  • QUAKERS, originally a cant name applied in derision to the members of the Society of Friends, but now used without any contemptuous significance.

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  • stony silence or derision by sections of the left.

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  • The distinction was never a scientific one, even in the sense in which the word science can be used of the middle ages; it originated in social conceits and in the contempt for mechanical arts which came of the cultivation of "ideas" as opposed to converse with "matter," and which, in the dawn of modern methods, led to the derision of Boyle by Oxford humanists as one given up to "base and mechanical pursuits."

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  • When, then, on the 10th of June 1810, the prince's body was conveyed to Stockholm, and Fersen, in his official capacity as Riksnzarskalk, received it at the barrier and led the funeral cortege into the city, his fine carriage and his splendid robes seemed to the people an open derision of the general grief.

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  • In England's Confusion, published on the 30th of May 1659, in the True and Full Narrative, and in The Brief Necessary Vindication, he gave long accounts of the attempt to enter the house and of his ejection, while in the Curtaine Drawne he held up the claims of the Rump to derision.

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  • Under their influence a new National Assembly met at Troezene in March 1827 and elected as president Count Capo d'Istria, formerly Russian minister for foreign affairs; at the same time a new constitution was promulgated which, when the very life of the insurrection seemed on the point of flickering out, set forth the full ideal of Pan-Hellenic dreams. Anarchy followed; war of Rumeliotes against Moreotes, of chief against chief; rival factions bombarded each other from the two forts at Nauplia over the stricken town, and in derision of the impotent government.

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  • Owing to his father's profession he was called in derision "the doctor," and George Canning, who wrote satirical verses at his expense, referred to him on one occasion as "happy Britain's guardian gander."

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  • The name, as has often been the case with party designations, was at first given in derision, and by an enemy.

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  • Some fighting Catholics haunted woods and hills under the name of tories, afterwards given in derision to a great party, and were hunted down with as little compunction as the wolves to which they were compared.

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  • (now married to Catherine, Charles VI.s daughter) as heir to the crown of France, to the detriment of the dauphin Charles, who was disavowed by his mother and called in derision the soi-disant dauphin of Viennois, When Henry V.

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  • The applause of the vulgar was mingled with the derision of the court party.

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  • By no means should we make others the object of derision and scornful laughter.

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  • Derision greeted a silent seduction scene, with sucking noises from the gallery whenever Novello kissed leading lady Francis Doble.

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  • To even suggest they was ever a Canadian horror movie industry of any note is sure to bring snorts of derision from some corners.

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  • This is no bad thing: I do n't particularly want people to start snorting with derision every time my kids open their mouths.

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  • No doubt they will be met with stony silence or derision by sections of the left.

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  • The comments I made in Troon did receive some derision.

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  • Why, then, are people queuing up to heap derision upon the hapless chavs?

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  • derision in the land of Egypt.

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  • derision in equal measure.

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  • derision of the people.

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  • derision from the crowds.

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  • derision from many intellectuals and other critics, the show has been a commercial success around the world.

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  • derision from the rest of the scientific community.

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  • But any attempt to make things erotic or exciting are impeded by Sharon's ridiculous performance which ultimately arouses nothing but derision.

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  • greeted with derision.

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  • Became a bit of a carpet salesman, myself... " This brought hoots of derision from some of his listeners.

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