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dismiss

dismiss

dismiss Sentence Examples

  • The fact he didn't dismiss me abruptly was more disturbing than if he had.

  • I'll let her think that's possible while I confirm or dismiss what she tells me.

  • She started to the table then stopped, unable to dismiss the feeling of the man's arms around her or what she'd felt when they touched.

  • She couldn't dismiss the sight of his darkened eye or bloodied lip.

  • His dark eyes went from her to Cora, and he lifted his chin in silent command to dismiss the death dealer.

  • My heart is empty as I have no doubt he'll dismiss me if his mother does, in fact, pass on to her final reward.

  • He wanted desperately to dismiss Cynthia from consideration.

  • I was too tunnel-visioned to dismiss the inconsistencies.

  • She let out a self-important sigh as she turned; ready to dismiss the pesky newcomer.

  • She'd read many reports of damage and was struck by how easy it had been to dismiss the humanity of the war they were in.

  • Dean managed to hand her his business card but she seemed to dismiss it, with eyes only for the charming Fred O'Connor.

  • He filled Fred in on his conversation with Cece Baldwin and tried to dismiss the entire case as a waste of time.

  • This seems too simple, and I cannot yet dismiss the caution my great-uncle - -and his son, my cousin - -took when discussing the creature.

  • It definitely wasn't something she was able to dismiss.

  • to dismiss Alberoni.

  • It may also dismiss a case on grounds of insufficient evidence.

  • He may either dismiss the case at once by an order of non-lieu, or order it to be tried, when the prosecution is undertaken.

  • Letters and writings of his own (1527-1528) proved him to hold strongly anti-Lutheran heresies, and both Catholics and Lutherans urged the duke of Liegnitz to dismiss him.

  • To begin with, 1 Though not relating exactly to our present theme, it would be improper to dismiss Nitzsch's name without reference to his extraordinary labours in investigating the insect and other external parasites of birds, a subject which as regards British species was subsequently elaborated by Denny in his Monographia Anoplurorum Britanniae (1842) and in his list of the specimens of British Anoplura in the collection of the British Museum.

  • Sagasta kept quiet until nearly the end of the struggle with the colonies, when the queen-regent had to dismiss the Conservative party, much shorn of its prestige by the failure of its efforts to pacify the colonies, and by the assassination of its chief, Canovas delCastillo.

  • We may then completely dismiss the notion of there being any studied secrecy in connexion with the early Christian cemeteries, and proceed to inquire into the mode of their formation.

  • Three influential people, among them the rector of Bala, agitated some of the parishioners against him, and persuaded his rector to dismiss him.

  • In all other respects the council, provided that it kept within the limits of the laws the administration of which was entrusted to it, was to be entirely independent of the Ottoman government, free to appoint and dismiss its own officials from highest to lowest, and to carry on its administration on such lines as it thought best.

  • Their intrigues in favour of the Greek and other revolutionary movements induced the Porte to dismiss them in 1806, contrary to the arrangement of 1802.

  • An ultimatum was presented ordering Turkey within twenty-four hours to dismiss the French ambassador, hand over the Turkish fleet, and make peace with Russia.

  • Its terms were: the confirmation of the Treaty of Bucharest and the opening of the navigation of the Black Sea to the Russian flag; a stipulation that the hospodars of Walachia and Moldavia should be elected by the boyars for seven years, their election being confirmed by the Porte which, however, had no power to dismiss them without the concurrence of the Russian ambassador at Constantinople; finally, Servia's autonomy was recognized, and, save in the fortresses, no Mussulman might reside there.

  • In July the emperor resolved to dismiss them and form a new ministry, but against this the brothers raised a violent opposition.

  • was very ill at Lyons, the two queens, Marie and Anne of Austria, reconciled for the time, won the king's promise to dismiss Richelieu.

  • Toxins may thus become so closely keyed into their corresponding atom groups, as for instance in tetanus, that they are no longer free to combine with the antitoxin; or, again, an antitoxin injected before a toxin may anticipate it and, preventing its mischievous adhesion, dismiss it for excretion.

  • Popular pressure forced him to bring the murderers to justice, to punish them and dismiss them his service.

  • In 356 he ordered all the satraps to dismiss their mercenaries.

  • Massinissa, according to the story, married Sophonisba immediately after his victory, but was required by Scipio to dismiss her as a Carthaginian, and consequently an enemy to Rome.

  • Pressure was put by the German powers on Charles Augustus, grand-duke of Saxe-Weimar, in whose dominions Jena university was situated, to reprove and dismiss the offenders.

  • C. Lea, " dismiss the religious changes incident to the Reformation with the remark that they were not the object sought, but the means for attaining the object.

  • He was then recalled by the younger Dionysius, whom he persuaded to dismiss Plato and Dion.

  • Spener refused to resign his post, and the Saxon government hesitated to dismiss him.

  • In 1387 the duke of Gloucester, uncle of Richard II., assembled in Hornsey Park the forces by the display of which he compelled the king to dismiss his minister de la Pole, earl of Suffolk; and in 1483 the park was the scene of the ceremonious reception of Edward V., under the charge of Richard, duke of Gloucester, by Edmund Shaw, lord mayor of London.

  • His former vows were simple and the Society was at liberty to dismiss him for any canonical reason.

  • Now that the queen was all-powerful, it was expected she would at once dismiss Mazarin and summon her own friends to power.

  • The revolution of that year compelled George's brother and successor, William, to dismiss Count Munster, who had been the actual ruler of the country, and to name his own brother, Adolphus Frederick, duke of Cambridge, a viceroy of Hanover; one of the viceroy's earliest duties being to appoint a commission to draw up a new constitution.

  • But these members were so far from representing the opinions of the people that popular resentment compelled George to dismiss his advisers in 1862.

  • The situation that resulted issued in the revolutionary year 1848 in a general manifestation of public discontent; and Frederick William, who had become elector on his father's death (November 20, 1847), was forced to dismiss his reactionary ministry and to agree to a comprehensive programme of democratic reform.

  • As regards the name, we may dismiss at once the suggestions of J.

  • MacMahon, equally unwilling to resign or to provoke civil war, had no choice but to dismiss his advisers and form a moderate republican ministry under the premiership of Dufaure.

  • On the ist of February 1881 Arabi and two other Egyptian colonels, summoned before a court-martial for acts of disobedience, were rescued by their soldiers, and the khedive was forced to dismiss his then minister of war in favour of Mahmud Sami.

  • Compelling King Solomon to own Henrys supremacy he restored the influence of Germany in Hungary; in .internal affairs he restrained the turbulence of the princes, but he made many enemies, especially in Saxony, and in 1066 Henry, who had just been declared of age, was compelled to dismiss him.

  • The action of the government, however, caused great indignation, and in a debate on the address an amendment was carried petitioning the king to dismiss his ministry.

  • Reventlow, the ultra-conservative Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, whose mission it was to repair: the damage done by Struensee, and that generation of alert and progressive spirits which surrounded the young crown prince Frederick, whose first act, on taking his seat in the council of state, at the age of sixteen, on the 4th of April 1784, was to dismiss Guldberg.

  • But this idea was quickly dispelled; on the 22nd he expressed his surprise that anybody should have thought he intended to approve of Mr Chamberlain's plan; he was not prepared to dismiss in advance a proposal for the consolidation of the empire made by the responsible government, but he believed that the objections to a policy of preference were insurmountable.

  • Darnley had taken on him (his one act of kingly power) to dismiss the parliament, but he now found himself the mere tool of his accomplices.

  • Having become unpopular, the barons in 1301 vainly asked Edward to dismiss him; about the same time he was accused of murder, adultery and simony.

  • Her husband buys and can dismiss her at will.

  • In great alarm Abdalmalik endeavoured to stifle the revolt by offering to dismiss Hajjaj from his post.

  • Hajjaj, however, was not the man to allow the formation of a fresh nucleus of sedition, and persuaded the caliph to dismiss Omar in the year 712, and appoint Othman b.

  • was offended that the work had not been submitted for approval before being given to the world, and ordered Charles to send Erigena to Rome, or at least to dismiss him from his court.

  • On the whole, the transaction, though it is too well vouched for to allow us to dismiss it as entirely fabulous, cannot take its place among the undoubted facts of history.

  • In 1708 she was forced to dismiss Harley, who, with the aid of Mrs Masham, had been intriguing against the government and projecting the creation of a third party.

  • The quarrel began in 1871 when the Prussian government supported some teachers in state-aided Catholic schools whom the bishops wished to dismiss on account of their anti-infallibilist opinions.

  • Essex was thus thrown upon his own resources, and his anger against the queen being roused afresh by the refusal to renew his monopoly of sweet wines, he formed the desperate project of seizing her person and compelling her to dismiss from her council his enemies Raleigh, Cobham, and Cecil.

  • The seers of Israel were content to dismiss their dead to a land of silence and darkness, the vast hollow gloom of the subterranean Sheol.'

  • The appointment of the majority of public officials is vested in the king, who can himself dismiss cabinet ministers and certain others, whereas in most cases a judicial inquiry is necessary before dismissal.

  • Early in June the Majlis urged the shah to dismiss the courtiers under suspicion.

  • can dismiss ministers and dissolve parliament.

  • He was compelled to dismiss all his followers except Buckingham, and to submit to interminable sermons, which generally contained violent invectives against his parents and himself.

  • The High Church party in England had induced Vere to dismiss him from the chaplaincy; but he was still held, deservedly, in such reverence, that it was arranged he should attend the synod, and accordingly he was retained by the Calvinist party at four florins a day to watch the proceedings on their behalf and advise them when necessary.

  • In 1870 the duke of Saldanha, the last survivor of the turbulent statesmen of Queen Maria's reign, threatened an appeal to arms if the king would not dismiss his minister, the duke of Louie, an advanced Radical and freemason, whose influence, dating from the reign of Pedro V., was viewed with disfavour by Saldanha, as well as by more conservative politicians.

  • That bacteria have existed from very early periods is clear from their presence in fossils; and although we cannot accept all the conclusions drawn from the imperfect records of the rocks, and may dismiss as absurd the statements that geologically immured forms have been found still living, the researches of Renault and van Tieghem have shown pretty clearly that large numbers of bacteria existed in Carboniferous and Devonian times, and probably earlier.

  • It would be rash summarily to dismiss this old tradition of the twenty-one nasks as pure invention.

  • He assumed the style of BaatX€i !MoX8a,ias, and eluded the Turkish stipulation that he should dismiss his foreign guards.

  • In the next year he returned in arms, raised Wessex in revolt, and compelled the king to in-law him again, to restore his earldom, and to dismiss with ignominy the Norman favorites who were hunted over seas.

  • Despite all this the Conquest would not have had its actual results if William, like Canute, had been able to dismiss his conquering army, and to refrain from a general policy Progress tf confiscation.

  • Both sides promised to lay down their arms, to dismiss their mercenaries, and to acquiesce in the destruction of unlicensed castles, of which it is said, with no very great exaggeration, that there were at the moment over 1000 in the realm.

  • The barons brought up many armed retainers to the parliament of 1321, and forced the king to dismiss and to condemn them to exile.

  • rebellion, proposing to march on London and compel the king to dismiss his ministers.

  • As Charles would not dismiss him simply because the Commons were dissatisfied with him as a minister, they fell back on charging him with criminal designs.

  • The king was compelled to dismiss Johannes Schlayer (1792-1860) and his other ministers, and to call to power men with more liberal ideas, the exponents of the idea of a united Germany.

  • The king took courage to dismiss.

  • It would be absurd, however, to dismiss all the legislative work of the Convention as merely partisan or eccentric. Much of it was enlightened and skilful, the product of the best minds in the assembly.

  • In May 1648 the people of Moscow rose against them, and the young tsar was compelled to dismiss both them and their patron Morozov.

  • In theory the viceroy, or ban of CroatiaSlavonia is nominated by the crown, and enjoys almost unlimited authority over local affairs; in practice the consent of the crown is purely formal, and the ban is appointed by the Hungarian premier, who can dismiss him at any moment.

  • But in 1497 he thought best to dismiss him, and Perkin, after attempting something again in Ireland, landed in Cornwall with a small body of men.

  • Although a sincere Catholic, he seems to have laid but little stress on the secret admonition of the Holy Office, which his sanguine temperament encouraged him gradually to dismiss from his mind.

  • The fact he didn't dismiss me abruptly was more disturbing than if he had.

  • I'll let her think that's possible while I confirm or dismiss what she tells me.

  • She started to the table then stopped, unable to dismiss the feeling of the man's arms around her or what she'd felt when they touched.

  • She couldn't dismiss the sight of his darkened eye or bloodied lip.

  • His dark eyes went from her to Cora, and he lifted his chin in silent command to dismiss the death dealer.

  • Deidre's tears burned through his shirt to his skin, and he couldn't dismiss the expression on her face from his thoughts.

  • My heart is empty as I have no doubt he'll dismiss me if his mother does, in fact, pass on to her final reward.

  • He wanted desperately to dismiss Cynthia from consideration.

  • I was too tunnel-visioned to dismiss the inconsistencies.

  • She let out a self-important sigh as she turned; ready to dismiss the pesky newcomer.

  • She'd read many reports of damage and was struck by how easy it had been to dismiss the humanity of the war they were in.

  • Dean managed to hand her his business card but she seemed to dismiss it, with eyes only for the charming Fred O'Connor.

  • He filled Fred in on his conversation with Cece Baldwin and tried to dismiss the entire case as a waste of time.

  • Especially so when he could dismiss her by implying her concerns were born of irrational premenstrual ranting.

  • This seems too simple, and I cannot yet dismiss the caution my great-uncle - -and his son, my cousin - -took when discussing the creature.

  • It definitely wasn't something she was able to dismiss.

  • You will need to resume the meeting with the respondent to inform him/her of the decision to uphold or dismiss the complaint.

  • Politicians will dismiss a rise in crime figures as " mostly traffic offenses ", whilst becoming quite apoplectic about car theft and joyriding.

  • It gave the king the power to dismiss capital burgesses he did not approve of.

  • We cannot dismiss a priori biblical chronology simply by assuming genealogical gaps.

  • I dismiss the claimant 's application for declaratory relief declaring that the Adjudicator's decision was null and void.

  • And since nobody expects men to shave their heads when they join the Viagra Nation, we can dismiss this as sexist claptrap.

  • We can dismiss the former position as moral cowardice, which leaves only the latter as a serious response.

  • discontinuityo much solid textual evidence in Allen's article about significant discontinuities in the play to dismiss his argument.

  • dismiss the appeal.

  • dismiss the employe unfairly.

  • dismiss such rumors.

  • dismiss lightly.

  • employeein 1939, the Ten Booms were forced to dismiss an employe for the first time ever.

  • fashionable to dismiss such matters as not accessible to systematic thinking.

  • fashionable in certain circles to dismiss the Kyoto agreement.

  • hasty to dismiss tapes for storage, Derek!

  • The employer then has the option to dismiss employees w ho were involved.

  • And such impetuosity was equally evident in the speed with which he proceeded to dismiss Germany's great Chancellor, Bismarck.

  • The manufacturer claims that this device does not kink your rope and after 6 months on test I can not dismiss this claim.

  • Rather, they will dismiss the notion lest they become a laughingstock in the papers.

  • Ferda (Peter Sullivan) is inclined to dismiss the Plastics as long-haired layabouts who aren't engaged in what matters.

  • notifyappeal must be made within 10 working days of the employe being notified of the decision to dismiss.

  • Of course, nowadays we would remember this only to dismiss it - terribly old-fashioned.

  • patrimony of the state, to dismiss the defenseless worker.

  • Critics, like Shiva, dismiss such claims as nothing more than corporate public relations puffery.

  • quick to dismiss these as ridiculous rumors.

  • Unfortunately grown ups will often dismiss this as a normal attachment to an imaginary friend and may even ridicule the child.

  • Again, this requires him to dismiss as products of later scholasticism, without cogent grounds, the many suttas that draw such distinctions.

  • And yet to dismiss Doing It as cheap sensationalism is to do it a disservice.

  • There comes a purpose to stop the world being so sordid, to help the people rather than dismiss them.

  • He made a grim effort to dismiss all such suppositions.

  • tempted to dismiss his work for that, you'd be making a mistake.

  • tempting to dismiss any such primacy of the individual as idealist fantasy.

  • unfair to dismiss workers taking part in industrial action.

  • worldview based on hierarchy and difference should not lead us to dismiss it as a kind of ethics, however.

  • When you understand why you dismiss all the other possible gods, you will understand why I dismiss yours.

  • The proprietor, in obedience to orders from Vienna (this seems the most probable account), took advantage of a dispute about salary to dismiss him.

  • to dismiss Alberoni.

  • It may also dismiss a case on grounds of insufficient evidence.

  • He may either dismiss the case at once by an order of non-lieu, or order it to be tried, when the prosecution is undertaken.

  • which English magistrates dismiss a case or commit the prisoner to quatter sessions or assizes, but the powers of the juge dmnstruction are more arbitrary and absolute.

  • His excuse s the popes refusal to dismiss his foreign levies (September 7).

  • Letters and writings of his own (1527-1528) proved him to hold strongly anti-Lutheran heresies, and both Catholics and Lutherans urged the duke of Liegnitz to dismiss him.

  • To begin with, 1 Though not relating exactly to our present theme, it would be improper to dismiss Nitzsch's name without reference to his extraordinary labours in investigating the insect and other external parasites of birds, a subject which as regards British species was subsequently elaborated by Denny in his Monographia Anoplurorum Britanniae (1842) and in his list of the specimens of British Anoplura in the collection of the British Museum.

  • Sagasta kept quiet until nearly the end of the struggle with the colonies, when the queen-regent had to dismiss the Conservative party, much shorn of its prestige by the failure of its efforts to pacify the colonies, and by the assassination of its chief, Canovas delCastillo.

  • We may then completely dismiss the notion of there being any studied secrecy in connexion with the early Christian cemeteries, and proceed to inquire into the mode of their formation.

  • Three influential people, among them the rector of Bala, agitated some of the parishioners against him, and persuaded his rector to dismiss him.

  • In all other respects the council, provided that it kept within the limits of the laws the administration of which was entrusted to it, was to be entirely independent of the Ottoman government, free to appoint and dismiss its own officials from highest to lowest, and to carry on its administration on such lines as it thought best.

  • Their intrigues in favour of the Greek and other revolutionary movements induced the Porte to dismiss them in 1806, contrary to the arrangement of 1802.

  • An ultimatum was presented ordering Turkey within twenty-four hours to dismiss the French ambassador, hand over the Turkish fleet, and make peace with Russia.

  • Its terms were: the confirmation of the Treaty of Bucharest and the opening of the navigation of the Black Sea to the Russian flag; a stipulation that the hospodars of Walachia and Moldavia should be elected by the boyars for seven years, their election being confirmed by the Porte which, however, had no power to dismiss them without the concurrence of the Russian ambassador at Constantinople; finally, Servia's autonomy was recognized, and, save in the fortresses, no Mussulman might reside there.

  • In July the emperor resolved to dismiss them and form a new ministry, but against this the brothers raised a violent opposition.

  • went to ask the emperor to dismiss the unpopular ministry.

  • was very ill at Lyons, the two queens, Marie and Anne of Austria, reconciled for the time, won the king's promise to dismiss Richelieu.

  • Toxins may thus become so closely keyed into their corresponding atom groups, as for instance in tetanus, that they are no longer free to combine with the antitoxin; or, again, an antitoxin injected before a toxin may anticipate it and, preventing its mischievous adhesion, dismiss it for excretion.

  • Schefer, Paris), a theoretical description of his religious and philosophical principles; and we can very well dismiss the rest as being probably just as apocryphal as Nasir's famous autobiography (found in several Persian tadhkiras or biographies of poets), a mere forgery of the most extravagant description, which is mainly responsible for the confusion in names and dates in older accounts of our author.

  • Popular pressure forced him to bring the murderers to justice, to punish them and dismiss them his service.

  • In 356 he ordered all the satraps to dismiss their mercenaries.

  • Massinissa, according to the story, married Sophonisba immediately after his victory, but was required by Scipio to dismiss her as a Carthaginian, and consequently an enemy to Rome.

  • Pressure was put by the German powers on Charles Augustus, grand-duke of Saxe-Weimar, in whose dominions Jena university was situated, to reprove and dismiss the offenders.

  • C. Lea, " dismiss the religious changes incident to the Reformation with the remark that they were not the object sought, but the means for attaining the object.

  • He was then recalled by the younger Dionysius, whom he persuaded to dismiss Plato and Dion.

  • Spener refused to resign his post, and the Saxon government hesitated to dismiss him.

  • In 1387 the duke of Gloucester, uncle of Richard II., assembled in Hornsey Park the forces by the display of which he compelled the king to dismiss his minister de la Pole, earl of Suffolk; and in 1483 the park was the scene of the ceremonious reception of Edward V., under the charge of Richard, duke of Gloucester, by Edmund Shaw, lord mayor of London.

  • His former vows were simple and the Society was at liberty to dismiss him for any canonical reason.

  • Now that the queen was all-powerful, it was expected she would at once dismiss Mazarin and summon her own friends to power.

  • The revolution of that year compelled George's brother and successor, William, to dismiss Count Munster, who had been the actual ruler of the country, and to name his own brother, Adolphus Frederick, duke of Cambridge, a viceroy of Hanover; one of the viceroy's earliest duties being to appoint a commission to draw up a new constitution.

  • But these members were so far from representing the opinions of the people that popular resentment compelled George to dismiss his advisers in 1862.

  • The situation that resulted issued in the revolutionary year 1848 in a general manifestation of public discontent; and Frederick William, who had become elector on his father's death (November 20, 1847), was forced to dismiss his reactionary ministry and to agree to a comprehensive programme of democratic reform.

  • As regards the name, we may dismiss at once the suggestions of J.

  • MacMahon, equally unwilling to resign or to provoke civil war, had no choice but to dismiss his advisers and form a moderate republican ministry under the premiership of Dufaure.

  • On the ist of February 1881 Arabi and two other Egyptian colonels, summoned before a court-martial for acts of disobedience, were rescued by their soldiers, and the khedive was forced to dismiss his then minister of war in favour of Mahmud Sami.

  • Compelling King Solomon to own Henrys supremacy he restored the influence of Germany in Hungary; in .internal affairs he restrained the turbulence of the princes, but he made many enemies, especially in Saxony, and in 1066 Henry, who had just been declared of age, was compelled to dismiss him.

  • The action of the government, however, caused great indignation, and in a debate on the address an amendment was carried petitioning the king to dismiss his ministry.

  • Reventlow, the ultra-conservative Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, whose mission it was to repair: the damage done by Struensee, and that generation of alert and progressive spirits which surrounded the young crown prince Frederick, whose first act, on taking his seat in the council of state, at the age of sixteen, on the 4th of April 1784, was to dismiss Guldberg.

  • But this idea was quickly dispelled; on the 22nd he expressed his surprise that anybody should have thought he intended to approve of Mr Chamberlain's plan; he was not prepared to dismiss in advance a proposal for the consolidation of the empire made by the responsible government, but he believed that the objections to a policy of preference were insurmountable.

  • Darnley had taken on him (his one act of kingly power) to dismiss the parliament, but he now found himself the mere tool of his accomplices.

  • Having become unpopular, the barons in 1301 vainly asked Edward to dismiss him; about the same time he was accused of murder, adultery and simony.

  • Her husband buys and can dismiss her at will.

  • In great alarm Abdalmalik endeavoured to stifle the revolt by offering to dismiss Hajjaj from his post.

  • Hajjaj, however, was not the man to allow the formation of a fresh nucleus of sedition, and persuaded the caliph to dismiss Omar in the year 712, and appoint Othman b.

  • was offended that the work had not been submitted for approval before being given to the world, and ordered Charles to send Erigena to Rome, or at least to dismiss him from his court.

  • On the whole, the transaction, though it is too well vouched for to allow us to dismiss it as entirely fabulous, cannot take its place among the undoubted facts of history.

  • In 1708 she was forced to dismiss Harley, who, with the aid of Mrs Masham, had been intriguing against the government and projecting the creation of a third party.

  • The quarrel began in 1871 when the Prussian government supported some teachers in state-aided Catholic schools whom the bishops wished to dismiss on account of their anti-infallibilist opinions.

  • Essex was thus thrown upon his own resources, and his anger against the queen being roused afresh by the refusal to renew his monopoly of sweet wines, he formed the desperate project of seizing her person and compelling her to dismiss from her council his enemies Raleigh, Cobham, and Cecil.

  • The seers of Israel were content to dismiss their dead to a land of silence and darkness, the vast hollow gloom of the subterranean Sheol.'

  • The appointment of the majority of public officials is vested in the king, who can himself dismiss cabinet ministers and certain others, whereas in most cases a judicial inquiry is necessary before dismissal.

  • The estates could only assemble when summoned by him; he could dismiss them whenever he thought fit; and their deliberations were to be confined exclusively to the propositions which he might think fit to lay before them.

  • Early in June the Majlis urged the shah to dismiss the courtiers under suspicion.

  • can dismiss ministers and dissolve parliament.

  • He was compelled to dismiss all his followers except Buckingham, and to submit to interminable sermons, which generally contained violent invectives against his parents and himself.

  • The High Church party in England had induced Vere to dismiss him from the chaplaincy; but he was still held, deservedly, in such reverence, that it was arranged he should attend the synod, and accordingly he was retained by the Calvinist party at four florins a day to watch the proceedings on their behalf and advise them when necessary.

  • In 1870 the duke of Saldanha, the last survivor of the turbulent statesmen of Queen Maria's reign, threatened an appeal to arms if the king would not dismiss his minister, the duke of Louie, an advanced Radical and freemason, whose influence, dating from the reign of Pedro V., was viewed with disfavour by Saldanha, as well as by more conservative politicians.

  • That bacteria have existed from very early periods is clear from their presence in fossils; and although we cannot accept all the conclusions drawn from the imperfect records of the rocks, and may dismiss as absurd the statements that geologically immured forms have been found still living, the researches of Renault and van Tieghem have shown pretty clearly that large numbers of bacteria existed in Carboniferous and Devonian times, and probably earlier.

  • It would be rash summarily to dismiss this old tradition of the twenty-one nasks as pure invention.

  • He assumed the style of BaatX€i !MoX8a,ias, and eluded the Turkish stipulation that he should dismiss his foreign guards.

  • In the next year he returned in arms, raised Wessex in revolt, and compelled the king to in-law him again, to restore his earldom, and to dismiss with ignominy the Norman favorites who were hunted over seas.

  • Despite all this the Conquest would not have had its actual results if William, like Canute, had been able to dismiss his conquering army, and to refrain from a general policy Progress tf confiscation.

  • Both sides promised to lay down their arms, to dismiss their mercenaries, and to acquiesce in the destruction of unlicensed castles, of which it is said, with no very great exaggeration, that there were at the moment over 1000 in the realm.

  • The barons brought up many armed retainers to the parliament of 1321, and forced the king to dismiss and to condemn them to exile.

  • rebellion, proposing to march on London and compel the king to dismiss his ministers.

  • As Charles would not dismiss him simply because the Commons were dissatisfied with him as a minister, they fell back on charging him with criminal designs.

  • The king was compelled to dismiss Johannes Schlayer (1792-1860) and his other ministers, and to call to power men with more liberal ideas, the exponents of the idea of a united Germany.

  • The king took courage to dismiss.

  • It would be absurd, however, to dismiss all the legislative work of the Convention as merely partisan or eccentric. Much of it was enlightened and skilful, the product of the best minds in the assembly.

  • In May 1648 the people of Moscow rose against them, and the young tsar was compelled to dismiss both them and their patron Morozov.

  • In theory the viceroy, or ban of CroatiaSlavonia is nominated by the crown, and enjoys almost unlimited authority over local affairs; in practice the consent of the crown is purely formal, and the ban is appointed by the Hungarian premier, who can dismiss him at any moment.

  • But in 1497 he thought best to dismiss him, and Perkin, after attempting something again in Ireland, landed in Cornwall with a small body of men.

  • Although a sincere Catholic, he seems to have laid but little stress on the secret admonition of the Holy Office, which his sanguine temperament encouraged him gradually to dismiss from his mind.

  • Now, if words and images come to me without effort, it is a pretty sure sign that they are not the offspring of my own mind, but stray waifs that I regretfully dismiss.

  • Why the jailer does not leave open his prison doors--why the judge does not dismis his case--why the preacher does not dismiss his congregation!

  • He was quick to dismiss these as ridiculous rumors.

  • Unfortunately grown ups will often dismiss this as a normal attachment to an imaginary friend and may even ridicule the child.

  • It seems that a key part of progress having the guts to never dismiss an anomaly, mistake or seemingly ridiculous assertion.

  • Again, this requires him to dismiss as products of later scholasticism, without cogent grounds, the many suttas that draw such distinctions.

  • And yet to dismiss Doing It as cheap sensationalism is to do it a disservice.

  • There comes a purpose to stop the world being so sordid, to help the people rather than dismiss them.

  • He made a grim effort to dismiss all such suppositions.

  • But if you 're tempted to dismiss his work for that, you 'd be making a mistake.

  • Or it will be tempting to dismiss any such primacy of the individual as idealist fantasy.

  • Made it automatically unfair to dismiss workers taking part in industrial action.

  • Resistance to a worldview based on hierarchy and difference should not lead us to dismiss it as a kind of ethics, however.

  • When you understand why you dismiss all the other possible gods, you will understand why I dismiss yours.

  • Classifieds. Don't dismiss the miscellaneous merchandising section of the classifieds either.

  • It's easy to dismiss the entire premise of biofuels based on these findings.

  • Stocking a wardrobe - Before you dismiss the idea of buying wholesale girls' apparel, consider one of the most important advantages - stocking your daughter's wardrobe.

  • There are those who dismiss the Glamour photos as little more than stunts, noting that these women are hardly plus size in the real world.

  • While some retirees dismiss college towns, there are several advantages to choosing one; they generally boast low crime rates and plenty of cultural opportunities.

  • One person's boredom may be another person's thrills, and visitors should not dismiss Pharaoh's Lost Kingdom's seemingly simple attractions.

  • Don't dismiss Wii Sports simply as a "training title" to help you adjust the Nintendo Wii's unique motion sensitive controls; there is oh so much more to enjoy here than meets the eye.

  • When brainstorming for new ideas to raise money for your agency, don't immediately dismiss concepts that don't seem sophisticated enough.

  • Don't automatically dismiss the possibility of a relationship just because she is a transsexual.

  • He may have hobbies and interests beyond the ones you share in common but don't dismiss them.

  • Both parties will also need to be confident enough in their relationship to dismiss the stares and whispers, in many cases.

  • But it can be a mistake to dismiss other things simply because it isn't applied to your mouth.

  • Though older children will likely dismiss the show as silly and unrealistic, the middle school crowd might see Hannah as a powerful role model, and, hence, Hannah Montana paraphernalia is greatly desired by these youngesters.

  • Aries can and will easily dismiss the opinions of others and will do whatever seems best to him.

  • They dismiss things as pure coincidence or seek to rationalize them with an on-the-spot explanation.

  • If you choose not to develop it, simply dismiss it from your mind.

  • Dismiss those notions of bright white sneakers with blue jeans or black pants.

  • Don't dismiss basic evening shoes or even prom shoes when shopping for your bridal footwear.

  • Pay attention to your instincts even when others are trying to dismiss them as irrelevant.

  • It's far more difficult for a credit bureau representative to evade or dismiss your dispute when faced with written documentation bombshells you casually lob in during a conversation.

  • Don't dismiss the power of offering a free gift or a bonus to your loyal customers.

  • The ultra-competitive nature of cheerleaders will often lead them to try to dismiss or cover up an injury for fear of letting down the rest of the team, so it is imperative that the coaches and squad members help them heal.

  • However, don't dismiss the babydolls and teddies as a first choice.

  • However, it would be criminal to dismiss their musical significance.

  • Dismissed - One person dates three and the one person gets to "dismiss" someone she doesn't like.

  • Never allow an untrained person to dismiss a concern about a mole or unusual skin blemish.

  • In October of 2009, a Daily News Article reported that Lance Armstrong used his Twitter account to dismiss reports that French authorities are investigating syringes handled by his Tour de France cycling team.

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