Courtiers sentence examples

  • Prince Andrew withdrew and was immediately surrounded by courtiers on all sides.

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  • Italians came to France as courtiers, ambassadors, men of business, captains and artists.

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  • But the king required his courtiers, and his courtiers in turn needed their servants in permanent attendance.

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  • The old age of Trembecki appears to have been ignoble and neglected; he had indeed "fallen upon evil days and evil tongues"; and when he died at an advanced age all the gay courtiers of whom he had been the parasite were either dead or had submitted to the Muscovite yoke.

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  • Early in June the Majlis urged the shah to dismiss the courtiers under suspicion.

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  • At last popular indignation against the courtiers, came to a head in the famous Good Parliament of 1376.

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  • DAMOCLES, one of the courtiers of the elder Dionysius of Syracuse.

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  • These deputies succeeded in 795 and 796 in taking possession of the vast treasures of the Avars, which were distributed by the king with lavish generosity to churches, courtiers and friends.

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  • First of all Monsignor Bayardi was brought from Rome and commissioned to write about the antiquities which were being collected in the museum at Portici under the care of Camillo Paderni, and when it was recognized that the prelate had not sufficient learning, and by the progress of the excavations other most abundant material was accumulated, about which at once scholars and courtiers were anxious to be informed, Bernardo Tanucci, having become secretary of state in 1755, founded the Accademia Ercolanese, which published the principal works on Herculaneum (Le Pitture ed i bronzi d'Ercolano, 8 vols., 1757, 1792; Dissertationis isagogicae ad Herculanensium voluminum explanationem pars prima, 1797).

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  • He belonged to that group of courtiers interested in the colonization of America, and was one of the eight to whom Charles II.

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  • The dissolved monastery of the Charterhouse, which had been bought and sold by the courtiers several times, was obtained from Thomas, earl of Suffolk, by Thomas Sutton for 13,000.

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  • His first speech appears to have been on the 22nd of January 1673, in which he inveighed against the stop of the exchequer, the attack on the Smyrna fleet, the corruption of courtiers with French money, and "the ill ministers about the king."

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  • He revoked numerous pensions and grants conferred by his predecessors upon idle courtiers, and, meeting the reproach of sacrilege made by the patriarch of Constantinople by a decree of exile, resumed a proportion of the revenues of the wealthy monasteries.

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  • Many of the chief citizens followed the example of the courtiers, and built for themselves country residences in Middlesex, Essex and Surrey; thus we learn from Norden that Alderman Roe lived at Muswell Hill, and we know that Sir Thomas Gresham built a fine house and planned a beautiful park at Osterley.

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  • In fact, most of them became professional courtiers, and lived habitually at Vienna.

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  • In frequenting the salons of her friends the queen not only came in contact with a number of the younger and more dissipated courtiers, whose high play and unseemly amusements she countenanced, but she fell under the influence of various ambitious intriguers, such as the baron de Besenval, the comte de Vaudreuil, the duc de Lauzun and the comte d'Adhemar, whose interested manoeuvres she was induced to further by her affection for her favourites.

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  • Nothing," he adds, " is more likely than that in a crowded assembly a lady should accidentally have dropped her garter; that the circumstance should have caused a smile in the bystanders; and that on its being taken up by Edward he should have reproved the levity of his courtiers by so happy and chivalrous an exclamation, placing the garter at the same time on his own knee, as ` Dishonoured be he who thinks ill of it.'

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  • During the troubled period of intrigue and assassination that followed on the death of Aurangzeb, two Mahommedan foreigners rose to high position as courtiers and generals, and succeeded in transmitting their power to their sons.

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  • The king and his courtiers joined in the processions in the garb of penitents, and scourged themselves with ostentation.

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  • He began by squandering the 15,000,000 dinars which were in the treasury when his brother died in largesses to his courtiers, who, however, merely increased their demands.

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  • Besides these garments there are others: the long jubba, or cloth cloak, worn by mirzas (secretaries), government employs of high rank, as ministers, farmers of taxes, courtiers, physicians, priests; the abba, or camel-hair cloak of the Arab, worn by travellers, priests and horsemen; the pustin, or Afghan skincloak, used by travellers and the sick or aged; the nimtan, or common sheepskin jacket, with short sleeves, used by shopkeepers and the lower class of servants, grooms, &c., in winter; the yapanjah, or woollen Kurdish cloak, a kind of felt, having a shaggy side, of immense thickness, worn generally by shepherds, who use it as greatcoat, bed and bedding.

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  • His own honorarium as author consisted of 200 copies, of which, however, he had to give away many to friends, to the king, the principal courtiers, the papal nuncio, &c. What remained he sold for his own profit at the price of a crown each, but the sale did not recoup him his outlay.

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  • Through their influence as tutors, professors, orators and courtiers, society was permeated by a fresh ideal of culture.

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  • But before taking further steps he retired to Versailles, then a hunting lodge, and there, listening to two of Richelieu's friends, Claude de Saint-Simon, father of the memoir writer, and Cardinal La Valette, sent for Richelieu in the evening, and while the salons of the Luxembourg were full of expectant courtiers the king was reassuring the cardinal of his continued favour and support.

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  • It is probable, however, that Harun's anger was caused to a large extent by the insinuations of his courtiers that he was a mere puppet in the hands of a powerful family.

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  • His military instincts did not always make it easy for him to accommodate himself to courtiers and professional politicians.

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  • The charge of heathenism we find in Suidas is probable enough; that is to say, Tribonian may well have been a crypto-pagan, like many other eminent courtiers and litterateurs of the time (including Procopius himself), a person who, while professing Christianity, was at least indifferent to its dogmas and rites, cherishing a sentimental recollection of the older and more glorious days of the empire.

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  • A prolonged ministerial crisis, in April and May, was attributed by the Nationalists to the influence of reactionary courtiers, and by the Royalists to the influence of the Anjumans, or political clubs, which were alleged to control the Nationalist majority in the Majlis.

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  • The royal authority in Portugal was delegated to Margaret of Savoy, duchess of Mantua, whose train of Spanish and Italian courtiers aroused the jealousy of the Portuguese nobles, while the harsh rule of her secretary of state, Miguel de Vasconcellos de Brito, provoked the resentment of all classes.

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  • Her influence over the monarch was absolute until his death, and courtiers and ministers were in favour or disgrace with him in exact accordance with her wishes.

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  • Alice the royal Perrers took possession again of the king, and all his ~ corrupt courtiers came back to him.

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  • She felt, as courtiers do when the Tsar enters, the sensation of fear and respect which the old man inspired in all around him.

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  • John of Gaunt regained power, and in 1377 a new parliament, carefully packed by the courtiers, reversed the acts of the Good Parliament.

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  • Gathered there also were a host of publicists, secretaries and courtiers, and never before had Europe witnessed such a collection of rank and talent.

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  • This with a large area around he dedicated to Aton in the sixth year, while splendid temples, palaces, houses and tombs for his god, for himself and for his courtiers were rising around him; apparently also this son of Aton swore an oath never to pass beyond the boundaries of Atons special domain.

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  • Hence what is not strictly allegorical after the fashion of the Romaunt of the Rose or Chaucer's exercises in that kind, is for the most part occasional, dealing with courtiers' sorrow and fun, with the conventional plaints on the vanity of the world and with pious ejaculation.

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  • The distinctive mark of the courtier, military, and upper servant class is the belt, generally of black varnished leather with a brass clasp; princes and courtiers often replace this clasp by a huge round ornament of cut stones.

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  • At the height of his power he was assassinated by his courtiers during a banquet in his palace at Sinope.

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  • She is said to have persuaded him of the divine character of her commission by discovering him though disguised in the crowd of his courtiers, and by reassuring him regarding his secret doubts as to his legitimacy.

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  • The Emperor, surrounded by his suite of officers and courtiers, was riding a bobtailed chestnut mare, a different one from that which he had ridden at the review, and bending to one side he gracefully held a gold lorgnette to his eyes and looked at a soldier who lay prone, with blood on his uncovered head.

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  • He knew that love of novelty and contempt for the gouty old king and his greedy courtiers had brought about this bloodless triumph; and he felt instinctively that he had to deal with a new France, which would not tolerate despotism.

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  • At the same time, artists and men of letters were now addressing themselves in most cases, not to their fellow-citizens in a free city, but to kings and courtiers, or the educated class generally of the Greek world.

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  • He was the author of a diatribe on the courtiers of Charles VII.

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  • And what are they doing, all these courtiers?

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  • Real power had passed into the hands of Mahommedan courtiers and Mahratta generals, both of whom were then carving for themselves kingdoms out of the dismembered empire, until at last British authority placed itself supreme over all.

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  • Towards the end of 66 he arrived in Greece with a retinue of soldiers, courtiers, musicians and dancers.

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  • As there was not a single town or large village in the vicinity of the camp, the immense number of generals and courtiers accompanying the army were living in the best houses of the villages on both sides of the river, over a radius of six miles.

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  • On one occasion when he expressed a fear that he lacked all the gifts of a courtier, Napoleon replied, "Courtiers!

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  • The cortes had grown obsolete; the feudal aristocracy were become courtiers.

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  • `Isa hastened to meet the caliph on his arrival at Rai (Rhagae), near the modern Teheran, with a great quantity of costly presents, which he distributed with such profusion among the princes and courtiers that no one was anxious to accuse him.

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  • She showed most favour to her reactionary generals and statesmen, to the Church and religious orders, and was constantly the tool of corrupt and profligate courtiers and favourites who gave her court a deservedly bad name.

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  • Question 2: How did you become one of the Queen's favorite courtiers?

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  • The finances were squandered in gratifying the king's unbridled prodigality, and the treasury was drained by his luxurious habits, by the innumerable gifts and pensions he distributed among his mistresses and courtiers, by his war expenses and by his magnificent buildings.

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  • On the contrary Canute had more English than Danish courtiers and ministers about his person, and sent many Englishmen as bishops and some even as royal officers to Denmark.

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  • Next morning they all assembled for the final parting, and many of the officials and courtiers came to look upon the impressive ceremonies.

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  • But this was only the external condition; the essential significance of the presence of the Emperor and of all these people, from a courtier's point of view (and in an Emperor's vicinity all became courtiers), was clear to everyone.

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  • To the third party--in which the Emperor had most confidence--belonged the courtiers who tried to arrange compromises between the other two.

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  • "Ha, what's this?" asked Napoleon, noticing that all the courtiers were looking at something concealed under a cloth.

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  • Raskolniks or Nonconformists in the second half of the 17th century, rebel stryeltsy under Peter the Great, courtiers of rank during the reigns of the empresses, Polish confederates under Catherine II., the " Decembrists " under Nicholas I., nearly 50,000 Poles after the insurrection of 1863, and later on whole generations of socialists were sent to Siberia; while the number of common-law convicts and exiles transported thither increased steadily from the end of the 18th century.

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  • According to Knox, Grindal distinguished himself from most of the court preachers in 1553 by denouncing the worldliness of the courtiers and foretelling the evils to follow on the king's death.

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  • courtiers left in July for Hampton Court and then Oxford.

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  • They were possessed with feelings then widespread, weariness of arbitrary government, hatred of ministers and courtiers, and distrust not so much of Louis as of those who surrounded him and influenced his judgment.

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  • Lane is credited with having been the first English smoker, and through the influence and example of the illustrious Raleigh, who " tooke a pipe of tobacco a little before he went to the scaffolde," the habit became rooted among Elizabethan courtiers.

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  • He found that he had no supporters save a handful of courtiers and officials and the leaders of his mercenary bands; wherefore in despair he accepted the terms forced upon.

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  • Deserted by his worthless courtiers and plundered on his death- bed by his greedy mistress, the victor of Sluys and ii:.

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  • From the tone in which the courtiers addressed him and the way Paulucci had allowed himself to speak of him to the Emperor, but above all from a certain desperation in Pfuel's own expressions, it was clear that the others knew, and Pfuel himself felt, that his fall was at hand.

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  • of Paris - its learned professors not more than the courtiers and the fair sex, flocked to hear the new doctrines explained, and possibly discuss their value.

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  • Numerous foreigners had been allowed to settle in Moscow and to build for themselves a heretical church, and their strange unholy customs had been adopted by not a few courtiers and great dignitaries.

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  • To conciliate them she greatly extended the area of serfage by making large grants of land and serfs to courtiers and public servants who had specially distinguished themselves.

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  • He sought to mediate, though with no success, between the pope and the emperor; he descended to a whimsical piety, and took his courtiers by guile in distributing to them, at Christmas, clothing on which a cross had been secretly stitched.

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  • The archbishop's murder, perpetrated within a month of his return to England (29th December 1170), was, however, the work of over zealous courtiers and regretted by no one more than Henry.

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  • Another was the fashion for the king to hold wassail with his courtiers, in which he unbent to an extent scandalous to the Greeks, dancing or indulging in routs and practical jokes.'

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  • He showed courage on the field of battle, both in Italy and Spain, during the War of the Spanish Succession, and was flattered by his courtiers with the title of El Animoso, or the spirited.

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  • fawning courtiers.

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  • The English courtiers were greatly incensed at the gracious reception accorded to these notable rebels by King James; but although Tyrone was confirmed in his title and estates, he had no sooner returned to Ireland than he again engaged in dispute with the government concerning his rights over certain of his feudatories, of whom Donnal O'Cahan was the most important.

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  • He maintained an attitude of defiance and of "Roman resolution," smiled scornfully at his questioners, making no secret of his intentions, replied to the king, who asked why he would kill him, that the pope had excommunicated him, that "dangerous diseases require a desperate remedy," adding fiercely to the Scottish courtiers who surrounded him that "one of his objects was to blow back the Scots into Scotland."

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  • For their courtiers he wrote epithalamial and funeral orations; ambassadors and visitors from foreign states he greeted with the rhetorical lucubrations then so much in vogue.

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  • His first preceptors were nothing but courtiers; and the most intelligent, his valet Laporte, developed in the royal childs mind his natural instinct of command, a very lively sense of his rank, and that nobly majestic air of master of the world which he preserved even in the commonest actions of his life.

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  • Etiquette and self-seeking became the chief rules of a courtiers life, and this explains the division of the nobility into two sections: the provincial squires, embittered by neglect; and the courtiers, who were ruined materially and intellectually by their way of living.

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  • By the former Turgot hampered the great interests; by the second he thwarted the desires of courtiers not only of the second rank but of the first.

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  • concise biographies of Britain's Kings and Queens, and some of their courtiers.

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  • The Dissolution was also highly profitable for favored courtiers who were able to obtain property on generous terms.

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  • It was so ludicrous it made you think of Mel Brooks or Monty Python playing a scene of monstrous king and fawning courtiers.

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  • The aim was to blow up the king, James I, and assembled courtiers and lords, at the state opening of parliament.

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  • The dashing escapades of courageous men who brought wealth to Queen Elizabeth were also included in the ranks of Elizabethan courtiers.

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  • Next for the chop were former courtiers Patrick Sikorski and Brian Heron and their Fourth International Supporters Caucus.

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  • I have heard you say that the French courtiers Wear their hats on ' fore that king.

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  • Determined in her faith and proud in her meekness, in opposition to the timid counsels of the military leaders, to the interested delays of the courtiers, to the scruples of the experts and the quarrelling of the doctors, she quoted her voices, who had, she said, commissioned her to raise the siege of Orleans and to conduct the gentle dauphin to Reims, there to be crowned.

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  • Orders the English courtiers to have theirs cut short too, to show sympathy, but grows his own long again quite soon.

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  • Closely followed by the new king's courtiers, Ophelia must leave her home forever, carrying a dangerous, yet precious secret.

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  • He glanced toward where Homura was being bowed to by a group of courtiers, still smiling that delighted private smile.

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  • Would not ' brutal egotism ' also be unacceptable, to courtiers and a distinguished general, as obvious bad manners?

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  • This had been engineered by courtiers with different agendas, and there ensued a period of unusual volatility.

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  • Its subject is human life told in the allegory of King Heart in his castle, surrounded by his five servitors (the senses), Queen Plesance, Foresight and other courtiers.

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  • Whatever part vanity or the flattery of courtiers may have played with others, or with Alexander, it is significant that the dynasties of Alexander's various successors all claim divine honours of some sort (see Ptolemies, Seleucid Dynasty, &c.).

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  • Philosophy, particularly that of Descartes, was becoming a fashionable divertissement for the queen and her courtiers, and it was felt that the presence of the sage himself was necessary to complete the good work of education.

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  • The nobles, turned into courtiers, placemen, diplomatists and men of affairs, ended by preferring his authority to the alternative of democratic institutions.

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  • According to many interpreters the courtiers or soldiers of Herod Antipas ("Milites Herodis," Jerome) are intended; but more probably the Herodians were a public political party, who distinguished themselves from the two great historical parties of post-exilian Judaism by the fact that they were and had been sincerely friendly to Herod the Great and to his dynasty (cf.

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  • From this moment begins a long-drawn-out series of tricks and subterfuges, undertaken with the view of deceiving Mark, whose suspicions, excited by sundry of his courtiers, from time to time get beyond his control, and are as often laid to rest by some clever ruse on the part of his nephew, or his wife, ably seconded by Brangaene.

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  • The counts of Dreux, for two centuries and a half (1132-1377), and the counts of Evreux, from 1307 to 1425, also belonged to the family of the Capets, - other members of which worthy of mention are the Dunois and the Longuevilles, illegitimate branches of the house of Valois, which produced many famous warriors and courtiers.

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  • The Concordat brought the clergy into subjection, and enabled him to distribute benefices at his pleasure among the most docile of his courtiers.

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  • Beyond the Alcazaba Emery Walker se is the palace of the Moorish kings, or Alhambra properly so-called; and beyond this, again, is the Alhambra Alta (Upper Alhambra), originally tenanted by officials and courtiers.

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  • He passes on to Galilee, where also He is welcomed, and where He performs His second " sign," healing the son of one of Herod's courtiers.

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  • His first experiment in treason was Rising of the so-called rising of Robin of Redesdale, which Robin of was ostensibly an armed protest by the gentry and Redes- commons of Yorkshire against the maladministration dale, of the realm by the kings favoriteshis wifes relatives, and the courtiers whom he had lately promoted to high rank and office.

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  • In the opinion of his courtiers, the bounds assigned to New Rome by Constantine seemed, it is said, too wide, but after some eighty years they proved too narrow for the population that had gathered within the city.

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  • But the queen and his brother, the count of Artois, with some of the ministers and courtiers, urged him to make a stand.

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  • Thereupon the princes and courtiers most hostile to the National Assembly, the count of Artois, the prince of Conde, the duke of Bourbon and many others, feeling themselves no longer safe, quitted France.

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  • The officers, almost all nobles, rarely showed much concern for their men, and were often mere courtiers and triflers.

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  • He advised his courtiers to marry Germans - "they are the best wives in the world, good, naive and fresh as roses."

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