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conflagration

conflagration

conflagration Sentence Examples

  • Fleury hardly had time to breathe before a new conflagration broke out in the east.

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  • It suffered severely from a conflagration in 1870.

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  • The situation, however, being in many ways inconvenient, and a conflagration having destroyed the shops at Makaryev, the fair was transferred in 1817 to its present locality at Nizhniy-Novgorod.

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  • The only survivors of the flood, and of the conflagration that followed it, were an old man and a pumpkin-seed.

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  • conflagration and would have unsettled the boundaries of most continental nations; and the British government endeavoured thenceforward to stop hostilities by referring the question immediately in dispute to a conference in London.

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  • The town was burned by Albert of Mecklenburg's party in 1389, by an accidental conflagration in 1665, and by the Russians in 1719.

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    13
  • This was replaced by several castles in succession, of which one - Castle Dounie - was taken by Cromwell and burned by the duke of Cumberland in 1746, the conflagration being witnessed from a neighbouring hill by Simon, Lord Lovat, before his capture on Loch Morar.

    11
    10
  • Each city which had been the cradle of freedom thankfully accepted a master, to qutmch the conflagration of party strife, encouragt trade, and make the handicraftsmen comfortable.

    11
    11
  • But in the end the universal conflagration was handed down without question as an article of belief.

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  • had doubts about a general conflagration; possibly (he thought) Aristotle was right in affirming the eternity of the present order of the world.

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    10
  • had doubts about a general conflagration; possibly (he thought) Aristotle was right in affirming the eternity of the present order of the world.

    10
    10
  • The conflagration is said by all authorities later than Tacitus to have been deliberately caused by Nero himself.'

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    9
  • The conflagration is said by all authorities later than Tacitus to have been deliberately caused by Nero himself.'

    9
    9
  • Thus the cycles of the world's existence, and the universal conflagration which terminates each of them, excited some doubt.

    8
    8
  • A tremendous conflagration consumes the world; the perfect separation of the two powers takes place once more; high above is the kingdom of light, again brought into a condition of completeness, and deep below is the (?

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    7
  • In 1194 another conflagration laid waste the new building then hardly completed; but clergy and people set zealously to work, and the main part of the present structure was finished by 1240.

    6
    3
  • serious conflagration was under way, which was not extinguished until about one-third of the city, including several of its historic buildings, had been destroyed.

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  • serious conflagration was under way, which was not extinguished until about one-third of the city, including several of its historic buildings, had been destroyed.

    6
    5
  • The revolution of 1848 spread like a conflagration through Europe, and shook every throne on the Continent except those of Russia, Spain, and Belgium.

    6
    6
  • It was erected in 1836-1841 on the site of the convent of St Mary Magdalen and escaped the conflagration of 1842.

    5
    3
  • The brethren were aided in old age, sickness and poverty, often also in cases of loss by robbery, shipwreck and conflagration; for example, any member of the gild of St Catherine, Aldersgate, was to be assisted if he "fall into poverty or be injured through age, or through fire or water, thieves or sickness."

    5
    3
  • Heated with many metals it converts them into oxides, and with combustible substances, such as charcoal, sulphur, &c., a most intense conflagration occurs.

    5
    3
  • ii., gained the upper hand, having usually become associated with the description of the universal conflagration of the world which had also originated in the Iranian eschatology.

    5
    3
  • The tension which has been relaxed will again be tightened; there will be a gradual resolution of things into elements, and of elements into the primary substance, to be consummated in a general conflagration when once more the world will be absorbed in God.

    5
    3
  • The brethren were aided in old age, sickness and poverty, often also in cases of loss by robbery, shipwreck and conflagration; for example, any member of the gild of St Catherine, Aldersgate, was to be assisted if he "fall into poverty or be injured through age, or through fire or water, thieves or sickness."

    5
    3
  • Towards the end of the 15th century it passed to Brandenburg, and, in 1684, after a great conflagration which laid it in ruins, was handsomely rebuilt by the electress Dorothea.

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  • Towards the end of the 15th century it passed to Brandenburg, and, in 1684, after a great conflagration which laid it in ruins, was handsomely rebuilt by the electress Dorothea.

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    4
  • In 1700 it was bombarded by the united fleets of England, Holland and Sweden; in 1728 a conflagration destroyed 1640 houses and five churches; another in 1795 laid waste 943 houses, the church of St Nicolas, and the Raadhus.

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    5
  • The material for the conflagration in Austria was thus all prepared when in February 1848 the fall of Louis Philippe fanned into a blaze the smouldering fires of revolution throughout Europe.

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    5
  • Affairs were brought to a climax by a series of conflicts which took place at Canea on the 4th of February; the Turkish troops fired on the Christians, a conflagration broke out in the town, and many thousands of Christians took refuge on the foreign warships in the bay.

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  • 6.1), and the conflagration is identical with that mentioned by Demosthenes (In Timocr.

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    4
  • Unfortunately siege of San a conflagration breaking out near the breaches Sebastian, caused it to be postponed until nightfall, when, the July 10.24, breaches in the interval having been strengthened, 1813' it was delivered unsuccessfully and with heavy loss.

    4
    12
  • To prevent a general conflagration in the Balkan Peninsula, the powers advised the sultan to comply with the demand, and when the British government strongly supported that advice the sultan yielded and delivered all the fortresses on Servian territory to the keeping of the prince of Servia (March 1867).

    3
    0
  • Just before the last boats sheered off the masses of stores which it had been necessary to abandon were set on fire, and only from the glare set up by this conflagration were the Turks made aware that their opponents had evaded them yet again.

    3
    3
  • 470, descriptive of the conflagration of the world, we read of how, after Az and the demons have been struck down, the pious man is purified and led up to sun and moon and to the being of Ahura Mazda, the Divine.

    3
    3
  • A great conflagration in 1433, the pestilence of 1532, the bombardment by the Danes in 1569, and the Russo-Livonian War, destroyed its trade.

    3
    3
  • 470, descriptive of the conflagration of the world, we read of how, after Az and the demons have been struck down, the pious man is purified and led up to sun and moon and to the being of Ahura Mazda, the Divine.

    3
    3
  • The conflagration, at which he had looked with so much indifference the evening before, had greatly increased during the night.

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  • In this way many fine mansions on Van Ness Avenue were destroyed, and the westward advance of the conflagration was stopped at Franklin Street, one block west.

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  • Richard never published any statement as to their end, though some easy tale of a fever, a conflagration, or an accident might have served him better than the mere silence that he employed.

    2
    0
  • In this way many fine mansions on Van Ness Avenue were destroyed, and the westward advance of the conflagration was stopped at Franklin Street, one block west.

    2
    0
  • The brine springs of Reichenhall are mentioned in a document of the 8th century and were perhaps known to the Romans; but almost all trace of antiquity of the town was destroyed by a conflagration in 1834.

    2
    2
  • A conflagration laid the buildings waste in 1716, and their present aspect is largely due to Peter the Great.

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    2
  • 91), and as praetor (70) he maintained, in opposition to Vespasian, that the management of the finances ought to be left to the discretion of the senate; he proposed that the capitol, which had been destroyed in the Neronian conflagration, should be restored at the public expense; he saluted Vespasian by his private name, and did not recognize him as emperor in his praetorian edicts.

    2
    2
  • Spectroscopic observation shows that the increased light accompanies an actual physical change or conflagration in the star.

    2
    2
  • The people of Malines gained in the old distich - "gaudet Mechlinia stultis" - the reputation of being "fools," because one of the citizens on seeing the moon through the dormer windows of St Rombaut called out that the place was on fire, and his fellow-citizens, following his example, endeavoured to put out the conflagration until they realized the truth.

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  • What voice in back of our great conflagration is trying to speak?

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  • Cleanthes is said to have held that all survive to the great conflagration which closes the cycle, Chrysippus that only the wise will.

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  • The expense of this re-creation probably duplicated, at least, the loss from the conflagration.

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  • Admitting the identification, we may perhaps conclude that the temple was repaired in order to provide a temporary home for the venerated image and other sacred objects; no traces of a restoration exist, but the walls probably remained standing after the Persian conflagration.

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    0
  • " It was into this mass of seething discontent that the spark of religious protest fell - the one thing needed to fire the train and kindle the social conflagration.

    0
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  • Humboldt also discussed the Mexican doctrine of four ages of the world belonging to water, earth, air and fire, and ending respectively by deluge, earthquake, tempest and conflagration.

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  • Yet the forests of larch in Siberia often suffer from conflagration.

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  • Luther was laid to rest in the Castle church on whose door he had nailed the theses which had kindled the great conflagration.

    0
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  • This treatment, so far from extinguishing the flame, eventually converted it into a conflagration.

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  • In 1844 there was a severe conflagration.

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  • There is a proper season for making attacks with fire, and special days for starting a conflagration.

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  • The church has two great treasures, both of which survived the conflagration, more or less.

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  • And in the resulting conflagration the bothy burnt down.

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  • The country is embroiled in a dispute with its neighbor Pakistan over Kashmir, which could become an international conflagration at any time.

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  • They carried their flaming brands toward the north, as it were ready to kindle a conflagration.

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  • Yet the Indian sub-continent is probably the part of the world most subject to the risk of nuclear conflagration.

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  • These will not much help us to put out the burning social questions that threaten a general conflagration.

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  • The sound of his drum heralds its creation; his burning flame signals its final conflagration.

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  • If you get a serious conflagration in the Gulf it will affect us.

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  • And after the end of the Second Great War, a third universal conflagration will come, so that it will determine everything.

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  • The boy stood for twelve hours in the wind, and sleet, and mud, rejoicing in the conflagration which thus liberated him.

    0
    0
  • Cleanthes is said to have held that all survive to the great conflagration which closes the cycle, Chrysippus that only the wise will.

    0
    0
  • Each city which had been the cradle of freedom thankfully accepted a master, to qutmch the conflagration of party strife, encouragt trade, and make the handicraftsmen comfortable.

    0
    0
  • The only survivors of the flood, and of the conflagration that followed it, were an old man and a pumpkin-seed.

    0
    0
  • Affairs were brought to a climax by a series of conflicts which took place at Canea on the 4th of February; the Turkish troops fired on the Christians, a conflagration broke out in the town, and many thousands of Christians took refuge on the foreign warships in the bay.

    0
    0
  • This was replaced by several castles in succession, of which one - Castle Dounie - was taken by Cromwell and burned by the duke of Cumberland in 1746, the conflagration being witnessed from a neighbouring hill by Simon, Lord Lovat, before his capture on Loch Morar.

    0
    0
  • The expense of this re-creation probably duplicated, at least, the loss from the conflagration.

    0
    0
  • 6.1), and the conflagration is identical with that mentioned by Demosthenes (In Timocr.

    0
    0
  • Admitting the identification, we may perhaps conclude that the temple was repaired in order to provide a temporary home for the venerated image and other sacred objects; no traces of a restoration exist, but the walls probably remained standing after the Persian conflagration.

    0
    0
  • It suffered severely from a conflagration in 1870.

    0
    0
  • In 1194 another conflagration laid waste the new building then hardly completed; but clergy and people set zealously to work, and the main part of the present structure was finished by 1240.

    0
    0
  • The conflagration of 1671, already mentioned, raged for fifteen days, and only the church, a part of the palace, and two towers escaped uninjured.

    0
    0
  • Unfortunately siege of San a conflagration breaking out near the breaches Sebastian, caused it to be postponed until nightfall, when, the July 10.24, breaches in the interval having been strengthened, 1813' it was delivered unsuccessfully and with heavy loss.

    0
    0
  • It was erected in 1836-1841 on the site of the convent of St Mary Magdalen and escaped the conflagration of 1842.

    0
    0
  • 1.20 of a conflagration produced by drought, when it appears from ii.

    0
    0
  • Just before the last boats sheered off the masses of stores which it had been necessary to abandon were set on fire, and only from the glare set up by this conflagration were the Turks made aware that their opponents had evaded them yet again.

    0
    0
  • Heated with many metals it converts them into oxides, and with combustible substances, such as charcoal, sulphur, &c., a most intense conflagration occurs.

    0
    0
  • The brine springs of Reichenhall are mentioned in a document of the 8th century and were perhaps known to the Romans; but almost all trace of antiquity of the town was destroyed by a conflagration in 1834.

    0
    0
  • " It was into this mass of seething discontent that the spark of religious protest fell - the one thing needed to fire the train and kindle the social conflagration.

    0
    0
  • A conflagration laid the buildings waste in 1716, and their present aspect is largely due to Peter the Great.

    0
    0
  • Humboldt also discussed the Mexican doctrine of four ages of the world belonging to water, earth, air and fire, and ending respectively by deluge, earthquake, tempest and conflagration.

    0
    0
  • 91), and as praetor (70) he maintained, in opposition to Vespasian, that the management of the finances ought to be left to the discretion of the senate; he proposed that the capitol, which had been destroyed in the Neronian conflagration, should be restored at the public expense; he saluted Vespasian by his private name, and did not recognize him as emperor in his praetorian edicts.

    0
    0
  • A tremendous conflagration consumes the world; the perfect separation of the two powers takes place once more; high above is the kingdom of light, again brought into a condition of completeness, and deep below is the (?

    0
    0
  • Yet the forests of larch in Siberia often suffer from conflagration.

    0
    0
  • The town was burned by Albert of Mecklenburg's party in 1389, by an accidental conflagration in 1665, and by the Russians in 1719.

    0
    0
  • In 1700 it was bombarded by the united fleets of England, Holland and Sweden; in 1728 a conflagration destroyed 1640 houses and five churches; another in 1795 laid waste 943 houses, the church of St Nicolas, and the Raadhus.

    0
    0
  • The material for the conflagration in Austria was thus all prepared when in February 1848 the fall of Louis Philippe fanned into a blaze the smouldering fires of revolution throughout Europe.

    0
    0
  • A great conflagration in 1433, the pestilence of 1532, the bombardment by the Danes in 1569, and the Russo-Livonian War, destroyed its trade.

    0
    0
  • ii., gained the upper hand, having usually become associated with the description of the universal conflagration of the world which had also originated in the Iranian eschatology.

    0
    0
  • Luther was laid to rest in the Castle church on whose door he had nailed the theses which had kindled the great conflagration.

    0
    0
  • Spectroscopic observation shows that the increased light accompanies an actual physical change or conflagration in the star.

    0
    0
  • He appears to have accepted all the Stoic doctrines except that he denied the final conflagration of the universe (see Stoics).

    0
    0
  • The situation, however, being in many ways inconvenient, and a conflagration having destroyed the shops at Makaryev, the fair was transferred in 1817 to its present locality at Nizhniy-Novgorod.

    0
    0
  • This treatment, so far from extinguishing the flame, eventually converted it into a conflagration.

    0
    0
  • The tension which has been relaxed will again be tightened; there will be a gradual resolution of things into elements, and of elements into the primary substance, to be consummated in a general conflagration when once more the world will be absorbed in God.

    0
    0
  • Thus the cycles of the world's existence, and the universal conflagration which terminates each of them, excited some doubt.

    0
    0
  • But in the end the universal conflagration was handed down without question as an article of belief.

    0
    0
  • The revolution of 1848 spread like a conflagration through Europe, and shook every throne on the Continent except those of Russia, Spain, and Belgium.

    0
    0
  • The people of Malines gained in the old distich - "gaudet Mechlinia stultis" - the reputation of being "fools," because one of the citizens on seeing the moon through the dormer windows of St Rombaut called out that the place was on fire, and his fellow-citizens, following his example, endeavoured to put out the conflagration until they realized the truth.

    0
    0
  • The success of the military revolution at Naples seriously alarmed the powers of the Holy Alliance, who feared that it might spread to other Italian states and so lead to that general European conflagration which it was their main preoccupation to avoid (see Europe: History).

    0
    0
  • Richard never published any statement as to their end, though some easy tale of a fever, a conflagration, or an accident might have served him better than the mere silence that he employed.

    0
    0
  • conflagration and would have unsettled the boundaries of most continental nations; and the British government endeavoured thenceforward to stop hostilities by referring the question immediately in dispute to a conference in London.

    0
    0
  • To prevent a general conflagration in the Balkan Peninsula, the powers advised the sultan to comply with the demand, and when the British government strongly supported that advice the sultan yielded and delivered all the fortresses on Servian territory to the keeping of the prince of Servia (March 1867).

    0
    0
  • Fleury hardly had time to breathe before a new conflagration broke out in the east.

    0
    0
  • In 1844 there was a severe conflagration.

    0
    0
  • Most of the buildings are of comparatively modern date, the city having suffered severely from the Hussites in 1430 and from a conflagration in 1621.

    0
    0
  • All the guns, without waiting for orders, were being fired in the direction of the conflagration.

    0
    0
  • A great number of people crowded in front of the conflagration.

    0
    0
  • As smaller and better quality electronics components make their journey from the engineer's desk to consumer outlets, the public's fascination for big functionality in small packages flares into a conflagration of desire.

    0
    0
  • Ares thrived on war, conflict and conflagration.

    0
    0
  • Most of the buildings are of comparatively modern date, the city having suffered severely from the Hussites in 1430 and from a conflagration in 1621.

    0
    5
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