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cato

cato

cato Sentence Examples

  • In J4 he impeached unsuccessfully C. Porcius Cato, who in his tribunate (56) had acted as the tool of the triumvirs.

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  • Porcius Cato historical composition He is not to be confused with L.

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  • Among the principal writers of this class who succeeded Cato, the following may be mentioned.

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  • With some associates he hired a room in the neighbouring Cato Street, collected arms and made ready to fall upon Harrowby's guests.

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  • 480-524), Roman philosopher and statesman, described by Gibbon as " the last of the Romans whom Cato or Tully could have acknowledged for their countryman."

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  • Now, I say there is nothing more dangerous and disadvantageous to the buyer than land so left waste and out of heart; and therefore Cato counsels well to purchase land of one who has managed it well, and not rashly to despise and make light of the skill and knowledge of another."

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  • The earliest important treatises are the of Cato (2 341 49 B.

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  • His taste, however, was curious; he preferred Cato the elder, Ennius and Caelius Antipater to Cicero, Virgil and Sallust, the obscure poet Antimachus to Homer and Plato.

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  • Cato ate and drank the same coarse victuals as his slaves, and even had the children suckled by his wife, that they might imbibe a fondness for the family.

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  • Cato advised the agriculturist to sell his old oxen and his old slaves, as well as his sick ones; and sick slaves were exposed in the island of Aesculapius in the Tiber; by a decree of Claudius slaves so exposed, if they recovered, could not be reclaimed by their masters.

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  • Cato, Varro and Columella all agree that slave labour was to be preferred to free except in unhealthy regions and for large occasional operations, which probably transcended the capacity of the permanent familia rustica.

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  • Porcius Cato the 'elder to supplement the deficiency in the cavalry by the'ereation of four additional centuries was not adopted.

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  • Another historic site is Horace Street near Edgware Road, formerly Cato Street, from which the conspiracy which bore that name was directed against the ministry in 1820.

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  • Porcius Cato, who disliked them.

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  • There is more than one meaning of Marcus Porcius Cato discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

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  • After the pontificate of Publius, the practice of compiling annals was carried on by various unofficial writers, of whom Cicero names Cato, Pictor and Piso.

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  • Porcius Cato the Censor2 1 (3449), the younger contemporary of Ennius, whom he brought to Rome.

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  • He speaks with emphasis of the impressiveness of Cato's eulogy and the satiric bitterness of his invective.

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  • Cato was the first historical writer of Rome to use his native tongue.

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  • Cato felt that the record of Roman glory could not be isolated from the story of the other Italian communities, which, after fighting against Rome for their owil independence, shared with her the task of conquering the world.

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  • In Naevius, Plautus, Ennius and Cato are represented the contending forces which strove for ascendancy in determining what was to be the character of the new literature.

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  • The impulse given to oratory by Cato, Ser.

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  • His Athenian elegance affords the strongest contrast to the Italian rudeness of Cato's De Re Rustica.

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  • Among the writers before the age of Cicero he alone deserves to be named with Naevius, Plautus Ennius and Cato as a great originative force in literature.

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  • Such were Valerius Cato also a distinguished literary critic, and C. Licinius Calvus, an eminent orator.

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  • The Pharsalia of Lucan (39-65), with Cato as its hero, is essentially a Stoic manifesto of the opposition.

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  • The six short Satires of Persius (34-62) are the purest product of Stoicism - a Stoicism that had found in a contemporary, Thrasea, a more rational and practical hero than Cato.

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  • 338ff., and in Cato's work de Re Rustica (141) we have full details and the text of the prayers used by the Latin farmer in thus "lustrating" his own land.

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  • Porcius Cato places it in the first year of the seventh Olympiad, that is, in 3963 of the Julian period, and 751 B.C. (4) Verrius Flaccus places it in the fourth year of the sixth Olympiad, that is, in the year 3962 of the Julian period, and 752 B.C. (5) Terentius Varro places it in the third year of the sixth Olympiad, that is, in the year 3961 of the Julian period, and 753 B.C. A knowledge of these different computations isnecessary, in order to reconcile the Roman historians with one another, and even any one writer with himself.

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  • Livy in general adheres to the epoch of Cato, though he sometimes follows that of Fabius Pictor.

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  • Dionysius of Halicarnassus follows Cato.

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  • The first novel printed in America was Franklin's reprint in 1744 of Pamela; and the first American translation from the classics which was printed in America was a version by James Logan (1674-1751) of Cato's Moral Distichs (173J).

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  • Other accounts of Latinus, differing considerably in detail, are to be found in the fragments of Cato's Origines (in Servius's commentary on Virgil) and in Dionysius of Halicarnassus; see further authorities in the article by J.

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  • Cato and stoicism were the order of the day.

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  • When the picture was done, the Saviour was found to be another Cato.

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  • His powerful reasoning excited among the Roman youth an enthusiasm for philosophical speculations, and the elder Cato insisted on Carneades and his companions being dismissed from the city.

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  • According to Cato (in Pliny, Nat.

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  • from Ennius, Pacuvius, Accius, Lucilius, Cato and Varro.

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  • The charge of complicity was freely levelled at Caesar, and indeed was hinted at by Cato in the great debate in the senate.

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  • His enemies in Rome accused him of treachery, and Cato even proposed that he should be handed over to the Germans.

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  • Here most of the republican leaders were killed and Cato committed suicide.

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  • Lucceius, who was of the party of Caesar; and bribery was freely used, with the approval of even the rigid Cato (Suetonius, Caesar, 9), to secure his election.

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  • When the relations of Caesar and Pompey became strained, Bibulus supported Pompey (Plutarch, Cato Minor, 41) and joined in proposing his election as sole consul (52 B.C.).

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  • By his wife Porcia, daughter of Cato, afterwards married to Brutus, he had three sons.

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  • For this Nobilior was bitterly attacked by Cato the Censor, on the ground that he had compromised his dignity as a Roman general.

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  • The three ambassadors lectured on philosophy in Rome with so much success that Cato was alarmed and had them dismissed the city.

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  • Like the younger Cato its members kept up the old Roman fashion of dispensing with the tunic and leaving the arms bare (Horace, Ars Poetica, 50; Lucan, Pharsalia, ii.

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  • The agricultural classes and the old landlords of the equestrian order (Cincinnatus, Curius Dentatus, Serranus and the Elder Cato) are to him the pillars of the state; and he bitterly laments the decline of agriculture in Italy (xviii.

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  • Cato in his Origines) regarded them as Hellenic immigrants, not as a native Italian people.

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  • Of his early years nothing is directly known, and we first hear of him in middle life as serving during the Second Punic War, with the rank of centurion, in Sardinia, in the year 204, where he attracted the attention of Cato the elder, and was taken by him to Rome in the same year.

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  • He also settled in Rome, where he died in the house of the younger Cato.

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  • The statement of Cato (in Pliny, Nat.

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  • Cicero found himself deserted, and on the advice of Cato went into exile to avoid bloodshed.

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  • the command by Cato the Younger at Corcyra, and was threatened with death by the young Cn.

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  • Porcius Cato sets forth the doctrine of the Stoics which is shown by Cicero to agree with that of Antiochus of Ascalon; in v.

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  • Cato maior, or de Senectute, a dialogue placed in 150 B.C. in which Cato, addressing Scipio and Laelius, set forth the praises of old age.

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  • Cato labours to express himself in an awkward and laconic epistle, apologizing for its length.

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  • The works which were most read were the de Inventione and Topica - though neither of these was quite so popular as the treatise ad Herennium, then supposed to be by Cicero - and among the moral works, the de Officiis, and the Cato Maior.

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  • Dante himself appears to be acquainted only with the Laelius, Cato Maior, de Officiis, de Finibus, de Inventione and Paradoxa.

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  • The de Officiis, Tusculan Disputations and Cato Major are found in a number of 9th-century MSS.

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  • Porcius Cato to annex the island, nominally because its king had connived at piracy, really because its revenues and the treasures of Paphos were coveted to finance a corn law of P. Clodius.

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  • "Cicero mentions that Cato, being asked what he thought of usury, made no other answer to the question than by asking the person who spoke to him what he thought of murder."

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  • Cato major, 25, Moral.

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  • If we could imagine the elder Cato living under Domitian, cut off from all share in public life, and finding no outlet for his combative energy except in literature, we should perhaps understand the motives of Juvenal's satire and the place which is his due as a representative of the genius of his country.

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  • The life and death of Cato fired the imagination of a degenerate age in which he stood out both as a Roman and a Stoic. To a long line of illustrious successors, men like Thrasea Paetus and Helvidius Priscus, Cato bequeathed his resolute opposition to the dominant power of the times; unsympathetic, impracticable, but fearless in demeanour, they were a standing reproach to the corruption and tyranny of their age.

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  • Nevertheless he proceeded to Epirus before the battle of Pharsalia, and awaited the result at Dyrrachium in the company of Cicero and Cato.

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  • Varro's greatest predecessor in this field of inquiry, the man who turned over the virgin soil, was Cato the Censor.

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  • This act, which was opposed by Julius Caesar and advocated by Cato Uticensis (and, indirectly, by Cicero), was afterwards vigorously attacked as a violation of the constitution, on the ground that the senate had no power of life and death over a Roman citizen.

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  • Porcius Cato (234-149 B.C.) widened the scope of Roman history so as to include that of the chief Italian cities, and made the first serious attempt to settle the chronology.

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  • The first mayor was Mr George Cato (c. 1810-1893), one of the earliest settlers in Natal.

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  • Thrasea's own model of life and conduct was Cato of Utica, on whom he had written a panegyric, one of Plutarch's chief authorities in his biography of Cato.

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  • Its olive oil was the best in Italy, and Cato mentions its brickworks and iron manufactures.

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  • Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, son of the above, husband of Porcia the sister of Cato Uticensis, friend of Cicero and enemy of Caesar, and a strong supporter of the aristocratical party.

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  • Flamininus was one of the first and most successful of the rising school of Roman statesmen, the opponents of the narrow patriotism of which Cato was the type, the disciples of Greek culture, and the advocates of a wide imperial policy.

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  • Such are Konunga-tal, Hugsvinnsmal (a paraphrase of Cato's Distichs), Merlin's Prophecy (paraphrased from Geoffrey of Monmouth by Gunnlaug the monk), Jomsvikinga-drapa (by Bishop Ketil), and the Islendinga-drapa, which has preserved brief notices of several lost sagas concerning Icelandic worthies, with which Gudmundar-drapa, though of the 14th century, may be also placed.

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  • In 114 they surprised and destroyed the army of Gaius Porcius Cato in the Servian mountains, but were defeated by Q.

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  • excerpt from a speech by Marcus Cato on concerning a wife who committing adultery.

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  • William Davidson and the Cato Street Conspiracy William Davidson was born in the 1780s, the illegitimate son and the Cato Street Conspiracy William Davidson was born in the 1780s, the illegitimate son of the Jamaican Attorney General.

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  • Cato was outstanding, and Tommy Sexton and Mark Selby were almost untouchable up front.

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  • What is more, he selected the Cato Street Conspiracy to launch the idea of using woodcuts to illustrate stories in newspapers.

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  • To Merula we are indebted for the editio princeps of Plautus (1472), of the Scriptores rei rusticae, Cato, Varro, Columella, Palladius (1472) and possibly of Martial (1471).

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  • ARTHUR THISTLEWOOD (1770-1820), the principal instigator of the Cato Street conspiracy, a plot formed to murder many British ministers in 1820.

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  • The shrewdness which, more than inventiveness, characterized their husbandry comes out well in the following quotation from the 18th book of the Natural History of Pliny: - " Cato would have this point especially to be considered, that the soil of a farm be good and fertile; also, that near it there be plenty of labourers and that it be not far from a large town; moreover, that it have sufficient means for transporting its produce, either by water or land.

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  • dipe was acted at the Theatre Francais on the 18th of November of the year of release, and was very well received, a rivalry between parties not dissimilar to that which not long before had helped Addison's Cato assisting its success.

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  • The first production of Addison's Cato was made by the Whigs the occasion of a great demonstration of indignation against the peace, and by Bolingbroke for presenting the actor Booth with a purse of fifty guineas for "defending the cause of liberty against a perpetual dictator" (Marlborough): In the terms granted to England there was perhaps little to criticize.

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  • Even though the opposition found so doughty a champion as the elder Cato (censor in 184), it was ultimately of no avail.

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  • When it became apparent that the conspirators had only removed the despot and left the despotism, he again devoted himself to philosophy, and in an incredibly short space of time produced the de Natura Deorum, de Divinatione, de Fato, Cato maior (or de Senectute), Laelius (or de Amicitia), and began his treatise de Officiis.

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  • 9 According to Plutarch, Cato the elder wrote histories for the use of his son, 151a ecpi ce'yaXocs (cf.

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  • In later times the art fell into disrepute, and the saying of Cato the Censor is well known, that he wondered how one haruspex could look another in the face without laughing (Cic. De div.

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  • It would seem that I made it according to the recipe which Marcus Porcius Cato gave about two centuries before Christ.

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  • Cato says, the master of a family (patremfamilias) must have in his rustic villa "cellam oleariam, vinariam, dolia multa, uti lubeat caritatem expectare, et rei, et virtuti, et gloriae erit," that is, "an oil and wine cellar, many casks, so that it may be pleasant to expect hard times; it will be for his advantage, and virtue, and glory."

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  • East of my bean-field, across the road, lived Cato Ingraham, slave of Duncan Ingraham, Esquire, gentleman, of Concord village, who built his slave a house, and gave him permission to live in Walden Woods;--Cato, not Uticensis, but Concordiensis.

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  • Cato's half-obliterated cellar-hole still remains, though known to few, being concealed from the traveller by a fringe of pines.

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  • But all I can learn of their conclusions amounts to just this, that "Cato and Brister pulled wool"; which is about as edifying as the history of more famous schools of philosophy.

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  • William Davidson and the Cato Street Conspiracy William Davidson was born in the 1780s, the illegitimate son of the Jamaican Attorney General.

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