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battery

battery

battery Sentence Examples

  • The battery in the lantern might be dead or the fall might have broken it.

  • I bought a battery, but it didn't do any good.

  • "It had a small size battery pack on the back," Howie offered, "not as large as a car battery."

  • I just came back from a battery of tests that said nothing's wrong with me.

  • All I do is pull the battery and store the old gal together with half my gear and the next summer she's as raring and ready as I am.

  • Deidre dug through her purse as she walked and pulled out her cell, thrilled to see she had battery power.

  • Christ, it tastes like battery acid.

  • We're building a bigger battery to store the energy we generate from the river, but … Kelli shrugged.

  • And the solar battery farther back.

  • He bought some battery powered lights to hang on the wagon and Gerald helped him pile hay on the wagon.

  • My wife is like a battery.

  • Later, while attempting to utilize the gas for the production of electricity by means of a Grove gas battery, he noticed that the carbon monoxide contained in it combined with nickel.

  • Battery >>

  • Now, we know that the number of electrochemical equivalents electrolysed is proportional to the whole amount of electricity which passed through the circuit, and the product of this by the electromotive force of the battery is the work done by the latter, so that in this case also Joule showed that the heat generated was proportional to the work done.

  • The ratio of this to the whole work done by the battery is (C - C')/C, so that the efficiency is increased by diminishing C'.

  • If we could drive the engine so fast as to reduce C' to zero, the whole of the energy of the battery would be available, no heat being produced in the wires, but the horse-power of the engine would be indefinitely small.

  • von Jacobi showed that for a given electromotive force in the battery the horse-power is greatest when the current is reduced to one-half of what it would be if the engine were at rest.

  • The singleneedle instrument is a vertical needle galvanoscope worked by a battery and reversing handle, or two " tapper " keys, the motions to right and left of one end of the index corresponding to the dashes and dots of the Morse alphabet.

  • 4); a current is sent from a battery, E, through one coil of a galvanometer, g, through a high resistance, r, through one of the wires, r, and thence back from office B (at which the wires are looped), through wire 2, through another high resistance, r', through a second coil on the galvanometer, g, and thence to earth.

  • Total insulation resistance of looped lines = 2 R(D/d - 1); in which R is the total resistance of the looped wires, including the resistance of the two coils of the galvanometer, of the battery, and of the two resistance coils r and r' (inserted for the purpose of causing the leakage on the lines to have a maximum effect on the galvanometer.

  • The electromotive force of each cell is i 07 volts and the resistance 3 ohms. The Fuller bichromate battery consists of an outer jar containing a solution of bichromate of potash and sulphuric acid, in which a plate of hard carbon is immersed; in the jar there is also a porous pot containing dilute sulphuric acid and a small quantity (2 oz.) of mercury, in which stands a stout zinc rod.

  • It is not possible to work double current from one set alone, as in this case, if one key of a group of instruments is up and another is down, the battery would be short-circuited and no current would flow to line.

  • It will be observed that the circuit is not in this case actually open; the meaning of the expression " open circuit " is " no battery to line."

  • It differs from the open circuit in only requiring one battery (although, as in the figure, half of it is often placed at each end), in having the re circuit ceiving instrument between the line and the key, and in having the battery continuously to the line.

  • The battery is kept to the line by the bar c, which short-circuits the keys.

  • number of stations, the sending battery is sometimes divided among them in order to give greater uniformity of current along the line.

  • When only one battery is used the current at the distant end may be considerably affected by the leakage to earth along the line.

  • If long circuits were worked direct with ordinary instruments, high battery power would be required in order to send sufficient Single current to actuate the apparatus.

  • In such cases it is usual to employ a local battery to produce the signals, and to close the local battery circuit by means of a relay working.

  • The local 1_ E I battery B 1 then sends a current through the in FIG.

  • Normally a switch attached to the key cuts the battery off, and connects the line direct through the receiving relay; this switch is turned to " send " when transmission commences, and is moved back to " receive " when it ceases: this movement is done quite mechanically by the telegraphist, and as it is practically never forgotten, automatic devices (which have often been suggested) to effect the turning are wholly unnecessary.

  • - Universal Battery Working.

  • when the local battery is coils.

  • 23, representing the " differential " method, B is the sending battery, B 1 a resistance equal to that of the battery, R a rheostat and C an adjustable condenser.

  • Incoming currents pass from line through one coil of the relay, the key, and either the battery or battery resistance, according as whether the key is raised or depressed.

  • The result is that the armature of the relay is attracted, and currents are sent through the sounder from the local battery, producing the signals from the distant station.

  • In this case no current flows from the battery through the line or instruments, the whole action being inductive.

  • By this method of transmission the battery is always to the line for the same interval of time, and alternately with opposite poles, so that the effect of electrostatic induction is reduced to a minimum.

  • When a key is depressed, slightly raising one of the pins, the horizontal arm will pass over it and in doing so will momentarily join the battery to the line.

  • In the raised position a negative battery is connected to the distributor and in the depressed position a positive battery.

  • Owing to the variable illumination of the selenium thus produced, the resistance of the latter, and therefore the intensity of the current sent through the line to the receiving station by the battery, will be altered accordingly.

  • battery and to earth alternately, the relative time sender during which it is to battery and to earth depending to a great extent on the operator.

  • 35) were sunk in the water; the pair on one side were connected by a battery B, and the pair on the other by a galvanometer or telegraphic receiver R.

  • Under these circumstances a small portion of the current from the battery is shunted through the galvanometer circuit, and can be used to make electric signals.

  • He found, as others have dune, that if a battery, dynamo or induction coil has its terminals connected to the earth at two distant places, a system of electric currents flows between these points through the crust of the earth.

  • Hence, by inserting a break-and-make key in the circuit of the battery, coil or dynamo, the uniform noise or hum in the telephone can be cut up into periods of long and short noises, which can be made to yield the signals of the Morse alphabet.

  • By the use of a key in the battery circuit as well as an interrupter or current reverser, signals can be given by breaking up the continuous hum in the telephone into long and short periods.

  • Elec. Eng., 27, p. 938.) It may be explained as follows: - Suppose a battery on shore to have one pole earthed and the other connected to an insulated submarine cable, the distant end of which was also earthed; if now a galvanometer is inserted anywhere in the cable, a current will be found flowing through the cable and returning by various paths through the sea.

  • If a battery on the mainland is connected through a key with the shore end of the main cable, and a speaking galvanometer is in circuit with the short cable crossing the Fastnet rock, then closing or opening the battery connexion will create a deflection of the galvanometer.

  • He proposed to employ two large flat coils of wire laid horizontally, on the ground, that on the mainland having in circuit a battery, interrupter and key, and that on the island a telephone.

  • At the sending station one battery was to have its positive pole connected to the earth and its negative pole to an insulated condenser.

  • In circuit with this battery was placed the secondary circuit of an induction coil, the primary circuit of which contained a telephone transmitter or microphone interrupter.

  • At the receiving station a telephone receiver was placed in series with another insulated battery, the negative terminal of which was to be in connexion with the earth.

  • He discovered a fact subsequently rediscovered by others, that a tube of metallic filings, loosely packed, was sensitive to electric sparks made in its vicinity, its electrical resistance being reduced, and he was able to detect effects on such a tube connected to a battery and telephone at a distance of 500 yds.'

  • The relay was employed to actuate through a local battery B2 an ordinary Morse printing telegraphic instrument M.

  • Marconi 2 imparted practical utility to this idea by tuning the two circuits together, and the arrangement now employed is as follows: - A suitable condenser C, or battery of Leyden jars, has one coating connected to one spark ball and the other through a coil of one turn with the other spark ball of a discharger S.

  • In this case a closed condenser circuit is formed with a battery of Leyden jars, an inductance coil and a spark gap, and oscillations are excited in it by discharges created across the spark gap by an induction coil or transformer.

  • The main capacity in this last circuit consists of a battery of Leyden See J.

  • The relay itself served to actuate a Morse printing telegraph by means of a local battery.

  • Ann., 1890, 40, p. 56) employed an arrangement as follows: Four fine platinum or iron wires were joined in lozenge shape, and two sets of these R and S were connected up with two resistances P and Q to form a bridge with a galvanometer G and battery B.

  • Fleming discovered that if the filament is made incandescent by the current from an insulated battery there is a unilateral conductivity of the rarefied gas between the hot filament and the metal plate, such that if the negative terminal of the filament is connected outside the lamp through a coil in which electric oscillations are created with the platinum plate, only one half of the oscillations are permitted to pass, viz., those which carry negative electricity from the hot filament to the cooled plate through the vacuous space.

  • A battery with a sufficient number of cells is connected to these two electrodes so as to pass a current through the mercury vapour, negative electricity proceeding from the mercury cathode to the iron anode.

  • - A, antenna; P S, jigger or oscillation transformer; C, condenser; 0, Fleming oscillation valve; B, working battery; T, telephone; R, rheostat; E, earth-plate.

  • His transmitter consists of a nearly closed oscillating circuit comprising a condenser or battery of Leyden jars, a spark gap, and the primary coil of an oscillation transformer consisting of one turn of thick wire wound on a wooden frame.

  • The instrument was joined in circuit with a battery and another similar instrument placed at a distance; and a continuous current was made to flow through the circuit, keeping the electromagnets energized.

  • The current from the battery used passed from the diaphragm through the granulated carbon to the metallic back of the box.

  • The current from the battery passes from one of the carbon disks to the other through the particles of granulated carbon which fill the space between them.

  • The telephone was switched out of circuit when not in use and the bell put in its place, a key being used for throwing the battery into circuit to make the signal.

  • 7, the microphone, a battery and the primary of an induction coil in a local circuit, and putting the line in circuit with the secondary of the induction coil, which acted as the transmitter.

  • The requisite energy is derived from the battery.

  • Though many types of manually operated switchboards have been brought into use, differing from each other in respect of circuit and working arrangements, yet each of them may be placed in one or other of three main classes according as the system of working is magneto, call-wire, or common battery.

  • There are still many magneto exchanges in existence, but when new exchanges are erected only the very smallest are equipped for magneto working, that system having succumbed to the common battery one in the case of all equipments of moderate and large dimensions.

  • One of the greatest advances made in the development of the art of telephony was the introduction of the " common battery relay system."

  • - Hayes Common Battery System.

  • 9) is characterized by the use of impedance coils between the battery and the line wires.

  • - Stone Common Battery System.

  • - Dean Common Battery System.

  • - Subscriber's Circuit, Common Battery System.

  • The impedance coils shown connected between the battery and the lines and between the latter and the transmitters are joined up non-inductively as regards the transmitter circuits, but inductively as regards the secondary circuits.

  • The conditions permit of the circulation of the alternating currents of low periodicity, which are used for operating the bells, but in respect of the battery the circuit is open until the subscriber lifts the receiver, when the hook switch, thus released, joins the transmitter with one winding of an induction coil in series across the circuit.

  • Calls are registered by pressing a key, which connects a battery through a position meter of very low resistance to the socket of the line jack, thereby furnishing the necessary energy to the meter.

  • But he is immortal as the man against whom Kant directed his tremendous battery 1 Human attributes magnified, or their weak points thought away.

  • On one side; another battery of Kant's was aimed against Hume.

  • In addition to tentacles, there may be marginal cirri (Laodice) with a solid endodermal axis, spirally coiled, very contractile, and bearing a terminal battery of nematocysts.

  • In Monument Square, the site of a battery in 1775 is a soldiers' and sailors' monument (1889), a tall granite pedestal surmounted by a bronze female figure, by Franklin Simmons; at the corner of State Street is a statue of Henry W.

  • Dalkey Island, lying off the town, has an ancient ruined chapel, of the history of which nothing is certainly known, and a disused battery, which protected the harbour, a landing-place of some former importance.

  • to the south, is a good harbour for its size, and at Kinghorn Ness a battery has been established in connexion with the fortifications on Inchkeith.

  • above the battery was purchased by government in 1903 and is used as a point of observation.

  • Part of the French losses, which were disproportionately heavy, were caused by the gunboats which lay close inshore and cannonaded the left flank of the French columns, and by a heavy naval gun which was placed in battery near the position of the 28th.

  • At the outbreak of the Civil War, the state authorities seized the United States Arsenal at Fayetteville, which contained 37,000 muskets and a complete equipment for a battery of light artillery.

  • On war-footing each field battery has 4 officers, 100-120 N.C. officers and men, 100-125 horses and draught animals, 3-9 ammunition wagons; each horse battery, 4 officers, 120 N.C. officers and men, 100 horses, &c., 3 ammunition wagons; each mountain battery, 3 officers, 100 N.C. officers and men, 87 horses, &c.; each howitzer battery, 4 officers, 120 N.C. officers and men, Poo horses, &c., 3 ammunition wagons.

  • the plate attached to the so-called positive terminal of the battery or other source of current, dissolves away, the copper going into solution as copper sulphate.

  • Alessandro Volta of Pavia discovered the electric battery in the year 1800, and thus placed the means of maintaining a steady electric current in the hands of investigators, who, before that date, had been restricted to the study of the isolated electric charges given by frictional electric machines.

  • They also noticed that a similar kind of chemical action went on in the battery itself.

  • In 1807 he decomposed potash and soda, previously considered to be elements, by passing the current from a powerful battery through the moistened solids, and thus isolated the metals potassium and sodium.

  • Now let us disconnect the platinum plates from the battery and join them directly with the galvanometer.

  • above sea-level; (c) another group of batteries on the narrow ground between the sea and the lake to the east of the town; the highest of these is the Jebel Tuila battery 265 ft.

  • The inner coil is supplied, through the intervening apparatus, with current from the battery of secondary cells B,; this produces the desired magnetic field inside the tube.

  • The magnetizing current, which is derived from the storage battery B, is regulated by the adjustable resistance R and measured by the galvanometer G.

  • By means of the three-way switch C the battery current may be sent either into the primary of E, for the purpose of calibrating the galvanometer, or into the magnetizing coil of the ring under test.

  • and on the Argyll battery stands a huge piece of ancient artillery,.

  • Electric locomotives usually work on the trolley system, though a few storage battery locomotives have been successfully employed.

  • Any Turkish battery that was chosen for target generally ceased firing before long; and the assailants were disposed to assume that the work was definitely put out of action, whereas all that had happened in reality was that the hostile gunners had been driven from their guns.

  • In diffusion plants the milk of lime is added, in proper proportion, in the cells of the diffusion battery, and the chips or slices themselves act as a mechanical filter for the juice; while in the Sandwich Islands coral-sand filters have been employed for some years, in addition to the chips, to free the juice from impurities held in mechanical suspension.

  • A cell when filled with fresh slices becomes the head of the battery, and where skilled scientific control can be relied upon to regulate the process, the best and most economical way of heating the slices, previous to admitting the hot liquor from the next cell, is by direct steam; but as the slightest inattention or carelessness in the admission of direct steam might have the effect of inverting sugar and thereby causing the loss of some portion of saccharine in the slices, water heaters are generally used, through which water is passed and heated up previous to admission to the freshly-filled cell.

  • When the new cell comes into operation and becomes the head of the battery, the first or tail cell is thrown out, and number two becomes the tail cell, and so the rounds are repeated; one cell is always being emptied and one filled or charged with slices and heated up, the latter becoming the head of the battery as soon as it is ready.

  • In a refinery in Nova Scotia a system has been introduced by which a travelling crane above the bag filters lifts up any head bodily with all its bags attached, and runs it to the mud and washing tanks at the end of the battery, while another similar crane drops another head, fitted with fresh bags, into the place of the one just removed.

  • 1400), earl and prince of Orkney and 1st earl of Caithness, its last vestiges having been demolished in 1865 to provide better access to the harbour; and the earthwork to the east of the town thrown up by the Cromwellians has been converted into a battery of the Orkney Artillery Volunteers.

  • For the theory and elemental laws of electro-deposition see Electrolysis; and for the construction and use of electric generators see Dynamo and Battery: Electric. The importance of the subject may be gauged by the fact that all the aluminium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, calcium carbide, carborundum and artificial graphite, now placed on the market, is made by electrical processes, and that the use of such processes for the refining of copper and silver, and in the manufacture of phosphorus, potassium chlorate and bleach, already pressing very heavily on the older non-electrical systems, is every year extending.

  • One of the best methods for doing this is to charge the Ab l condenser by the known voltage of a battery, and then d e t erdischarge it through a galvanometer and repeat this minations.

  • The metal slips are so placed that, as the disk revolves, the middle brush, connected to one terminal of the condenser C, is alternately put in conductive connexion with first one and then the other outside brush, which are joined respectively to the battery B and galvanometer G terminals.

  • These arms. are then altered until on raising or depressing the battery key there is no sudden deflection either way of the galvano meter.

  • It depends on the principle that if two condensers of capacity C I and C2 are respectively charged to potentials V I and V2, and then joined in parallel with terminals of opposite charge together, the resulting potential difference of the two condensers will be V, such that V = (C,V 2 -CiV2) /(C1+C2) (16); and hence if V is zero we have C I: C2 = V2 The method is carried out by charging the two condensers to be compared at the two sections of a high resistance joining the ends of a battery which is divided into two parts by a movable contact.'

  • A simple method for condenser comparison is to charge the two condensers to the same voltage by a battery and then discharge them successively through a ballistic galvanometer and observe the respective " throws " or deflections of the coil or needle.

  • South, east and west of the city are the gold mines, indicated by tall chimneys, battery houses and the compounds of the labourers.

  • lumps in a rock-breaker, is fed in through an aperture at the back of the " battery box," a constant supply of water is admitted from above, and mercury in a finely divided state is added at frequent intervals.

  • Similar plates are often used to catch any particles of gold that may be thrown back, while the main operation is so conducted that the bulk of the gold may be reduced to the state of amalgam by bringing the two metals into intimate contact under the stamp head, and remain in the battery.

  • So sudden was the collision that the Prussian advanced guard battery had to fire case to clear its own front.

  • Marshal Bazaine had meanwhile arrived on the scene, and ordering forward fresh troops to relieve (not to reinforce) those already engaged, he rode forward with a horse artillery battery to watch the operations.

  • In the dust and confusion of the charge a group of the hussars approached Bazaine and his horse artillery battery, and almost carried off the marshal.

  • The Third Army will assist the Fourth Army with counter battery work on the enemy's guns in the region La Terriere-Villers Outreaux.

  • On the 2nd-13th of August 1704 Eugene and Marlborough set their forces in motion towards the hostile camps; several streams had to be crossed on the march, and it was seven o'clock (five hours after moving off) when the British of Marlborough's left wing, next the Danube, deployed opposite Blenheim, which Tallard thereupon garrisoned with a large force of his best infantry, aided by a battery of 24-pounder guns.

  • The " Blue " brigadeGustavus's infantry wore distinctive colours - overran the Rdcken ' 'Battle Of Lutzen November 16th., 1632  :60,000 I German Armym Swedish Army battery of heavy guns, and the " Swedish " 1 and " Yellow " brigades engaged the left face of the Imperialist lozenge with success.

  • They consist of an electric battery cable and lamp-holders and small glow lamps; that for the hind-sight is coloured.

  • ever, a battery of 80 French guns unlimbered on the long spur to the S.E.

  • Delivered in three echelons, these final attacks were repulsed, the first echelon by Colin Halkett's British Brigade, a Dutch-Belgian battery, and a brigade of Chasse's Dutch-Belgian division; the second and third echelons by the Guards, the 52nd, and the Royal Artillery.

  • In this case one terminal of the battery is connected to the earth, and the other terminal is connected through the galvanometer with the copper wire, the insulation of which it is desired to test.

  • battery is applied to the shunted galvanometer, then the current C passing through the galvanometer will be given by the expression SV C - R' (R +S) +RS' where V is the electromotive force of the battery.

  • It is possible so to arrange the value of the shunt and of the high resistance R' that the same or nearly the same deflection of the galvanometer is obtained as when it is used in series with the battery and the insulation-resistance.

  • In these circumstances the current passing through the galvanometer is known, provided that the voltage of the battery is determined by means of a potentiometer.

  • Hence the resistance of the insulator can be ascertained, since it is expressed in ohms by the ratio of the voltage of the battery in volts to the current through the C C galvanometer in amperes.

  • which is connected to one terminal of the insulated battery B, the other terminal being connected to the metallic conductor CC of the wire under test, through a galvanometer G.

  • To prevent leakage over the surface of the insulating covering of the wire which projects above the surface of the water, it is necessary to employ a " guard wire P, which consists of a piece of fine copper wire, twisted round the extremity of the insulated wire and connected to the battery.

  • Every knoll had its redoubt or battery, and the trenches were arranged line behind line, to give supporting, cross and enfilade fire in every direction.

  • Thus on the north front, from Chi-Kuan battery to Sung-Shu, a distance of about two miles, there were three permanent forts and seven semi-permanent works and batteries.

  • Fort and Battery, and was continued at intervals, varied by Russian counter-attacks, till the 2nd of November.

  • On the 22nd of November the Japanese assaulted the trench round Chi-Kuan battery.

  • A battery of 11-inch howitzers was Metre fist established only one mile away.

  • le Blanc has shown, however, that the effect of ammonium amalgam on the magnitude of polarization of a battery is comparable with that of the amalgams of the alkali metals.

  • He had no taste for office work, and much of his time was occupied in commanding a battery of volunteers and in charge of a steam launch.

  • With Dr Hugo Miller as his collaborator he published several papers of a chemical character between the years 1856 and 1862, and investigated, 1868-1883, the discharge of electricity through gases by means of a battery of 14,600 chloride of silver cells.

  • The difficulties under which the siege corps laboured were very great, and it was not until the 7th of January 1871 that the rightmost battery opened fire.

  • It is used in the manufacture of carbon rods for arc lights, and for the negative element in the Bunsen battery.

  • 1434 on the fine wire, and the Clark cell is connected in between the sliding contact and one terminal of the galvanometer, so that its negative pole is connected through the galvanometer with that end of the fine wire to which the negative pole of the working battery is attached.

  • We may employ such a potentiometer to measure large potential difference greater than the electromotive force of the working battery, as follows: The two points between which the potential difference is required are connected by high resistance, say of 100,000 ohms or more, and from the extremities of a known fraction of this resistance, say, 'Roo or I/1000 or I/Io,000 wires are brought to the potentiometer and connected in between the slider and the corresponding galvanometer terminal.

  • On placing a piece of potash on a platinum plate, connected to the negative of a powerful electric battery, and bringing a platinum wire, connected to the positive of the battery, to the surface of the potassium a vivid action was observed: gas was evolved at the upper surface of the fused globule of potash, whilst at the lower surface, adjacent to the platinum plate, minute metallic globules were formed, some of which immediately inflamed, whilst others merely tarnished.

  • Stuart discovered a position which commanded the Federal camp, and maintained his cavalry and horse artillery in this position until the afternoon of July 3, when, his ammunition being expended, he was compelled to retire before a Federal force of infantry and a battery.

  • Thomson 6 places spherical bulbs inside thick spiral conductors through which the oscillating discharge of a powerful battery is led.

  • When an electric current from a battery is sent through a tube containing hydrogen, increase of current simply means increase in the number of ions which take part where is an additional constant.

  • p. 362) gives the following note from his laboratory book on the 10th of September 1822: "Polarized a ray of lamplight by reflection, and endeavoured to ascertain whether any depolarizing action (was) exerted on it by water placed between the poles of a voltaic battery in a glass cistern; one Wollaston's trough used; the fluids decomposed were pure water, weak solution of sulphate of soda, and strong sulphuric acid; none of them had any effect on the polarized light, either when out of or in the voltaic circuit, so that no particular arrangement of particles could be ascertained in this way."

  • With a battery of five Grove cells and a Ruhmkorff coil of medium size, a somewhat short spark, or arc, of about 5 mm.

  • Where it is available, an alternating electric current is much superior to a battery and break.

  • Richards, in which the source of power was a secondary battery of 5000 cells.

  • At the outer end was a battery of 3 5.9-in.

  • battery (known at Dover as the Knocke) armed with 4 12-in.

  • of Ostend was the Tirpitz battery with 4 r r-in: ranging 35, 000 yd., and 3 m.

  • The approach to the entrance of the ship canal at Zeebrugge was under the :fire of the Goeben battery of 4 8.2-in.

  • The object of the attack on the mole at Zeebrugge was first to seize the battery at the seaward end and prevent it firing at the block ships, and then to demolish the structures on it as far as possible.

  • The battery was 250 yd.

  • to shoreward of the battery and 400 yd.

  • battery, the upper deck pompoms and the guns in the fore top. The storming parties drawn up ready to rush ashore lost both their leaders at this point.

  • battery, but the starboard anchor was hung up with a strong tide sluicing down the mole, and the ship was carried some 700 yd.

  • The seamen, instead of dropping down on the battery, had to go back to it 400 yd.

  • The "fortified zone," instead of being between the "Vindictive" and the shore, was now between the "Vindictive" and the battery on the mole, increasing the difficulty of an assault.

  • In 1808 Sir Humphry Davy, fresh from the electrolytic isolation of potassium and sodium, attempted to decompose alumina by heating it with potash in a platinum crucible and submitting the mixture to a current of electricity; in 1809, with a more powerful battery, he raised iron wire to a red heat in contact with alumina, and obtained distinct evidence of the production of an iron-aluminium alloy.

  • Both schemes appeared practically impossible; potassium cost about L 1 7 per lb, gave a very small yield and was dangerous to manipulate, while on the other hand, the only source of electric current then available was the primary battery, and zinc as a store of industrial energy was utterly out of the question.

  • The main fortification of Copenhagen was the powerful Trekroner (Three Crown) battery at the northern end of the sea-front.

  • He therefore proposed that he should be detached with ten sail of the line, and the frigates and small craft, to pass between the Middle Ground and Saltholm Flat, and assail the Danish line at the southern end while the remainder of the fleet engaged the Trekroner battery from the north.

  • Having entered the British army, he went to Japan in 1867 in command of a battery of artillery.

  • Walker planted a battery on Loudoun Heights.

  • The Russian cavalry mass, after crossing the ridge, moved towards Balaklava; a few shots were fired into it by a Turkish battery and a moment later the Heavy Brigade charged.

  • The bombardment ceased at 5 P.M.; but a few rounds were fired by the Inflexible and Temeraire on the morning of,the 12th at the right battery in Ras-el-Tin lines.

  • Every effort was now concentrated upon sending an expeditionary force to Suakin, and before the end of March about 13,000 men, including a brigade from India and a field battery from New South Wales, with nearly 7000 camels and 1000 mules, were there assembled.

  • Graham, with two battalions of Guards and a battery of horse artillery, started for Tofrik, but returned on being assured that reinforcements were not required.

  • A flying column, comprising a squadron of cavalry, a field battery, 6 machine guns, 6 companies of the camel corps, and a brigade of infantry and details, in all 3700 men, under Wingate, left Faki Kohi on the 21st of November.

  • Not the least extraordinary feature of the battle that followed is the part played by a sangar of stones at the head of Quarry Ravine and a small battery, called the Sandbag Battery, made as a temporary emplacement for two heavy guns a few days before.

  • Possession of the Sandbag Battery was far more fiercely contested.

  • The line of defence adjacent to the battery looked downhill for about 300 yds., giving a clear field of fire for the new Enfield rifle the English carried; but a sharp break in the slope beyond that range gave the assailants plenty of "dead ground" on which to form up. For a time, therefore, the battle was a series of attacks, delivered with great fierceness by the main body of Pavlov's corps, the repulse of each being followed by the disappearance of the assailants.

  • Most of the division indeed had to be used to patch up the weaker parts of the line, but Cathcart himself with about 400 men worked his way along the lower and steeper part of the eastern slope so as to take the assailants of the battery in flank.

  • Thenard, who had no battery at their disposal, to search for a chemical method of obtaining those metals, and by the action of red-hot iron on fused potash - a method of which Davy admitted the advantages - they succeeded in 1808 in preparing potassium, going on to make a full study of its properties and to use it, as Davy also did, for the reduction of boron from boracic acid in 1809.

  • When the two metal surfaces are connected for a short time with the terminals of some source of electromotive force, such as an electric machine, an induction coil or a voltaic battery, electric energy is stored up in the condenser in the form of electric strain in the glass, and can be recovered again in the form of an electric discharge.

  • This arrangement is commonly called a battery of Leyden jars.

  • At one end is an insulated plate P kept at a potential of 200 volts or so above the earth by a battery.

  • In 1806 Davy communicated to the Royal Society of London a celebrated paper on some " Chemical Agencies of Electricity," and after providing himself at the Royal Institution of London with a battery of several hundred cells, he announced in 1807 his great discovery of the electrolytic decomposition of the alkalis, potash and soda, obtaining therefrom the metals potassium and sodium.

  • In July 1808 Davy laid a request before the managers of the Royal Institution that they would set on foot a subscription for the purchase of a specially large voltaic battery; as a result he was provided with one of 2000 pairs of plates, and the first experiment performed with it was the production of the electric arc light between carbon poles.

  • Trans., 1823) showed that when two wires connected with the pole of a battery were dipped into a cup of mercury placed on the pole of a powerful magnet, the fluid rotated in opposite directions about the two electrodes.

  • Joseph Henry, in the United States, first suggested the construction of what were then called intensity electromagnets, by winding upon a horseshoe-shaped piece of soft iron many superimposed windings of copper wire, insulated by covering it with silk or cotton, and then sending through the coils the current from a voltaic battery.

  • One of these coils was connected with the voltaic battery and the other with the galvanometer.

  • He found that at the moment the current in the battery circuit was started or stopped, transitory currents appeared in the galvanometer circuit in opposite directions.

  • Faure made an important improvement in the lead secondary battery which G.

  • The promontory is strongly fortified and crosses fire with a battery erected to the east of Oran.

  • The war organization of the home establishment, with its general and special reserves, aimed at the mobilization and despatch overseas of 6 army divisions, each of 12 battalions in 3 brigades; 9 field batteries in 3 brigades, a brigade of 3 field howitzer batteries, and a heavy battery, each with the appropriate ammunition columns; 2 field companies and telegraph company R.E.; 2 companies mounted infantry; and ambulances, columns and parks.

  • Hankel still further improved the dry pile electrometer by giving a slow motion movement to the two plates, and substituted a galvanic battery with a large number of cells for the dry pile, and also employed a divided scale to measure the movements of the gold-leaf (Pogg.

  • The needle is charged to a potential of 50 to 200 volts by means of a dry pile or voltaic battery, or from a lighting circuit.

  • Built on the narrow strip of sand which separates the lake from the gulf, Goletta is defended by a fort and battery.

  • Ampere floated a voltaic battery with a coil of wire in its circuit in order to observe the effects of the earth's magnetism on the electric circuit.

  • Faraday observed that a large drop of mercury, resting on the flat bottom of a vessel containing dilute acid, changes its form in a remarkable way when connected with one of the electrodes of a battery, the other electrode being placed in the acid.

  • On the 9th however, with the aid of a Montenegrin battery that was got up to very close range, the trenches were carried after fierce handto-hand fighting.

  • The British troops in cantonments consisted of three regiments of native infantry and a battery of artillery.

  • When this liquid is cold it is diluted with cold water, heated until all the soluble salts are dissolved, transferred to a tall, narrow beaker, and diluted to about 150 cc. The electrodes are attached to a frame connected with the battery and the beaker is placed on a stool, which can be raised so that the electrodes are immersed in the liquid and reach the bottom of the beaker.

  • Each cylinder has a platinum wire fused to the upper circumference to connect with a clamp from which a wire leads to the proper pole of the battery.

  • He must be walked about, have smelling salts constantly applied to the nose, or be stimulated by the faradic battery.

  • He was also the first to demonstrate experimentally the difference of action between what he called a "quantity" magnet excited by a "quantity" battery of a single pair, and an "intensity" magnet with long fine wire coil excited by an "intensity" battery of many elements, having their resistances suitably proportioned.

  • This was the first instance of magnetizing iron at a distance, or of a suitable combination of magnet and battery being so arranged as to be capable of such action.

  • On the morning of the 24th the terms of a capitulation were agreed upon - the Mexicans were permitted to retire, retaining their small arms and one field battery of six pieces with twenty-one rounds of ammunition, and an armistice of eight weeks was arranged.

  • Galvanic phenomena had already engaged his attention before he left Bristol, but in London he had at his disposal a large battery which gave him much greater opportunities.

  • A year after this paper, which gained him from the French Institute the medal offered by Napoleon for the best experiment made each year on galvanism, he described in his second Bakerian lecture the electrolytic preparation of potassium and sodium, effected in October 1807 by the aid of his battery.

  • The distal club corresponds to the crystal-sac of an ordinary After Wladimir Schewiakoff, simplified from rhopalium, but bears a battery a coloured plate in Morphologisches Jahrbuch, of nematocysts in place of the xv., 1889, by permission of Wilhelm Engelotoliths.

  • In each township there are from two to five justices of the peace, any one of whom may preside over the " small cause court," which has jurisdiction of cases in which the matter in dispute does not exceed $too and is not an action of replevin, one in which the charge is slander, trespass or assault, battery or imprisonment, or in which the title to real estate is in question.

  • By the addition of a new pier running north-east from the lighthouse, and protected by a heavily armed battery, Charles III.

  • He abandoned temporarily the study of law in Indianapolis to recruit a company of volunteers (of which he was made second lieutenant) for the Mexican War, and served in1846-1847in the First Indiana Battery.

  • Upon his return he took up his residence in New York City, where (1868-1869) he was engaged in superintending the construction of an experimental floating battery.

  • The enemy's artillery was three hundred yards away, yet the British pressed on in spite of their losses, and as some of the Light Division troops reached the "Great Battery" the Russians hurried their guns away to safety.

  • In the meantime, on both sides of this battery, the assailants had come to close quarters with the Russian columns, which were aided by their field guns.

  • A brave counter-attack was made by the Russian Vladimir regiment, 3000 strong, against the troops which had stormed the great battery, and for want of support the British were driven out again.

  • In one of these branches is placed a battery B and in another a galvanometer G; the four p Q other resistances are denoted by the letters P, Q, R, S.

  • Keys are inserted in the battery and galvanometer circuits to open or close them at pleasure.

  • these resistances have values denoted by P, Q, R, and S, then when P: Q :: R: S, the current in the galvanometer circuit will be zero when an electromotive force is applied in the battery circuit.

  • Let E be the electromotive force in the battery circuit, and let (x+y) be the current through the resistance P, y the current through the resistance Q and z that through B.

  • of a galvanometer and a battery connected up as shown in the diagram.

  • The operation of determining the value of the resistance R therefore consists in altering the ratio of the three resistances P, Q,, and S, until the galvanometer indicates no current through it when the battery circuit is completed or closed by the key.

  • A battery C of two or three cells is connected to the extremities of the slide wire, and the sensitive galvanometer G is connected in between the contact-maker and the junction between the coils P and Q.

  • The regular military force consists of a field battery, with several regiments of cavalry and battalions of infantry.

  • At the extremity of the peninsula is Fort St George, with a saluting battery.

  • The Flag Battery is the "platform before the castle" where the ghost appears in Hamlet.

  • At the siege of Cartagena, in March 1741, at the head of a party of seamen, he took a battery of fifteen 24-pounders, while exposed to the fire of another fort.

  • There are in general stationed here a native regiment, two sections of a battery and the wing of a European regiment.

  • Modern improvements, with a view to cheapening of cost, effect the transport of the cages from one press battery to another on rails.

  • A battery of vessels is so arranged that one vessel can always be made the last of the series to discharge finished meal and to be recharged with fresh meal, so that the process is practically a continuous one.

  • These wires are also traversed in the same direction by a constant current from a battery.

  • The battery might be dead or the fall might have broken it.

  • I bought a battery, but it didn't do any good.

  • "It had a small size battery pack on the back," Howie offered, "not as large as a car battery."

  • The battery in this cell is about gone.

  • "As long as it's not tagged by anyone else, I don't give a shit," he said with a faint smile and took the battery out.

  • I just came back from a battery of tests that said nothing's wrong with me.

  • All I do is pull the battery and store the old gal together with half my gear and the next summer she's as raring and ready as I am.

  • Deidre dug through her purse as she walked and pulled out her cell, thrilled to see she had battery power.

  • Christ, it tastes like battery acid.

  • The absence of fangs and the battery acid blood probably would have saved her life.

  • We're building a bigger battery to store the energy we generate from the river, but … Kelli shrugged.

  • And the solar battery farther back.

  • He bought some battery powered lights to hang on the wagon and Gerald helped him pile hay on the wagon.

  • Battery is illegal too.

  • My wife is like a battery.

  • The test scientifically analyzes battery performance with a true constant current load capacity test that is graphically displayed.

  • He was charged with misdemeanor battery which has a bail of at least $1,000.

  • aa battery [not included] .

  • It is recommended that the battery is disconnected at all times to avoid any accidental starting of the car.

  • The Wireless was run off a wet battery we called an accumulator, we took it to a garage to be charged up.

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