5th-century sentence example

  • Of other 5th-century sources, Aristophanes is obviously a caricaturist, pseudo-Xenophon (de republica Atheniensium) a mere party pamphleteer.
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  • The last 5th-century author to be mentioned here is Ahudhemmeh, who was Jacobite metropolitan of Taghrith from 559 till he was martyred by Khosrau Anosharwan in 575.
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  • The conquest of Laconia at least is represented in 5th-century tradition as immediate and complete, though one legend admits the previous death of the Heracleid leader Aristodemus, and another describes a protracted struggle in the case of Corinth.
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  • The 5th-century tradition that the Heracleid kings of Macedon were Temenid exiles from Argos may belong to the same cycle.
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  • The legend of an organized apportionment of Peloponnese amongst the Heracleid leaders appears first in the 5th-century tragedians, - not earlier, that is, than the rise of the Peloponnesian League, - and was amplified in the 4th century; the Aetolians' aid, and claim to Elis, appear first in Ephorus.
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  • It occupies the site of the 5th-century church of SS.
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  • Carneades, practically a 5th-century sophist, is the most important of the ancient sceptics.
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  • The Epistola ad omnes philosophos and the Homily on the Penitent Thief, ascribed by Armenian tradition to Aristides, are really of 5th-century origin.
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  • The cemetery of Kerameikos outside the Dipylon Gate was being extensively excavated and restored, so far as possible, to its original 5th-century appearance by the German Institute in 1914.
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  • The celebrated 5th-century example over the well at Antwerp, attributed to Quintin Matsys, is the finest of these.
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  • Herodotus, in the spirit of 5th-century Greeks, which conventionally regarded the tyrants as selfish despots, says he ruled harshly, but he is generally represented as mild, beneficent and so popular as to be able to dispense with a bodyguard, the usual attribute of a tyrannis.
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  • In this work, which furnishes a valuable if prejudiced description of life in 5th-century Gaul, Salvian deals with the same problem that had moved the eloquence of Augustine and Orosius.
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  • Salvian was a 5th-century socialist of the most extreme type, and a zealous ascetic who pitilessly scourged everything that fell short of an exalted morality, and exaggerated, albeit unconsciously, the faults that he desired to eradicate.
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  • Finally, an unknown 5th-century writer (see Buresch, Klaros, 1889, pp. 87-126) says that the Oracles of Hystaspes dealt with the incarnation of the Saviour.
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