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  • His voice was controlled.
  • It was the earthquake.
  • Alex was supposed to be sterile, but they had been wrong about that.
  • Nurturing was in his personality.
  • The conductor said it was the worst quake he ever knew.
  • With these words she greeted Prince Vasili Kuragin, a man of high rank and importance, who was the first to arrive at her reception.
  • They saw a landscape with mountains and plains, lakes and rivers, very like those upon the earth's surface; but all the scene was splendidly colored by the variegated lights from the six suns.
  • This was a very interesting experience to them.
  • His tail was short and scraggly, and his harness had been broken in many places and fastened together again with cords and bits of wire.
  • The central and largest one was white, and reminded her of the sun.
  • All were surprised to find that he was not with them.
  • This was not the light in which I hoed them.
  • Obviously he was still struggling with it.
  • This was a decision she had already made once - but not really.
  • Far up in the air was an object that looked like a balloon.
  • Their son, Charles Adams, was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, and moved to Helena, Arkansas.
  • It was in July, 1805, and the speaker was the well-known Anna Pavlovna Scherer, maid of honor and favorite of the Empress Marya Fedorovna.
  • America was birthed in optimism.
  • Count Ilya Rostov, in a military uniform of Catherine's time, was sauntering with a pleasant smile among the crowd, with all of whom he was acquainted.
  • He was elected president.
  • How long this state of things continued Dorothy could not even guess, she was so greatly bewildered.
  • This second one was a Rain of People-and-Horse-and-Buggy.
  • Water was dripping from the trees, and the grass was wet.
  • Next to Washington he was the greatest American.
  • Then he got into the buggy again and took the reins, and the horse at once backed away from the tree, turned slowly around, and began to trot down the sandy road which was just visible in the dim light.
  • Next minute there was a roar and a sharp crash, and at her side Dorothy saw the ground open in a wide crack and then come together again.
  • He was quite an old little man and his head was long and entirely bald.
  • After the war was over the family moved to Memphis, Tennessee.
  • A middle-aged man, handsome and virile, in the uniform of a retired naval officer, was speaking in one of the rooms, and a small crowd was pressing round him.
  • The nobility don't gwudge theah lives--evewy one of us will go and bwing in more wecwuits, and the sov'weign" (that was the way he referred to the Emperor) "need only say the word and we'll all die fo' him!" added the orator with animation.
  • Pierre's one feeling at the moment was a desire to show that he was ready to go all lengths and was prepared to sacrifice everything.
  • "That was an awful big quake," replied Zeb, with a white face.
  • Immediately the Prince and all of his people flocked out of the hall into the street, that they might see what was about to happen.
  • Now was the Wizard's turn, so he smiled upon the assemblage and asked:
  • "I will show you," was the reply.
  • It was completely covered with vines, climbing roses and honeysuckles.
  • Pierre was among those who saw him come out from the merchants' hall with tears of emotion in his eyes.
  • His clothing fitted his form snugly and was gorgeously colored in brilliant shades of green, which varied as the sunbeams touched them but was not wholly influenced by the solar rays.
  • He waved a thorny hand and at once the tinkling of bells was heard, playing sweet music.
  • As they sat upon the grass watching Jim, who was still busily eating, Eureka said:
  • The only bait he could find was a bright red blossom from a flower; but he knew fishes are easy to fool if anything bright attracts their attention, so he decided to try the blossom.
  • And this man was saying we were going to the moon in a rocket ship made of metals we hadn't even invented.
  • Scarcity was the new watchword as the focus turned to all the problems of the future, not all the possibilities.
  • The great cathedral Notre Dame de Paris, which was begun before your birth, would not be finished by your death.
  • I was born on June 27, 1880, in Tuscumbia, a little town of northern Alabama.
  • Yet it is admirable to profess because it was once admirable to live.
  • He too approached that group and listened with a kindly smile and nods of approval, as he always did, to what the speaker was saying.
  • The retired naval man was speaking very boldly, as was evident from the expression on the faces of the listeners and from the fact that some people Pierre knew as the meekest and quietest of men walked away disapprovingly or expressed disagreement with him.
  • All that did was to enwich the pwiests' sons and thieves and wobbahs....
  • He hardened his heart against the senator who was introducing this set and narrow attitude into the deliberations of the nobility.
  • But scarcely had Pierre uttered these words before he was attacked from three sides.
  • Adraksin was in uniform, and whether as a result of the uniform or from some other cause Pierre saw before him quite a different man.
  • Count Rostov at the back of the crowd was expressing approval; several persons, briskly turning a shoulder to the orator at the end of a phrase, said:
  • Pierre wished to say that he was ready to sacrifice his money, his serfs, or himself, only one ought to know the state of affairs in order to be able to improve it, but he was unable to speak.
  • Glinka, the editor of the Russian Messenger, who was recognized (cries of "author! author!" were heard in the crowd), said that "hell must be repulsed by hell," and that he had seen a child smiling at lightning flashes and thunderclaps, but "we will not be that child."
  • "Yes, yes, at thunderclaps!" was repeated approvingly in the back rows of the crowd.
  • One of the old men nearest to him looked round, but his attention was immediately diverted by an exclamation at the other side of the table.
  • He was answered by a voice which informed him of the resolution just arrived at.
  • There was a rustling among the crowd and it again subsided, so that Pierre distinctly heard the pleasantly human voice of the Emperor saying with emotion:
  • When Pierre saw the Emperor he was coming out accompanied by two merchants, one of whom Pierre knew, a fat otkupshchik.
  • The other was the mayor, a man with a thin sallow face and narrow beard.
  • Was it greedy to want one of their own as well?
  • It was possible after all - but was it moral?
  • It was the first time she thought of Katie that way.
  • Her heart was starting to flutter.
  • Alex was doing everything in his power to provide her with all the experiences of a natural mother.
  • It was true, and it brought color to his neck, but he didn't comment.
  • It should have arrived at Hugson's Siding at midnight, but it was already five o'clock and the gray dawn was breaking in the east when the little train slowly rumbled up to the open shed that served for the station-house.
  • The shed at Hugson's Siding was bare save for an old wooden bench, and did not look very inviting.
  • As she peered through the soft gray light not a house of any sort was visible near the station, nor was any person in sight; but after a while the child discovered a horse and buggy standing near a group of trees a short distance away.
  • It was a big horse, tall and bony, with long legs and large knees and feet.
  • She could count his ribs easily where they showed through the skin of his body, and his head was long and seemed altogether too big for him, as if it did not fit.
  • He laughed at that, and his laugh was merry and frank.
  • I thought that was the best way to carry her.
  • Dorothy thought he just wiggled one of his drooping ears, but that was all.
  • Then it must have happened while I was asleep, he said thoughtfully.
  • There was a breath of danger in the very air, and every few moments the earth would shake violently.
  • Jim's ears were standing erect upon his head and every muscle of his big body was tense as he trotted toward home.
  • He was not going very fast, but on his flanks specks of foam began to appear and at times he would tremble like a leaf.
  • The top of the buggy caught the air like a parachute or an umbrella filled with wind, and held them back so that they floated downward with a gentle motion that was not so very disagreeable to bear.
  • The worst thing was their terror of reaching the bottom of this great crack in the earth, and the natural fear that sudden death was about to overtake them at any moment.
  • With this thought in mind the girl took heart and leaned her head over the side of the buggy to see where the strange light was coming from.
  • Dorothy was too dazed to say much, but she watched one of Jim's big ears turn to violet and the other to rose, and wondered that his tail should be yellow and his body striped with blue and orange like the stripes of a zebra.
  • Then she looked at Zeb, whose face was blue and whose hair was pink, and gave a little laugh that sounded a bit nervous.
  • All this was so terrible and unreal that he could not understand it at all, and so had good reason to be afraid.
  • Yes; there was land below them; and not so very far away, either.
  • There was not an ugly person in all the throng.
  • "I don't know," said Zeb, who was still confused.
  • There was even a thorn upon the tip of his nose and he looked so funny that Dorothy laughed when she saw him.
  • If you had any sense at all you'd known it was the earthquake.
  • Yet one has just occurred that was even worse than the first.
  • It was all they could do, for to go away and leave that strange sight was impossible; nor could they hurry its fall in any way.
  • Dorothy was surprised to find how patient the people were, for her own little heart was beating rapidly with excitement.
  • "Who did you say it was?" whispered Zeb to the girl.
  • It was one of the things Gwig usually did to prove he was a sorcerer.
  • By the time he had attached a handle to this sword he was having much trouble to breathe, as the charm of the Sorcerer was beginning to take effect.
  • "It's violet," said the Wizard, who was in the buggy.
  • In the center of each plant grew a daintily dressed Mangaboo, for the clothing of all these creatures grew upon them and was attached to their bodies.
  • Her poise expressed both dignity and grace.
  • "That is a matter I have not quite decided upon," was the reply.
  • She was not at all heavy, so the Wizard and Dorothy managed to lift her gently to the ground.
  • Instantly the Princess turned and faced him, and when he saw that she was picked the Prince stood still and began to tremble.
  • The cab-horse, who was browsing near, lifted his head with a sigh.
  • Then the boy returned to one of the upper rooms, and in spite of the hardness of the glass bench was soon deep in slumberland.
  • So the boy went willingly upon the errand, and by the time he had returned Dorothy was awake.
  • If there was any other place to go, I'd like to go there.
  • "Oh, you cannot go away, of course; so you must be destroyed," was the answer.
  • The advisors of the Princess did not like this test; but she commanded them to step into the flame and one by one they did so, and were scorched so badly that the air was soon filled with an odor like that of baked potatoes.
  • Half way up the steep was a yawning cave, black as night beyond the point where the rainbow rays of the colored suns reached into it.
  • "If the Wizard was here," said one of the piglets, sobbing bitterly, "he would not see us suffer so."
  • The mouth of the hole was nearly filled up now, but the kitten gave a leap through the remaining opening and at once scampered up into the air.
  • The Wizard carried his satchel, which was quite heavy, and Zeb carried the two lanterns and the oil can.
  • Before long they neared the Black Pit, where a busy swarm of Mangaboos, headed by their Princess, was engaged in piling up glass rocks before the entrance.
  • Noticing that the light was growing dim he picked up his nine piglets, patted each one lovingly on its fat little head, and placed them carefully in his inside pocket.
  • Jim stopped sometimes to rest, for the climb was rather steep and tiresome.
  • I didn't know this mountain was so tall.
  • It was all laid out into lovely lawns and gardens, with pebble paths leading through them and groves of beautiful and stately trees dotting the landscape here and there.
  • The second and even more singular fact was the absence of any inhabitant of this splendid place.
  • The nearest cottage was still some distance away.
  • He took the piglets from his pocket and let them run on the grass, and Jim tasted a mouthful of the green blades and declared he was very contented in his new surroundings.
  • The fruit was so daintily colored and so fragrant, and looked so appetizing and delicious that Dorothy stopped and exclaimed:
  • "It was fine, Dorothy," called one of the piglets.
  • It was a pretty place, with vines growing thickly over the broad front porch.
  • The door stood open and a table was set in the front room, with four chairs drawn up to it.
  • The meat was smoking hot and the knives and forks were performing strange antics and jumping here and there in quite a puzzling way.
  • One of the chairs pushed back from the table, and this was so astonishing and mysterious that Dorothy was almost tempted to run away in fright.
  • "They walled us up in a mountain," continued the Wizard; "but we found there was a tunnel through to this side, so we came here.
  • Two childish voices laughed merrily at this action, and Dorothy was sure they were in no danger among such light-hearted folks, even if those folks couldn't be seen.
  • "What is he good for?" was the next question.
  • "Yes," was the reply.
  • In front of each place was a plate bearing one of the delicious dama-fruit, and the perfume that rose from these was so enticing and sweet that they were sorely tempted to eat of them and become invisible.
  • The girl's hair was soft and fluffy and her skin as smooth as satin.
  • The children were inclined to be frightened by the sight of the small animal, which reminded them of the bears; but Dorothy reassured them by explaining that Eureka was a pet and could do no harm even if she wished to.
  • And if he was invis'ble, and the bears invis'ble, who knows that they really ate him up?
  • Dorothy climbed into the buggy, although Jim had been unharnessed from it and was grazing some distance away.
  • "You must take to the river," was the reply.
  • The next moment a broad-leaved plant was jerked from the ground where it grew and held suspended in the air before the Wizard.
  • He had nearly finished this last task when a low growling was suddenly heard and the horse began to jump around and kick viciously with his heels.
  • The horse was plunging madly about, and two or three deep gashes appeared upon its flanks, from which the blood flowed freely.
  • As soon as he trotted out upon the surface of the river he found himself safe from pursuit, and Zeb was already running across the water toward Dorothy.
  • The third time that he thrust out the weapon there was a loud roar and a fall, and suddenly at his feet appeared the form of a great red bear, which was nearly as big as the horse and much stronger and fiercer.
  • Dorothy nearly went with them, but she was holding fast to the iron rail of the seat, and that saved her.
  • The mountain before them was shaped like a cone and was so tall that its point was lost in the clouds.
  • Directly facing the place where Jim had stopped was an arched opening leading to a broad stairway.
  • At the foot of the stairs was a sign reading:
  • The light was dim, and soon they mounted into total darkness, so that the Wizard was obliged to get out his lanterns to light the way.
  • But this enabled them to proceed steadily until they came to a landing where there was a rift in the side of the mountain that let in both light and air.
  • The opening in the mountain was on the side opposite to the Valley of Voe, and our travellers looked out upon a strange scene.
  • Below them was a vast space, at the bottom of which was a black sea with rolling billows, through which little tongues of flame constantly shot up.
  • He was a very old man, bent nearly double; but the queerest thing about him was his white hair and beard.
  • Another breathless climb brought our adventurers to a third landing where there was a rift in the mountain.
  • On peering out all they could see was rolling banks of clouds, so thick that they obscured all else.
  • The Wizard now put the nine tiny ones back into his pocket and the journey was resumed.
  • Jim, who was in advance, saw the last stair before him and stuck his head above the rocky sides of the stairway.
  • The ground was sawdust and the pebbles scattered around were hard knots from trees, worn smooth in course of time.
  • The patches of grass were splinters of wood, and where neither grass nor sawdust showed was a solid wooden flooring.
  • These were very numerous, for the place was thickly inhabited, and a large group of the queer people clustered near, gazing sharply upon the strangers who had emerged from the long spiral stairway.
  • There was no sound to be heard anywhere throughout the country.
  • The birds did not sing, nor did the cows moo; yet there was more than ordinary activity everywhere.
  • The group of these queer creatures which was discovered clustered near the stairs at first remained staring and motionless, glaring with evil eyes at the intruders who had so suddenly appeared in their land.
  • The horse had especially attracted their notice, because it was the biggest and strangest creature they had ever seen; so it became the center of their first attack.
  • But Jim was ready for them, and when he saw them coming he turned his heels toward them and began kicking out as hard as he could.
  • But the Wizard was not so confident.
  • The top of its head was carved into a crown and the Wizard's bullet had struck it exactly in the left eye, which was a hard wooden knot.
  • Dorothy was captured in the same way, and numbers of the Gargoyles clung to Jim's legs, so weighting him down that the poor beast was helpless.
  • The Gargoyles roughly pushed them into the opening, where there was a platform, and then flew away and left them.
  • The creatures had sense enough to reason that way, and the only mistake they made was in supposing the earth people were unable to overcome such ordinary difficulties.
  • Everything visible was made of wood, and the scene seemed stiff and extremely unnatural.
  • In this country, as in all others they had visited underneath the earth's surface, there was no night, a constant and strong light coming from some unknown source.
  • They all looked around, but the kitten was no place to be seen.
  • "Well, this was a figure of a cat," said Jim, "and she WENT down, anyhow, whether she climbed or crept."
  • Then the line was let down again for Zeb to climb up by.
  • The boy was no longer sleepy, but full of energy and excitement.
  • Dorothy was a little anxious about the success of their trip, for the way Jim arched his long neck and spread out his bony legs as he fluttered and floundered through the air was enough to make anybody nervous.
  • The main point, however, was that they flew, and flew swiftly, if a bit unevenly, toward the rock for which they had headed.
  • Then he poured over them all the kerosene oil that was left in his oil-can, and lighting a match set fire to the pile.
  • To their disappointment there was within this mountain no regular flight of steps by means of which they could mount to the earth's surface.
  • It carried their baggage and was useful to ride in wherever there were good roads, and since it had accompanied them so far in their travels they felt it their duty to preserve it.
  • "Young dragons, of course; but we are not allowed to call ourselves real dragons until we get our full growth," was the reply.
  • There was a regretful accent in the creature's voice, and at the words all the other dragonettes sighed dismally.
  • This rock was separate from the rest of the mountain and was in motion, turning slowly around and around as if upon a pivot.
  • But they knew now that there was a means of escape and so waited patiently until the path appeared for the second time.
  • But their journey was almost over, for in a short time they reached a small cave from which there was no further outlet.
  • That meant that their world--the real world--was not very far away, and that the succession of perilous adventures they had encountered had at last brought them near the earth's surface, which meant home to them.
  • "I was sure it would come to this, in the end," remarked the old cab-horse.
  • "The girl that rules the marvelous Land of Oz," was the reply.
  • Princess Ozma once brought him to life with a witch-powder, when she was a boy.
  • "Was Ozma once a boy?" asked Zeb, wonderingly.
  • And that was the way it did happen.
  • The cab-horse gave a nervous start and Zeb began to rub his eyes to make sure he was not asleep.
  • For they were in the streets of a beautiful emerald-green city, bathed in a grateful green light that was especially pleasing to their eyes, and surrounded by merry faced people in gorgeous green-and-gold costumes of many extraordinary designs.
  • He had seen considerable of life in the cities in his younger days, and knew that this regal palace was no place for him.
  • Zeb was also escorted to a room--so grand and beautiful that he almost feared to sit in the chairs or lie upon the bed, lest he might dim their splendor.
  • Taken altogether, it was a dreadfully long name to weigh down a poor innocent child, and one of the hardest lessons I ever learned was to remember my own name.
  • Throwing my voice into any object I pleased, to make it appear that the object was speaking instead of me.
  • I told them I was a Wizard, and showed them some easy tricks that amazed them; and when they saw the initials painted on the balloon they called me Oz.
  • Many years before you came here this Land was united under one Ruler, as it is now, and the Ruler's name was always 'Oz,' which means in our language 'Great and Good'; or, if the Ruler happened to be a woman, her name was always 'Ozma.'
  • One wicked witch named Mombi stole him and carried him away, keeping him as a prisoner.
  • That was why the people were so glad to see you, and why they thought from your initials that you were their rightful ruler.
  • But Mombi was still my grandfather's jailor, and afterward my father's jailor.
  • "We owe a great deal to the Wonderful Wizard," continued the Princess, "for it was you who built this splendid Emerald City."
  • "Oz can do some good tricks, humbug or no humbug," announced Zeb, who was now feeling more at ease.
  • The Wizard was also most heartily welcomed by the straw man, who was an important personage in the Land of Oz.
  • "How long did you rule the Emerald City, after I left here?" was the next question.
  • Just then a loud cackling was heard outside; and, when a servant threw open the door with a low bow, a yellow hen strutted in.
  • Around Billina's neck was a string of beautiful pearls, and on her legs were bracelets of emeralds.
  • But it was never noticed that they became very warm friends, for all of that.
  • I was afraid it would get moldy in that tin body of yours.
  • But he became nervous again when the next visitor was announced.
  • "Highness!" repeated Jim, who was unused to such titles.
  • The ends of the wooden legs were shod with plates of solid gold, and the saddle of the Princess Ozma, which was of red leather set with sparkling diamonds, was strapped to the clumsy body.
  • "Not only possible, but true," replied Jim, who was gratified by the impression he had created.
  • To be called beautiful was a novelty in his experience.
  • "Princess Ozma did that," was the reply; "and it saves my legs from wearing out.
  • The cab-horse was about to reply when suddenly he gave a start and a neigh of terror and stood trembling like a leaf.
  • Jim was in the act of plunging down the path to escape when the Sawhorse cried out:
  • One was an enormous Lion with clear, intelligent eyes, a tawney mane bushy and well kept, and a body like yellow plush.
  • If he thought to frighten the striped beast by such language he was mistaken.
  • "What brought you back?" was the next question, and Dorothy's eye rested on an antlered head hanging on the wall just over the fireplace, and caught its lips in the act of moving.
  • I was then for a time the Head of the finest Flying Machine that was ever known to exist, and we did many wonderful things.
  • The procession was very imposing.
  • In the center was a large emerald-green star, and all over the four quarters were sewn spangles that glittered beautifully in the sunshine.
  • Just behind the royal standard-bearers came the Princess Ozma in her royal chariot, which was of gold encrusted with emeralds and diamonds set in exquisite designs.
  • The chariot was drawn on this occasion by the Cowardly Lion and the Hungry Tiger, who were decorated with immense pink and blue bows.
  • Tik-tok moved by clockwork, and was made all of burnished copper.
  • There followed another band after this, which was called the Royal Court Band, because the members all lived in the palace.
  • The boys wore long hair and striped sweaters and yelled their college yell every other step they took, to the great satisfaction of the populace, which was glad to have this evidence that their lungs were in good condition.
  • The first thing the little humbug did was to produce a tiny white piglet from underneath his hat and pretend to pull it apart, making two.
  • When he had made them all disappear again Ozma declared she was sorry they were gone, for she wanted one of them to pet and play with.
  • There was enough material there to enable him to prepare several new tricks which he had learned from some of the jugglers in the circus, and he had passed part of the night in getting them ready.
  • There was a beautiful canopy for Ozma and her guests to sit under and watch the people run races and jump and wrestle.
  • But although the Munchkin was hardly tall enough to come to Zeb's shoulder he was so strong and clever that he laid the boy three times on his back with apparent ease.
  • "Once, when I was young," said Jim, "I was a race horse, and defeated all who dared run against me.
  • I was born in Kentucky, you know, where all the best and most aristocratic horses come from.
  • I only wish there was a real horse here for me to race with.
  • "Go!" cried Zeb; and at the word the two horses leaped forward and the race was begun.
  • But the Sawhorse was swifter than the wind.
  • I was wrong to kick the Sawhorse, and I am sorry I became angry at him.
  • There was more applause at this, and then Ozma had the jewelled saddle replaced upon the Sawhorse and herself rode the victor back to the city at the head of the grand procession.
  • Several days of festivity and merry-making followed, for such old friends did not often meet and there was much to be told and talked over between them, and many amusements to be enjoyed in this delightful country.
  • Jellia at once departed on the errand, and she was gone so long that they had almost forgotten her mission when the green robed maiden returned with a troubled face.
  • "Was not the door closed?" asked the Princess.
  • Dorothy was nearly weeping, by this time, while Ozma was angry and indignant.
  • "Under the bed in your own room," was the reply.
  • When next the door was opened you ran out and hid yourself--and the piglet was gone.
  • Ozma was now greatly incensed by the kitten's conduct.
  • "As many times as is necessary," was the reply.
  • The Wizard, when he returned to his own room, was exceedingly thoughtful.
  • At three o'clock the Throne Room was crowded with citizens, men, women and children being eager to witness the great trial.
  • At her right sat the queerly assorted Jury--animals, animated dummies and people--all gravely prepared to listen to what was said.
  • "The criminal who now sits before the court licking her paws," resumed the Woggle-Bug, "has long desired to unlawfully eat the fat piglet, which was no bigger than a mouse.
  • There was great applause when the speaker sat down.
  • Ozma was delighted and exclaimed, eagerly:
  • If he can produce but seven, then this is not the piglet that was lost, but another one.
  • I will confess that I intended to eat the little pig for my breakfast; so I crept into the room where it was kept while the Princess was dressing and hid myself under a chair.
  • Instead of keeping still, so I could eat him comfortably, he trembled so with fear that he fell off the table into a big vase that was standing on the floor.
  • There was no way to get the creature out without breaking the vase, so the Tin Woodman smashed it with his axe and set the little prisoner free.
  • Then the crowd cheered lustily and Dorothy hugged the kitten in her arms and told her how delighted she was to know that she was innocent.
  • Eureka was much surprised to find herself in disgrace; but she was, in spite of the fact that she had not eaten the piglet.
  • Dorothy was herself anxious to get home, so she promised Eureka they would not stay in the Land of Oz much longer.
  • That last evening was so delightful that the boy will never forget it as long as he lives.
  • Jim was trotting along the well-known road, shaking his ears and whisking his tail with a contented motion.
  • The four lawyers rode along, one behind another; for the pathway was narrow, and the mud on each side of it was deep.
  • "What is the matter here?" asked the first lawyer, whose name was Speed.
  • "General, you are in danger here," said an officer who was riding with him.
  • He would do many more before the war was over.
  • The cannon were roaring, the balls were flying, the battle was raging.
  • The boy was only four years old, and the girl was not yet six.
  • This primer was his only book, and he loved it.
  • It had a bright blue cover, which he was careful not to soil.
  • The school was more than a mile from their home, and the children trotted along as fast as their short legs could carry them.
  • He was dressed in black, and had a very pleasant face.
  • They were glad to see Mr. Harris, for he was the minister.
  • The speech was not hard to learn, and Edward soon knew every word of it.
  • He spoke so well that everybody was pleased.
  • The little boy's name was Edward Everett.
  • Some of them thought that "Home" was a good subject.
  • He was only a child.
  • Just behind the schoolhouse was Mr. Finney's barn.
  • Quite close to the barn was a garden.
  • Then he tried to tell what it was like, what it was good for, and what was done with it.
  • Before the half hour was ended he had written a very neat composition on his slate.
  • The teacher was surprised and pleased.
  • But this was not true.
  • Henry's composition was not in verse.
  • As soon as it was read to the school, he rubbed it off the slate, and it was forgotten.
  • She boiled it, and boiled it, As long as she was able; Then Mrs. Finney took it, And put it on the table.
  • He was the best loved of all our poets.
  • Two hundred years ago there lived in Boston a little boy whose name was Benjamin Franklin.
  • On the day that he was seven years old, his mother gave him a few pennies.
  • It was the first money that he had ever had.
  • Boston is now a great city, but at that time it was only a little town.
  • And the father was a poor man.
  • He had not gone far when he met a larger boy, who was blowing a whistle.
  • Little Benjamin Franklin was very happy; for he was only seven years old.
  • He was a great thinker and a great doer, and with Washington he helped to make our country free.
  • His life was such that no man could ever say, "Ben Franklin has wronged me."
  • In Scotland there once lived a poor shepherd whose name was James Hogg.
  • It was his business to take care of the sheep which belonged to a rich landholder by the Ettrick Water.
  • Sometimes he would take care of the whole flock while the shepherd was resting or eating his dinner.
  • One dark night James Hogg was on the hilltop with a flock of seven hundred lambs.
  • Sirrah was with him.
  • There was thunder and lightning; the wind blew hard; the rain poured.
  • The men hurried down and soon saw that the flock was a large one.
  • They counted them and were surprised to find that not one lamb of the great flock of seven hundred was missing.
  • But there was no shepherd in Scotland that could have done better than Sirrah did that night.
  • There were no libraries near him, and it was hard for him to get books.
  • But he was anxious to learn.
  • He was often called the Ettrick Shepherd, because he was the keeper of sheep near the Ettrick Water.
  • Once upon a time there was a famous Arab whose name was Al Mansur.
  • Al Mansur loved poetry and was fond of hearing poets repeat their own verses.
  • Sometimes, if a poem was very pleasing, he gave the poet a prize.
  • One day a poet whose name was Thalibi [Footnote: Thal i'bi.] came to the caliph and recited a long poem.
  • Then he ordered his treasurer to pay the poet five hundred pieces of gold; for, indeed, the poem which he had recited was wonderfully fine.
  • He was the builder of a famous and beautiful city called Bagdad.
  • Thousands of years ago the greatest country, in the world was Egypt.
  • It was a beautiful land lying on both sides of the wonderful river Nile.
  • "It was in our country that the first men and women lived," they said.
  • The shepherd did as he was bidden.
  • This was an odd way of proving something, for, as every one can readily see, it proved nothing.
  • The feast was held in the grandest room of the palace.
  • The table was decorated with rare and beautiful plants and flowers.
  • Then one of the officers, who was sitting near the poet, cried out: Stop!
  • Haroun-al-Raschid (Aaron the Just) was the greatest of all the caliphs of Bagdad.
  • The whole country was stirred up.
  • Among the watchers at Charlestown was a brave young man named Paul Revere.
  • He was ready to serve his country in any way that he could.
  • And so it was done.
  • He was beginning to feel tired.
  • He walked up and down the river bank, leading his horse behind him; but he kept his eyes turned always toward the dim, dark spot which he knew was the old North Church.
  • He was ready to mount.
  • At Lexington, not far from Concord, there was a sharp fight in which several men were killed.
  • It seemed as if every man in the country was after them.
  • In France there once lived a famous man who was known as the Marquis de Lafayette. When he was a little boy his mother called him Gilbert.
  • He was very proud to think of this, and he wished that he might grow up to be like them.
  • His home was in the country not far from a great forest.
  • Often, when he was a little lad, he took long walks among the trees with his mother.
  • Men said that it was a very large wolf and that it had killed some of the farmers' sheep.
  • His mother smiled, for she felt quite sure that there was no danger.
  • The sun was warm.
  • Gilbert looked up from his play and saw that his mother was very deeply interested in her book.
  • Something was pushing its way through the bushes.
  • It was coming toward him.
  • The animal was coming nearer.
  • The beast was very close to him now.
  • Ah! there was the wolf!
  • Gilbert was soon on his feet again.
  • He was not hurt at all.
  • It was not a wolf.
  • It was only a pet calf that had come there to browse among the bushes.
  • You were very brave, and it is lucky that the wolf was not there.
  • You faced what you thought was a great danger, and you were not afraid.
  • He was the friend of Washington.
  • "We don't know," was the answer, "but we saw her tracks down there by the brook.
  • "She killed three of my lambs last night," said the one whose name was David Brown.
  • He says she was a monster; and she was running straight toward the hills with a little lamb in her mouth.
  • They could be seen very plainly, for here the ground was quite muddy.
  • But the wolf was too wise to show herself.
  • The opening to the cave was only a narrow hole between two rocks.
  • It was very dark there, and he could not see anything.
  • They feared that the wolf was upon him; but he wished only to get his gun.
  • But Putnam was not afraid.
  • It was no fun to be pulled over the sharp stones in that way; but it was better than to be bitten by the wolf.
  • There was not a sound inside of the cave.
  • Perhaps the wolf was waiting to spring upon him.
  • No angry growl was heard.
  • The wolf was dead.
  • This happened when Israel Putnam was a young man.
  • When the Revolutionary War began he was one of the first to hurry to Boston to help the people defend themselves against the British soldiers.
  • A blacksmith was shoeing a horse.
  • His enemy, Henry, who wished to be king, was pressing him hard.
  • He was hardly halfway across the stony field when one of the horse's shoes flew off.
  • The horse was lamed on a rock.
  • The horse stumbled, and his rider was thrown heavily to the ground.
  • The king looked, and saw that his soldiers were beaten, and that the battle was everywhere going against him.
  • But there was no horse for him.
  • The battle was lost.
  • King Richard was lost.
  • For the want of a nail the shoe was lost; For the want of a shoe the horse was lost; For the want of a horse the battle was lost; For the failure of battle the kingdom was lost;-- And all for the want of a horseshoe nail.
  • Richard the Third was one of England's worst kings.
  • If a man was obliged to go from one city to another, he often rode on horseback.
  • He was riding very slowly, and both he and his horse were bespattered with mud.
  • The traveler was soon at the door.
  • He was dressed plainly, and, with his reddish-brown hair and mud-bespattered face, looked like a hard- working countryman just in from the backwoods.
  • Yes, and he was quite tall.
  • "That was Mr. Jefferson," said the gentleman.
  • Was that the vice president?
  • One morning there was a loud knock at Dean Swift's door.
  • Now, Mr. Boyle was a sporting neighbor who spent a good deal of time in shooting.
  • He was a great admirer of Dean Swift, and took pleasure in sending him presents of game.
  • It was not long until the man came with another present.
  • The door was opened by the man from Mr. Boyle's.
  • The lesson in manners was not forgotten; for, always after that, the man was very polite when he brought his presents.
  • Jonathan Swift, often called Dean Swift, was famous as a writer on many subjects.
  • He was only fourteen years old.
  • And so the matter was at last settled.
  • George's brothers knew the master of a trading ship who was getting ready to sail to England.
  • George's mother was very sad.
  • He was headstrong and determined.
  • It was waiting in the river.
  • A boat was at the landing, ready to take him on board.
  • He was our most famous president.
  • One day a traveler was walking through a part of Italy where a great many sheep were pasturing.
  • Near the top of a hill he saw a little shepherd boy who was lying on the ground while a flock of sheep and lambs were grazing around him.
  • As he came nearer he saw that the boy held a charred stick in his hand, with which he was drawing something on a flat rock.
  • The lad was so much interested in his work that he did not see the stranger.
  • It was the picture of a sheep, and it was drawn so well that the stranger was filled with astonishment.
  • The lad was startled.
  • The stranger's name was Cimabue.[Footnote: Cimabue (_pro_. she ma boo'a).] He was the most famous painter of the time.
  • Bondone was surprised when Cimabue offered to take his little boy to Florence and teach him to be a great painter.
  • One day Cimabue was painting the picture of a man's face.
  • It was only a painted fly.
  • It was a good place for a fly, and I never thought of spoiling your picture.
  • There was once a painter whose name was Zeuxis. He could paint pictures so life-like that they were mistaken for the real things which they represented.
  • At one time he painted the picture of some fruit which was so real that the birds flew down and pecked at it.
  • There was another famous artist whose name was Parrhasius. When he heard of the boast which Zeuxis had made, he said to himself, "I will see what I can do."
  • It was that of a boy carrying a basket of ripe red cherries.
  • One day King Solomon was sitting on his throne, and his great men were standing around him.
  • Suddenly the door was thrown open and the Queen of Sheba came in.
  • The king, for once, was puzzled.
  • He remembered that close by his window there was a climbing vine filled with beautiful sweet flowers.
  • The queen was standing quite near to it with the two wreaths still in her hands.
  • A long time ago there lived, in Pennsylvania, a little boy whose name was Benjamin West.
  • His father and mother were Quakers, and they did not think it was right to spend money for such things.
  • He was glad to do this; for he loved the baby.
  • The baby was asleep in her cradle, and he must not make a noise and waken her.
  • He had no paper, but he knew where there was a smooth board.
  • He had no pencil, but there was a piece of black charcoal on the hearth.
  • Here was her round head, covered with pretty curls.
  • Here was her mouth.
  • Here was her fat little neck.
  • So busy was he with the drawing that he did not think of anything else.
  • The good woman was so overjoyed that she caught him in her arms and kissed him.
  • It was a good old Friend, whom everybody loved--a-white-haired, pleasant-faced minister, whose words were always wise.
  • They told him how the lad was always trying to draw something.
  • He was the first great American painter.
  • When Andrew Jackson was a little boy he lived with his mother in South Carolina.
  • He was eight years old when he heard about the ride of Paul Revere and the famous fight at Lexington.
  • It was then that the long war, called the Revolutionary War, began.
  • There was much fighting; and several great battles took place between the British and the Americans.
  • At last Charleston, in South Carolina, was taken by the British.
  • Andrew Jackson was then a tall white-haired boy, thirteen years old.
  • He was not old enough to be a soldier, but he could be a scout--and a good scout he was.
  • He was very tall--as tall as a man.
  • He was not afraid of anything.
  • He was strong and ready for every duty.
  • One day as he was riding through the woods, some British soldiers saw him.
  • The captain was very angry.
  • Andrew was not held long as a prisoner.
  • The British soldiers soon returned to Charleston, and he was allowed to go home.
  • He was elected to Congress, he was chosen judge of the supreme court of Tennessee, he was appointed general in the army, and lastly he was for eight years the president of the United States.
  • When Daniel Webster was a child he lived in the country, far from any city.
  • He was not strong enough to work on the farm like his brothers; but he loved books and study.
  • He was very young when he was first sent to school.
  • The schoolhouse was two or three miles from home, but he did not mind the long walk through the woods and over the hills.
  • He soon learned all that his teacher could teach; for he was bright and quick, and had a good memory.
  • So it was decided that the boy should go to some school where he might be prepared for college.
  • The academy at Exeter was a famous school for preparing boys for college.
  • There were no railroads at that time, and Exeter was nearly fifty miles away.
  • One was Mr. Webster's horse; the other was an old gray nag with a lady's sidesaddle on its back.
  • Yet there was something in his manner and voice that caused everybody to admire him.
  • He was honored at home and abroad.
  • He was in trouble because his scholars would not study.
  • Whenever his back was turned, they were sure to begin whispering to one another.
  • The afternoon was half gone, and the trouble was growing.
  • He was tired, he was vexed, he hardly knew what he said.
  • The children thought the new game was very funny.
  • First, Tommy Jones whispered to Billy Brown and was at once called out to stand on the floor.
  • Mary looked around and saw Samuel Miller asking his neighbor for a pencil, and Samuel was called.
  • The clock ticked loudly, and Tommy Jones, who was standing up for the fourth time, began to feel very uneasy.
  • Now Lucy was the pet of the school.
  • Everybody loved her, and this was the first time she had whispered that day.
  • There was something which she wished very much to know before going home, and so, without thinking, she had leaned over and whispered just three little words.
  • She was very much ashamed and hurt, for it was the first time that she had ever been in disgrace at school.
  • Everybody was astonished, for that boy was the best scholar in the school, and he had never been known to break a rule.
  • At the same moment the bell struck and school was dismissed.
  • Elihu Burritt was a poor boy who was determined to learn.
  • Each book was written with a pen or a brush.
  • There was one such king who had four sons, Ethelbald, Ethelbert, Ethelred, and Alfred. The three older boys were sturdy, half-grown lads; the youngest, Alfred, was a slender, fair-haired child.
  • It was no easy thing to learn these letters and how they are put together to make words.
  • Little William Jones was always asking questions.
  • He was a very little boy, but before he was three years old he could read quite well.
  • When eight years of age he was the best scholar at the famous school at Harrow.
  • He was always reading, learning, inquiring.
  • He was noted for his great knowledge, the most of which he had obtained from books.
  • Long, long ago, there lived in Persia a little prince whose name was Cyrus.
  • He was not petted and spoiled like many other princes.
  • Although his father was a king, Cyrus was brought up like the son of a common man.
  • When Cyrus was twelve years old he went with his mother to Media to visit his grandfather.
  • Cyrus was so tall and strong and handsome that his grandfather was very proud of him.
  • There was to be music and dancing; and Cyrus was to invite as many guests as he chose.
  • The king's cupbearer, Sarcas, was very much offended because he was not given a share of the feast.
  • The king also wondered why this man, who was his favorite, should be so slighted.
  • He was dressed in the rich uniform of the cupbearer, and he came forward with much dignity and grace.
  • He was a very wise and powerful ruler, and he made his country the greatest of any that was then known.
  • There was a caliph of Persia whose name was Al Mamoun. He had two sons whom he wished to become honest and noble men.
  • So he employed a wise man whose name was Al Farra to be their teacher.
  • They did nothing that was beneath the dignity of princes.
  • In Persia, when Cyrus the Great was king, boys were taught to tell the truth.
  • This was one of their first lessons at home and at school.
  • When Otanes was twelve years old, his parents wished to send him to a distant city to study in a famous school that was there.
  • So it was arranged that the boy should travel with a small company of merchants who were going to the same place.
  • They went but slowly, for the sun was hot and the way was rough.
  • The robber chief was struck by this answer.
  • He was the advisor and friend of two of the kings who succeeded Cyrus.
  • "It was not for gold that I came here," said Alexander.
  • Yesterday, when I was digging in it, I found a box full of gold and jewels.
  • "Yes, a young man of promise," was the answer.
  • On a mountain near their city, there was a narrow chasm or hole in the rocks.
  • It was very deep, and there was no way to climb out of it.
  • There was no place where he could set his foot to climb out.
  • Suddenly he was startled by a noise close by him.
  • Something was moving among the rocks at the bottom of the chasm.
  • He lay quite still till the animal was very near.
  • It ran into a narrow cleft which he had not seen before, and then through a long, dark passage which was barely large enough for a man's body.
  • It was the sunlight streaming in at the entrance to the passage.
  • In a short time he was free and in the open air.
  • He lived two hundred years ago, and was famous for his courage in defending his country.
  • One day he was in the midst of a great battle.
  • The small house in which he had taken shelter was almost between the two armies.
  • There was a great famine in Rome.
  • There was no bread in the city.
  • But one of the rulers was not willing to do this.
  • Coriolanus made his way to the city of Antium, [Footnote: Antium (_pro._ an'shi um).] which was not far from Rome.
  • His army was the greatest that the Romans had ever seen.
  • On the last day, the great army which Coriolanus had led from Antium was drawn up in battle array.
  • It was ready to march upon the city and destroy it.
  • All Rome was in terror.
  • Coriolanus was in his tent.
  • When he saw his mother and his wife and his children, he was filled with joy.
  • Rome was saved; but Coriolanus could never return to his home, his mother, his wife and children.
  • He was lost to them.
  • The king of Corinth was his friend.
  • One summer he went over the sea to Italy; for his name was well known there, and many people wished to hear him sing.
  • He visited several cities, and in each place he was well paid for his music.
  • There was a ship just ready to sail for Corinth, and the captain agreed to take him as a passenger.
  • The sea was rough.
  • The ship was driven far out of her course.
  • And now they would have spared him; but he was true to his promise,-- as soon as the song was finished, he threw himself headlong into the sea.
  • "He was well and happy when we left Italy," they answered.
  • He was dressed just as they had seen him when he jumped into the sea.
  • Now, how was Arion saved from drowning when he leaped overboard?
  • Old story-tellers say that he alighted on the back of a large fish, called a dolphin, which had been charmed by his music and was swimming near the ship.
  • Other people think that the dolphin which saved Arion was not a fish, but a ship named the _Dolphin_.
  • His name was Francis, and because of his goodness, all men now call him St. Francis.
  • Very kind and loving was St. Francis--kind and loving not only to men but to all living things.
  • One day as he was walking among the trees the birds saw him and flew down to greet him.
  • Then, when they saw that he was about to speak, they nestled softly in the grass and listened.
  • And when he had blessed them, all began to sing; and the whole forest was filled with sweetness and joy because of their wonderful melodies.
  • A long time ago there lived a poor slave whose name was Aesop. He was a small man with a large head and long arms.
  • His face was white, but very homely.
  • When Aesop was about twenty years old his master lost a great deal of money and was obliged to sell his slaves.
  • To do this, he had to take them to a large city where there was a slave market.
  • The city was far away, and the slaves must walk the whole distance.
  • The other slaves laughed and said he was foolish.
  • The next day, the laugh was the other way.
  • After all had eaten three meals from it, it was very much lighter.
  • One was a fine gardener; another could take care of horses; a third was a good cook; a fourth could manage a household.
  • His master was so much pleased with him that he gave him his freedom.
  • An old Cat was in a fair way to kill all the Mice in the barn.
  • One day the Mice met to talk about the great harm that she was doing them.
  • The sun rose bright and fair, and the morning was without a cloud.
  • The air was very still.
  • There was not a breath of wind to stir the young leaves on the trees.
  • The sun was hidden.
  • The gloom was terrible.
  • His voice was clear and strong, and all knew that he, at least, was not afraid.
  • The people of Connecticut still remember Abraham Davenport, because he was a wise judge and a brave lawmaker.
  • The road was strange to him, and he traveled very slowly.
  • A fine supper was prepared, and the innkeeper himself waited upon his guest.
  • In the morning a good breakfast was served, and then Mr. Randolph made ready to start on his journey.
  • His horse was led to the door, and a servant helped him to mount it.
  • As he was starting away, the friendly innkeeper said, "Which way will you travel, Mr. Randolph?"
  • There was no signboard to help him.
  • He was famous as a lawyer and statesman.
  • He was a member of Congress for many years, and was noted for his odd manners and strong self- will.
  • He was quarrelsome and unruly.
  • He was often making trouble among his neighbors.
  • He was big and strong and soon became a fine sailor.
  • But he was still headstrong and ill-tempered; and he was often in trouble with the other sailors.
  • Once his ship was sailing in the great Pacific Ocean, It was four hundred miles from the coast of South America.
  • The ship sailed away and was soon lost to sight.
  • So there was always plenty of food.
  • He tried to make signals to them; he called as loudly as he could; but he was neither seen nor heard, and the ships came no nearer.
  • When he reached Scotland everybody was eager to hear him tell of his adventures, and he soon found himself famous.
  • So, when he was eighteen years old, he ran away from his pleasant home and went to sea.
  • One day there was a great storm.
  • The ship was driven about by the winds; it was wrecked.
  • He swam to an island that was not far away.
  • It was a small island, and there was no one living on it.
  • For a long time Robinson Crusoe was all alone.
  • He was busy every day.
  • At last a ship happened to pass that way and Robinson was taken on board.
  • He was glad to go back to England to see his home and his friends once more.
  • Among the servants there was a little page whose name was Carl.
  • It was Carl's duty to sit outside of the king's bedroom and be ready to serve him at any time.
  • One night the king sat up very late, writing letters and sending messages; and the little page was kept busy running on errands until past midnight.
  • He rang the little bell which was used to call the page, but no page answered.
  • There, sitting in his chair, was Carl, fast asleep.
  • The poor child was so tired after his night's work that he could not keep awake.
  • The king was about to waken him roughly, when he saw a piece of paper on the floor beside him.
  • It was a letter from the page's mother:--
  • He was frightened and ready to cry.
  • He put his hand in his pocket, and was surprised to find the gold pieces wrapped in his mother's letter.
  • The king himself was obliged to hide in the wild woods while his foes hunted for him with hounds.
  • Sometimes he was alone.
  • A woman was sitting alone by the fire.
  • Suddenly a great noise was heard outside.
  • The door was thrown open and he saw a hundred brave men, all ready to give him aid.
  • And Robert the Bruce was never again obliged to hide in the woods or to run from savage hounds.
  • But at last his army was beaten; his men were scattered; and Tamerlane fled alone from the field of battle.
  • He was in despair.
  • He was about to lose all hope.
  • One day he was lying under a tree, thinking of his misfortunes.
  • He looked more closely and saw that it was an ant.
  • The ant was carrying a grain of wheat as large as itself.
  • As Tamerlane looked, he saw that there was a hole in the tree only a little way above, and that this was the home of the ant.
  • He was dressed plainly, his coat was worn, and his hat was dingy.
  • He was dressed in fine style and carried a small cane.
  • The old man who had bought the first turkey was standing quite near.
  • He had heard all that was said.
  • It was no trouble to me, and you are welcome.
  • He is one of the greatest men in our country, was the answer.
  • The young gentleman was surprised and ashamed.
  • The rod was bent in the middle so that it could be turned as with a crank.
  • When the work was finished, the old fishing boat looked rather odd, with a paddle wheel on each side which dipped just a few inches into the water.
  • He became famous because he was always thinking and studying and working.
  • There was once a caliph of Cordova whose name was Al Mansour.
  • The caliph was so well pleased with these jewels that he bought them and paid the merchant a large sum of money.
  • It was midsummer, and the day was very hot.
  • As the merchant was walking along, he came to a river that flowed gently between green and shady banks.
  • He was hot and covered with dust.
  • No one was near.
  • But it was no use.
  • The great bird was high in the air and flying towards the far-off mountains with all his money.
  • Al Mansour noticed that the merchant was very sad and downcast.
  • Toward what place was the eagle flying when you last saw it?
  • "It was flying toward the Black Mountains," answered the merchant.
  • Do you know of any person who was once poor but who has lately and suddenly become well-to-do?
  • A few said that there was one man in their neighborhood who seemed to have had some sort of good luck.
  • This man was a gardener.
  • A year ago he was so poor that he had scarcely clothes for his back.
  • Before noon the next day the gardener was admitted to the palace.
  • The gardener answered: A year ago, as I was spading in my garden, I saw something fall at the foot of a palm tree.
  • I ran to pick it up and was surprised to find that it was a bag full of bright gold pieces.
  • "It was this way," said the gardener: "I looked at the gold pieces, and then thought of my own great necessities.
  • But, as I came to your palace this morning, I kept saying to myself, 'When our lord Al Mansour learns just how it was that I borrowed the gold, I have no doubt that in his kindness of heart he will forgive me the debt.'
  • Great was the caliph's surprise when he heard the poor man's story.
  • The merchant did as he was told.
  • In England there was once a famous abbey, called Whitby.
  • It was so close to the sea that those who lived in it could hear the waves forever beating against the shore.
  • The land around it was rugged, with only a few fields in the midst of a vast forest.
  • In those far-off days, an abbey was half church, half castle.
  • It was a place where good people, and timid, helpless people could find shelter in time of war.
  • There they might live in peace and safety while all the country round was overrun by rude and barbarous men.
  • Out of doors the wind was blowing.
  • But in the corner, almost hidden from his fellows, one poor man was sitting who did not enjoy the singing.
  • It was Caedmon, the cowherd.
  • So he sat there trembling and afraid; for he was a timid, bashful man and did not like to be noticed.
  • At last, just as the blacksmith was in the midst of a stirring song, he rose quietly and went out into the darkness.
  • Inside of the great kitchen, beside the fire, the men were shouting and laughing; for the blacksmith had finished his song, and it was very pleasing.
  • But when they looked, they saw that his seat was vacant.
  • He was afraid and has slipped away from us.
  • The singing in the kitchen was ended, the fire had burned low, and each man had gone to his place.
  • He thought that a wonderful light was shining around him.
  • At first he was so bewildered that he could not answer.
  • It was for this reason that I left my fellows in the abbey kitchen and came here to be alone.
  • "Sing of the creation," was the answer.
  • So Caedmon was led into the great hall of the abbey.
  • So she called her clerk, who was a scholar, and bade him write the song, word for word, as it came from Caedmon's lips.
  • Such was the way in which the first true English poem was written.
  • And Caedmon, the poor cowherd of the abbey, was the first great poet of England.
  • In the Far East there was once a prince whose name was Gautama.
  • He lived in a splendid palace where there was everything that could give delight.
  • It was the wish of his father and mother that every day of his life should be a day of perfect happiness.
  • Everything that was evil or disagreeable had been carefully kept out of his sight.
  • "Yes, it is a beautiful place," was the answer.
  • But when they saw that his mind was set on going, they said no more.
  • "If you live long enough," was the answer.
  • By the door of one of these a sick man was lying upon a couch, helpless and pale.
  • The coachman explained as well as he was able; and they rode onward.
  • Their faces were browned by the sun; their hands were hard and gnarly; their backs were bent by much heavy lifting; their clothing was in tatters.
  • "They are poor men, and they are working to improve the king's highway," was the answer.
  • At one end of the room there was a big fireplace, where the mother did the cooking.
  • And in the middle was a rough table with benches around it instead of chairs.
  • Jacquot's business was to sell charcoal to the rich people in the city.
  • One evening he was very late coming home.
  • The table was spread and supper was ready.
  • Then she saw that the child's face was very pale and that he neither opened his eyes nor moved.
  • Soon the little stranger was clad in the warm clothes; the dry soft blanket was wrapped around him; and he was laid on the children's bed.
  • The child was indeed very tired.
  • His eyes closed and he was soon fast asleep.
  • I had carried some charcoal to the queen's kitchen and was just starting home.
  • Well, as I was hurrying along, I heard a great splash, as though something had fallen into the pool by the fountain.
  • He was almost drowned.
  • He was senseless; but I knew he wasn't drowned.
  • Then there was a knock at the door.
  • In a few minutes the room was filled with gentlemen.
  • "Well," said the soldier, "about two hours ago I was on guard at the gate of the queen's park.
  • He had just noticed that the king was wearing poor Charlot's Sunday suit instead of his own.
  • Louis the Fourteenth became king of France when he was only five years old.
  • One day King Henry the Fourth of France was hunting in a large forest.
  • Towards evening he told his men to ride home by the main road while he went by another way that was somewhat longer.
  • "Oh, that will be easy enough," was the answer.
  • One morning, long ago, a merchant of Miletus [Footnote: Mile'tus.] was walking along the seashore.
  • There was certainly something in it.
  • In a few minutes the big net was pulled up out of the water.
  • There was not a fish in it.
  • But it held a beautiful golden tripod that was worth more than a thousand fishes.
  • The merchant was delighted.
  • Now the oracle at Delphi was supposed to be very wise.
  • The governor was much pleased with this answer.
  • He was a poor man and had no wish to be rich.
  • The name of Pittacus was known all over the world.
  • He was a brave soldier and a wise teacher.
  • One of his mottoes was this: "Whatever you do, do it well."
  • There everybody was talking about King Cleobulus and his wonderful wisdom.
  • They told him that it was not for sale, but that it was to be given to the wisest of the wise.
  • They had never heard of Chilon, for his name was hardly known outside of his own country.
  • They learned that Chilon was a very quiet man, that he never spoke about himself, and that he spent all his time in trying to make his country great and strong and happy.
  • Chilon was so busy that the messengers had to wait several days before they could see him.
  • He was the chief ruler of that great city.
  • But nowhere in it was there even a hint that it might not be possible.
  • Whether you are rich or poor, live in the developed world or the developing world, life today is better and easier than it was a century ago by virtually any measure.
  • When the light bulb was cheaper and better, we ditched kerosene.
  • He didn't know the car was coming.
  • You would have thought this was crazy.
  • You would have said that was crazy.
  • Because television was radio with pictures, the first television shows were simply men in suits standing in front of microphones reading the news.
  • What if the basic unit was a couple, a relationship, and what if that relationship had an identity?
  • But that movement was, by its nature, backward looking.
  • Unquestionably, an extraordinary amount of talent was present during the Renaissance.
  • It was, however—and this is sure to earn me the wrath of many humanities professors—a time of surprisingly little originality.
  • In his day, Shakespeare was low-brow entertainment for the common class.
  • It was not at all clear at the time that his work would transcend the ages.
  • But the truth is that almost all furniture back in the day was cheaply made junk and only a very few high-quality pieces survived.
  • The rest was reduced to firewood long ago.
  • Who could argue there was ever a better time to start a business any time in the world?
  • Has there ever before been a time when business opportunity was more blind to color, gender, or creed?
  • He turned onto Franz Josef Street, where he was not supposed to have been, and drove right in front of a surprised Princip.
  • War, poverty, misery, and nearly one hundred million people dead came from what essentially was a single wrong turn.
  • Maybe it was inevitable at that point that some spark would set off the powder keg of Europe.
  • It was like the Olympic torch in antiquity: All it took was one guy carrying the torch to slip in the mud and the entire chain was broken.
  • This led to the creation of large libraries all around the world—and this was a problem.
  • The most famous of these was the Oracle at Delphi.
  • King Croesus was very intrigued by all these oracles around the world.
  • He was, in fact, making this soup, his favorite dish.
  • And Croesus was so amazed that he endowed the Oracle at Delphi with all kinds of gifts and planned to run all-important questions by this oracle.
  • Scholars today are pretty sure that in the case of Delphi, the oracle was inadvertently breathing gases that rose from the cave in which she sat.
  • Croesus attacked, was defeated, and was killed.
  • Think of how the computer in the Star Trek universe was a purely factual machine.
  • Pushing this to its logical extreme: What if everything you did was digitally remembered?
  • Imagine that every word you said was recorded by your personal recorder and automatically transcribed.
  • Not just that you went to a certain address but that the address was a movie theater and—based on where you sat and that you ordered tickets online—you saw Episode VII of Star Wars.
  • What if the capability to see connections and even to have them detected was all there for us?
  • These features weren't on the site when it was first launched because the necessary data did not yet exist.
  • It took him most of his life to do this, and the value was engraved on his tombstone.
  • By 1973 it was calculated to more than a million digits, in 1983 more than ten million digits, in 1987 more than one hundred million digits, in 1989 more than one billion digits, and in 1997 more than fifty billion digits.
  • In 2009, pi was calculated to more than two trillion digits—in less than thirty hours.
  • Every sale from the point the robot was turned on to when the sun finally burns out will be perfectly remembered.
  • And from every experience they have had in their lives, we would be able to infer what was successful and what was not successful.
  • The idea was that it would be great to make machines that behaved like us and, through that, we could harness their abilities.
  • In the past, knowing the wise thing to do was a power confined to a few.
  • But at times in history, left-handedness was thought to be a malady in need of curing (and in some parts of the world still is).
  • Consider Jedediah Buxton of Derbyshire, England, who in the 1700s was asked to compute the number one would get by doubling a farthing 139 times.
  • It was recognized as the flu, although records describe conditions which were highly likely to have been polio.
  • In 1908, the poliovirus was identified as the cause.
  • In 1916, the number of cases just in New York City was reported to be nine thousand.
  • Infected children were removed to hospitals and the rest of the family was quarantined until they became noninfectious.
  • In 1921, a dozen years before he would be sworn in as president, Franklin Roosevelt was diagnosed with polio.
  • During his campaign and his time in office, the extent of the effect of his polio was kept from the public, but the fact he had the disease was commonly known.
  • His call for a "march of dimes" was a play on "The March of Time," a well-known newsreel series.
  • On the research team of the eminent virologist Dr. Thomas Francis, who was working on a flu vaccine, was a young physician named Jonas Salk.
  • After the war, in 1947, Jonas Salk was offered his own laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.
  • Today, it is hard for us to imagine what that time was like.
  • But by 1952, there was also hope.
  • As I was writing these words, my ten-year-old son came in and asked, "What are you doing?"
  • It was mentioned by the Hindus more than three thousand years ago (and some suggest they even inoculated against it).
  • It was described in China about the same time.
  • The second was that the disease clearly passed from person to person, though by what mechanism was not clear.
  • An Englishwoman who saw the process in Turkey in the early 1700s brought it back to England, where it was proven to be effective.
  • By the 1780s, though the procedure was certainly better than nothing, it still had a fair number of problems.
  • The goal was annihilation.
  • Cowpox was a localized condition, so fresh supplies were hard to get.
  • Although the technique of growing cowpox on cow hides would come, transporting it was difficult due to lack of refrigeration.
  • If the conditions weren't sterile—a word that was not even comprehended at the time—the inoculation didn't work, or worse, introduced a new disease.
  • A stable vaccine was developed, our understanding of the disease expanded, and technology moved forward.
  • In 1967 the effort was intensified.
  • The scourge was eradicated.
  • Hippocrates was remarkable not only as a surgeon but also because he systematized medicine in his spare time.
  • (The use of such practices continued into the scientific age: While Jenner was inoculating people with his new smallpox vaccine, doctors were draining half a gallon of blood from George Washington for his sore throat, a procedure that hastened his death.
  • When the ancients could not find these solutions, it was not for a lack of intelligence but for a lack of technology.
  • In 1628, the first complete explanation that blood flows through the body in arteries was published.
  • In 1747, it was discovered that lemons prevent scurvy.
  • In 1879 a vaccine for cholera was invented.
  • In 1921, a tuberculosis vaccine was developed in France.
  • The same year, a technique for treating diabetes, insulin therapy, was developed.
  • In 1935, a vaccine for yellow fever was created.
  • The number of medical patents issued in 2010 was more than fifty thousand, an all-time record—and it almost certainly will be broken next year, then the next, and again the next.
  • The number of pharmaceutical patents issued in 2010 was also more than fifty thousand—also an all-time record, and also likely to be broken again and again in the years to come.
  • This was an electrifying discovery to the whole world.
  • Then in the 1940s, another American, Oswald Avery, was able to show, through an ingenious method, that the genetic information had to be carried by the DNA.
  • Then the scientific race of the century was on, with this goal: to figure out how DNA conveyed genetic information.
  • Fifty years later, the human genome was decoded.
  • That three-billion-letter recipe for making you is what was sequenced—deciphered and written down—in the human genome project.
  • You would know before you received a treatment how likely it was to work for you—not merely how likely it was to work for the larger population, but for you.
  • If you were a scientist in Jenner's time, your only form of communication was letter writing.
  • You knew little of what any other scientist was working on.
  • If you had access to a library, its stock of medical books and journals was very small.
  • Difficulty of communication was still a barrier, and technology was still highly limited.
  • After all, it was the doctor's job to keep you healthy, not to make money when you were sick.
  • That is why money was invented.
  • Imagine if everyone frequently disputed charges: "I never got my order!" or "It wasn't what they promised it would be!" or "Yeah, I got a box in the mail, but it was full of rocks."
  • In the past, when most media was mass media, it was essential to create products with mass appeal.
  • If these two advances could be combined, we would have a supply of solar energy that was cheap, abundant, and environmentally benign.
  • That was indeed the hope for atomic energy in that era, and it did not pan out.
  • Was it some kind of rhetorical flourish, just words that sounded good?
  • I doubted that, as Feynman was precise in his usage of words.
  • I knew typesetters who said computers would never duplicate their quality; travel agents who said the Internet would never replace them, and whose stockbrokers reassured them this was true.
  • If every job that could be done by a machine was done by a machine tomorrow, the standard of living of virtually everyone on the planet would rise.
  • But what if dogs didn't exist and your only experience with them was watching Scooby-Doo?
  • They still have the hand-operated machine from the 1940s that was used to make the first Legos, but it is of course now a museum piece.
  • Researchers also discovered the vaccine was able to restore normal blood sugar levels without using insulin.
  • And that was almost half a century ago!
  • The report also cited a mid-1950s report that found 85 percent of economic growth was attributed to technological change in the period 1890 to 1950.
  • Taken together, those findings suggest that almost all economic growth in the last 120-plus years was from technology.
  • When I was thirteen in 1981, I got a Commodore VIC-20 computer.
  • It was worth it.)
  • So I saw, in real dollars, the cost of computer memory fall to one one-millionth of what it was thirty years ago.
  • In 2009, in the United States of America, the poverty threshold for a single person under sixty-five was about $11,000 a year; the threshold for a family group of four, including two children, was about $22,000 a year.
  • It was a calculated, deliberate move to wipe out the wealthy.
  • Didn't Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of Independence, believe the Constitution should be rewritten every twenty years so that no one was governed by a document they had no say in creating?
  • He worked to apply a means test, pared the rolls back, then died; the rolls swelled again, and his successor again tried to bring them in line, but it was hard.
  • It was theirs to do with as they pleased and they chose to give it to you.
  • But in describing that job spectrum, I never said anything about his absolute ability—I said only that he was at the bottom of the list relative to others.
  • In the agricultural economy, virtually everyone was a farmer.
  • Electricity (hmm, I guess the trailer was solar powered), a refrigerator, air conditioning.
  • But before the twentieth century, this was not the case and actual famines were much more common.
  • I personally think the establishment of charitable organizations was driven by the same spirit that drove the creation of new businesses.
  • Much change was due to the efforts of William Jennings Bryan, who received the Democratic Party nomination for president three times, in 1896, 1900, and 1908.
  • The thought was that the overseer, being local, would be able to separate the lazy from the truly needy.
  • By around 1700, the workhouse movement was under way.
  • The system was revised in the 1830s because it was viewed as discouraging work by interfering with the laws of supply and demand relating to labor.
  • The theory was that life in the workhouse had to be worse than life outside the workhouse, otherwise it would be overrun with the poor.
  • That number is 30 percent higher than it was only ten years ago.
  • At one point, Tiger Woods got a dime for every box of Wheaties cereal with his photo on it, while the farmer was paid only a nickel for the wheat in that same box—and the farmer still made a profit.
  • But the problem, of course, was that food prices went up, the people went hungry, and riots ensued.
  • Norman was born in 1914 in Cresco, Iowa.
  • This speech was a pivotal event in Borlaug's life.
  • In 1962, some of them were grown in India, and based on the results, Borlaug was invited to India.
  • Although there was cultural opposition in India to Borlaug's methods and seeds, the famine was so bad by 1965 that the government stepped in and urged the project forward.
  • This was a guy from a small town in Iowa who failed his 1933 entrance exam to the University of Minnesota.
  • But if ever there was a textbook case of one guy making a difference, this is it.
  • All he could do was cross strains of wheat, much in the same fashion as Gregor Mendel did in the 1800s.
  • A trash bag was the highest-tech object Borlaug had.
  • What if the farmer could give every stalk of corn individual attention and water and fertilize each one exactly when it was needed?
  • A fascinating character and an extremely patient experimenter, Mendel was a German friar and scientist who figured out that plants (and presumably animals) had inheritable characteristics.
  • Eventually, the pea was as large as its genetic potential allowed it to be.
  • By 1860, it was down to 60 percent; by 1920, 40 percent; by 1940, 20 percent; and by 1960, 6 percent.
  • Until I was ten years old, my family lived in rural east Texas.
  • But what if manufactured food was tastier?
  • What if a manufactured steak was as good as the best steak you have ever had?
  • In 1961 in Perthshire, Scotland, a white barn cat named Susie was found at a farm.
  • The fold in the ears was caused by a heritable, dominant, mutated gene.
  • Although the original mutation was not caused by human activity, human activity preserved and perpetuated it.
  • Soon everyone was zapping seeds and planting them and, lo and behold, it actually worked!
  • But sometimes it was like lightning in a bottle, and magic happened.
  • In late 2009, the entire genome of corn was decoded.
  • In 2006, a pig was genetically engineered to produce healthy omega-3 fatty acids.
  • The United Nations World Food Programme was so inspired by this success that pilot programs for an exchange were launched in twenty-one countries.
  • It was his view that "the attainment of human rights in the fullest sense cannot be achieved so long as hundreds of millions of poverty-stricken people lack the basic necessities for life."
  • During the period 1958 to 1961, an initiative called "The Great Leap Forward" was intended to increase the production of grain and other agricultural products.
  • Their only concern was how to fulfill the delivery of grain.
  • I don't recall ever being in a department store, drinking from the water fountain, and having the staff look at me disapprovingly because I was running up the water bill.
  • In using the phrase, "Necessitous men are not free men," Roosevelt was actually quoting from a decision in a well-known 1762 English legal case.
  • The individual had no liberties, or at least very few, but in exchange was, in theory, entitled to certain economic rights.
  • While Jefferson's "all men are created equal" statement was not meant by him to include slaves, we have broadened the application of the principle and should continue to do so.
  • If you knew someone who was a good business partner, was fun to hang out with, but let one of his children starve to death so that he could enjoy a higher standard of living, what would be your opinion of this person?
  • Now, I'm faced with explaining why the past was full of war but somehow the future will not be.
  • The Bulgarian king Samuel was so stricken by the sight of his mighty army staggering back home that he suffered a stroke and died two days later.
  • The ancient world was a cruel place.
  • Once again, this change was not imposed on people through coercion but came (and still comes) gradually through civilization.
  • Until very recently, our world was ruled by kings.
  • As recently as 1900, most of the world was governed this way.
  • There was a period when intellectuals believed and spoke openly of the idea that the "breeding" of the "unfit" should be limited.
  • In the past, when the power of the state was absolute in many parts of the world, it was harder to argue that every person on the planet had rights no monarch or state could violate.
  • Scandinavia was at forty-six in the 1400s and has fallen to one today.
  • After speaking about the economic costs of war, the burden it places on the economy, and the toll this takes on the people, Eisenhower closed by describing the peace proposals he was offering Russia and China.
  • Their aim, he said, was nothing less than "the lifting, from the backs and from the hearts of men, of their burden of arms and of fears, so that they may find before them a golden age of freedom and of peace."
  • If it was true then, then it is even more true now.
  • It was a way for that generation to ask, Why is there war?
  • It was a rhetorical question and, to those posing it, simply a wish—just another way to say, "Why can't we all just get along?"
  • When the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, I was an undergraduate at Rice University.
  • The atmosphere on campus was electric!
  • Of course, politics being what it is, the Peace Dividend was spent a dozen times over by as many special interests who felt they were the most deserving of such an unexpected largess.
  • After all, World War I was called The War to End War.
  • By far, the world's bloodiest century was the twentieth century, which saw one hundred million people die from war.
  • Trivia question: How old was Colonel William Travis when he died leading the Texans at the Alamo?
  • In the 1960 version of the film, he was played by a thirty-one-year-old Laurence Harvey.
  • In the 2004 incarnation of the film, he was played by thirty-one-year-old Patrick Wilson.
  • While military service was less important to securing work in commerce, that was not a particularly noteworthy occupation.
  • Now the "war stories" are about how Mark Zuckerberg was nineteen when he started Facebook, Bill Gates was nineteen when he started Microsoft, and Larry Page and Sergey Brin were in their early twenties when they started Google.
  • The reasoning behind MAD was that if we can annihilate the Soviets or the Chinese and they in turn can annihilate us, then none of us will start a war.
  • But at the time the doctrine was in force, MAD was effective (or at least, not proven ineffective).
  • It was the basis for the movie War Games in which the military's computer finally figures out it can't win in a nuclear launch scenario and says of such a war, Strange game.
  • The pacifist manufacturer was a conflicted individual during wartime.
  • The arch not only celebrates this military victory, it points out that it was profitable.
  • As true as that was in Jefferson's time, our age has amplified all of it: both the miseries war can produce and the blessings peace can produce.
  • Germany, an ally of Austria-Hungary, was obligated by treaty to defend it.
  • In fact, virtually everyone should have wondered why he was fighting soldiers from places he couldn't find on a map.
  • It all happened because of military pacts in which an attack on one party was viewed as an attack on all.
  • I am not saying tthe world would be better if every country was the size of Liechtenstein.
  • Once this became known, the question was submitted for arbitration to the king of the Netherlands, who ruled the St. John River to be the border.
  • This was fine with Great Britain but not with Maine.
  • Tensions mounted all through the 1830s as militias were raised on both sides in what later came to be known as the Aroostook War, even though there was never actually a war or casualties.
  • The border issue was finally resolved by the Webster-Ashburton treaty of 1842.
  • There was a time, not so long ago, when almost everyone smoked.
  • Every part of every restaurant was a smoking section.
  • Movie stars smoked and it was so cool!
  • Next, entire cities banned smoking in all indoor public places, contending a private business's right to allow smoking was trumped by the dangers of exposing patrons to secondhand smoke.
  • But having your starlet drive eighty mph whilst liquored up, well, that was fine.
  • It was a huge shift in public opinion in which no group benefited financially; if anything, financial interests were aligned against this change, just as with tobacco.
  • This was done in large part because the two powers came so close to going to war over the Cuban Missile Crisis.
  • Two examples: the Battle of New Orleans, fought after the treaty ending the War of 1812 was signed; and the Battle of Palmito Ranch, fought a month after the Civil War ended.
  • Publishing was expensive, and by the time news of the lie came out, days or weeks had passed.
  • O'Neill observed that scrutiny of government had become so intense that officials never could have gotten away with that—and he was writing in the late 1980s.
  • Their revolution was not made up of a bunch of hotheads with torches and pitchforks.
  • This was the strategy in Tehran, Tunisia, Cairo, Syria, Jordan, Morocco, Oman, Lebanon, and Kuwait.
  • In the ancient world, it was Greek in the European arena.
  • When there was a coup in Burma, now Myanmar, in 1988, they closed the universities.
  • In an era when cameras were cumbersome and the number of channels on TV could be counted on one hand with enough fingers left over to snap, very little video of any kind was seen.
  • The population at that time was a tenth of what it is today.
  • Shakespeare was undoubtedly the greatest master the English language has ever known and, quite probably, will ever know.
  • He told Simonides he was only going to pay him half the fee and if he wanted the other half, he should collect it from Castor and Pollux.
  • Later that evening when Simonides was at a banquet with Scopas, he got word that two young men were outside looking for him.
  • While Simonides was outside, the roof of the house caved in and killed everyone.
  • The implication was that Castor and Pollux, knowing of the imminent collapse of the roof, had come calling with the purpose of saving Simonides's life as their payment for the poem.
  • When Augustine finally asked, "What are you doing?," Ambrose replied that he was reading.
  • Ambrose replied that he was looking at the words and reading them that way.
  • Processing aurally was familiar to Augustine while reading silently was revelatory, so noteworthy that he wrote it in his autobiography.
  • So it was natural that to earn extra money, Jason and I would buy cool, old cars we found in junkyards for a few hundred dollars apiece.
  • I remember in autumn of '87 thinking it was perfectly reasonable to take the red 1964 Corvair convertible for a test drive, despite its lack of functioning brakes.
  • The title of Ralph Nader's book was right: That car was Unsafe at Any Speed, at least with the master cylinder removed.
  • The problem for us was always that it is easier to get a car running than it is to fix the brakes.
  • The little porch was hidden from view by a screen of yellow roses and Southern smilax.
  • It was the favourite haunt of humming-birds and bees.
  • The Keller homestead, where the family lived, was a few steps from our little rose-bower.
  • It was called "Ivy Green" because the house and the surrounding trees and fences were covered with beautiful English ivy.
  • Its old-fashioned garden was the paradise of my childhood.
  • The beginning of my life was simple and much like every other little life.
  • There was the usual amount of discussion as to a name for me.
  • But in the excitement of carrying me to church my father lost the name on the way, very naturally, since it was one in which he had declined to have a part.
  • I am told that while I was still in long dresses I showed many signs of an eager, self-asserting disposition.
  • It was the word "water," and I continued to make some sound for that word after all other speech was lost.
  • They tell me I walked the day I was a year old.
  • There was great rejoicing in the family that morning, but no one, not even the doctor, knew that I should never see or hear again.
  • Was it bread that I wanted?
  • Indeed, I owe to her loving wisdom all that was bright and good in my long night.
  • I understood a good deal of what was going on about me.
  • I do not remember when I first realized that I was different from other people; but I knew it before my teacher came to me.
  • I could not understand, and was vexed.
  • This made me so angry at times that I kicked and screamed until I was exhausted.
  • I was strong, active, indifferent to consequences.
  • I was quite ill afterward, and I wonder if retribution also overtook the turkey.
  • The guinea-fowl likes to hide her nest in out-of-the-way places, and it was one of my greatest delights to hunt for the eggs in the long grass.
  • The sheds where the corn was stored, the stable where the horses were kept, and the yard where the cows were milked morning and evening were unfailing sources of interest to Martha and me.
  • Of course I did not know what it was all about, but I enjoyed the pleasant odours that filled the house and the tidbits that were given to Martha Washington and me to keep us quiet.
  • One was black as ebony, with little bunches of fuzzy hair tied with shoestrings sticking out all over her head like corkscrews.
  • The other was white, with long golden curls.
  • One child was six years old, the other two or three years older.
  • The younger child was blind--that was I--and the other was Martha Washington.
  • Belle, our dog, my other companion, was old and lazy and liked to sleep by the open fire rather than to romp with me.
  • I tried hard to teach her my sign language, but she was dull and inattentive.
  • I did not then know why Belle acted in this way; but I knew she was not doing as I wished.
  • One day I happened to spill water on my apron, and I spread it out to dry before the fire which was flickering on the sitting-room hearth.
  • Except for my hands and hair I was not badly burned.
  • One morning I locked my mother up in the pantry, where she was obliged to remain three hours, as the servants were in a detached part of the house.
  • My father was obliged to get a ladder and take Miss Sullivan out through the window--much to my delight.
  • When I was about five years old we moved from the little vine-covered house to a large new one.
  • I was greatly puzzled to know what he was doing.
  • My father was most loving and indulgent, devoted to his home, seldom leaving us, except in the hunting season.
  • He was a great hunter, I have been told, and a celebrated shot.
  • His hospitality was great, almost to a fault, and he seldom came home without bringing a guest.
  • His special pride was the big garden where, it was said, he raised the finest watermelons and strawberries in the county; and to me he brought the first ripe grapes and the choicest berries.
  • I was in the North, enjoying the last beautiful days of the summer of 1896, when I heard the news of my father's death.
  • He had had a short illness, there had been a brief time of acute suffering, then all was over.
  • This was my first great sorrow--my first personal experience with death.
  • She was, alas, the helpless victim of my outbursts of temper and of affection, so that she became much the worse for wear.
  • We lived a long way from any school for the blind or the deaf, and it seemed unlikely that any one would come to such an out-of-the-way place as Tuscumbia to teach a child who was both deaf and blind.
  • His methods had probably died with him; and if they had not, how was a little girl in a far-off town in Alabama to receive the benefit of them?
  • The conductor, too, was kind.
  • His punch, with which he let me play, was a delightful toy.
  • It was the most comical shapeless thing, this improvised doll, with no nose, mouth, ears or eyes--nothing that even the imagination of a child could convert into a face.
  • A bright idea, however, shot into my mind, and the problem was solved.
  • I tumbled off the seat and searched under it until I found my aunt's cape, which was trimmed with large beads.
  • Child as I was, I at once felt the tenderness and sympathy which endeared Dr. Bell to so many hearts, as his wonderful achievements enlist their admiration.
  • This was in the summer of 1886.
  • It was the third of March, 1887, three months before I was seven years old.
  • I guessed vaguely from my mother's signs and from the hurrying to and fro in the house that something unusual was about to happen, so I went to the door and waited on the steps.
  • I was like that ship before my education began, only I was without compass or sounding-line, and had no way of knowing how near the harbour was.
  • "Light! give me light!" was the wordless cry of my soul, and the light of love shone on me in that very hour.
  • I did not know that I was spelling a word or even that words existed; I was simply making my fingers go in monkey-like imitation.
  • I was keenly delighted when I felt the fragments of the broken doll at my feet.
  • In the still, dark world in which I lived there was no strong sentiment or tenderness.
  • I felt my teacher sweep the fragments to one side of the hearth, and I had a sense of satisfaction that the cause of my discomfort was removed.
  • She brought me my hat, and I knew I was going out into the warm sunshine.
  • We walked down the path to the well-house, attracted by the fragrance of the honeysuckle with which it was covered.
  • Some one was drawing water and my teacher placed my hand under the spout.
  • That was because I saw everything with the strange, new sight that had come to me.
  • As my knowledge of things grew I felt more and more the delight of the world I was in.
  • The morning had been fine, but it was growing warm and sultry when at last we turned our faces homeward.
  • Our last halt was under a wild cherry tree a short distance from the house.
  • The shade was grateful, and the tree was so easy to climb that with my teacher's assistance I was able to scramble to a seat in the branches.
  • It was so cool up in the tree that Miss Sullivan proposed that we have our luncheon there.
  • I knew the sky was black, because all the heat, which meant light to me, had died out of the atmosphere.
  • I knew it, it was the odour that always precedes a thunderstorm, and a nameless fear clutched at my heart.
  • There was a moment of sinister silence, then a multitudinous stirring of the leaves.
  • After this experience it was a long time before I climbed another tree.
  • It was the sweet allurement of the mimosa tree in full bloom that finally overcame my fears.
  • I felt my way to the end of the garden, knowing that the mimosa tree was near the fence, at the turn of the path.
  • Yes, there it was, all quivering in the warm sunshine, its blossom-laden branches almost touching the long grass.
  • Was there ever anything so exquisitely beautiful in the world before!
  • I had now the key to all language, and I was eager to learn to use it.
  • This was before I knew many words.
  • The warm sun was shining on us.
  • But Miss Sullivan shook her head, and I was greatly puzzled and disappointed.
  • A day or two afterward I was stringing beads of different sizes in symmetrical groups--two large beads, three small ones, and so on.
  • In a flash I knew that the word was the name of the process that was going on in my head.
  • For a long time I was still--I was not thinking of the beads in my lap, but trying to find a meaning for "love" in the light of this new idea.
  • From the beginning of my education Miss Sullivan made it a practice to speak to me as she would speak to any hearing child; the only difference was that she spelled the sentences into my hand instead of speaking them.
  • If I did not know the words and idioms necessary to express my thoughts she supplied them, even suggesting conversation when I was unable to keep up my end of the dialogue.
  • But it was a long time before I ventured to take the initiative, and still longer before I could find something appropriate to say at the right time.
  • Often everything in the room was arranged in object sentences.
  • From the printed slip it was but a step to the printed book.
  • I took my "Reader for Beginners" and hunted for the words I knew; when I found them my joy was like that of a game of hide-and-seek.
  • Perhaps it was the result of long association with the blind.
  • Another favourite haunt of mine was the orchard, where the fruit ripened early in July.
  • Our favourite walk was to Keller's Landing, an old tumbledown lumber-wharf on the Tennessee River, used during the Civil War to land soldiers.
  • I built dams of pebbles, made islands and lakes, and dug river-beds, all for fun, and never dreamed that I was learning a lesson.
  • From the first I was not interested in the science of numbers.
  • Again, it was the growth of a plant that furnished the text for a lesson.
  • It was great fun to plunge my hand into the bowl and feel the tadpoles frisk about, and to let them slip and slide between my fingers.
  • The only sign of life was a slight wriggling of his tail.
  • He had made his leap, he had seen the great world, and was content to stay in his pretty glass house under the big fuchsia tree until he attained the dignity of froghood.
  • At the beginning I was only a little mass of possibilities.
  • It was my teacher who unfolded and developed them.
  • When she came, everything about me breathed of love and joy and was full of meaning.
  • It was my teacher's genius, her quick sympathy, her loving tact which made the first years of my education so beautiful.
  • It was because she seized the right moment to impart knowledge that made it so pleasant and acceptable to me.
  • The first Christmas after Miss Sullivan came to Tuscumbia was a great event.
  • It was a moment of supreme happiness.
  • When I learned that there was a gift for each child, I was delighted, and the kind people who had prepared the tree permitted me to hand the presents to the children.
  • In the pleasure of doing this, I did not stop to look at my own gifts; but when I was ready for them, my impatience for the real Christmas to begin almost got beyond control.
  • I knew the gifts I already had were not those of which friends had thrown out such tantalizing hints, and my teacher said the presents I was to have would be even nicer than these.
  • I was persuaded, however, to content myself with the gifts from the tree and leave the others until morning.
  • Next morning it was I who waked the whole family with my first "Merry Christmas!"
  • Little Tim was so tame that he would hop on my finger and eat candied cherries out of my hand.
  • The next important event in my life was my visit to Boston, in May, 1888.
  • How different this journey was from the one I had made to Baltimore two years before!
  • I was no longer a restless, excitable little creature, requiring the attention of everybody on the train to keep me amused.
  • She was covered with dirt – the remains of mud pies I had compelled her to eat, although she had never shown any special liking for them.
  • This was too much for poor Nancy.
  • When I next saw her she was a formless heap of cotton, which I should not have recognized at all except for the two bead eyes which looked out at me reproachfully.
  • When the train at last pulled into the station at Boston it was as if a beautiful fairy tale had come true.
  • The "once upon a time" was now; the "far-away country" was here.
  • In the school where Laura Bridgman was taught I was in my own country.
  • I could not quite convince myself that there was much world left, for I regarded Boston as the beginning and the end of creation.
  • This was my first trip on the ocean and my first voyage in a steamboat.
  • But the rumble of the machinery made me think it was thundering, and I began to cry, because I feared if it rained we should not be able to have our picnic out of doors.
  • I was more interested, I think, in the great rock on which the Pilgrims landed than in anything else in Plymouth.
  • I was keenly surprised and disappointed years later to learn of their acts of persecution that make us tingle with shame, even while we glory in the courage and energy that gave us our "Country Beautiful."
  • Their kindness to me was the seed from which many pleasant memories have since grown.
  • It was hard, smooth sand, very different from the loose, sharp sand, mingled with kelp and shells, at Brewster.
  • I saw him many times after that, and he was always a good friend to me; indeed, I was thinking of him when I called Boston "the City of Kind Hearts."
  • Just before the Perkins Institution closed for the summer, it was arranged that my teacher and I should spend our vacation at Brewster, on Cape Cod, with our dear friend, Mrs. Hopkins.
  • I was delighted, for my mind was full of the prospective joys and of the wonderful stories I had heard about the sea.
  • So my little heart leaped high with eager excitement when I knew that my wish was at last to be realized.
  • Suddenly my ecstasy gave place to terror; for my foot struck against a rock and the next instant there was a rush of water over my head.
  • At last, however, the sea, as if weary of its new toy, threw me back on the shore, and in another instant I was clasped in my teacher's arms.
  • The tang of the untainted, fresh and free sea air was like a cool, quieting thought, and the shells and pebbles and the seaweed with tiny living creatures attached to it never lost their fascination for me.
  • It was a great horseshoe crab--the first one I had ever seen.
  • This feat pleased me highly, as his body was very heavy, and it took all my strength to drag him half a mile.
  • I was never still a moment; my life was as full of motion as those little insects that crowd a whole existence into one brief day.
  • The opening was filled with ferns which completely covered the beds of limestone and in places hid the streams.
  • The rest of the mountain was thickly wooded.
  • It was delightful to lose ourselves in the green hollows of that tangled wood in the late afternoon, and to smell the cool, delicious odours that came up from the earth at the close of day.
  • Our cottage was a sort of rough camp, beautifully situated on the top of the mountain among oaks and pines.
  • Round the house was a wide piazza, where the mountain winds blew, sweet with all wood-scents.
  • "To-morrow to the chase!" was their good-night shout as the circle of merry friends broke up for the night.
  • At dawn I was awakened by the smell of coffee, the rattling of guns, and the heavy footsteps of the men as they strode about, promising themselves the greatest luck of the season.
  • A fire was kindled at the bottom of a deep hole in the ground, big sticks were laid crosswise at the top, and meat was hung from them and turned on spits.
  • At the foot of the mountain there was a railroad, and the children watched the trains whiz by.
  • About a mile distant there was a trestle spanning a deep gorge.
  • It was very difficult to walk over, the ties were wide apart and so narrow that one felt as if one were walking on knives.
  • We would have taken any way rather than this; but it was late and growing dark, and the trestle was a short cut home.
  • I had to feel for the rails with my toe; but I was not afraid, and got on very well, until all at once there came a faint "puff, puff" from the distance.
  • Winter was on hill and field.
  • All the roads were hidden, not a single landmark was visible, only a waste of snow with trees rising out of it.
  • There was no odour of pine-needles.
  • So dazzling was the light, it penetrated even the darkness that veils my eyes.
  • Our favourite amusement during that winter was tobogganing.
  • It was in the spring of 1890 that I learned to speak.
  • I was pleased with anything that made a noise and liked to feel the cat purr and the dog bark.
  • I also liked to keep my hand on a singer's throat, or on a piano when it was being played.
  • Mrs. Lamson had scarcely finished telling me about this girl's success before I was on fire with eagerness.
  • Miss Fuller's method was this: she passed my hand lightly over her face, and let me feel the position of her tongue and lips when she made a sound.
  • In reading my teacher's lips I was wholly dependent on my fingers: I had to use the sense of touch in catching the vibrations of the throat, the movements of the mouth and the expression of the face; and often this sense was at fault.
  • In such cases I was forced to repeat the words or sentences, sometimes for hours, until I felt the proper ring in my own voice.
  • My work was practice, practice, practice.
  • "My little sister will understand me now," was a thought stronger than all obstacles.
  • The winter of 1892 was darkened by the one cloud in my childhood's bright sky.
  • A little story called "The Frost King," which I wrote and sent to Mr. Anagnos, of the Perkins Institution for the Blind, was at the root of the trouble.
  • I wrote the story when I was at home, the autumn after I had learned to speak.
  • I thought then that I was "making up a story," as children say, and I eagerly sat down to write it before the ideas should slip from me.
  • At dinner it was read to the assembled family, who were surprised that I could write so well.
  • It was suggested that I should change the title from "Autumn Leaves" to "The Frost King," which I did.
  • Mr. Anagnos was delighted with "The Frost King," and published it in one of the Perkins Institution reports.
  • This was the pinnacle of my happiness, from which I was in a little while dashed to earth.
  • It was difficult to make me understand this; but when I did understand I was astonished and grieved.
  • He was unusually tender and kind to me, and for a brief space the shadow lifted.
  • I was to be Ceres in a kind of masque given by the blind girls.
  • Something I said made her think she detected in my words a confession that I did remember Miss Canby's story of "The Frost Fairies," and she laid her conclusions before Mr. Anagnos, although I had told her most emphatically that she was mistaken.
  • I was brought before a court of investigation composed of the teachers and officers of the Institution, and Miss Sullivan was asked to leave me.
  • I think if this sorrow had come to me when I was older, it would have broken my spirit beyond repairing.
  • Miss Sullivan had never heard of "The Frost Fairies" or of the book in which it was published.
  • One thing is certain, the language was ineffaceably stamped upon my brain, though for a long time no one knew it, least of all myself.
  • But the fact remains that Miss Canby's story was read to me once, and that long after I had forgotten it, it came back to me so naturally that I never suspected that it was the child of another mind.
  • For a long time, when I wrote a letter, even to my mother, I was seized with a sudden feeling of terror, and I would spell the sentences over and over, to make sure that I had not read them in a book.
  • At the time I was writing "The Frost King," and this letter, like many others, contains phrases which show that my mind was saturated with the story.
  • Since the publication of "The Story of My Life" in the Ladies' Home Journal, Mr. Anagnos has made a statement, in a letter to Mr. Macy, that at the time of the "Frost King" matter, he believed I was innocent.
  • He says, the court of investigation before which I was brought consisted of eight people: four blind, four seeing persons.
  • I was too excited to notice anything, too frightened to ask questions.
  • Indeed, I could scarcely think what I was saying, or what was being said to me.
  • "The Frost King" was forgotten.
  • I was still excessively scrupulous about everything I wrote.
  • At other times, in the midst of a paragraph I was writing, I said to myself, "Suppose it should be found that all this was written by some one long ago!"
  • It was with the hope of restoring my self-confidence that she persuaded me to write for the Youth's Companion a brief account of my life.
  • I was then twelve years old.
  • It seemed like the "Arabian Nights," it was crammed so full of novelty and interest.
  • At a little distance from this ship there was a model of the Santa Maria, which I also examined.
  • It was a sort of tangible kaleidoscope, this white city of the West.
  • Whenever it was possible, I touched the machinery while it was in motion, so as to get a clearer idea how the stones were weighed, cut, and polished.
  • I searched in the washings for a diamond and found it myself--the only true diamond, they said, that was ever found in the United States.
  • Mr. Irons, a neighbour of theirs, was a good Latin scholar; it was arranged that I should study under him.
  • He taught me Latin grammar principally; but he often helped me in arithmetic, which I found as troublesome as it was uninteresting.
  • At first I was rather unwilling to study Latin grammar.
  • I was just beginning to read Caesar's "Gallic War" when I went to my home in Alabama.
  • There it was arranged that I should go to the Wright-Humason School for the Deaf in New York City.
  • I studied it with Madame Olivier, a French lady who did not know the manual alphabet, and who was obliged to give her instruction orally.
  • I could not read her lips easily; so my progress was much slower than in German.
  • It was very amusing but I did not like it nearly so well as "Wilhelm Tell."
  • My progress in lip-reading and speech was not what my teachers and I had hoped and expected it would be.
  • When I was not guessing, I was jumping at conclusions, and this fault, in addition to my dullness, aggravated my difficulties more than was right or necessary.
  • I remember especially the walks we all took together every day in Central Park, the only part of the city that was congenial to me.
  • I loved to have it described every time I entered it; for it was beautiful in all its aspects, and these aspects were so many that it was beautiful in a different way each day of the nine months I spent in New York.
  • He, who made every one happy in a beautiful, unobtrusive way, was most kind and tender to Miss Sullivan and me.
  • When I left New York the idea had become a fixed purpose; and it was decided that I should go to Cambridge.
  • This was the nearest approach I could get to Harvard and to the fulfillment of my childish declaration.
  • Of course my instructors had had no experience in teaching any but normal pupils, and my only means of conversing with them was reading their lips.
  • I had had, moreover, a good start in French, and received six months' instruction in Latin; but German was the subject with which I was most familiar.
  • But, though everybody was kind and ready to help us, there was only one hand that could turn drudgery into pleasure.
  • Burke's speech was more instructive than any other book on a political subject that I had ever read.
  • I wondered more and more, while Burke's masterly speech rolled on in mighty surges of eloquence, how it was that King George and his ministers could have turned a deaf ear to his warning prophecy of our victory and their humiliation.
  • I thought how strange it was that such precious seeds of truth and wisdom should have fallen among the tares of ignorance and corruption.
  • In a different way Macaulay's "Life of Samuel Johnson" was interesting.
  • Perhaps an explanation of the method that was in use when I took my examinations will not be amiss here.
  • Each candidate was known, not by his name, but by a number.
  • It was thought advisable for me to have my examinations in a room by myself, because the noise of the typewriter might disturb the other girls.
  • A man was placed on guard at the door to prevent interruption.
  • In the finals, no one read my work over to me, and in the preliminaries I offered subjects with some of which I was in a measure familiar before my work in the Cambridge school; for at the beginning of the year I had passed examinations in English, History, French and German, which Mr. Gilman gave me from previous Harvard papers.
  • I remember that the day the Latin paper was brought to us, Professor Schilling came in and informed me I had passed satisfactorily in German.
  • But during the first few weeks I was confronted with unforeseen difficulties.
  • The classes I was in were very large, and it was impossible for the teachers to give me special instruction.
  • I could not follow with my eyes the geometrical figures drawn on the blackboard, and my only means of getting a clear idea of them was to make them on a cushion with straight and curved wires, which had bent and pointed ends.
  • It was not until Mr. Keith taught me that I had a clear idea of mathematics.
  • I was beginning to overcome these difficulties when an event occurred which changed everything.
  • Just before the books came, Mr. Gilman had begun to remonstrate with Miss Sullivan on the ground that I was working too hard, and in spite of my earnest protestations, he reduced the number of my recitations.
  • Mr. Gilman at first agreed to this; but when my tasks had become somewhat perplexing, he insisted that I was overworked, and that I should remain at his school three years longer.
  • On the seventeenth of November I was not very well, and did not go to school.
  • There was no hurry, no confusion.
  • He was always gentle and forbearing, no matter how dull I might be, and believe me, my stupidity would often have exhausted the patience of Job.
  • The college authorities did not allow Miss Sullivan to read the examination papers to me; so Mr. Eugene C. Vining, one of the instructors at the Perkins Institution for the Blind, was employed to copy the papers for me in American braille.
  • Mr. Vining was a stranger to me, and could not communicate with me, except by writing braille.
  • The proctor was also a stranger, and did not attempt to communicate with me in any way.
  • I was sorely perplexed, and felt discouraged wasting much precious time, especially in algebra.
  • It is true that I was familiar with all literary braille in common use in this country--English, American, and New York Point; but the various signs and symbols in geometry and algebra in the three systems are very different, and I had used only the English braille in my algebra.
  • To my dismay I found that it was in the American notation.
  • But on the night before the algebra examination, while I was struggling over some very complicated examples, I could not tell the combinations of bracket, brace and radical.
  • The struggle for admission to college was ended, and I could now enter Radcliffe whenever I pleased.
  • Before I entered college, however, it was thought best that I should study another year under Mr. Keith.
  • It was a day full of interest for me.
  • I knew that there were obstacles in the way; but I was eager to overcome them.
  • But I soon discovered that college was not quite the romantic lyceum I had imagined.
  • It was very lively.
  • Who was he and what did he do?
  • I read my first connected story in May, 1887, when I was seven years old, and from that day to this I have devoured everything in the shape of a printed page that has come within the reach of my hungry finger tips.
  • I think that was all; but I read them over and over, until the words were so worn and pressed I could scarcely make them out.
  • It was during my first visit to Boston that I really began to read in good earnest.
  • I was permitted to spend a part of each day in the Institution library, and to wander from bookcase to bookcase, and take down whatever book my fingers lighted upon.
  • I was then about eight years old.
  • Then she told me that she had a beautiful story about a little boy which she was sure I should like better than "The Scarlet Letter."
  • The name of the story was "Little Lord Fauntleroy," and she promised to read it to me the following summer.
  • When she returned almost the first thing we did was to begin the story of "Little Lord Fauntleroy."
  • It was a warm afternoon in August.
  • The hammock was covered with pine needles, for it had not been used while my teacher was away.
  • The air was balmy, with a tang of the sea in it.
  • Circumscribed as my life was in so many ways, I had to look between the covers of books for news of the world that lay outside my own.
  • It was the Iliad that made Greece my paradise.
  • I was familiar with the story of Troy before I read it in the original, and consequently I had little difficulty in making the Greek words surrender their treasures after I had passed the borderland of grammar.
  • From "Greek Heroes" to the Iliad was no day's journey, nor was it altogether pleasant.
  • One reading was sufficient to stamp every detail of the story upon my memory forever.
  • I could see, absolutely see, the dagger and Lady Macbeth's little white hand--the dreadful stain was as real to me as to the grief-stricken queen.
  • I remember that I was sorry for them.
  • The first book that gave me any real sense of the value of history was Swinton's "World History," which I received on my thirteenth birthday.
  • The harbour was our joy, our paradise.
  • Oh, it was all so interesting, so beautiful!
  • There was a regatta in the Northwest Arm, in which the boats from the different warships were engaged.
  • Hundreds of little sail-boats swung to and fro close by, and the sea was calm.
  • Our hearts beat fast, and our hands trembled with excitement, not fear, for we had the hearts of vikings, and we knew that our skipper was master of the situation.
  • We went out to see the hero that had withstood so many tempests, and it wrung my heart to see him prostrate who had mightily striven and was now mightily fallen.
  • But I must not forget that I was going to write about last summer in particular.
  • In Wrentham we caught echoes of what was happening in the world--war, alliance, social conflict.
  • It was a wonderful, glorious song, and it won the blind poet an immortal crown, the admiration of all ages.
  • In the king's face, which he wore as a mask, there was a remoteness and inaccessibility of grief which I shall never forget.
  • The first time I saw him act was while at school in New York.
  • Once while I was calling on him in Boston he acted the most striking parts of "The Rivals" for me.
  • Then the great actor gave his coat a hitch and his mouth a twitch, and in an instant I was in the village of Falling Water and felt Schneider's shaggy head against my knee.
  • It was twelve years ago.
  • Elsie Leslie, the little actress, was in Boston, and Miss Sullivan took me to see her in "The Prince and the Pauper."
  • After the play I was permitted to go behind the scenes and meet her in her royal costume.
  • I was only just learning to speak, and had previously repeated her name until I could say it perfectly.
  • He was the most sympathetic of companions.
  • He knew so much and was so genial that it was impossible to feel dull in his presence.
  • It was early in the spring, just after I had learned to speak.
  • There was an odour of print and leather in the room which told me that it was full of books, and I stretched out my hand instinctively to find them.
  • My fingers lighted upon a beautiful volume of Tennyson's poems, and when Miss Sullivan told me what it was I began to recite:
  • I had made my beloved poet weep, and I was greatly distressed.
  • He made me sit in his armchair, while he brought different interesting things for me to examine, and at his request I recited "The Chambered Nautilus," which was then my favorite poem.
  • He was delighted that I could pronounce the words so well, and said that he had no difficulty in understanding me.
  • He said he was the little boy in the poem, and that the girl's name was Sally, and more which I have forgotten.
  • I promised to visit him again the following summer, but he died before the promise was fulfilled.
  • I have known him since I was eight, and my love for him has increased with my years.
  • I also knew Mr. Charles Dudley Warner, the most delightful of story-tellers and the most beloved friend, whose sympathy was so broad that it may be truly said of him, he loved all living things and his neighbour as himself.
  • I was like little Ascanius, who followed with unequal steps the heroic strides of Aeneas on his march toward mighty destinies.
  • Three months and a half after the first word was spelled into her hand, she wrote in pencil this letter
  • Twenty-five days later, while she was on a short visit away from home, she wrote to her mother.
  • She was taken to the cotton exchange.
  • It was on a large river.
  • Nancy was not a good child when I went to Memphis.
  • Nancy was a bad child when I went to Memphis she cried loud, I whipped her with a stick.
  • Boat was on very large river.
  • "Uncle Morrie" of the next letter is Mr. Morrison Heady, of Normandy, Kentucky, who lost his sight and hearing when he was a boy.
  • This was a day when the child's vocabulary grew.
  • I was very happy to receive pretty book and nice candy and two letters from you.
  • We came to Boston last Thursday, and Mr. Anagnos was delighted to see me, and he hugged and kissed me.
  • I was delighted to see my dear little friends and I hugged and kissed them.
  • The horse's name was Prince and he was gentle and liked to trot very fast.
  • Pony's name was Mollie and I had a nice ride on her back; I was not afraid, I hope my uncle will get me a dear little pony and a little cart very soon.
  • I was born in America, and Mr. Anagnos was born in Greece.
  • Chinese nurse came to see me, her name was Asu.
  • We came home in horse cars because it was Sunday and steam cars do not go often on Sunday.
  • He was six years old.
  • What did I do when I was six years old?
  • Her visit to Plymouth was in July.
  • It was like a ship.
  • One day a dear little baby-boy was born.
  • His name was Peregrine White.
  • One day there was a great shout on the ship for the people saw the land and they were full of joy because they had reached a new country safely.
  • It was in this way that she learned to use correctly words of sound and vision which express ideas outside of her experience.
  • The other day I broke my doll's head off; but that was not a dreadful accident, because dolls do not live and feel, like people.
  • It made me feel very sad to leave Boston and I missed all of my friends greatly, but of course I was glad to get back to my lovely home once more.
  • A little girl in a story was not courageous.
  • My Dear Mr. Anagnos:--You cannot imagine how delighted I was to receive a letter from you last evening.
  • It was very pleasant out in the shady woods, and we all enjoyed the picnic very much.
  • Oh, it was a lovely and delicate doll! but the little girl's brother, a tall lad, had taken the doll, and set it up in a high tree in the garden, and had run away.
  • "I will stay with you," said she to the doll, although she was not at all courageous.
  • During the summer Miss Sullivan was away from Helen for three months and a half, the first separation of teacher and pupil.
  • Only once afterward in fifteen years was their constant companionship broken for more than a few days at a time.
  • What was the name of the little boy who fell in love with the beautiful star?
  • It was a picture of a mill, near a beautiful brook.
  • There was a boat floating on the water, and the fragrant lilies were growing all around the boat.
  • Not far from the mill there was an old house, with many trees growing close to it.
  • I was very sorry that the poor little girl with the browns and the "tangled golden curls" died.
  • I was delighted to receive the flowers from home.
  • There was a terrible fire Thursday.
  • Her throat was very sore and the doctor thought she would have to go away to the hospital, but she is better now.
  • He was very brave.
  • The flowers were wilted, but the kind thought which came with them was as sweet and as fresh as newly pulled violets.
  • Jakey was the sweetest little fellow you can imagine, but he was poor and blind.
  • Do you think the lovely moon was glad that I could speak to her?
  • When I was a very little child I used to sit in my mother's lap all the time, because I was very timid, and did not like to be left by myself.
  • I did not know then what she was doing, for I was quite ignorant of all things.
  • I did not know then that it was very naughty to do so.
  • This good and happy news delighted me exceedingly, for then I was sure that I should learn also.
  • I tried to make sounds like my little playmates, but teacher told me that the voice was very delicate and sensitive and that it would injure it to make incorrect sounds, and promised to take me to see a kind and wise lady who would teach me rightly.
  • That lady was yourself.
  • This was the first home-going after she had learned to "talk with her mouth."
  • I was very, very sad to part with all of my friends in Boston, but I was so eager to see my baby sister I could hardly wait for the train to take me home.
  • Mildred has grown much taller and stronger than she was when I went to Boston, and she is the sweetest and dearest little child in the world.
  • My parents were delighted to hear me speak, and I was overjoyed to give them such a happy surprise.
  • I am always happy and so was Little Lord Fauntleroy, but dear Little Jakey's life was full of sadness.
  • How did God tell people that his home was in heaven?
  • My Dear Helen--I was very glad indeed to get your letter.
  • I told you that I was very happy because of your happiness.
  • And so He loved men Himself and though they were very cruel to Him and at last killed Him, He was willing to die for them because He loved them so.
  • This letter was written to some gentlemen in Gardiner, Maine, who named a lumber vessel after her.
  • I am sorry to say that our train was delayed in several places, which made us late in reaching New York.
  • I was delighted to get there, though I was much disappointed because we did not arrive on Mr. Anagnos' birthday.
  • We surprised our dear friends, however, for they did not expect us Saturday; but when the bell rung Miss Marrett guessed who was at the door, and Mrs. Hopkins jumped up from the breakfast table and ran to the door to meet us; she was indeed much astonished to see us.
  • I was overjoyed to see my dearest and kindest friend once more.
  • The view was most charmingly picturesque.
  • The grass was as green as though it was springtime, and the golden ears of corn gathered together in heaps in the great fields looked very pretty.
  • The case was broken and the keys are nearly all out.
  • At first I was very sorry when I found that the sun had hidden his shining face behind dull clouds, but afterwards I thought why he did it, and then I was happy.
  • My Dear Young Friend--I was very glad to have such a pleasant letter on my birthday.
  • I had two or three hundred others and thine was one of the most welcome of all.
  • Tommy Stringer, who appears in several of the following letters, became blind and deaf when he was four years old.
  • His mother was dead and his father was too poor to take care of him.
  • For a while he was kept in the general hospital at Allegheny.
  • From here he was to be sent to an almshouse, for at that time there was no other place for him in Pennsylvania.
  • She wanted him brought to Boston, and when she was told that money would be needed to get him a teacher, she answered, "We will raise it."
  • Turned to this new use, the fund grew fast, and Tommy was provided for.
  • He was admitted to the kindergarten on the sixth of April.
  • Once the Earl of Meath came to see me, and he told me that the queen was much beloved by her people, because of her gentleness and wisdom.
  • Before a teacher was found for Tommy and while he was still in the care of Helen and Miss Sullivan, a reception was held for him at the kindergarten.
  • I cannot begin to tell you how delighted I was when Mr. Anagnos told me that you had sent him some money to help educate "Baby Tom."
  • He is the same restless little creature he was when you saw him.
  • I tried to imagine my gentle poet when he was a school-boy, and I wondered if it was in Andover he learned the songs of the birds and the secrets of the shy little woodland children.
  • I am sure his heart was always full of music, and in God's beautiful world he must have heard love's sweet replying.
  • Yesterday I thought for the first time what a beautiful thing motion was, and it seemed to me that everything was trying to get near to God, does it seem that way to you?
  • My dear Mr. Munsell, Surely I need not tell you that your letter was very welcome.
  • I enjoyed every word of it and wished that it was longer.
  • Perhaps the Old Sea God as he lay asleep upon the shore, heard the soft music of growing things--the stir of life in the earth's bosom, and his stormy heart was angry, because he knew that his and Winter's reign was almost at an end.
  • This letter was reproduced in facsimile in St. Nicholas, June, 1892.
  • It is undated, but must have been written two or three months before it was published.
  • My dear Miss Carrie:--I was much pleased to receive your kind letter.
  • Need I tell you that I was more than delighted to hear that you are really interested in the "tea"?
  • We thought everything was arranged: but we found Monday that Mrs. Elliott would not be willing to let us invite more than fifty people, because Mrs. Howe's house is quite small.
  • Then I was like the little blind children who are waiting to enter the kindergarten.
  • There was no light in my soul.
  • This wonderful world with all its sunlight and beauty was hidden from me, and I had never dreamed of its loveliness.
  • Everything was fresh and spring-like, and we stayed out of doors all day.
  • I was greatly amused at the idea of your writing the square hand.
  • What was the book you sent me for my birthday?
  • I received several, and I do not know which was from you.
  • It was a lovely cape crocheted, for me, by an old gentleman, seventy-five years of age.
  • Before I left Boston, I was asked to write a sketch of my life for the Youth's Companion.
  • I had intended to write the sketch during my vacation: but I was not well, and I did not feel able to write even to my friends.
  • It was some time before I could plan it to suit me.
  • We received the Silent Worker which you sent, and I wrote right away to the editor to tell him that it was a mistake.
  • I must confess I was puzzled at first.
  • But after a minute I answered that beauty was a form of goodness--and he went away.
  • When the reception was over we went back to the hotel and teacher slept quite unconscious of the surprise which was in store for her.
  • This was the surprise--I was to have the pleasure of taking my dear teacher to see Niagara Falls!...
  • The hotel was so near the river that I could feel it rushing past by putting my hand on the window.
  • Teacher said I was a little traitor.
  • I was only doing as the Canadians do, while I was in their country, and besides I honor England's good queen.
  • Her visit to the World's Fair she described in a letter to Mr. John P. Spaulding, which was published in St. Nicholas, and is much like the following letter.
  • ...Every one at the Fair was very kind to me...
  • It was a bewildering and fascinating place.
  • That was fine fun.
  • In the spring of 1893 a club was started in Tuscumbia, of which Mrs. Keller was president, to establish a public library.
  • Our quiet mountain home was especially attractive and restful after the excitement and fatigue of our visit to the World's Fair.
  • I did not like to trouble them while I was trying to get money for poor little Tommy, for of course it was more important that he should be educated than that my people should have books to read. 4.
  • The experiment was interesting, but of course came to little.
  • I was much disappointed not to see her, but I hope I shall have that pleasure some other time.
  • After we had had our breakfast, Teacher asked one of the train-men in the station if the New York train was made up.
  • Was that not very kind?
  • Miss Terry was lovely.
  • How noble and kingly the King was, especially in his misfortunes!
  • It was very exciting; but I must say I did not enjoy it very much.
  • Sweet Rebecca, with her strong, brave spirit, and her pure, generous nature, was the only character which thoroughly won my admiration.
  • It was so hard to lose him, he was the best and kindest of friends, and I do not know what we shall do without him....
  • Their house stands near a charming lake where we went boating and canoeing, which was great fun.
  • Our friend, Mr. Alden, the editor of Harper's was there, and of course we enjoyed his society very much....
  • He died last Saturday at my home in Tuscumbia, and I was not there.
  • The "examinations" mentioned in this letter were merely tests given in the school, but as they were old Harvard papers, it is evident that in some subjects Miss Keller was already fairly well prepared for Radcliffe.
  • All the time I was preparing for the great ordeal, I could not suppress an inward fear and trembling lest I should fail, and now it is an unspeakable relief to know that I have passed the examinations with credit.
  • I find I get on faster, and do better work with Mr. Keith than I did in the classes at the Cambridge School, and I think it was well that I gave up that kind of work.
  • But the weather and the scenery were so beautiful, and it was such fun to go scooting over the smoother part of the road, I didn't mind the mishaps in the least.
  • Was that not lovely?
  • Oh, he was simply beautiful!
  • She looked as if she had just risen from the foam of the sea, and her loveliness was like a strain of heavenly music.
  • I almost cried, it was all so real and tragic.
  • Why, bless you, I thought I wrote to you the day after the "Eclogues" arrived, and told you how glad I was to have them!
  • Why, only a little while ago people thought it quite impossible to teach the deaf-blind anything; but no sooner was it proved possible than hundreds of kind, sympathetic hearts were fired with the desire to help them, and now we see how many of those poor, unfortunate persons are being taught to see the beauty and reality of life.
  • I was a good deal amused by what she said about history.
  • He said she was very industrious and happy.
  • She said she did not consider a degree of any real value, but thought it was much more desirable to do something original than to waste one's energies only for a degree.
  • The college authorities would not permit Miss Sullivan to read the examination papers to me; so Mr. Eugene C. Vining, one of the instructors at the Perkins Institution for the Blind, was employed to copy the papers for me in braille.
  • Mr. Vining was a perfect stranger to me, and could not communicate with me except by writing in braille.
  • The Proctor also was a stranger, and did not attempt to communicate with me in any way; and, as they were both unfamiliar with my speech, they could not readily understand what I said to them.
  • However, the braille worked well enough in the languages; but when it came to Geometry and Algebra, it was different.
  • I was sorely perplexed, and felt quite discouraged, and wasted much precious time, especially in Algebra.
  • But, when I took up Algebra, I had a harder time still--I was terribly handicapped by my imperfect knowledge of the notation.
  • Dear Frau Grote learned the manual alphabet, and used to teach me herself; but this was in private lessons, which were paid for by my friends.
  • Colonel Roosevelt was there, on Harvard's side; but bless you, he wore a white sweater, and no crimson that we know of!
  • There were about twenty-five thousand people at the game, and, when we went out, the noise was so terrific, we nearly jumped out of our skins, thinking it was the din of war, and not of a football game that we heard.
  • But, in spite of all their wild efforts, neither side was scored, and we all laughed and said, "Oh, well now the pot can't call the kettle black!"...
  • Mrs. Hutton had already written to mother, asking her to telegraph if she was willing for me to have other advisers besides herself and Teacher.
  • At the same time Dr. Bell added that I could rest content and fight my way through Radcliffe in competition with seeing and hearing girls, while the great desire of my heart was being fulfilled.
  • Perhaps I shall take up these studies later; but I've said goodbye to Mathematics forever, and I assure you, I was delighted to see the last of those horrid goblins!
  • She said that Maud was born deaf and lost her sight when she was only three months old, and that when she went to the Institution a few weeks ago, she was quite helpless.
  • I was in New York not long ago and I saw Miss Rhoades, who told me that she had seen Katie McGirr.
  • She said Katie was very sweet indeed, but sadly in need of proper instruction.
  • I was much surprised to hear all this; for I judged from your letters that Katie was a very precocious girl....
  • I am sure no reporter was present.
  • I only spoke a few words, as I did not know I was expected to speak until a few minutes before I was called upon.
  • I have worn it only once, but then I felt that Solomon in all his glory was not to be compared with me!
  • A little bird had already sung the good news in my ear; but it was doubly pleasant to have it straight from you.
  • The Indiana was the largest and finest ship in the Harbor, and we felt very proud of her.
  • I was there and really helped him fly the kites.
  • Dr. Bell said "No!" with great confidence, and the kite was sent up.
  • It was written out of my heart, and perhaps that is why it met a sympathetic response in other hearts.
  • She cannot know in detail how she was taught, and her memory of her childhood is in some cases an idealized memory of what she has learned later from her teacher and others.
  • Indeed, at one time it was believed that the best way for them to communicate was through systematized gestures, the sign language invented by the Abbe de l'Epee.
  • When she met Dr. Furness, the Shakespearean scholar, he warned her not to let the college professors tell her too many assumed facts about the life of Shakespeare; all we know, he said, is that Shakespeare was baptized, married, and died.
  • Mr. Joseph Jefferson was once explaining to Miss Keller what the bumps on her head meant.
  • It was this same perseverance that made her go to college.
  • But she was not satisfied until she had carried out her purpose and entered college.
  • When the organ was played for her in St. Bartholomew's, the whole building shook with the great pedal notes, but that does not altogether account for what she felt and enjoyed.
  • She was slower than he expected her to be in identifying them by their relative weight and size.
  • When she was at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston she stood on a step-ladder and let both hands play over the statues.
  • Although she has used the typewriter since she was eleven years old, she is rather careful than rapid.
  • Philosophers have tried to find out what was her conception of abstract ideas before she learned language.
  • If she had any conception, there is no way of discovering it now; for she cannot remember, and obviously there was no record at the time.
  • Her sense of time is excellent, but whether it would have developed as a special faculty cannot be known, for she has had a watch since she was seven years old.
  • What her good friend, Charles Dudley Warner, wrote about her in Harper's Magazine in 1896 was true then, and it remains true now:
  • Some time ago, when a policeman shot dead her dog, a dearly loved daily companion, she found in her forgiving heart no condemnation for the man; she only said, 'If he had only known what a good dog she was, he wouldn't have shot her.'
  • It was said of old time, 'Lord forgive them, they know not what they do!'
  • She was very greatly excited by it, and said: 'It is terrible!
  • "Toleration," she said once, when she was visiting her friend Mrs. Laurence Hutton, "is the greatest gift of the mind; it requires the same effort of the brain that it takes to balance oneself on a bicycle."
  • Not all the attention that has been paid her since she was a child has made her take herself too seriously.
  • She was intensely pro-Boer and wrote a strong argument in favour of Boer independence.
  • When she was told of the surrender of the brave little people, her face clouded and she was silent a few minutes.
  • Both Mr. Gilman and Mr. Keith, the teachers who prepared her for college, were struck by her power of constructive reasoning; and she was excellent in pure mathematics, though she seems never to have enjoyed it much.
  • Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe was born in Boston, November 10, 1801, and died in Boston, January 9, 1876.
  • He was a great philanthropist, interested especially in the education of all defectives, the feeble-minded, the blind, and the deaf.
  • Laura Bridgman was born at Hanover, New Hampshire, December 21, 1829; so she was almost eight years old when Dr. Howe began his experiments with her.
  • Dr. Howe was an experimental scientist and had in him the spirit of New England transcendentalism with its large faith and large charities.
  • Science and faith together led him to try to make his way into the soul which he believed was born in Laura Bridgman as in every other human being.
  • His plan was to teach Laura by means of raised types.
  • She taught it to Laura, and from that time on the manual alphabet was the means of communicating with her.
  • From a scientific standpoint it is unfortunate that it was impossible to keep such a complete record of Helen Keller's development.
  • As soon as a thing was done, a definite goal passed, the teacher did not always look back and describe the way she had come.
  • The explanation of the fact was unimportant compared to the fact itself and the need of hurrying on.
  • Mr. Anagnos was delighted with it.
  • As Mr. Anagnos was the head of a great institution, what he said had much more effect than the facts in Miss Sullivan's account on which he based his statements.
  • Teachers of the deaf proved a priori that what Miss Sullivan had done could not be, and some discredit was reflected on her statements, because they were surrounded by the vague eloquence of Mr. Anagnos.
  • But it is evident that in these letters she was making a clear analysis of what she was doing.
  • Miss Anne Mansfield Sullivan was born at Springfield, Massachusetts.
  • Very early in her life she became almost totally blind, and she entered the Perkins Institution October 7, 1880, when she was fourteen years old.
  • Later her sight was partially restored.
  • Mr. Anagnos says in his report of 1887: She was obliged to begin her education at the lowest and most elementary point; but she showed from the very start that she had in herself the force and capacity which insure success....
  • The only time she had to prepare herself for the work with her pupil was from August, 1886, when Captain Keller wrote, to February, 1887.
  • It was Dr. Howe who, by his work with Laura Bridgman, made Miss Sullivan's work possible: but it was Miss Sullivan who discovered the way to teach language to the deaf-blind.
  • ...It was 6.30 when I reached Tuscumbia.
  • The drive from the station to the house, a distance of one mile, was very lovely and restful.
  • I was surprised to find Mrs. Keller a very young-looking woman, not much older than myself, I should think.
  • My first question was, "Where is Helen?"
  • It did not open easily, and she felt carefully to see if there was a keyhole.
  • Finding that there was, she turned to me, making the sign of turning a key and pointing to the bag.
  • She understood in a flash and ran downstairs to tell her mother, by means of emphatic signs, that there was some candy in a trunk for her.
  • She helped me unpack my trunk when it came, and was delighted when she found the doll the little girls sent her.
  • Then I took the doll, meaning to give it back to her when she had made the letters; but she thought I meant to take it from her, and in an instant she was in a temper, and tried to seize the doll.
  • I forced her into a chair and held her there until I was nearly exhausted.
  • Then it occurred to me that it was useless to continue the struggle--I must do something to turn the current of her thoughts.
  • The two letters "c-a," you see, had reminded her of Fridays "lesson"--not that she had any idea that cake was the name of the thing, but it was simply a matter of association, I suppose.
  • She follows with her hands every motion you make, and she knew that I was looking for the doll.
  • She pointed down, meaning that the doll was downstairs.
  • She had not finished the cake she was eating, and I took it away, indicating that if she brought the doll I would give her back the cake.
  • She was very troublesome when I began to write this morning.
  • Naturally the family was much disturbed, and left the room.
  • Helen was lying on the floor, kicking and screaming and trying to pull my chair from under me.
  • She kept this up for half an hour, then she got up to see what I was doing.
  • I let her see that I was eating, but did not let her put her hand in the plate.
  • Then she went all round the table to see who was there, and finding no one but me, she seemed bewildered.
  • It was another hour before I succeeded in getting her napkin folded.
  • If she ever failed to get what she wanted, it was because of her inability to make the vassals of her household understand what it was.
  • Every thwarted desire was the signal for a passionate outburst, and as she grew older and stronger, these tempests became more violent.
  • As I began to teach her, I was beset by many difficulties.
  • To get her to do the simplest thing, such as combing her hair or washing her hands or buttoning her boots, it was necessary to use force, and, of course, a distressing scene followed.
  • I saw clearly that it was useless to try to teach her language or anything else until she learned to obey me.
  • But I soon found that I was cut off from all the usual approaches to the child's heart.
  • She accepted everything I did for her as a matter of course, and refused to be caressed, and there was no way of appealing to her affection or sympathy or childish love of approbation.
  • She would or she wouldn't, and there was an end of it.
  • I had a good, frank talk with Mrs. Keller, and explained to her how difficult it was going to be to do anything with Helen under the existing circumstances.
  • She devoted herself to her dolls the first evening, and when it was bedtime she undressed very quietly, but when she felt me get into bed with her, she jumped out on the other side, and nothing that I could do would induce her to get in again.
  • But I was afraid she would take cold, and I insisted that she must go to bed.
  • The next morning she was very docile, but evidently homesick.
  • This lasted for several minutes; then this mood passed, and Nancy was thrown ruthlessly on the floor and pushed to one side, while a large, pink-cheeked, fuzzy-haired member of the family received the little mother's undivided attention.
  • Helen evidently knew where she was as soon as she touched the boxwood hedges, and made many signs which I did not understand.
  • He says the gentleman was not particularly interested, but said he would see if anything could be done.
  • When I came, her movements were so insistent that one always felt there was something unnatural and almost weird about her.
  • She was delighted if he made a mistake, and made him form the letter over several times.
  • Helen was giving Nancy a bath, and didn't notice the dog at first.
  • She stumbled upon Belle, who was crouching near the window where Captain Keller was standing.
  • It was evident that she recognized the dog; for she put her arms round her neck and squeezed her.
  • She was at her place when I came down.
  • She had put the napkin under her chin, instead of pinning it at the back, as was her custom.
  • I wondered if she was trying to "make up."
  • Last week she made her doll an apron, and it was done as well as any child of her age could do it.
  • This morning, while she was washing, she wanted to know the name for "water."
  • All the way back to the house she was highly excited, and learned the name of every object she touched, so that in a few hours she had adDED THIRTY NEW WORDS TO HER VOCABULARY.
  • Last night when I got in bed, she stole into my arms of her own accord and kissed me for the first time, and I thought my heart would burst, so full was it of joy.
  • If she wanted a small object and was given a large one, she would shake her head and take up a tiny bit of the skin of one hand between the thumb and finger of the other.
  • I couldn't make out at first what it was all about.
  • My first thought was, one of the dogs has hurt Mildred; but Helen's beaming face set my fears at rest.
  • She led the way to the pump-house, and there in the corner was one of the setters with five dear little pups!
  • She was much interested in the feeding process, and spelled "mother-dog" and "baby" several times.
  • I suppose her idea was "Baby eats much."
  • I knew she was thinking of Mildred, and I spelled, "One baby and five puppies."
  • She noticed that one of the puppies was much smaller than the others, and she spelled "small," making the sign at the same time, and I said "very small."
  • She evidently understood that VERY was the name of the new thing that had come into her head; for all the way back to the house she used the word VERY correctly.
  • One stone was "small," another was "very small."
  • Keller's Landing was used during the war to land troops, but has long since gone to pieces, and is overgrown with moss and weeds.
  • I had no idea a short time ago how to go to work; I was feeling about in the dark; but somehow I know now, and I know that I know.
  • When the sun got round to the window where she was sitting with her book, she got up impatiently and shut the window.
  • The hen was very gentle, and made no objection to our investigations.
  • I asked what was the matter, and she said, "Much (many) teeth do make Nancy sick."
  • I happened to tell her the other day that the vine on the fence was a "creeper."
  • She was greatly amused, and began at once to find analogies between her movements and those of the plants.
  • She enjoys punching holes in paper with the stiletto, and I supposed it was because she could examine the result of her work; but we watched her one day, and I was much surprised to find that she imagined she was writing a letter.
  • She was (or imagined she was) putting on paper the things which had interested her.
  • There was a great rumpus downstairs this morning.
  • I heard Helen screaming, and ran down to see what was the matter.
  • At all events, there she was, tearing and scratching and biting Viney like some wild thing.
  • It seems Viney had attempted to take a glass, which Helen was filling with stones, fearing that she would break it.
  • When I took her hand she was trembling violently, and began to cry.
  • I asked what was the matter, and she spelled: "Viney--bad," and began to slap and kick her with renewed violence.
  • She stood very still for a moment, and it was evident from her face, which was flushed and troubled, that a struggle was going on in her mind.
  • She knew that I was much troubled, and would have liked to stay near me; but I thought it best for her to sit by herself.
  • At the dinner-table she was greatly disturbed because I didn't eat, and suggested that "Cook make tea for teacher."
  • But I told her that my heart was sad, and I didn't feel like eating.
  • She was very much excited when we went upstairs; so I tried to interest her in a curious insect called a stick-bug.
  • I wouldn't believe it was alive until I saw it move.
  • Her heart was full of trouble, and she wanted to talk about it.
  • She was very willing to go, and let Viney kiss her, though she didn't return the caress.
  • Everybody there was delighted with Helen, and showered her with gifts and kisses.
  • She was delighted, and showed her pleasure by hugging and kissing the little fellow, which embarrassed him very much.
  • You see, I had to use words and images with which she was familiar through the sense of touch.
  • But it hardly seems possible that any mere words should convey to one who has never seen a mountain the faintest idea of its grandeur; and I don't see how any one is ever to know what impression she did receive, or the cause of her pleasure in what was told her about it.
  • If it was natural for Helen to ask such questions, it was my duty to answer them.
  • I decided that there was no reason, except my deplorable ignorance of the great facts that underlie our physical existence.
  • It was no doubt because of this ignorance that I rushed in where more experienced angels fear to tread.
  • But she was surprised that hot water should come out of the ground.
  • She wanted to know who made fire under the ground, and if it was like the fire in stoves, and if it burned the roots of plants and trees.
  • She was much pleased with the letter, and after she had asked all the questions she could think of, she took it to her mother, who was sewing in the hall, and read it to her.
  • It was amusing to see her hold it before her eyes and spell the sentences out on her fingers, just as I had done.
  • Belle was sleepy, and Mildred inattentive.
  • Finally Belle got up, shook herself, and was about to walk away, when Helen caught her by the neck and forced her to lie down again.
  • This was too much for Helen.
  • "I did tell baby, no, no, much (many) times," was Helen's reply.
  • I do not wonder you were surprised to hear that I was going to write something for the report.
  • He agreed with Mr. Anagnos that it was my duty to give others the benefit of my experience.
  • I told her that her hair was brown, and she asked, "Is brown very pretty?"
  • We sat in the hammock; but there was no rest for the weary there.
  • Helen was eager to know "more colour."
  • "What colour is think?" was one of the restful questions she asked, as we swung to and fro in the hammock.
  • I couldn't help laughing, for at that very moment Viney was shouting at the top of her voice:
  • This lesson was followed by one on words indicative of place-relations.
  • Very soon she learned the difference between ON and IN, though it was some time before she could use these words in sentences of her own.
  • Then her attention was called to the hardness of the one ball and the softness of the other, and she learned SOFT and HARD.
  • A slip on which was printed, in raised letters, the word BOX was placed on the object, and the same experiment was tried with a great many articles, but she did not immediately comprehend that the label-name represented the thing.
  • Indeed, she was much displeased because I could not find her name in the book.
  • When she touched one with which she was familiar, a peculiarly sweet expression lighted her face, and we saw her countenance growing sweeter and more earnest every day.
  • When she finished it she was overjoyed.
  • She was working recently with the number forty, when I said to her, "Make twos."
  • On being told that she was white and that one of the servants was black, she concluded that all who occupied a similar menial position were of the same hue; and whenever I asked her the colour of a servant she would say "black."
  • The flowers did not seem to give her pleasure, and she was very quiet while we stayed there.
  • They let her feel the animals whenever it was safe.
  • She fed the elephants, and was allowed to climb up on the back of the largest, and sit in the lap of the "Oriental Princess," while the elephant marched majestically around the ring.
  • She was greatly delighted with the monkeys and kept her hand on the star performer while he went through his tricks, and laughed heartily when he took off his hat to the audience.
  • She also felt a Greek chariot, and the charioteer would have liked to take her round the ring; but she was afraid of "many swift horses."
  • Christmas week was a very busy one here, too.
  • One little chap, about seven, was persuaded to learn the letters, and he spelled his name for Helen.
  • She was delighted, and showed her joy, by hugging and kissing him, much to his embarrassment.
  • It was the first Christmas tree she had ever seen, and she was puzzled, and asked many questions.
  • It was not difficult, however, to make her understand that there was a present for each child, and to her great delight she was permitted to hand the gifts to the children.
  • It was very sweet to see the children's eager interest in Helen, and their readiness to give her pleasure.
  • The exercises began at nine, and it was one o'clock before we could leave.
  • My fingers and head ached; but Helen was as fresh and full of spirit as when we left home.
  • Sunday morning the ground was covered, and Helen and the cook's children and I played snowball.
  • By noon the snow was all gone.
  • It was the first snow I had seen here, and it made me a little homesick.
  • It was touching and beautiful to see Helen enjoy her first Christmas.
  • When I told her that Santa Claus would not come until she was asleep, she shut her eyes and said, "He will think girl is asleep."
  • The ring you sent her was in the toe of the stocking, and when I told her you gave it to Santa Claus for her, she said, "I do love Mrs. Hopkins."
  • She had a trunk and clothes for Nancy, and her comment was, "Now Nancy will go to party."
  • But his silence was more eloquent than words.
  • My heart, too, was full of gratitude and solemn joy.
  • How ridiculous it is to say I had drunk so copiously of the noble spirit of Dr. Howe that I was fired with the desire to rescue from darkness and obscurity the little Alabamian!
  • I explained that Uncle Frank was old, and couldn't learn braille easily.
  • It was nothing but excitement from first to last--drives, luncheons, receptions, and all that they involve when you have an eager, tireless child like Helen on your hands.
  • Helen was petted and caressed enough to spoil an angel; but I do not think it is possible to spoil her, she is too unconscious of herself, and too loving.
  • "I will buy some good candy to take to Tuscumbia," was her reply.
  • Helen was greatly interested in the boat, and insisted on being shown every inch of it from the engine to the flag on the flagstaff.
  • I had Helen begin a journal March 1st.[Most of this journal was lost.
  • He said Dear Helen, Robert was glad to get a letter from dear, sweet little Helen.
  • The Sunday-school was in session when we arrived, and I wish you could have seen the sensation Helen's entrance caused.
  • When it was time for the church service to begin, she was in such a state of excitement that I thought it best to take her away; but Captain Keller said, "No, she will be all right."
  • It was impossible to keep Helen quiet.
  • When the wine was passed to our neighbour, he was obliged to stand up to prevent her taking it away from him.
  • I never was so glad to get out of a place as I was to leave that church!
  • Finally she got up from the table and went through the motion of picking seaweed and shells, and splashing in the water, holding up her skirts higher than was proper under the circumstances.
  • Almost every one on the train was a physician, and Dr. Keller seemed to know them all.
  • Everybody was delighted with Helen.
  • Wherever she went she was the centre of interest.
  • She was delighted with the orchestra at the hotel, and whenever the music began she danced round the room, hugging and kissing every one she happened to touch.
  • Do you remember Dr. Garcelon, who was Governor of Maine several years ago?
  • We laughed until we cried, she was so serious about it.
  • The Doctor was puzzled.
  • He had never heard of "talking-gloves"; but I explained that she had seen a glove on which the alphabet was printed, and evidently thought they could be bought.
  • I was incredulous when he first told me the secret.
  • A curly-headed little boy was writing: I have a large ball.
  • When we entered the room, the children's attention was riveted on Helen.
  • The teacher was writing on the blackboard: The girl's name is Helen.
  • I asked her if the little girl who had written about the new dress was particularly pleased with her dress.
  • These children were older in years, it is true, than the baby who lisps, "Papa kiss baby--pretty," and fills out her meaning by pointing to her new dress; but their ability to understand and use language was no greater.
  • One day, while she was out walking with her mother and Mr. Anagnos, a boy threw a torpedo, which startled Mrs. Keller.
  • She would turn her head, smile, and act as though she had heard what was said.
  • I was then standing beside her, holding her hand.
  • Helen remained motionless through them all, not once showing the least sign that she realized what was going on.
  • This time her countenance changed whenever she was spoken to, but there was not such a decided lighting up of the features as when I had held her hand.
  • The wounded leg soon became so much worse that the horse was suspended from a beam.
  • The animal groaned with pain, and Helen, perceiving his groans, was filled with pity.
  • At last it became necessary to kill him, and, when Helen next asked to go and see him, I told her that he was DEAD.
  • This was the first time that she had heard the word.
  • When her attention was drawn to a marble slab inscribed with the name FLORENCE in relief, she dropped upon the ground as though looking for something, then turned to me with a face full of trouble, and asked, "Were is poor little Florence?"
  • This was true, although we were at a loss to understand how she guessed it.
  • She was very sick and died.
  • When she was very sick she tossed and moaned in bed.
  • One morning she was greatly distressed by finding that one of the dogs had a block fastened to her collar.
  • We explained that it was done to keep Pearl from running away.
  • Naturally, there was at first a strong tendency on her part to use only the important words in a sentence.
  • This is especially true of her earlier lessons, when her knowledge of language was so slight as to make explanation impossible.
  • Soon after I became her teacher Helen broke her new doll, of which she was very fond.
  • It was raining very hard and he had a very large umbrella to keep off the rain-drops.
  • PERHAPS his name was Joe.
  • I do not know where he was going because he was a little strange boy.
  • I SUPPOSE he was going to take it to his mother.
  • I was glad to hug and kiss him.
  • Between these humps she had placed her doll, which she was giving a ride around the room.
  • When I asked her what she was doing, she replied, "I am a very funny camel."
  • During the next two years neither Mr. Anagnos, who was in Europe for a year, nor Miss Sullivan wrote anything about Helen Keller for publication.
  • It was the first two years that counted.
  • I was reading the following paragraph to her:
  • The horse was an old, worn-out chestnut, with an ill-kept coat, and bones that showed plainly through it; the knees knuckled over, and the forelegs were very unsteady.
  • There was a hopeless look in the dull eye that I could not help noticing, and then, as I was thinking where I had seen that horse before, she looked full at me and said, 'Black Beauty, is that you?'
  • She was sobbing convulsively.
  • "It was poor Ginger," was all she could say at first.
  • Later, when she was able to talk about it, she said: Poor Ginger!
  • This morning Helen was reading for the first time Bryant's poem, "Oh, mother of a mighty race!"
  • After she had read "The Battlefield," by the same author, I asked her which verse she thought was the most beautiful.
  • I have never known her to be willing to leave a lesson when she felt that there was anything in it which she did not understand.
  • She was quiet for a moment, and then asked, with spirit: How do you know that I cannot understand?
  • As the design was somewhat complicated, the slightest jar made the structure fall.
  • After a time I became discouraged, and told her I was afraid she could not make it stand, but that I would build it for her; but she did not approve of this plan.
  • She shook her head decidedly, and said: My enemies would think I was running away.
  • Of course, in the beginning it was necessary that the things described should be familiar and interesting, and the English pure and simple.
  • When she had read the words of the second sentence, I showed her that there really was a mouse in the box.
  • The expression of the little girl's countenance showed that she was perplexed.
  • She was familiar with the words of the last sentence, and was delighted when allowed to act them out.
  • It was hoped that one so peculiarly endowed by nature as Helen, would, if left entirely to her own resources, throw some light upon such psychological questions as were not exhaustively investigated by Dr. Howe; but their hopes were not to be realized.
  • In the case of Helen, as in that of Laura Bridgman, disappointment was inevitable.
  • "Were did I come from?" and "Where shall I go when I die?" were questions Helen asked when she was eight years old.
  • She had met with the expression Mother Nature in the course of her reading, and for a long time she was in the habit of ascribing to Mother Nature whatever she felt to be beyond the power of man to accomplish.
  • After May, 1890, it was evident to me that she had reached a point where it was impossible to keep from her the religious beliefs held by those with whom she was in daily contact.
  • Where was I before I came to mother?
  • What was the egg before it was an egg?
  • Can any one doubt after reading these questions that the child who was capable of asking them was also capable of understanding at least their elementary answers?
  • She was very still for a few minutes, evidently thinking earnestly.
  • I was compelled to evade her question, for I could not explain to her the mystery of a self-existent being.
  • I told her that God was everywhere, and that she must not think of Him as a person, but as the life, the mind, the soul of everything.
  • When she referred to our conversation again, it was to ask, "Why did not Jesus go away, so that His enemies could not find Him?"
  • When told of the instance in which Jesus raised the dead, she was much perplexed, saying, "I did not know life could come back into the dead body!"
  • "Oh, yes!" she replied; "because last hour I was thinking very hard of Mr. Anagnos, and then my mind,"--then changing the word--"my soul was in Athens, but my body was here in the study."
  • When asked if she would not like to live ALWAYS in a beautiful country called heaven, her first question was, "Where is heaven?"
  • I was obliged to confess that I did not know, but suggested that it might be on one of the stars.
  • It was more than a year before she alluded to the subject again, and when she did return to it, her questions were numerous and persistent.
  • Is it blind? she asked; for in her mind the idea of being led was associated with blindness.
  • She was answered in the affirmative.
  • Another time she was asking about the power and goodness of God.
  • At first my little pupil's mind was all but vacant.
  • The manual alphabet was not the only means of presenting words to Helen Keller's fingers.
  • It was not a special subject, like geography or arithmetic, but her way to outward things.
  • It was not a lesson, but only one of her recreations.
  • And the fact remains that she was taught by a method of teaching language to the deaf the essential principles of which are clearly expressed in Miss Sullivan's letters, written while she was discovering the method and putting it successfully into practice.
  • When Miss Sullivan went out in the barnyard and picked up a little chicken and talked to Helen about it, she was giving a kind of instruction impossible inside four walls, and impossible with more than one pupil at a time.
  • How far she could receive communications is hard to determine, but she knew much that was going on around her.
  • Her early rages were an unhappy expression of the natural force of character which instruction was to turn into trained and organized power.
  • It was, then, to a good subject that Miss Sullivan brought her devotion and intelligence, and fearless willingness to experiment.
  • When she was at the Wright-Humason School in New York, Dr. Humason tried to improve her voice, not only her word pronunciation, but the voice itself, and gave her lessons in tone and vocal exercises.
  • I explained to her that some deaf children were taught to speak, but that they could see their teachers' mouths, and that that was a very great assistance to them.
  • But she interrupted me to say she was very sure she could feel my mouth very well.
  • From the first she was not content to be drilled in single sounds, but was impatient to pronounce words and sentences.
  • But there was satisfaction in seeing from day to day the evidence of growing mastery and the possibility of final success.
  • She was already perfectly familiar with words and the construction of sentences, and had only mechanical difficulties to overcome.
  • When she was stricken down with the illness which resulted in her loss of sight and hearing, at the age of nineteen months, she was learning to talk.
  • Her pronunciation of this gradually became indistinct, and when I first knew her it was nothing more than a peculiar noise.
  • Her little hands felt every object and observed every movement of the persons about her, and she was quick to imitate these movements.
  • It seems, however, that, while she was still suffering from severe pain, she noticed the movements of her mother's lips.
  • When she was not occupied, she wandered restlessly about the house, making strange though rarely unpleasant sounds.
  • This was in imitation of her mother's crooning to the baby.
  • She was pleased with anything which made a noise.
  • She always liked to stand by the piano when some one was playing and singing.
  • Enough appears in the accounts by Miss Keller's teacher to show the process by which she reads the lips with her fingers, the process by which she was taught to speak, and by which, of course, she can listen to conversation now.
  • The ability to read the lips helps Miss Keller in getting corrections of her pronunciation from Miss Sullivan and others, just as it was the means of her learning to speak at all, but it is rather an accomplishment than a necessity.
  • Of course, it was not easy at first to fly.
  • When Dr. Bell said this he was arguing his own case.
  • For it was Dr. Bell who first saw the principles that underlie Miss Sullivan's method, and explained the process by which Helen Keller absorbed language from books.
  • She excels other deaf people because she was taught as if she were normal.
  • Language was her liberator, and from the first she cherished it.
  • Miss Keller has given her account of it, and the whole matter was discussed in the first Volta Bureau Souvenir from which I quote at length:
  • * In this paper Miss Sullivan says: During this winter (1891-92) I went with her into the yard while a light snow was falling, and let her feel the falling flakes.
  • The teachers at the Institution expressed the opinion that the description did not appear in any book in raised print in that library; but one lady, Miss Marrett, took upon herself the task of examining books of poems in ordinary type, and was rewarded by finding the following lines in one of Longfellow's minor poems, entitled 'Snowflakes':
  • One warm, sunny day in early spring, when we were at the North, the balmy atmosphere appears to have brought to her mind the sentiment expressed by Longfellow in "Hiawatha," and she almost sings with the poet: "The ground was all aquiver with the stir of new life.
  • The original story was read to her from a copy of "Andersen's Stories," published by Leavitt & Allen Bros., and may be found on p. 97 of Part I. in that volume.
  • She was at work upon it about two weeks, writing a little each day, at her own pleasure.
  • Before Helen made her final copy of the story, it was suggested to her to change its title to "The Frost King," as more appropriate to the subject of which the story treated; to this she willingly assented.
  • She was utterly unable to recall either the name of the story or the book.
  • Careful examination was made of the books in raised print in the library of the Perkins Institution to learn if any extracts from this volume could be found there; but nothing was discovered.
  • But as she was not able to find her copy, and applications for the volume at bookstores in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Albany, and other places resulted only in failure, search was instituted for the author herself.
  • This became a difficult task, as her publishers in Philadelphia had retired from business many years ago; however, it was eventually discovered that her residence is at Wilmington, Delaware, and copies of the second edition of the book, 1889, were obtained from her.
  • No one shall be allowed to think it was anything wrong; and some day she will write a great, beautiful story or poem that will make many people happy.
  • Now he found out that his father's words were true, for a few days of warm weather had turned the green balls into rosebuds, and they were SO beautiful that it was enough to make Birdie stand still before them, his blue eyes dancing with delight and his little hands clasped tightly together.
  • She was playing on the pier with a wee brother.
  • She gave me a kiss and then ran away, because she was a shy little girl.
  • I wonder if you would like to have me tell you a pretty dream which I had a long time ago when I was a very little child?
  • Teacher says it was a day-dream, and she thinks you would be delighted to hear it.
  • One pleasant morning in the beautiful springtime, I thought I was sitting on the soft grass under my dear mother's window, looking very earnestly at the rose-bushes which were growing all around me.
  • It was quite early, the sun had not been up very long; the birds were just beginning to sing joyously.
  • I was a very happy little child with rosy cheeks, and large blue eyes, and the most beautiful golden ringlets you can imagine.
  • Well, one day King Frost was trying to think of some good that he could do with his treasure; and suddenly he concluded to send some of it to his kind neighbour, Santa Claus, to buy presents of food and clothing for the poor, that they might not suffer so much when King Winter went near their homes.
  • Still, for awhile, the frost fairies did not notice this strange occurrence, for they were down on the grass, so far below the tree-tops that the wonderful shower of treasure was a long time in reaching them; but at last one of them said, Hark!
  • Then looking more closely at the trees around, they saw that the treasure was all melting away, and that much of it was already spread over the leaves of the oak trees and maples, which were shining with their gorgeous dress of gold and bronze, crimson and emerald.
  • It was very beautiful; but the idle fairies were too much frightened at the mischief their disobedience had caused, to admire the beauty of the forest, and at once tried to hide themselves among the bushes, lest King Frost should come and punish them.
  • Of course, he soon noticed the brightness of the leaves, and discovered the cause, too, when he caught sight of the broken jars and vases from which the melted treasure was still dropping.
  • At length every jar and vase was cracked or broken, and the precious stones they contained were melting, too, and running in little streams over the trees and bushes of the forest.
  • Then looking around more closely, they saw that much of the treasure was already melted, for the oaks and maples were arrayed in gorgeous dresses of gold and crimson and emerald.
  • It was very beautiful, but the disobedient fairies were too frightened to notice the beauty of the trees.
  • Of course, he had not gone far when he noticed the brightness of the leaves, and he quickly guessed the cause when he saw the broken jars from which the treasure was still dropping.
  • At first King Frost was very angry, and the fairies trembled and crouched lower in their hiding-places, and I do not know what might have happened to them if just then a party of boys and girls had not entered the wood.
  • Now Helen, in her letter of February, 1890 (quoted above), alludes to this story of Miss Canby's as a dream "WHICH I HAD A LONG TIME AGO WHEN I WAS A VERY LITTLE CHILD."
  • The person said her story was called "Frost Fairies."
  • My heart was full of tears, for I love the beautiful truth with my whole heart and mind.
  • I thought very much about the sad news when teacher went to the doctor's; she was not here at dinner and I missed her.'
  • Soon after its appearance in print I was pained to learn, through the Goodson Gazette, that a portion of the story (eight or nine passages) is either a reproduction or adaptation of Miss Margaret Canby's "Frost Fairies."
  • The only person that we supposed might possibly have read the story to Helen was her friend, Mrs. Hopkins, whom she was visiting at the time in Brewster.
  • I have scarcely any doubt that Miss Canby's little book was read to Helen, by Mrs. Hopkins, in the summer of 1888.
  • She did not know the meaning of the word "plagiarism" until quite recently, when it was explained to her.
  • In this case Helen Keller held almost intact in her mind, unmixed with other ideas, the words of a story which at the time it was read to her she did not fully understand.
  • It was a word that created these thoughts in her mind.
  • Helen Keller writing "The Frost King" was building better than she knew and saying more than she meant.
  • In the early years of her education she had only good things to read; some were, indeed, trivial and not excellent in style, but not one was positively bad in manner or substance.
  • When she was twelve years old, she was asked what book she would take on a long railroad journey.
  • When she came to retell the story in a fuller form, the echo was still in her mind of the phrases she had written nine years before.
  • I discovered the true way to walk when I was a year old, and during the radiant summer days that followed I was never still a minute....
  • In the cold, dreary month of February, when I was nineteen months old, I had a serious illness.
  • But I was too young to realize what had happened.
  • When I awoke and found that all was dark and still, I suppose I thought it was night, and I must have wondered why day was so long coming.
  • Soon even my childish voice was stilled, because I had ceased to hear any sound.
  • But all was not lost!
  • The most precious, the most wonderful of His gifts was still mine.
  • When I was a little older I felt the need of some means of communication with those around me, and I began to make simple signs which my parents and friends readily understood; but it often happened that I was unable to express my thoughts intelligibly, and at such times I would give way to my angry feelings utterly....
  • I was never angry after that because I understood what my friends said to me, and I was very busy learning many wonderful things.
  • I was never still during the first glad days of my freedom.
  • I was continually spelling and acting out the words as I spelled them.
  • Everything was budding and blossoming.
  • A beautiful summer day had dawned, the day on which I was to make the acquaintance of a somber and mysterious friend.
  • As soon as breakfast was over we hurried off to the shore.
  • The beautiful, warm air was peculiarly fragrant, and I noticed it got cooler and fresher as we went on.
  • Suddenly we stopped, and I knew, without being told, the Sea was at my feet.
  • I knew, too, it was immense! awful! and for a moment some of the sunshine seemed to have gone out of the day.
  • In the years when she was growing out of childhood, her style lost its early simplicity and became stiff and, as she says, "periwigged."
  • In these years the fear came many times to Miss Sullivan lest the success of the child was to cease with childhood.
  • This was my first real experience in college life, and a delightful experience it was!
  • Tantalus, too, great as he was above all mortals, went down to the kingdom of the dead, never to return.
  • I was very fond of bananas, and one night I dreamed that I found a long string of them in the dining-room, near the cupboard, all peeled and deliciously ripe, and all I had to do was to stand under the string and eat as long as I could eat.
  • Its warm touch seemed so like a human caress, I really thought it was a sentient being, capable of loving and protecting me.
  • One cold winter night I was alone in my room.
  • Miss Sullivan had put out the light and gone away, thinking I was sound asleep.
  • It was only a dream, but I thought it real, and my heart sank within me.
  • Perhaps this was a confused recollection of the story I had heard not long before about Red Riding Hood.
  • The instant I felt its warmth I was reassured, and I sat a long time watching it climb higher and higher in shining waves.
  • "No, we do not want any," was the reply.
  • As this business was to be entered into without the usual capital, it may not be easy to conjecture where those means, that will still be indispensable to every such undertaking, were to be obtained.
  • He was only a little more weather-beaten than when I saw him last.
  • I have heard of a dog that barked at every stranger who approached his master's premises with clothes on, but was easily quieted by a naked thief.
  • Nevertheless, we will not forget that some Egyptian wheat was handed down to us by a mummy.
  • We are amused at beholding the costume of Henry VIII, or Queen Elizabeth, as much as if it was that of the King and Queen of the Cannibal Islands.
  • In our climate, in the summer, it was formerly almost solely a covering at night.
  • It was the natural yearning of that portion, any portion of our most primitive ancestor which still survived in us.
  • I have seen Penobscot Indians, in this town, living in tents of thin cotton cloth, while the snow was nearly a foot deep around them, and I thought that they would be glad to have it deeper to keep out the wind.
  • A comfortable house for a rude and hardy race, that lived mostly out of doors, was once made here almost entirely of such materials as Nature furnished ready to their hands.
  • It has created palaces, but it was not so easy to create noblemen and kings.
  • When he was refreshed with food and sleep, he contemplated his journey again.
  • He dwelt, as it were, in a tent in this world, and was either threading the valleys, or crossing the plains, or climbing the mountain-tops.
  • The man who independently plucked the fruits when he was hungry is become a farmer; and he who stood under a tree for shelter, a housekeeper.
  • The owner of the axe, as he released his hold on it, said that it was the apple of his eye; but I returned it sharper than I received it.
  • They were pleasant spring days, in which the winter of man's discontent was thawing as well as the earth, and the life that had lain torpid began to stretch itself.
  • On the 1st of April it rained and melted the ice, and in the early part of the day, which was very foggy, I heard a stray goose groping about over the pond and cackling as if lost, or like the spirit of the fog.
  • Each stick was carefully mortised or tenoned by its stump, for I had borrowed other tools by this time.
  • Before I had done I was more the friend than the foe of the pine tree, though I had cut down some of them, having become better acquainted with it.
  • Sometimes a rambler in the wood was attracted by the sound of my axe, and we chatted pleasantly over the chips which I had made.
  • By the middle of April, for I made no haste in my work, but rather made the most of it, my house was framed and ready for the raising.
  • James Collins' shanty was considered an uncommonly fine one.
  • When I called to see it he was not at home.
  • I walked about the outside, at first unobserved from within, the window was so deep and high.
  • It was of small dimensions, with a peaked cottage roof, and not much else to be seen, the dirt being raised five feet all around as if it were a compost heap.
  • The roof was the soundest part, though a good deal warped and made brittle by the sun.
  • Doorsill there was none, but a perennial passage for the hens under the door board.
  • It was dark, and had a dirt floor for the most part, dank, clammy, and aguish, only here a board and there a board which would not bear removal.
  • This he assured me was the only encumbrance.
  • He was there to represent spectatordom, and help make this seemingly insignificant event one with the removal of the gods of Troy.
  • It was but two hours' work.
  • No man was ever more honored in the character of his raisers than I. They are destined, I trust, to assist at the raising of loftier structures one day.
  • When it stormed before my bread was baked, I fixed a few boards over the fire, and sat under them to watch my loaf, and passed some pleasant hours in that way.
  • Before winter I built a chimney, and shingled the sides of my house, which were already impervious to rain, with imperfect and sappy shingles made of the first slice of the log, whose edges I was obliged to straighten with a plane.
  • To my astonishment I was informed on leaving college that I had studied navigation!--why, if I had taken one turn down the harbor I should have known more about it.
  • They are but improved means to an unimproved end, an end which it was already but too easy to arrive at; as railroads lead to Boston or New York.
  • The whole lot contains eleven acres, mostly growing up to pines and hickories, and was sold the preceding season for eight dollars and eight cents an acre.
  • One farmer said that it was "good for nothing but to raise cheeping squirrels on."
  • I was obliged to hire a team and a man for the plowing, though I held the plow myself.
  • The seed corn was given me.
  • I was more independent than any farmer in Concord, for I was not anchored to a house or farm, but could follow the bent of my genius, which is a very crooked one, every moment.
  • In Arcadia, when I was there, I did not see any hammering stone.
  • The grandeur of Thebes was a vulgar grandeur.
  • Nothing was given me of which I have not rendered some account.
  • It was, for nearly two years after this, rye and Indian meal without yeast, potatoes, rice, a very little salt pork, molasses, and salt; and my drink, water.
  • It was fit that I should live on rice, mainly, who love so well the philosophy of India.
  • To meet the objections of some inveterate cavillers, I may as well state, that if I dined out occasionally, as I always had done, and I trust shall have opportunities to do again, it was frequently to the detriment of my domestic arrangements.
  • Even the little variety which I used was a yielding to the demands of appetite, and not of health.
  • Bread I at first made of pure Indian meal and salt, genuine hoe-cakes, which I baked before my fire out of doors on a shingle or the end of a stick of timber sawed off in building my house; but it was wont to get smoked and to have a piny flavor.
  • In cold weather it was no little amusement to bake several small loaves of this in succession, tending and turning them as carefully as an Egyptian his hatching eggs.
  • As for a habitat, if I were not permitted still to squat, I might purchase one acre at the same price for which the land I cultivated was sold--namely, eight dollars and eight cents.
  • But as it was, I considered that I enhanced the value of the land by squatting on it.
  • He was a lucky fox that left his tail in the trap.
  • Among the rest was a dried tapeworm.
  • The Mexicans also practised a similar purification at the end of every fifty-two years, in the belief that it was time for the world to come to an end.
  • As I did not teach for the good of my fellow-men, but simply for a livelihood, this was a failure.
  • I was actually afraid that I might by that time be doing what is called a good business.
  • It was easy to see that they could not long be companions or co-operate, since one would not operate at all.
  • Howard was no doubt an exceedingly kind and worthy man in his way, and has his reward; but, comparatively speaking, what are a hundred Howards to us, if their philanthropy do not help us in our best estate, when we are most worthy to be helped?
  • This ducking was the very thing he needed.
  • A robust poor man, one sunny day here in Concord, praised a fellow-townsman to me, because, as he said, he was kind to the poor; meaning himself.
  • I discovered many a site for a house not likely to be soon improved, which some might have thought too far from the village, but to my eyes the village was too far from it.
  • My imagination carried me so far that I even had the refusal of several farms--the refusal was all I wanted--but I never got my fingers burned by actual possession.
  • The nearest that I came to actual possession was when I bought the Hollowell place, and had begun to sort my seeds, and collected materials with which to make a wheelbarrow to carry it on or off with; but before the owner gave me a deed of it, his wife--every man has such a wife--changed her mind and wished to keep it, and he offered me ten dollars to release him.
  • Now, to speak the truth, I had but ten cents in the world, and it surpassed my arithmetic to tell, if I was that man who had ten cents, or who had a farm, or ten dollars, or all together.
  • I was in haste to buy it, before the proprietor finished getting out some rocks, cutting down the hollow apple trees, and grubbing up some young birches which had sprung up in the pasture, or, in short, had made any more of his improvements.
  • All that I could say, then, with respect to farming on a large scale--I have always cultivated a garden--was, that I had had my seeds ready.
  • The present was my next experiment of this kind, which I purpose to describe more at length, for convenience putting the experience of two years into one.
  • This was an airy and unplastered cabin, fit to entertain a travelling god, and where a goddess might trail her garments.
  • This frame, so slightly clad, was a sort of crystallization around me, and reacted on the builder.
  • It was suggestive somewhat as a picture in outlines.
  • It was not so much within doors as behind a door where I sat, even in the rainiest weather.
  • Such was not my abode, for I found myself suddenly neighbor to the birds; not by having imprisoned one, but having caged myself near them.
  • Though the view from my door was still more contracted, I did not feel crowded or confined in the least.
  • There was pasture enough for my imagination.
  • Every morning was a cheerful invitation to make my life of equal simplicity, and I may say innocence, with Nature herself.
  • I got up early and bathed in the pond; that was a religious exercise, and one of the best things which I did.
  • I was as much affected by the faint hum of a mosquito making its invisible and unimaginable tour through my apartment at earliest dawn, when I was sitting with door and windows open, as I could be by any trumpet that ever sang of fame.
  • It was Homer's requiem; itself an Iliad and Odyssey in the air, singing its own wrath and wanderings.
  • I have never yet met a man who was quite awake.
  • What news! how much more important to know what that is which was never old!
  • One of his father's ministers having discovered him, revealed to him what he was, and the misconception of his character was removed, and he knew himself to be a prince.
  • The oldest Egyptian or Hindoo philosopher raised a corner of the veil from the statue of the divinity; and still the trembling robe remains raised, and I gaze upon as fresh a glory as he did, since it was I in him that was then so bold, and it is he in me that now reviews the vision.
  • No dust has settled on that robe; no time has elapsed since that divinity was revealed.
  • I read one or two shallow books of travel in the intervals of my work, till that employment made me ashamed of myself, and I asked where it was then that I lived.
  • The day advanced as if to light some work of mine; it was morning, and lo, now it is evening, and nothing memorable is accomplished.
  • I had this advantage, at least, in my mode of life, over those who were obliged to look abroad for amusement, to society and the theatre, that my life itself was become my amusement and never ceased to be novel.
  • Housework was a pleasant pastime.
  • When my floor was dirty, I rose early, and, setting all my furniture out of doors on the grass, bed and bedstead making but one budget, dashed water on the floor, and sprinkled white sand from the pond on it, and then with a broom scrubbed it clean and white; and by the time the villagers had broken their fast the morning sun had dried my house sufficiently to allow me to move in again, and my meditations were almost uninterupted.
  • It was pleasant to see my whole household effects out on the grass, making a little pile like a gypsy's pack, and my three-legged table, from which I did not remove the books and pen and ink, standing amid the pines and hickories.
  • I was sometimes tempted to stretch an awning over them and take my seat there.
  • It was worth the while to see the sun shine on these things, and hear the free wind blow on them; so much more interesting most familiar objects look out of doors than in the house.
  • It looked as if this was the way these forms came to be transferred to our furniture, to tables, chairs, and bedsteads--because they once stood in their midst.
  • My house was on the side of a hill, immediately on the edge of the larger wood, in the midst of a young forest of pitch pines and hickories, and half a dozen rods from the pond, to which a narrow footpath led down the hill.
  • Its broad pinnate tropical leaf was pleasant though strange to look on.
  • Have not men improved somewhat in punctuality since the railroad was invented?
  • Here goes lumber from the Maine woods, which did not go out to sea in the last freshet, risen four dollars on the thousand because of what did go out or was split up; pine, spruce, cedar--first, second, third, and fourth qualities, so lately all of one quality, to wave over the bear, and moose, and caribou.
  • Sometimes, on Sundays, I heard the bells, the Lincoln, Acton, Bedford, or Concord bell, when the wind was favorable, a faint, sweet, and, as it were, natural melody, worth importing into the wilderness.
  • It is new information and not merely a repetition of what was presented in the first chapter.
  • At evening, the distant lowing of some cow in the horizon beyond the woods sounded sweet and melodious, and at first I would mistake it for the voices of certain minstrels by whom I was sometimes serenaded, who might be straying over hill and dale; but soon I was not unpleasantly disappointed when it was prolonged into the cheap and natural music of the cow.
  • Sometimes one would circle round and round me in the woods a few feet distant as if tethered by a string, when probably I was near its eggs.
  • I was also serenaded by a hooting owl.
  • Nay, I was frequently notified of the passage of a traveller along the highway sixty rods off by the scent of his pipe.
  • I have never felt lonesome, or in the least oppressed by a sense of solitude, but once, and that was a few weeks after I came to the woods, when, for an hour, I doubted if the near neighborhood of man was not essential to a serene and healthy life.
  • To be alone was something unpleasant.
  • But I was at the same time conscious of a slight insanity in my mood, and seemed to foresee my recovery.
  • In those driving northeast rains which tried the village houses so, when the maids stood ready with mop and pail in front entries to keep the deluge out, I sat behind my door in my little house, which was all entry, and thoroughly enjoyed its protection.
  • I answered that I was very sure I liked it passably well; I was not joking.
  • It was a kind of fiction, a work of the imagination only, so far as he was concerned.
  • I have heard of a man lost in the woods and dying of famine and exhaustion at the foot of a tree, whose loneliness was relieved by the grotesque visions with which, owing to bodily weakness, his diseased imagination surrounded him, and which he believed to be real.
  • An elderly dame, too, dwells in my neighborhood, invisible to most persons, in whose odorous herb garden I love to stroll sometimes, gathering simples and listening to her fables; for she has a genius of unequalled fertility, and her memory runs back farther than mythology, and she can tell me the original of every fable, and on what fact every one is founded, for the incidents occurred when she was young.
  • She was probably the only thoroughly sound-conditioned, healthy, and robust young lady that ever walked the globe, and wherever she came it was spring.
  • When visitors came in larger and unexpected numbers there was but the third chair for them all, but they generally economized the room by standing up.
  • As the conversation began to assume a loftier and grander tone, we gradually shoved our chairs farther apart till they touched the wall in opposite corners, and then commonly there was not room enough.
  • My "best" room, however, my withdrawing room, always ready for company, on whose carpet the sun rarely fell, was the pine wood behind my house.
  • As for lodging, it is true they were but poorly entertained, though what they found an inconvenience was no doubt intended for an honor; but as far as eating was concerned, I do not see how the Indians could have done better.
  • Another time when Winslow visited them, it being a season of plenty with them, there was no deficiency in this respect.
  • In this respect, my company was winnowed by my mere distance from town.
  • I had withdrawn so far within the great ocean of solitude, into which the rivers of society empty, that for the most part, so far as my needs were concerned, only the finest sediment was deposited around me.
  • To him Homer was a great writer, though what his writing was about he did not know.
  • He was about twenty-eight years old, and had left Canada and his father's house a dozen years before to work in the States, and earn money to buy a farm with at last, perhaps in his native country.
  • He was a skilful chopper, and indulged in some flourishes and ornaments in his art.
  • In him the animal man chiefly was developed.
  • I asked him once if he was not sometimes tired at night, after working all day; and he answered, with a sincere and serious look, "Gorrappit, I never was tired in my life."
  • He was so genuine and unsophisticated that no introduction would serve to introduce him, more than if you introduced a woodchuck to your neighbor.
  • He was so simply and naturally humble--if he can be called humble who never aspires--that humility was no distinct quality in him, nor could he conceive of it.
  • If you told him that such a one was coming, he did as if he thought that anything so grand would expect nothing of himself, but take all the responsibility on itself, and let him be forgotten still.
  • He had worn the home-made Vermont gray, he said, and that was good.
  • He had soaked hemlock leaves in water and drank it, and thought that was better than water in warm weather.
  • If I suggested any improvement in his mode of life, he merely answered, without expressing any regret, that it was too late.
  • Half-witted men from the almshouse and elsewhere came to see me; but I endeavored to make them exercise all the wit they had, and make their confessions to me; in such cases making wit the theme of our conversation; and so was compensated.
  • Indeed, I found some of them to be wiser than the so-called overseers of the poor and selectmen of the town, and thought it was time that the tables were turned.
  • With respect to wit, I learned that there was not much difference between the half and the whole.
  • It was the Lord's will, I suppose.
  • And there he was to prove the truth of his words.
  • He was a metaphysical puzzle to me.
  • I have rarely met a fellowman on such promising ground--it was so simple and sincere and so true all that he said.
  • I did not know at first but it was the result of a wise policy.
  • Men of business, even farmers, thought only of solitude and employment, and of the great distance at which I dwelt from something or other; and though they said that they loved a ramble in the woods occasionally, it was obvious that they did not.
  • Children come a-berrying, railroad men taking a Sunday morning walk in clean shirts, fishermen and hunters, poets and philosophers; in short, all honest pilgrims, who came out to the woods for freedom's sake, and really left the village behind, I was ready to greet with--"Welcome, Englishmen! welcome, Englishmen!" for I had had communication with that race.
  • What was the meaning of this so steady and self-respecting, this small Herculean labor, I knew not.
  • When I was four years old, as I well remember, I was brought from Boston to this my native town, through these very woods and this field, to the pond.
  • But soon my homestead was out of their sight and thought.
  • It was the only open and cultivated field for a great distance on either side of the road, so they made the most of it; and sometimes the man in the field heard more of travellers' gossip and comment than was meant for his ear: "Beans so late! peas so late!"--for I continued to plant when others had begun to hoe--the ministerial husbandman had not suspected it.
  • This was one field not in Mr. Coleman's report.
  • Mine was, as it were, the connecting link between wild and cultivated fields; as some states are civilized, and others half-civilized, and others savage or barbarous, so my field was, though not in a bad sense, a half-cultivated field.
  • But this was not corn, and so it was safe from such enemies as he.
  • It was a cheap sort of top dressing in which I had entire faith.
  • When my hoe tinkled against the stones, that music echoed to the woods and the sky, and was an accompaniment to my labor which yielded an instant and immeasurable crop.
  • It was no longer beans that I hoed, nor I that hoed beans; and I remembered with as much pity as pride, if I remembered at all, my acquaintances who had gone to the city to attend the oratorios.
  • And when the sound died quite away, and the hum had ceased, and the most favorable breezes told no tale, I knew that they had got the last drone of them all safely into the Middlesex hive, and that now their minds were bent on the honey with which it was smeared.
  • I felt proud to know that the liberties of Massachusetts and of our fatherland were in such safe keeping; and as I turned to my hoeing again I was filled with an inexpressible confidence, and pursued my labor cheerfully with a calm trust in the future.
  • When there were several bands of musicians, it sounded as if all the village was a vast bellows and all the buildings expanded and collapsed alternately with a din.
  • But sometimes it was a really noble and inspiring strain that reached these woods, and the trumpet that sings of fame, and I felt as if I could spit a Mexican with a good relish--for why should we always stand for trifles?--and looked round for a woodchuck or a skunk to exercise my chivalry upon.
  • This was one of the great days; though the sky had from my clearing only the same everlastingly great look that it wears daily, and I saw no difference in it.
  • It was a singular experience that long acquaintance which I cultivated with beans, what with planting, and hoeing, and harvesting, and threshing, and picking over and selling them--the last was the hardest of all--I might add eating, for I did taste.
  • I was determined to know beans.
  • It was on the whole a rare amusement, which, continued too long, might have become a dissipation.
  • After hoeing, or perhaps reading and writing, in the forenoon, I usually bathed again in the pond, swimming across one of its coves for a stint, and washed the dust of labor from my person, or smoothed out the last wrinkle which study had made, and for the afternoon was absolutely free.
  • They, being commonly out of doors, heard whatever was in the wind.
  • Besides, there was a still more terrible standing invitation to call at every one of these houses, and company expected about these times.
  • It was very pleasant, when I stayed late in town, to launch myself into the night, especially if it was dark and tempestuous, and set sail from some bright village parlor or lecture room, with a bag of rye or Indian meal upon my shoulder, for my snug harbor in the woods, having made all tight without and withdrawn under hatches with a merry crew of thoughts, leaving only my outer man at the helm, or even tying up the helm when it was plain sailing.
  • I was never cast away nor distressed in any weather, though I encountered some severe storms.
  • I have heard of many going astray even in the village streets, when the darkness was so thick that you could cut it with a knife, as the saying is.
  • However, I was released the next day, obtained my mended shoe, and returned to the woods in season to get my dinner of huckleberries on Fair Haven Hill.
  • I was never molested by any person but those who represented the State.
  • I never fastened my door night or day, though I was to be absent several days; not even when the next fall I spent a fortnight in the woods of Maine.
  • Perhaps on that spring morning when Adam and Eve were driven out of Eden Walden Pond was already in existence, and even then breaking up in a gentle spring rain accompanied with mist and a southerly wind, and covered with myriads of ducks and geese, which had not heard of the fall, when still such pure lakes sufficed them.
  • I can remember when it was a foot or two lower, and also when it was at least five feet higher, than when I lived by it.
  • If the name was not derived from that of some English locality--Saffron Walden, for instance--one might suppose that it was called originally Walled-in Pond.
  • The pond was my well ready dug.
  • The temperature of the Boiling Spring the same day was 45º, or the warmest of any water tried, though it is the coldest that I know of in summer, when, beside, shallow and stagnant surface water is not mingled with it.
  • It was as good when a week old as the day it was dipped, and had no taste of the pump.
  • It was made of two white pine logs dug out and pinned together, and was cut off square at the ends.
  • It was very clumsy, but lasted a great many years before it became water-logged and perhaps sank to the bottom.
  • He did not know whose it was; it belonged to the pond.
  • When I first paddled a boat on Walden, it was completely surrounded by thick and lofty pine and oak woods, and in some of its coves grape-vines had run over the trees next the water and formed bowers under which a boat could pass.
  • It is the work of a brave man surely, in whom there was no guile!
  • A walk through the woods thither was often my recreation.
  • It was worth the while, if only to feel the wind blow on your cheek freely, and see the waves run, and remember the life of mariners.
  • It did not turn his mill, and it was no privilege to him to behold it.
  • It was even supposed by some that the pond had sunk, and this was one of the primitive forest that formerly stood there.
  • In the spring of '49 I talked with the man who lives nearest the pond in Sudbury, who told me that it was he who got out this tree ten or fifteen years before.
  • As near as he could remember, it stood twelve or fifteen rods from the shore, where the water was thirty or forty feet deep.
  • He sawed a channel in the ice toward the shore, and hauled it over and along and out on to the ice with oxen; but, before he had gone far in his work, he was surprised to find that it was wrong end upward, with the stumps of the branches pointing down, and the small end firmly fastened in the sandy bottom.
  • It was about a foot in diameter at the big end, and he had expected to get a good saw-log, but it was so rotten as to be fit only for fuel, if for that.
  • His father, eighty years old, could not remember when it was not there.
  • It was a lake of rainbow light, in which, for a short while, I lived like a dolphin.
  • One who visited me declared that the shadows of some Irishmen before him had no halo about them, that it was only natives that were so distinguished.
  • This was probably the same phenomenon to which I have referred, which is especially observed in the morning, but also at other times, and even by moonlight.
  • It was one of those afternoons which seem indefinitely long before one, in which many events may happen, a large portion of our natural life, though it was already half spent when I started.
  • I had sat there many times of old before the ship was built that floated his family to America.
  • The shower was now over, and a rainbow above the eastern woods promised a fair evening; so I took my departure.
  • But he, poor man, disturbed only a couple of fins while I was catching a fair string, and he said it was his luck; but when we changed seats in the boat luck changed seats too.
  • It was insignificant and unnecessary, and cost more than it came to.
  • Yet, for my part, I was never unusually squeamish; I could sometimes eat a fried rat with a good relish, if it were necessary.
  • Nothing was too trivial for the Hindoo lawgiver, however offensive it may be to modern taste.
  • It was a rather cool evening, and some of his neighbors were apprehending a frost.
  • It was no more than the scurf of his skin, which was constantly shuffled off.
  • Sometimes I had a companion in my fishing, who came through the village to my house from the other side of the town, and the catching of the dinner was as much a social exercise as the eating of it.
  • Was that a farmer's noon horn which sounded from beyond the woods just now?
  • Angleworms are rarely to be met with in these parts, where the soil was never fattened with manure; the race is nearly extinct.
  • Let me see; where was I?
  • Methinks I was nearly in this frame of mind; the world lay about at this angle.
  • I was as near being resolved into the essence of things as ever I was in my life.
  • What was it that I was thinking of?
  • It was a very hazy day.
  • I know not whether it was the dumps or a budding ecstasy.
  • When I was building, one of these had its nest underneath the house, and before I had laid the second floor, and swept out the shavings, would come out regularly at lunch time and pick up the crumbs at my feet.
  • So perfect is this instinct, that once, when I had laid them on the leaves again, and one accidentally fell on its side, it was found with the rest in exactly the same position ten minutes afterward.
  • Such an eye was not born when the bird was, but is coeval with the sky it reflects.
  • I had dug out the spring and made a well of clear gray water, where I could dip up a pailful without roiling it, and thither I went for this purpose almost every day in midsummer, when the pond was warmest.
  • I was witness to events of a less peaceful character.
  • Looking farther, I was surprised to find that the chips were covered with such combatants, that it was not a duellum, but a bellum, a war between two races of ants, the red always pitted against the black, and frequently two red ones to one black.
  • The legions of these Myrmidons covered all the hills and vales in my wood-yard, and the ground was already strewn with the dead and dying, both red and black.
  • It was the only battle which I have ever witnessed, the only battle-field I ever trod while the battle was raging; internecine war; the red republicans on the one hand, and the black imperialists on the other.
  • It was evident that their battle-cry was "Conquer or die."
  • Or perchance he was some Achilles, who had nourished his wrath apart, and had now come to avenge or rescue his Patroclus.
  • For numbers and for carnage it was an Austerlitz or Dresden.
  • There was not one hireling there.
  • I never learned which party was victorious, nor the cause of the war; but I felt for the rest of that day as if I had had my feelings excited and harrowed by witnessing the struggle, the ferocity and carnage, of a human battle before my door.
  • Once I was surprised to see a cat walking along the stony shore of the pond, for they rarely wander so far from home.
  • The surprise was mutual.
  • But I was more than a match for him on the surface.
  • I pursued with a paddle and he dived, but when he came up I was nearer than before.
  • It was surprising how quickly he made up his mind and put his resolve into execution.
  • While he was thinking one thing in his brain, I was endeavoring to divine his thought in mine.
  • It was a pretty game, played on the smooth surface of the pond, a man against a loon.
  • I found that it was as well for me to rest on my oars and wait his reappearing as to endeavor to calculate where he would rise; for again and again, when I was straining my eyes over the surface one way, I would suddenly be startled by his unearthly laugh behind me.
  • He was indeed a silly loon, I thought.
  • It was surprising to see how serenely he sailed off with unruffled breast when he came to the surface, doing all the work with his webbed feet beneath.
  • Though the sky was by this time overcast, the pond was so smooth that I could see where he broke the surface when I did not hear him.
  • The barberry's brilliant fruit was likewise food for my eyes merely; but I collected a small store of wild apples for coddling, which the proprietor and travellers had overlooked.
  • It was very exciting at that season to roam the then boundless chestnut woods of Lincoln--they now sleep their long sleep under the railroad--with a bag on my shoulder, and a stick to open burs with in my hand, for I did not always wait for the frost, amid the rustling of leaves and the loud reproofs of the red squirrels and the jays, whose half-consumed nuts I sometimes stole, for the burs which they had selected were sure to contain sound ones.
  • They grew also behind my house, and one large tree, which almost overshadowed it, was, when in flower, a bouquet which scented the whole neighborhood, but the squirrels and the jays got most of its fruit; the last coming in flocks early in the morning and picking the nuts out of the burs before they fell, I relinquished these trees to them and visited the more distant woods composed wholly of chestnut.
  • The mortar on them was fifty years old, and was said to be still growing harder; but this is one of those sayings which men love to repeat whether they are true or not.
  • However that may be, I was struck by the peculiar toughness of the steel which bore so many violent blows without being worn out.
  • This was toward the end of summer.
  • It was now November.
  • My house never pleased my eye so much after it was plastered, though I was obliged to confess that it was more comfortable.
  • My dwelling was small, and I could hardly entertain an echo in it; but it seemed larger for being a single apartment and remote from neighbors.
  • All the attractions of a house were concentrated in one room; it was kitchen, chamber, parlor, and keeping-room; and whatever satisfaction parent or child, master or servant, derive from living in a house, I enjoyed it all.
  • I did not plaster till it was freezing weather.
  • In lathing I was pleased to be able to send home each nail with a single blow of the hammer, and it was my ambition to transfer the plaster from the board to the wall neatly and rapidly.
  • I remembered the story of a conceited fellow, who, in fine clothes, was wont to lounge about the village once, giving advice to workmen.
  • I was surprised to see how thirsty the bricks were which drank up all the moisture in my plaster before I had smoothed it, and how many pailfuls of water it takes to christen a new hearth.
  • The beauty of the ice was gone, and it was too late to study the bottom.
  • The new ice had formed around and under the bubble, so that it was included between the two ices.
  • My employment out of doors now was to collect the dead wood in the forest, bringing it in my hands or on my shoulders, or sometimes trailing a dead pine tree under each arm to my shed.
  • An old forest fence which had seen its best days was a great haul for me.
  • I sacrificed it to Vulcan, for it was past serving the god Terminus.
  • There was also the driftwood of the pond.
  • In the course of the summer I had discovered a raft of pitch pine logs with the bark on, pinned together by the Irish when the railroad was built.
  • After soaking two years and then lying high six months it was perfectly sound, though waterlogged past drying.
  • It is as precious to us as it was to our Saxon and Norman ancestors.
  • In this town the price of wood rises almost steadily, and the only question is, how much higher it is to be this year than it was the last.
  • As my driver prophesied when I was plowing, they warmed me twice--once while I was splitting them, and again when they were on the fire, so that no fuel could give out more heat.
  • As for the axe, I was advised to get the village blacksmith to "jump" it; but I jumped him, and, putting a hickory helve from the woods into it, made it do.
  • If it was dull, it was at least hung true.
  • My house was not empty though I was gone.
  • It was as if I had left a cheerful housekeeper behind.
  • It was I and Fire that lived there; and commonly my housekeeper proved trustworthy.
  • But my house occupied so sunny and sheltered a position, and its roof was so low, that I could afford to let the fire go out in the middle of almost any winter day.
  • Some of my friends spoke as if I was coming to the woods on purpose to freeze myself.
  • Cooking was then, for the most part, no longer a poetic, but merely a chemic process.
  • I weathered some merry snow-storms, and spent some cheerful winter evenings by my fireside, while the snow whirled wildly without, and even the hooting of the owl was hushed.
  • At length, in the war of 1812, her dwelling was set on fire by English soldiers, prisoners on parole, when she was away, and her cat and dog and hens were all burned up together.
  • Farther down the hill, on the left, on the old road in the woods, are marks of some homestead of the Stratton family; whose orchard once covered all the slope of Brister's Hill, but was long since killed out by pitch pines, excepting a few stumps, whose old roots furnish still the wild stocks of many a thrifty village tree.
  • It was about the size of mine.
  • It was set on fire by mischievous boys, one Election night, if I do not mistake.
  • We thought it was far south over the woods--we who had run to fires before--barn, shop, or dwelling-house, or all together.
  • At first we thought to throw a frog-pond on to it; but concluded to let it burn, it was so far gone and so worthless.
  • It chanced that I walked that way across the fields the following night, about the same hour, and hearing a low moaning at this spot, I drew near in the dark, and discovered the only survivor of the family that I know, the heir of both its virtues and its vices, who alone was interested in this burning, lying on his stomach and looking over the cellar wall at the still smouldering cinders beneath, muttering to himself, as is his wont.
  • He gazed into the cellar from all sides and points of view by turns, always lying down to it, as if there was some treasure, which he remembered, concealed between the stones, where there was absolutely nothing but a heap of bricks and ashes.
  • The house being gone, he looked at what there was left.
  • One day in midsummer, when I was hoeing, a man who was carrying a load of pottery to market stopped his horse against my field and inquired concerning Wyman the younger.
  • I had read of the potter's clay and wheel in Scripture, but it had never occurred to me that the pots we use were not such as had come down unbroken from those days, or grown on trees like gourds somewhere, and I was pleased to hear that so fictile an art was ever practiced in my neighborhood.
  • Quoil, he was called.
  • His trade here was that of a ditcher.
  • He was a man of manners, like one who had seen the world, and was capable of more civil speech than you could well attend to.
  • He wore a greatcoat in midsummer, being affected with the trembling delirium, and his face was the color of carmine.
  • Before his house was pulled down, when his comrades avoided it as "an unlucky castle," I visited it.
  • The skin of a woodchuck was freshly stretched upon the back of the house, a trophy of his last Waterloo; but no warm cap or mittens would he want more.
  • Sometimes the well dent is visible, where once a spring oozed; now dry and tearless grass; or it was covered deep--not to be discovered till some late day--with a flat stone under the sod, when the last of the race departed.
  • But no friendly Indian concerned himself about me; nor needed he, for the master of the house was at home.
  • When the farmers could not get to the woods and swamps with their teams, and were obliged to cut down the shade trees before their houses, and, when the crust was harder, cut off the trees in the swamps, ten feet from the ground, as it appeared the next spring.
  • Nor was it much better by the carriage road from Brister's Hill.
  • Broadway was still and deserted in comparison.
  • Great Expecter! to converse with whom was a New England Night's Entertainment.
  • There was one other with whom I had "solid seasons," long to be remembered, at his house in the village, and who looked in upon me from time to time; but I had no more for society there.
  • When I crossed Flint's Pond, after it was covered with snow, though I had often paddled about and skated over it, it was so unexpectedly wide and so strange that I could think of nothing but Baffin's Bay.
  • Walden, being like the rest usually bare of snow, or with only shallow and interrupted drifts on it, was my yard where I could walk freely when the snow was nearly two feet deep on a level elsewhere and the villagers were confined to their streets.
  • One night in the beginning of winter, before the pond froze over, about nine o'clock, I was startled by the loud honking of a goose, and, stepping to the door, heard the sound of their wings like a tempest in the woods as they flew low over my house.
  • It was one of the most thrilling discords I ever heard.
  • I also heard the whooping of the ice in the pond, my great bed-fellow in that part of Concord, as if it were restless in its bed and would fain turn over, were troubled with flatulency and had dreams; or I was waked by the cracking of the ground by the frost, as if some one had driven a team against my door, and in the morning would find a crack in the earth a quarter of a mile long and a third of an inch wide.
  • They were manifestly thieves, and I had not much respect for them; but the squirrels, though at first shy, went to work as if they were taking what was their own.
  • They were so familiar that at length one alighted on an armful of wood which I was carrying in, and pecked at the sticks without fear.
  • The squirrels also grew at last to be quite familiar, and occasionally stepped upon my shoe, when that was the nearest way.
  • In dark winter mornings, or in short winter afternoons, I sometimes heard a pack of hounds threading all the woods with hounding cry and yelp, unable to resist the instinct of the chase, and the note of the hunting-horn at intervals, proving that man was in the rear.
  • A hunter told me that he once saw a fox pursued by hounds burst out on to Walden when the ice was covered with shallow puddles, run part way across, and then return to the same shore.
  • But I fear that he was not the wiser for all I told him, for every time I attempted to answer his questions he interrupted me by asking, "What do you do here?"
  • Late in the afternoon, as he was resting in the thick woods south of Walden, he heard the voice of the hounds far over toward Fair Haven still pursuing the fox; and on they came, their hounding cry which made all the woods ring sounding nearer and nearer, now from Well Meadow, now from the Baker Farm.
  • Then the hunter came forward and stood in their midst, and the mystery was solved.
  • One man still preserves the horns of the last deer that was killed in this vicinity, and another has told me the particulars of the hunt in which his uncle was engaged.
  • At midnight, when there was a moon, I sometimes met with hounds in my path prowling about the woods, which would skulk out of my way, as if afraid, and stand silent amid the bushes till I had passed.
  • Not without reason was its slenderness.
  • Such then was its nature.
  • As I was desirous to recover the long lost bottom of Walden Pond, I surveyed it carefully, before the ice broke up, early in '46, with compass and chain and sounding line.
  • The greatest depth was exactly one hundred and two feet; to which may be added the five feet which it has risen since, making one hundred and seven.
  • I am thankful that this pond was made deep and pure for a symbol.
  • As I sounded through the ice I could determine the shape of the bottom with greater accuracy than is possible in surveying harbors which do not freeze over, and I was surprised at its general regularity.
  • In proportion as the mouth of the cove was wider compared with its length, the water over the bar was deeper compared with that in the basin.
  • The deepest part was found to be within one hundred feet of this, still farther in the direction to which I had inclined, and was only one foot deeper, namely, sixty feet.
  • They also showed me in another place what they thought was a "leach-hole," through which the pond leaked out under a hill into a neighboring meadow, pushing me out on a cake of ice to see it.
  • It was a small cavity under ten feet of water; but I think that I can warrant the pond not to need soldering till they find a worse leak than that.
  • While I was surveying, the ice, which was sixteen inches thick, undulated under a slight wind like water.
  • At one rod from the shore its greatest fluctuation, when observed by means of a level on land directed toward a graduated staff on the ice, was three quarters of an inch, though the ice appeared firmly attached to the shore.
  • It was probably greater in the middle.
  • This was somewhat like cutting a hole in the bottom of a ship to let the water out.
  • Sometimes, also, when the ice was covered with shallow puddles, I saw a double shadow of myself, one standing on the head of the other, one on the ice, the other on the trees or hillside.
  • They said that a gentleman farmer, who was behind the scenes, wanted to double his money, which, as I understood, amounted to half a million already; but in order to cover each one of his dollars with another, he took off the only coat, ay, the skin itself, of Walden Pond in the midst of a hard winter.
  • They told me that in a good day they could get out a thousand tons, which was the yield of about one acre.
  • This heap, made in the winter of '46-7 and estimated to contain ten thousand tons, was finally covered with hay and boards; and though it was unroofed the following July, and a part of it carried off, the rest remaining exposed to the sun, it stood over that summer and the next winter, and was not quite melted till September, 1848.
  • I have noticed that a portion of Walden which in the state of water was green will often, when frozen, appear from the same point of view blue.
  • They told me that they had some in the ice-houses at Fresh Pond five years old which was as good as ever.
  • But such was not the effect on Walden that year, for she had soon got a thick new garment to take the place of the old.
  • The ice in the shallowest part was at this time several inches thinner than in the middle.
  • Ice has its grain as well as wood, and when a cake begins to rot or "comb," that is, assume the appearance of honeycomb, whatever may be its position, the air cells are at right angles with what was the water surface.
  • It took a short siesta at noon, and boomed once more toward night, as the sun was withdrawing his influence.
  • On the 13th of March, after I had heard the bluebird, song sparrow, and red-wing, the ice was still nearly a foot thick.
  • In 1845 Walden was first completely open on the 1st of April; in '46, the 25th of March; in '47, the 8th of April; in '51, the 28th of March; in '52, the 18th of April; in '53, the 23d of March; in '54, about the 7th of April.
  • It was a warm day, and he was surprised to see so great a body of ice remaining.
  • The material was sand of every degree of fineness and of various rich colors, commonly mixed with a little clay.
  • When the frost comes out in the spring, and even in a thawing day in the winter, the sand begins to flow down the slopes like lava, sometimes bursting out through the snow and overflowing it where no sand was to be seen before.
  • They were wholly deaf to my arguments, or failed to perceive their force, and fell into a strain of invective that was irresistible.
  • Walden was dead and is alive again.
  • Suddenly an influx of light filled my house, though the evening was at hand, and the clouds of winter still overhung it, and the eaves were dripping with sleety rain.
  • As it grew darker, I was startled by the honking of geese flying low over the woods, like weary travellers getting in late from Southern lakes, and indulging at last in unrestrained complaint and mutual consolation.
  • The Golden Age was first created, which without any avenger Spontaneously without law cherished fidelity and rectitude.
  • It was the most ethereal flight I had ever witnessed.
  • It was not lonely, but made all the earth lonely beneath it.
  • Where was the parent which hatched it, its kindred, and its father in the heavens?
  • The tenant of the air, it seemed related to the earth but by an egg hatched some time in the crevice of a crag;--or was its native nest made in the angle of a cloud, woven of the rainbow's trimmings and the sunset sky, and lined with some soft midsummer haze caught up from earth?
  • The phÅ“be had already come once more and looked in at my door and window, to see if my house was cavern-like enough for her, sustaining herself on humming wings with clinched talons, as if she held by the air, while she surveyed the premises.
  • Thus was my first year's life in the woods completed; and the second year was similar to it.
  • This was manly, as the world goes; and yet it was idle, if not desperate.
  • I do not suppose that I have attained to obscurity, but I should be proud if no more fatal fault were found with my pages on this score than was found with the Walden ice.
  • Let every one mind his own business, and endeavor to be what he was made.
  • There was an artist in the city of Kouroo who was disposed to strive after perfection.
  • Before he had found a stock in all respects suitable the city of Kouroo was a hoary ruin, and he sat on one of its mounds to peel the stick.
  • The material was pure, and his art was pure; how could the result be other than wonderful?
  • I live in the angle of a leaden wall, into whose composition was poured a little alloy of bell-metal.
  • The hospitality was as cold as the ices.
  • I thought that there was no need of ice to freeze them.
  • There was a man in my neighborhood who lived in a hollow tree.
  • The government of the world I live in was not framed, like that of Britain, in after-dinner conversations over the wine.
  • It was not always dry land where we dwell.
  • Every one has heard the story which has gone the rounds of New England, of a strong and beautiful bug which came out of the dry leaf of an old table of apple-tree wood, which had stood in a farmer's kitchen for sixty years, first in Connecticut, and afterward in Massachusetts--from an egg deposited in the living tree many years earlier still, as appeared by counting the annual layers beyond it; which was heard gnawing out for several weeks, hatched perchance by the heat of an urn.
  • One would think, that a deliberate and practical denial of its authority was the only offence never contemplated by government; else, why has it not assigned its definite, its suitable and proportionate, penalty?
  • Absolutely speaking, the more money, the less virtue; for money comes between a man and his objects, and obtains them for him; and it was certainly no great virtue to obtain it.
  • The best thing a man can do for his culture when he is rich is to endeavor to carry out those schemes which he entertained when he was poor.
  • I did not see why the schoolmaster should be taxed to support the priest, and not the priest the schoolmaster: for I was not the State's schoolmaster, but I supported myself by voluntary subscription.
  • I saw that the State was half-witted, that it was timid as a lone woman with her silver spoons, and that it did not know its friends from its foes, and I lost all my remaining respect for it, and pitied it.
  • I was not born to be forced.
  • The night in prison was novel and interesting enough.
  • When the door was locked, he showed me where to hang my hat, and how he managed matters there.
  • The rooms were whitewashed once a month; and this one, at least, was the whitest, most simply furnished, and probably the neatest apartment in the town.
  • As near as I could discover, he had probably gone to bed in a barn when drunk, and smoked his pipe there; and so a barn was burnt.
  • I pumped my fellow-prisoner as dry as I could, for fear I should never see him again; but at length he showed me which was my bed, and left me to blow out the lamp.
  • It was like travelling into a far country, such as I had never expected to behold, to lie there for one night.
  • It was to see my native village in the light of the Middle Ages, and our Concord was turned into a Rhine stream, and visions of knights and castles passed before me.
  • I was an involuntary spectator and auditor of whatever was done and said in the kitchen of the adjacent village-inn--a wholly new and rare experience to me.
  • It was a closer view of my native town.
  • When they called for the vessels again, I was green enough to return what bread I had left; but my comrade seized it, and said that I should lay that up for lunch or dinner.
  • Soon after he was let out to work at haying in a neighboring field, whither he went every day, and would not be back till noon; so he bade me good-day, saying that he doubted if he should see me again.
  • It was formerly the custom in our village, when a poor debtor came out of jail, for his acquaintances to salute him, looking through their fingers, which were crossed to represent the grating of a jail window, "How do ye do?"
  • Even the Chinese philosopher was wise enough to regard the individual as the basis of the empire.
  • He is the well-known Prince Bolkonski who had to retire from the army under the late Emperor, and was nicknamed 'the King of Prussia.'
  • Anna Pavlovna's drawing room was gradually filling.
  • The highest Petersburg society was assembled there: people differing widely in age and character but alike in the social circle to which they belonged.
  • The aunt spoke to each of them in the same words, about their health and her own, and the health of Her Majesty, "who, thank God, was better today."
  • The little princess went round the table with quick, short, swaying steps, her workbag on her arm, and gaily spreading out her dress sat down on a sofa near the silver samovar, as if all she was doing was a pleasure to herself and to all around her.
  • One of the next arrivals was a stout, heavily built young man with close-cropped hair, spectacles, the light-colored breeches fashionable at that time, a very high ruffle, and a brown dress coat.
  • This stout young man was an illegitimate son of Count Bezukhov, a well-known grandee of Catherine's time who now lay dying in Moscow.
  • Anna Pavlovna's alarm was justified, for Pierre turned away from the aunt without waiting to hear her speech about Her Majesty's health.
  • But amid these cares her anxiety about Pierre was evident.
  • He knew that all the intellectual lights of Petersburg were gathered there and, like a child in a toyshop, did not know which way to look, afraid of missing any clever conversation that was to be heard.
  • Seeing the self-confident and refined expression on the faces of those present he was always expecting to hear something very profound.
  • Anna Pavlovna's reception was in full swing.
  • The third group was gathered round Mortemart and Anna Pavlovna.
  • The vicomte was a nice-looking young man with soft features and polished manners, who evidently considered himself a celebrity but out of politeness modestly placed himself at the disposal of the circle in which he found himself.
  • Anna Pavlovna was obviously serving him up as a treat to her guests.
  • "How evidently he belongs to the best society," said she to a third; and the vicomte was served up to the company in the choicest and most advantageous style, like a well-garnished joint of roast beef on a hot dish.
  • "Come over here, Helene, dear," said Anna Pavlovna to the beautiful young princess who was sitting some way off, the center of another group.
  • Helene was so lovely that not only did she not show any trace of coquetry, but on the contrary she even appeared shy of her unquestionable and all too victorious beauty.
  • He was dressed in a dark-green dress coat, knee breeches of the color of cuisse de nymphe effrayee, as he called it, shoes, and silk stockings.
  • The story was very pretty and interesting, especially at the point where the rivals suddenly recognized one another; and the ladies looked agitated.
  • Pierre had managed to start a conversation with the abbe about the balance of power, and the latter, evidently interested by the young man's simple-minded eagerness, was explaining his pet theory.
  • Both were talking and listening too eagerly and too naturally, which was why Anna Pavlovna disapproved.
  • "The means are... the balance of power in Europe and the rights of the people," the abbe was saying.
  • He was a very handsome young man, of medium height, with firm, clearcut features.
  • It was evident that he not only knew everyone in the drawing room, but had found them to be so tiresome that it wearied him to look at or listen to them.
  • May I? he added in a low voice so as not to disturb the vicomte who was continuing his story.
  • It was, in fact, solely to meet Prince Vasili that she had obtained an invitation to Anna Pavlovna's reception and had sat listening to the vicomte's story.
  • She returned to the group where the vicomte was still talking, and again pretended to listen, while waiting till it would be time to leave.
  • Her task was accomplished.
  • It was evident that he did not like the vicomte and was aiming his remarks at him, though without looking at him.
  • I do not know how far he was justified in saying so.
  • Before Anna Pavlovna and the others had time to smile their appreciation of the vicomte's epigram, Pierre again broke into the conversation, and though Anna Pavlovna felt sure he would say something inappropriate, she was unable to stop him.
  • "The execution of the Duc d'Enghien," declared Monsieur Pierre, "was a political necessity, and it seems to me that Napoleon showed greatness of soul by not fearing to take on himself the whole responsibility of that deed."
  • The people only gave him power that he might rid them of the Bourbons and because they saw that he was a great man.
  • In the first moment of Pierre's outburst Anna Pavlovna, despite her social experience, was horror-struck.
  • But when she saw that Pierre's sacrilegious words had not exasperated the vicomte, and had convinced herself that it was impossible to stop him, she rallied her forces and joined the vicomte in a vigorous attack on the orator.
  • "I should like," said the vicomte, "to ask how monsieur explains the 18th Brumaire; was not that an imposture?
  • It was a swindle, and not at all like the conduct of a great man!
  • That was horrible! said the little princess, shrugging her shoulders.
  • His smile was unlike the half-smile of other people.
  • The vicomte who was meeting him for the first time saw clearly that this young Jacobin was not so terrible as his words suggested.
  • Prince Andrew, who had evidently wished to tone down the awkwardness of Pierre's remarks, rose and made a sign to his wife that it was time to go.
  • I was told a charming Moscow story today and must treat you to it.
  • That was her taste.
  • Suddenly there was a great wind.
  • Though it was unintelligible why he had told it, or why it had to be told in Russian, still Anna Pavlovna and the others appreciated Prince Hippolyte's social tact in so agreeably ending Pierre's unpleasant and unamiable outburst.
  • All his absent-mindedness and inability to enter a room and converse in it was, however, redeemed by his kindly, simple, and modest expression.
  • Prince Andrew had gone out into the hall, and, turning his shoulders to the footman who was helping him on with his cloak, listened indifferently to his wife's chatter with Prince Hippolyte who had also come into the hall.
  • The princess, picking up her dress, was taking her seat in the dark carriage, her husband was adjusting his saber; Prince Hippolyte, under pretense of helping, was in everyone's way.
  • Pierre reaching the house first went into Prince Andrew's study like one quite at home, and from habit immediately lay down on the sofa, took from the shelf the first book that came to his hand (it was Caesar's Commentaries), and resting on his elbow, began reading it in the middle.
  • It was evident that Prince Andrew was not interested in such abstract conversation.
  • It was about this choice that Prince Andrew was speaking.
  • The rustle of a woman's dress was heard in the next room.
  • Her tone was now querulous and her lip drawn up, giving her not a joyful, but an animal, squirrel-like expression.
  • "Lise!" was all Prince Andrew said.
  • He seemed unable to bear the sight of tears and was ready to cry himself.
  • Every muscle of his thin face was now quivering with nervous excitement; his eyes, in which the fire of life had seemed extinguished, now flashed with brilliant light.
  • It was evident that the more lifeless he seemed at ordinary times, the more impassioned he became in these moments of almost morbid irritation.
  • He was free, he had nothing but his aim to consider, and he reached it.
  • I am now going to the war, the greatest war there ever was, and I know nothing and am fit for nothing.
  • Pierre was always astonished at Prince Andrew's calm manner of treating everybody, his extraordinary memory, his extensive reading (he had read everything, knew everything, and had an opinion about everything), but above all at his capacity for work and study.
  • And if Pierre was often struck by Andrew's lack of capacity for philosophical meditation (to which he himself was particularly addicted), he regarded even this not as a defect but as a sign of strength.
  • That smile was immediately reflected on Pierre's face.
  • He suddenly blushed crimson, and it was plain that he had made a great effort to say this.
  • Pierre was staying at Prince Vasili Kuragin's and sharing the dissipated life of his son Anatole, the son whom they were planning to reform by marrying him to Prince Andrew's sister.
  • It was past one o'clock when Pierre left his friend.
  • It was a cloudless, northern, summer night.
  • It was light enough to see a long way in the deserted street and it seemed more like morning or evening than night.
  • A footman, thinking no one saw him, was drinking on the sly what was left in the glasses.
  • This was Dolokhov, an officer of the Semenov regiment, a notorious gambler and duelist, who was living with Anatole.
  • Anatole kept on refilling Pierre's glass while explaining that Dolokhov was betting with Stevens, an English naval officer, that he would drink a bottle of rum sitting on the outer ledge of the third floor window with his legs hanging out.
  • Dolokhov was holding the Englishman's hand and clearly and distinctly repeating the terms of the bet, addressing himself particularly to Anatole and Pierre.
  • Dolokhov was of medium height, with curly hair and light-blue eyes.
  • He was about twenty-five.
  • Like all infantry officers he wore no mustache, so that his mouth, the most striking feature of his face, was clearly seen.
  • Dolokhov was a man of small means and no connections.
  • The bottle of rum was brought.
  • The window frame which prevented anyone from sitting on the outer sill was being forced out by two footmen, who were evidently flurried and intimidated by the directions and shouts of the gentlemen around.
  • Anatole turned to the Englishman and taking him by one of the buttons of his coat and looking down at him--the Englishman was short--began repeating the terms of the wager to him in English.
  • Anatole brought two candles and placed them on the window sill, though it was already quite light.
  • Suddenly Dolokhov made a backward movement with his spine, and his arm trembled nervously; this was sufficient to cause his whole body to slip as he sat on the sloping ledge.
  • Suddenly he was aware of a stir all around.
  • He looked up: Dolokhov was standing on the window sill, with a pale but radiant face.
  • They seized him by his arms; but he was so strong that everyone who touched him was sent flying.
  • The matter was mentioned to the Emperor, an exception made, and Boris transferred into the regiment of Semenov Guards with the rank of cornet.
  • The Guards had already left Petersburg on the tenth of August, and her son, who had remained in Moscow for his equipment, was to join them on the march to Radzivilov.
  • It was St. Natalia's day and the name day of two of the Rostovs--the mother and the youngest daughter--both named Nataly.
  • The countess was a woman of about forty-five, with a thin Oriental type of face, evidently worn out with childbearing--she had had twelve.
  • The conversation was on the chief topic of the day: the illness of the wealthy and celebrated beau of Catherine's day, Count Bezukhov, and about his illegitimate son Pierre, the one who had behaved so improperly at Anna Pavlovna's reception.
  • Anatole Kuragin's father managed somehow to get his son's affair hushed up, but even he was ordered out of Petersburg.
  • And there was the bear swimming about with the policeman on his back!
  • "It was all they could do to rescue the poor man," continued the visitor.
  • And he was said to be so well educated and clever.
  • He has lost count of his children, but this Pierre was his favorite.
  • "How handsome the old man still was only a year ago!" remarked the countess.
  • "But do you know, my dear, that was a capital joke," said the count; and seeing that the elder visitor was not listening, he turned to the young ladies.
  • It was evident that she had not intended her flight to bring her so far.
  • You see... was all Natasha managed to utter (to her everything seemed funny).
  • Boris was tall and fair, and his calm and handsome face had regular, delicate features.
  • Nicholas was short with curly hair and an open expression.
  • Boris on the contrary at once found his footing, and related quietly and humorously how he had known that doll Mimi when she was still quite a young lady, before her nose was broken; how she had aged during the five years he had known her, and how her head had cracked right across the skull.
  • The only young people remaining in the drawing room, not counting the young lady visitor and the countess' eldest daughter (who was four years older than her sister and behaved already like a grown-up person), were Nicholas and Sonya, the niece.
  • Sonya was a slender little brunette with a tender look in her eyes which were veiled by long lashes, thick black plaits coiling twice round her head, and a tawny tint in her complexion and especially in the color of her slender but graceful and muscular arms and neck.
  • And there was a place and everything waiting for him in the Archives Department!
  • It was so dull without you, said she, giving him a tender smile.
  • With her elder sister I was stricter.
  • "Yes, I was brought up quite differently," remarked the handsome elder daughter, Countess Vera, with a smile.
  • Our dear countess was too clever with Vera, said the count.
  • She was already growing impatient, and stamped her foot, ready to cry at his not coming at once, when she heard the young man's discreet steps approaching neither quickly nor slowly.
  • Natasha was about to call him but changed her mind.
  • After receiving her visitors, the countess was so tired that she gave orders to admit no more, but the porter was told to be sure to invite to dinner all who came "to congratulate."
  • "Vera," she said to her eldest daughter who was evidently not a favorite, "how is it you have so little tact?
  • Sonya was sitting close to Nicholas who was copying out some verses for her, the first he had ever written.
  • It was pleasant and touching to see these little girls in love; but apparently the sight of them roused no pleasant feeling in Vera.
  • Though what she said was quite just, perhaps for that very reason no one replied, and the four simply looked at one another.
  • (She used the word "diplomat," which was just then much in vogue among the children, in the special sense they attached to it.)
  • You are a Madame de Genlis and nothing more" (this nickname, bestowed on Vera by Nicholas, was considered very stinging), "and your greatest pleasure is to be unpleasant to people!
  • In the drawing room the conversation was still going on.
  • He was so kind.
  • This was the celebrated Petersburg doctor, Lorrain.
  • The length of her body was strikingly out of proportion to her short legs.
  • The story told about him at Count Rostov's was true.
  • He had now been for some days in Moscow and was staying as usual at his father's house.
  • It was the eldest who was reading--the one who had met Anna Mikhaylovna.
  • Pierre was received as if he were a corpse or a leper.
  • The eldest princess paused in her reading and silently stared at him with frightened eyes; the second assumed precisely the same expression; while the youngest, the one with the mole, who was of a cheerful and lively disposition, bent over her frame to hide a smile probably evoked by the amusing scene she foresaw.
  • Olga, go and see whether Uncle's beef tea is ready--it is almost time, she added, giving Pierre to understand that they were busy, and busy making his father comfortable, while evidently he, Pierre, was only busy causing him annoyance.
  • He had left Moscow when Boris was a boy of fourteen, and had quite forgotten him, but in his usual impulsive and hearty way he took Boris by the hand with a friendly smile.
  • Boris knew nothing about the Boulogne expedition; he did not read the papers and it was the first time he had heard Villeneuve's name.
  • Pierre was still afraid that this officer might inadvertently say something disconcerting to himself.
  • A footman came in to summon Boris--the princess was going.
  • She held a handkerchief to her eyes and her face was tearful.
  • "It is dreadful, dreadful!" she was saying, "but cost me what it may I shall do my duty.
  • But, don't be uneasy, he added, noticing that the count was beginning to breathe heavily and quickly which was always a sign of approaching anger.
  • When Anna Mikhaylovna returned from Count Bezukhov's the money, all in clean notes, was lying ready under a handkerchief on the countess' little table, and Anna Mikhaylovna noticed that something was agitating her.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna was already embracing her and weeping.
  • One of them was a sallow, clean-shaven civilian with a thin and wrinkled face, already growing old, though he was dressed like a most fashionable young man.
  • This was an old bachelor, Shinshin, a cousin of the countess', a man with "a sharp tongue" as they said in Moscow society.
  • This was Lieutenant Berg, an officer in the Semenov regiment with whom Boris was to travel to join the army, and about whom Natasha had teased her elder sister Vera, speaking of Berg as her "intended."
  • His favorite occupation when not playing boston, a card game he was very fond of, was that of listener, especially when he succeeded in setting two loquacious talkers at one another.
  • "Well, then, old chap, mon tres honorable Alphonse Karlovich," said Shinshin, laughing ironically and mixing the most ordinary Russian expressions with the choicest French phrases--which was a peculiarity of his speech.
  • The other guests seeing that Shinshin was talking came up to listen.
  • But all he said was so prettily sedate, and the naivete of his youthful egotism was so obvious, that he disarmed his hearers.
  • It was just the moment before a big dinner when the assembled guests, expecting the summons to zakuska, * avoid engaging in any long conversation but think it necessary to move about and talk, in order to show that they are not at all impatient for their food.
  • Pierre had come just at dinnertime and was sitting awkwardly in the middle of the drawing room on the first chair he had come across, blocking the way for everyone.
  • He was in the way and was the only one who did not notice the fact.
  • The latter understood that she was being asked to entertain this young man, and sitting down beside him she began to speak about his father; but he answered her, as he had the countess, only in monosyllables.
  • Countess Apraksina... was heard on all sides.
  • "Well, you old sinner," she went on, turning to the count who was kissing her hand, "you're feeling dull in Moscow, I daresay?
  • All were silent, expectant of what was to follow, for this was clearly only a prelude.
  • At the ladies' end an even chatter of voices was heard all the time, at the men's end the voices sounded louder and louder, especially that of the colonel of hussars who, growing more and more flushed, ate and drank so much that the count held him up as a pattern to the other guests.
  • Berg with tender smiles was saying to Vera that love is not an earthly but a heavenly feeling.
  • Boris was telling his new friend Pierre who the guests were and exchanging glances with Natasha, who was sitting opposite.
  • Natasha, who sat opposite, was looking at Boris as girls of thirteen look at the boy they are in love with and have just kissed for the first time.
  • Nicholas sat at some distance from Sonya, beside Julie Karagina, to whom he was again talking with the same involuntary smile.
  • Sonya wore a company smile but was evidently tormented by jealousy; now she turned pale, now blushed and strained every nerve to overhear what Nicholas and Julie were saying to one another.
  • The German tutor was trying to remember all the dishes, wines, and kinds of dessert, in order to send a full description of the dinner to his people in Germany; and he felt greatly offended when the butler with a bottle wrapped in a napkin passed him by.
  • "What you said just now was splendid!" said his partner Julie.
  • Sonya trembled all over and blushed to her ears and behind them and down to her neck and shoulders while Nicholas was speaking.
  • "You won't ask," Natasha's little brother was saying; "I know you won't ask!"
  • She half rose, by a glance inviting Pierre, who sat opposite, to listen to what was coming, and turning to her mother:
  • The conversation was hushed.
  • Before the ices, champagne was served round.
  • Natasha, who was treated as though she were grown up, was evidently very proud of this but at the same time felt shy.
  • She looked round and seeing that her friend was not in the room ran to look for her.
  • The chest in the passage was the place of mourning for the younger female generation in the Rostov household.
  • Yes, these verses Nicholas wrote himself and I copied some others, and she found them on my table and said she'd show them to Mamma, and that I was ungrateful, and that Mamma would never allow him to marry me, but that he'll marry Julie.
  • Why, we settled how everything was to be.
  • At the visitors' request the young people sang the quartette, "The Brook," with which everyone was delighted.
  • Natasha was perfectly happy; she was dancing with a grown-up man, who had been abroad.
  • She was sitting in a conspicuous place and talking to him like a grown-up lady.
  • He drew himself up, a smile of debonair gallantry lit up his face and as soon as the last figure of the ecossaise was ended, he clapped his hands to the musicians and shouted up to their gallery, addressing the first violin:
  • This was the count's favorite dance, which he had danced in his youth.
  • (Strictly speaking, Daniel Cooper was one figure of the anglaise.)
  • "Look at Papa!" shouted Natasha to the whole company, and quite forgetting that she was dancing with a grown-up partner she bent her curly head to her knees and made the whole room ring with her laughter.
  • And indeed everybody in the room looked with a smile of pleasure at the jovial old gentleman, who standing beside his tall and stout partner, Marya Dmitrievna, curved his arms, beat time, straightened his shoulders, turned out his toes, tapped gently with his foot, and, by a smile that broadened his round face more and more, prepared the onlookers for what was to follow.
  • What was expressed by the whole of the count's plump figure, in Marya Dmitrievna found expression only in her more and more beaming face and quivering nose.
  • Natasha kept pulling everyone by sleeve or dress, urging them to "look at Papa!" though as it was they never took their eyes off the couple.
  • "That was a Daniel Cooper!" exclaimed Marya Dmitrievna, tucking up her sleeves and puffing heavily.
  • While in the Rostovs' ballroom the sixth anglaise was being danced, to a tune in which the weary musicians blundered, and while tired footmen and cooks were getting the supper, Count Bezukhov had a sixth stroke.
  • The magnificent reception room was crowded.
  • "The limits of human life... are fixed and may not be o'erpassed," said an old priest to a lady who had taken a seat beside him and was listening naively to his words.
  • The Military Governor himself? was being asked at the other side of the room.
  • The second princess had just come from the sickroom with her eyes red from weeping and sat down beside Dr. Lorrain, who was sitting in a graceful pose under a portrait of Catherine, leaning his elbow on a table.
  • In this room it was almost dark; only two tiny lamps were burning before the icons and there was a pleasant scent of flowers and burnt pastilles.
  • The room was crowded with small pieces of furniture, whatnots, cupboards, and little tables.
  • The quilt of a high, white feather bed was just visible behind a screen.
  • She rose and smoothed her hair, which was as usual so extremely smooth that it seemed to be made of one piece with her head and covered with varnish.
  • "Well, my dear?" said Prince Vasili, taking her hand and bending it downwards as was his habit.
  • It was plain that this "well?" referred to much that they both understood without naming.
  • Prince Vasili said no more and his cheeks began to twitch nervously, now on one side, now on the other, giving his face an unpleasant expression which was never to be seen on it in a drawing room.
  • Prince Vasili looked questioningly at the princess, but could not make out whether she was considering what he had just said or whether she was simply looking at him.
  • "I can tell you more," continued Prince Vasili, seizing her hand, "that letter was written, though it was not sent, and the Emperor knew of it.
  • "I know the will was made, but I also know that it is invalid; and you, mon cousin, seem to consider me a perfect fool," said the princess with the expression women assume when they suppose they are saying something witty and stinging.
  • Yes, I was a fool!
  • You must remember, Catiche, that it was all done casually in a moment of anger, of illness, and was afterwards forgotten.
  • As the wheels rolled softly over the straw beneath the windows, Anna Mikhaylovna, having turned with words of comfort to her companion, realized that he was asleep in his corner and woke him up.
  • While he was getting down from the carriage steps two men, who looked like tradespeople, ran hurriedly from the entrance and hid in the shadow of the wall.
  • She hurriedly ascended the narrow dimly lit stone staircase, calling to Pierre, who was lagging behind, to follow.
  • Pierre did not understand a word, but the conviction that all this had to be grew stronger, and he meekly followed Anna Mikhaylovna who was already opening a door.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, addressing a maid who was hurrying past with a decanter on a tray as "my dear" and "my sweet," asked about the princess' health and then led Pierre along a stone passage.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna evinced no surprise, she only smiled faintly and sighed, as if to say that this was no more than she had expected.
  • Pierre could not make out what it was all about, and still less what "watching over his interests" meant, but he decided that all these things had to be.
  • She felt that as she brought with her the person the dying man wished to see, her own admission was assured.
  • A deference such as he had never before received was shown him.
  • He was wearing his long coat with three stars on his breast.
  • He went up to him, took his hand (a thing he never used to do), and drew it downwards as if wishing to ascertain whether it was firmly fixed on.
  • Pierre's mind was in such a confused state that the word "stroke" suggested to him a blow from something.
  • He looked at Prince Vasili in perplexity, and only later grasped that a stroke was an attack of illness.
  • The part of the room behind the columns, with a high silk-curtained mahogany bedstead on one side and on the other an immense case containing icons, was brightly illuminated with red light like a Russian church during evening service.
  • Prince Vasili in front of the door, near the invalid chair, a wax taper in his left hand, was leaning his left arm on the carved back of a velvet chair he had turned round for the purpose, and was crossing himself with his right hand, turning his eyes upward each time he touched his forehead.
  • In the midst of the service the voices of the priests suddenly ceased, they whispered to one another, and the old servant who was holding the count's hand got up and said something to the ladies.
  • The French doctor held no taper; he was leaning against one of the columns in a respectful attitude implying that he, a foreigner, in spite of all differences of faith, understood the full importance of the rite now being performed and even approved of it.
  • The sick man was given something to drink, there was a stir around him, then the people resumed their places and the service continued.
  • On leaving the bed both Prince Vasili and the princess passed out by a back door, but returned to their places one after the other before the service was concluded.
  • Pierre paid no more attention to this occurrence than to the rest of what went on, having made up his mind once for all that what he saw happening around him that evening was in some way essential.
  • The chanting of the service ceased, and the voice of the priest was heard respectfully congratulating the dying man on having received the sacrament.
  • Around him everyone began to stir: steps were audible and whispers, among which Anna Mikhaylovna's was the most distinct.
  • The sick man was so surrounded by doctors, princesses, and servants that Pierre could no longer see the reddish-yellow face with its gray mane-- which, though he saw other faces as well, he had not lost sight of for a single moment during the whole service.
  • It was the same as Pierre remembered it three months before, when the count had sent him to Petersburg.
  • But now this head was swaying helplessly with the uneven movements of the bearers, and the cold listless gaze fixed itself upon nothing.
  • When Pierre came up the count was gazing straight at him, but with a look the significance of which could not be understood by mortal man.
  • Once more Pierre looked questioningly at Anna Mikhaylovna to see what he was to do next.
  • While the count was being turned over, one of his arms fell back helplessly and he made a fruitless effort to pull it forward.
  • The sick man was turned on to his side with his face to the wall.
  • "He is dozing," said Anna Mikhaylovna, observing that one of the princesses was coming to take her turn at watching.
  • There was now no one in the reception room except Prince Vasili and the eldest princess, who were sitting under the portrait of Catherine the Great and talking eagerly.
  • Now this same room was dimly lighted by two candles.
  • He looked inquiringly at his monitress and saw that she was again going on tiptoe to the reception room where they had left Prince Vasili and the eldest princess.
  • Pierre concluded that this also was essential, and after a short interval followed her.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna was standing beside the princess, and they were both speaking in excited whispers.
  • "I know, my dear, kind princess," said Anna Mikhaylovna, seizing the portfolio so firmly that it was plain she would not let go easily.
  • Their efforts in the struggle for the portfolio were the only sounds audible, but it was evident that if the princess did speak, her words would not be flattering to Anna Mikhaylovna.
  • Here, Pierre, tell them your opinion, said she, turning to the young man who, having come quite close, was gazing with astonishment at the angry face of the princess which had lost all dignity, and at the twitching cheeks of Prince Vasili.
  • He staggered to the sofa on which Pierre was sitting and dropped onto it, covering his face with his hand.
  • Pierre noticed that he was pale and that his jaw quivered and shook as if in an ague.
  • "Ah, my friend!" said he, taking Pierre by the elbow; and there was in his voice a sincerity and weakness Pierre had never observed in it before.
  • She led him into the dark drawing room and Pierre was glad no one could see his face.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna left him, and when she returned he was fast asleep with his head on his arm.
  • She said the count had died as she would herself wish to die, that his end was not only touching but edifying.
  • At Bald Hills, Prince Nicholas Andreevich Bolkonski's estate, the arrival of young Prince Andrew and his wife was daily expected, but this expectation did not upset the regular routine of life in the old prince's household.
  • Though in the new reign he was free to return to the capitals, he still continued to live in the country, remarking that anyone who wanted to see him could come the hundred miles from Moscow to Bald Hills, while he himself needed no one and nothing.
  • He was himself always occupied: writing his memoirs, solving problems in higher mathematics, turning snuffboxes on a lathe, working in the garden, or superintending the building that was always going on at his estate.
  • As regularity is a prime condition facilitating activity, regularity in his household was carried to the highest point of exactitude.
  • With those about him, from his daughter to his serfs, the prince was sharp and invariably exacting, so that without being a hardhearted man he inspired such fear and respect as few hardhearted men would have aroused.
  • An old powdered manservant who was sitting in the antechamber rose quietly and said in a whisper: "Please walk in."
  • The prince was working at the lathe and after glancing round continued his work.
  • The enormous study was full of things evidently in constant use.
  • "This won't do, Princess; it won't do," said he, when Princess Mary, having taken and closed the exercise book with the next day's lesson, was about to leave: "Mathematics are most important, madam!
  • She sat down at her writing table, on which stood miniature portraits and which was littered with books and papers.
  • The princess was as untidy as her father was tidy.
  • But the princess never saw the beautiful expression of her own eyes--the look they had when she was not thinking of herself.
  • I will confess to you, dear Mary, that in spite of his extreme youth his departure for the army was a great grief to me.
  • Someday I will tell you about our parting and all that was said then.
  • The princess pondered awhile with a thoughtful smile and her luminous eyes lit up so that her face was entirely transformed.
  • The news of Count Bezukhov's death reached us before your letter and my father was much affected by it.
  • He says the count was the last representative but one of the great century, and that it is his own turn now, but that he will do all he can to let his turn come as late as possible.
  • It was a convoy of conscripts enrolled from our people and starting to join the army.
  • The princess glanced at her watch and, seeing that she was five minutes late in starting her practice on the clavichord, went into the sitting room with a look of alarm.
  • Between twelve and two o'clock, as the day was mapped out, the prince rested and the princess played the clavichord.
  • The gray-haired valet was sitting drowsily listening to the snoring of the prince, who was in his large study.
  • Prince Andrew apparently knew this as well as Tikhon; he looked at his watch as if to ascertain whether his father's habits had changed since he was at home last, and, having assured himself that they had not, he turned to his wife.
  • She was not expecting us?
  • Prince Andrew and his sister, hand in hand, kissed one another, and he told her she was still the same crybaby as ever.
  • Princess Mary was still looking silently at her brother and her beautiful eyes were full of love and sadness.
  • It was plain that she was following a train of thought independent of her sister-in-law's words.
  • The old prince always dressed in old-fashioned style, wearing an antique coat and powdered hair; and when Prince Andrew entered his father's dressing room (not with the contemptuous look and manner he wore in drawing rooms, but with the animated face with which he talked to Pierre), the old man was sitting on a large leather-covered chair, wrapped in a powdering mantle, entrusting his head to Tikhon.
  • Wants to vanquish Buonaparte? said the old man, shaking his powdered head as much as the tail, which Tikhon was holding fast to plait, would allow.
  • The old man was in a good temper after his nap before dinner.
  • "Nonsense, nonsense!" cried the old man, shaking his pigtail to see whether it was firmly plaited, and grasping his by the hand.
  • He explained how an army, ninety thousand strong, was to threaten Prussia so as to bring her out of her neutrality and draw her into the war; how part of that army was to join some Swedish forces at Stralsund; how two hundred and twenty thousand Austrians, with a hundred thousand Russians, were to operate in Italy and on the Rhine; how fifty thousand Russians and as many English were to land at Naples, and how a total force of five hundred thousand men was to attack the French from different sides.
  • This meant that Tikhon was not handing him the waistcoat he wanted.
  • At the appointed hour the prince, powdered and shaven, entered the dining room.
  • The prince, who generally kept very strictly to social distinctions and rarely admitted even important government officials to his table, had unexpectedly selected Michael Ivanovich (who always went into a corner to blow his nose on his checked handkerchief) to illustrate the theory that all men are equals, and had more than once impressed on his daughter that Michael Ivanovich was "not a whit worse than you or I."
  • In the dining room, which like all the rooms in the house was exceedingly lofty, the members of the household and the footmen--one behind each chair--stood waiting for the prince to enter.
  • The head butler, napkin on arm, was scanning the setting of the table, making signs to the footmen, and anxiously glancing from the clock to the door by which the prince was to enter.
  • She did not understand what he was laughing at.
  • Everything her father did inspired her with reverence and was beyond question.
  • Princess Mary could not understand the boldness of her brother's criticism and was about to reply, when the expected footsteps were heard coming from the study.
  • The prince walked in quickly and jauntily as was his wont, as if intentionally contrasting the briskness of his manners with the strict formality of his house.
  • She was silent and seemed confused.
  • Michael Ivanovich did not at all know when "you and I" had said such things about Bonaparte, but understanding that he was wanted as a peg on which to hang the prince's favorite topic, he looked inquiringly at the young prince, wondering what would follow.
  • Buonaparte was born with a silver spoon in his mouth.
  • His son made no rejoinder, but it was evident that whatever arguments were presented he was as little able as his father to change his opinion.
  • Prince Andrew was to leave next evening.
  • The little princess was in her sister-in-law's room.
  • It was the heavy tread of Princess Mary that he heard.
  • She was so tired that she has fallen asleep on the sofa in my room.
  • Prince Andrew was silent, but the princess noticed the ironical and contemptuous look that showed itself on his face.
  • You know I always was a savage, and now am even more so.
  • Father took her when she was homeless after losing her own father.
  • Princess Mary was first surprised and then aghast at this question.
  • "He always was rather harsh; and now I should think he's getting very trying," said Prince Andrew, apparently speaking lightly of their father in order to puzzle or test his sister.
  • "Even if it were a great deal of trouble..." answered Prince Andrew, as if guessing what it was about.
  • (She still did not take out what she was holding in her reticule.)
  • There was a look of tenderness, for he was touched, but also a gleam of irony on his face.
  • As I was saying to you, Andrew, be kind and generous as you always used to be.
  • Red patches appeared on Princess Mary's face and she was silent as if she felt guilty.
  • His fine eyes lit up with a thoughtful, kindly, and unaccustomed brightness, but he was looking not at his sister but over her head toward the darkness of the open doorway.
  • It was the third time that day that, with an ecstatic and artless smile, she had met him in secluded passages.
  • When he reached his sister's room his wife was already awake and her merry voice, hurrying one word after another, came through the open door.
  • She was speaking as usual in French, and as if after long self-restraint she wished to make up for lost time.
  • The little princess, plump and rosy, was sitting in an easy chair with her work in her hands, talking incessantly, repeating Petersburg reminiscences and even phrases.
  • The coach with six horses was waiting at the porch.
  • It was an autumn night, so dark that the coachman could not see the carriage pole.
  • The immense house was brilliant with lights shining through its lofty windows.
  • "Hm... Hm..." muttered the old prince to himself, finishing what he was writing.
  • Andrew did not speak; he was both pleased and displeased that his father understood him.
  • He spoke so rapidly that he did not finish half his words, but his son was accustomed to understand him.
  • The old man was silent.
  • Braunau was the headquarters of the commander-in-chief, Kutuzov.
  • Though the words of the order were not clear to the regimental commander, and the question arose whether the troops were to be in marching order or not, it was decided at a consultation between the battalion commanders to present the regiment in parade order, on the principle that it is always better to "bow too low than not bow low enough."
  • It was the state of the soldiers' boots.
  • The commander of the regiment was an elderly, choleric, stout, and thick-set general with grizzled eyebrows and whiskers, and wider from chest to back than across the shoulders.
  • With this object he intended to meet the regiment; so the worse the condition it was in, the better pleased the commander- in-chief would be.
  • In half an hour all was again in order, only the squares had become gray instead of black.
  • When the eager but misrepeated words had reached their destination in a cry of: "The general to the third company," the missing officer appeared from behind his company and, though he was a middle-aged man and not in the habit of running, trotted awkwardly stumbling on his toes toward the general.
  • Spots appeared on his nose, the redness of which was evidently due to intemperance, and his mouth twitched nervously.
  • Having snapped at an officer for an unpolished badge, at another because his line was not straight, he reached the third company.
  • Then amidst a dead silence the feeble voice of the commander-in-chief was heard.
  • Thanks to the strictness and assiduity of its commander the regiment, in comparison with others that had reached Braunau at the same time, was in splendid condition.
  • Everything was in good order except the boots.
  • Looking at their boots he several times shook his head sadly, pointing them out to the Austrian general with an expression which seemed to say that he was not blaming anyone, but could not help noticing what a bad state of things it was.
  • This was Prince Bolkonski.
  • Beside him was his comrade Nesvitski, a tall staff officer, extremely stout, with a kindly, smiling, handsome face and moist eyes.
  • The regimental commander was afraid he might be blamed for this and did not answer.
  • The officer evidently had complete control of his face, and while Kutuzov was turning managed to make a grimace and then assume a most serious, deferential, and innocent expression.
  • The third company was the last, and Kutuzov pondered, apparently trying to recollect something.
  • "You won't bear me a grudge, Prokhor Ignatych?" said the regimental commander, overtaking the third company on its way to its quarters and riding up to Captain Timokhin who was walking in front.
  • (The regimental commander's face now that the inspection was happily over beamed with irrepressible delight.)
  • He was very pleased!
  • "In a word, a hearty one..." said the subaltern, laughing (the regimental commander was nicknamed King of Hearts).
  • And they said Kutuzov was blind of one eye?
  • Everybody said that Buonaparte himself was at Braunau.
  • A drummer, their leader, turned round facing the singers, and flourishing his arm, began a long-drawn-out soldiers' song, commencing with the words: "Morning dawned, the sun was rising," and concluding: "On then, brothers, on to glory, led by Father Kamenski."
  • It was Dolokhov marching with particular grace and boldness in time to the song and looking at those driving past as if he pitied all who were not at that moment marching with the company.
  • I was attached; I'm on duty.
  • On returning from the review, Kutuzov took the Austrian general into his private room and, calling his adjutant, asked for some papers relating to the condition of the troops on their arrival, and the letters that had come from the Archduke Ferdinand, who was in command of the advanced army.
  • Kutuzov and the Austrian member of the Hofkriegsrath were sitting at the table on which a plan was spread out.
  • It was evident that Kutuzov himself listened with pleasure to his own voice.
  • And, in fact, the last letter he had received from Mack's army informed him of a victory and stated strategically the position of the army was very favorable.
  • In the expression of his face, in his movements, in his walk, scarcely a trace was left of his former affected languor and indolence.
  • Some, a minority, acknowledged him to be different from themselves and from everyone else, expected great things of him, listened to him, admired, and imitated him, and with them Prince Andrew was natural and pleasant.
  • Coming out of Kutuzov's room into the waiting room with the papers in his hand Prince Andrew came up to his comrade, the aide-de-camp on duty, Kozlovski, who was sitting at the window with a book.
  • The unknown general looked disdainfully down at Kozlovski, who was rather short, as if surprised that anyone should not know him.
  • Prince Andrew was one of those rare staff officers whose chief interest lay in the general progress of the war.
  • When he saw Mack and heard the details of his disaster he understood that half the campaign was lost, understood all the difficulties of the Russian army's position, and vividly imagined what awaited it and the part he would have to play.
  • There was room enough in the wide corridor for the generals to pass the three officers quite easily, but Zherkov, pushing Nesvitski aside with his arm, said in a breathless voice,
  • He screwed up his eyes showing that he was listening.
  • The squadron in which Nicholas Rostov served as a cadet was quartered in the German village of Salzeneck.
  • On October 11, the day when all was astir at headquarters over the news of Mack's defeat, the camp life of the officers of this squadron was proceeding as usual.
  • It was evident that the cadet was liberal with his tips and that it paid to serve him.
  • His landlord, who in a waistcoat and a pointed cap, pitchfork in hand, was clearing manure from the cowhouse, looked out, and his face immediately brightened on seeing Rostov.
  • Denisov was a small man with a red face, sparkling black eyes, and black tousled mustache and hair.
  • He took the lighted pipe that was offered to him, gripped it in his fist, and tapped it on the floor, making the sparks fly, while he continued to shout.
  • Rostov thrust the purse under the pillow and shook the damp little hand which was offered him.
  • (Rook was a young horse Telyanin had sold to Rostov.)
  • The lieutenant never looked the man he was speaking to straight in the face; his eyes continually wandered from one object to another.
  • "Oh, he's all right, a good horse," answered Rostov, though the horse for which he had paid seven hundred rubbles was not worth half that sum.
  • In the passage Denisov, with a pipe, was squatting on the threshold facing the quartermaster who was reporting to him.
  • On seeing Rostov, Denisov screwed up his face and pointing over his shoulder with his thumb to the room where Telyanin was sitting, he frowned and gave a shudder of disgust.
  • Telyanin was sitting in the same indolent pose in which Rostov had left him, rubbing his small white hands.
  • When Rostov went back there was a bottle of vodka and a sausage on the table.
  • Denisov was sitting there scratching with his pen on a sheet of paper.
  • Denisov frowned and was about to shout some reply but stopped.
  • The purse was not there.
  • The purse was not there.
  • There was no one else in the room except myself.
  • There was an inn in the village which the officers frequented.
  • In the second room of the inn the lieutenant was sitting over a dish of sausages and a bottle of wine.
  • The coin was a new one.
  • The lieutenant was looking about in his usual way and suddenly seemed to grow very merry.
  • He was glad, and at the same instant began to pity the miserable man who stood before him, but the task he had begun had to be completed.
  • That same evening there was an animated discussion among the squadron's officers in Denisov's quarters.
  • "And I tell you, Rostov, that you must apologize to the colonel!" said a tall, grizzly-haired staff captain, with enormous mustaches and many wrinkles on his large features, to Rostov who was crimson with excitement.
  • "You speak to the colonel about this nasty business before other officers," continued the staff captain, "and Bogdanich" (the colonel was called Bogdanich) "shuts you up."
  • He did not shut me up, he said I was telling an untruth.
  • Now what was the colonel to do?
  • And Bogdanich was a brick: he told you you were saying what was not true.
  • It was a warm, rainy, autumnal day.
  • The wide expanse that opened out before the heights on which the Russian batteries stood guarding the bridge was at times veiled by a diaphanous curtain of slanting rain, and then, suddenly spread out in the sunlight, far-distant objects could be clearly seen glittering as though freshly varnished.
  • A Cossack who accompanied him had handed him a knapsack and a flask, and Nesvitski was treating some officers to pies and real doppelkummel.
  • Yes, the Austrian prince who built that castle was no fool.
  • Two of the enemy's shots had already flown across the bridge, where there was a crush.
  • Halfway across stood Prince Nesvitski, who had alighted from his horse and whose big body was jammed against the railings.
  • Each time Prince Nesvitski tried to move on, soldiers and carts pushed him back again and pressed him against the railings, and all he could do was to smile.
  • "What a fine fellow you are, friend!" said the Cossack to a convoy soldier with a wagon, who was pressing onto the infantrymen who were crowded together close to his wheels and his horses.
  • Sometimes through the monotonous waves of men, like a fleck of white foam on the waves of the Enns, an officer, in a cloak and with a type of face different from that of the men, squeezed his way along; sometimes like a chip of wood whirling in the river, an hussar on foot, an orderly, or a townsman was carried through the waves of infantry; and sometimes like a log floating down the river, an officers' or company's baggage wagon, piled high, leather covered, and hemmed in on all sides, moved across the bridge.
  • "And then, old fellow, he gives him one in the teeth with the butt end of his gun..." a soldier whose greatcoat was well tucked up said gaily, with a wide swing of his arm.
  • "Yes, the ham was just delicious..." answered another with a loud laugh.
  • He just sends a ball and they think they'll all be killed, a sergeant was saying angrily and reproachfully.
  • It was a German cart with a pair of horses led by a German, and seemed loaded with a whole houseful of effects.
  • A fine brindled cow with a large udder was attached to the cart behind.
  • The eyes of all the soldiers turned toward the women, and while the vehicle was passing at foot pace all the soldiers' remarks related to the two young ones.
  • "Where are you going?" asked an infantry officer who was eating an apple, also half smiling as he looked at the handsome girl.
  • Nesvitski realized that it was a cannon ball.
  • Carelessly holding in his stallion that was neighing and pawing the ground, eager to rejoin its fellows, he watched his squadron draw nearer.
  • At last the baggage wagons had all crossed, the crush was less, and the last battalion came onto the bridge.
  • The weather had cleared again since noon and the sun was descending brightly upon the Danube and the dark hills around it.
  • It was calm, and at intervals the bugle calls and the shouts of the enemy could be heard from the hill.
  • There was no one now between the squadron and the enemy except a few scattered skirmishers.
  • An empty space of some seven hundred yards was all that separated them.
  • The enemy ceased firing, and that stern, threatening, inaccessible, and intangible line which separates two hostile armies was all the more clearly felt.
  • On the high ground where the enemy was, the smoke of a cannon rose, and a ball flew whistling over the heads of the hussar squadron.
  • He was glancing at everyone with a clear, bright expression, as if asking them to notice how calmly he sat under fire.
  • The black, hairy, snub-nosed face of Vaska Denisov, and his whole short sturdy figure with the sinewy hairy hand and stumpy fingers in which he held the hilt of his naked saber, looked just as it usually did, especially toward evening when he had emptied his second bottle; he was only redder than usual.
  • His face with its long mustache was serious as always, only his eyes were brighter than usual.
  • It seemed to Rostov that Bogdanich was only pretending not to notice him, and that his whole aim now was to test the cadet's courage, so he drew himself up and looked around him merrily; then it seemed to him that Bogdanich rode so near in order to show him his courage.
  • After his dismissal from headquarters Zherkov had not remained in the regiment, saying he was not such a fool as to slave at the front when he could get more rewards by doing nothing on the staff, and had succeeded in attaching himself as an orderly officer to Prince Bagration.
  • Zherkov was followed by an officer of the suite who rode up to the colonel of hussars with the same order.
  • He was afraid of falling behind the hussars, so much afraid that his heart stood still.
  • Rostov wiping his muddy hands on his breeches looked at his enemy and was about to run on, thinking that the farther he went to the front the better.
  • On the French side, amid the groups with cannon, a cloud of smoke appeared, then a second and a third almost simultaneously, and at the moment when the first report was heard a fourth was seen.
  • For Christ's sake let me alone! cried the wounded man, but still he was lifted and laid on the stretcher.
  • There was peace and happiness...
  • "Was that grapeshot?" he asked Denisov.
  • And this was true.
  • Austrian troops that had escaped capture at Ulm and had joined Kutuzov at Braunau now separated from the Russian army, and Kutuzov was left with only his own weak and exhausted forces.
  • The defense of Vienna was no longer to be thought of.
  • On the thirtieth he attacked Mortier's division, which was on the left bank, and broke it up.
  • As a mark of the commander-in-chief's special favor he was sent with the news of this victory to the Austrian court, now no longer at Vienna (which was threatened by the French) but at Brunn.
  • Despite his apparently delicate build Prince Andrew could endure physical fatigue far better than many very muscular men, and on the night of the battle, having arrived at Krems excited but not weary, with dispatches from Dokhturov to Kutuzov, he was sent immediately with a special dispatch to Brunn.
  • The night was dark but starry, the road showed black in the snow that had fallen the previous day--the day of the battle.
  • Reviewing his impressions of the recent battle, picturing pleasantly to himself the impression his news of a victory would create, or recalling the send-off given him by the commander-in-chief and his fellow officers, Prince Andrew was galloping along in a post chaise enjoying the feelings of a man who has at length begun to attain a long-desired happiness.
  • Then he began to imagine that the Russians were running away and that he himself was killed, but he quickly roused himself with a feeling of joy, as if learning afresh that this was not so but that on the contrary the French had run away.
  • The dark starry night was followed by a bright cheerful morning.
  • The snow was thawing in the sunshine, the horses galloped quickly, and on both sides of the road were forests of different kinds, fields, and villages.
  • It was already quite dark when Prince Andrew rattled over the paved streets of Brunn and found himself surrounded by high buildings, the lights of shops, houses, and street lamps, fine carriages, and all that atmosphere of a large and active town which is always so attractive to a soldier after camp life.
  • At the chief entrance to the palace, however, an official came running out to meet him, and learning that he was a special messenger led him to another entrance.
  • Five minutes later he returned and bowing with particular courtesy ushered Prince Andrew before him along a corridor to the cabinet where the Minister of War was at work.
  • Prince Andrew's joyous feeling was considerably weakened as he approached the door of the minister's room.
  • It was high time!
  • He took the dispatch which was addressed to him and began to read it with a mournful expression.
  • You say the affair was decisive?
  • The stupid smile, which had left his face while he was speaking, reappeared.
  • Besides it was pleasant, after his reception by the Austrians, to speak if not in Russian (for they were speaking French) at least with a Russian who would, he supposed, share the general Russian antipathy to the Austrians which was then particularly strong.
  • Bilibin was a man of thirty-five, a bachelor, and of the same circle as Prince Andrew.
  • They had known each other previously in Petersburg, but had become more intimate when Prince Andrew was in Vienna with Kutuzov.
  • He was not one of those many diplomats who are esteemed because they have certain negative qualities, avoid doing certain things, and speak French.
  • He was one of those, who, liking work, knew how to do it, and despite his indolence would sometimes spend a whole night at his writing table.
  • It was not the question "What for?" but the question "How?" that interested him.
  • In society he always awaited an opportunity to say something striking and took part in a conversation only when that was possible.
  • His conversation was always sprinkled with wittily original, finished phrases of general interest.
  • His thin, worn, sallow face was covered with deep wrinkles, which always looked as clean and well washed as the tips of one's fingers after a Russian bath.
  • * "But my dear fellow, with all my respect for the Orthodox Russian army, I must say that your victory was not particularly victorious."
  • "Count Lichtenfels was here this morning," Bilibin continued, "and showed me a letter in which the parade of the French in Vienna was fully described: Prince Murat et tout le tremblement...
  • "Really I don't care about that, I don't care at all," said Prince Andrew, beginning to understand that his news of the battle before Krems was really of small importance in view of such events as the fall of Austria's capital.
  • How is it Vienna was taken?
  • We heard reports that Prince Auersperg was defending Vienna? he said.
  • "Buonaparte?" said Bilibin inquiringly, puckering up his forehead to indicate that he was about to say something witty.
  • "If we live we shall see," replied Bilibin, his face again becoming smooth as a sign that the conversation was at an end.
  • When Prince Andrew reached the room prepared for him and lay down in a clean shirt on the feather bed with its warmed and fragrant pillows, he felt that the battle of which he had brought tidings was far, far away from him.
  • Recalling his recent impressions, the first thought that came into his mind was that today he had to be presented to the Emperor Francis; he remembered the Minister of War, the polite Austrian adjutant, Bilibin, and last night's conversation.
  • With Prince Hippolyte Kuragin, who was a secretary to the embassy, Bolkonski was already acquainted.
  • "But the best of it was," said one, telling of the misfortune of a fellow diplomat, "that the Chancellor told him flatly that his appointment to London was a promotion and that he was so to regard it.
  • He was evidently distressed, and breathed painfully, but could not restrain the wild laughter that convulsed his usually impassive features.
  • But after it was over, the adjutant he had seen the previous day ceremoniously informed Bolkonski that the Emperor desired to give him an audience.
  • Before the conversation began Prince Andrew was struck by the fact that the Emperor seemed confused and blushed as if not knowing what to say.
  • Then followed other questions just as simple: Was Kutuzov well?
  • "I cannot inform Your Majesty at what o'clock the battle began at the front, but at Durrenstein, where I was, our attack began after five in the afternoon," replied Bolkonski growing more animated and expecting that he would have a chance to give a reliable account, which he had ready in his mind, of all he knew and had seen.
  • At what o'clock was General Schmidt killed?
  • Prince Andrew withdrew and was immediately surrounded by courtiers on all sides.
  • The Minister of War came up and congratulated him on the Maria Theresa Order of the third grade, which the Emperor was conferring on him.
  • Contrary to Bilibin's forecast the news he had brought was joyfully received.
  • A thanksgiving service was arranged, Kutuzov was awarded the Grand Cross of Maria Theresa, and the whole army received rewards.
  • Bolkonski was invited everywhere, and had to spend the whole morning calling on the principal Austrian dignitaries.
  • Between four and five in the afternoon, having made all his calls, he was returning to Bilibin's house thinking out a letter to his father about the battle and his visit to Brunn.
  • Franz, Bilibin's man, was dragging a portmanteau with some difficulty out of the front door.
  • Why, the French have crossed the bridge that Auersperg was defending, and the bridge was not blown up: so Murat is now rushing along the road to Brunn and will be here in a day or two.
  • But why did they not blow up the bridge, if it was mined?
  • Next day, which was yesterday, those gentlemen, messieurs les marechaux, * Murat, Lannes, and Belliard, mount and ride to the bridge.
  • This news grieved him and yet he was pleased.
  • Listening to Bilibin he was already imagining how on reaching the army he would give an opinion at the war council which would be the only one that could save the army, and how he alone would be entrusted with the executing of the plan.
  • But what is best of all," he went on, his excitement subsiding under the delightful interest of his own story, "is that the sergeant in charge of the cannon which was to give the signal to fire the mines and blow up the bridge, this sergeant, seeing that the French troops were running onto the bridge, was about to fire, but Lannes stayed his hand.
  • The sergeant, who was evidently wiser than his general, goes up to Auersperg and says: 'Prince, you are being deceived, here are the French!'
  • It was a stroke of genius.
  • "Where are you off to?" he said suddenly to Prince Andrew who had risen and was going toward his room.
  • In Brunn everybody attached to the court was packing up, and the heavy baggage was already being dispatched to Olmutz.
  • Near Hetzelsdorf Prince Andrew struck the high road along which the Russian army was moving with great haste and in the greatest disorder.
  • The road was so obstructed with carts that it was impossible to get by in a carriage.
  • Wishing to find out where the commander-in-chief was, he rode up to a convoy.
  • A soldier was driving, and a woman enveloped in shawls sat behind the apron under the leather hood of the vehicle.
  • Prince Andrew rode up and was just putting his question to a soldier when his attention was diverted by the desperate shrieks of the woman in the vehicle.
  • Prince Andrew saw that the officer was in that state of senseless, tipsy rage when a man does not know what he is saying.
  • "This is a mob of scoundrels and not an army," he was thinking as he went up to the window of the first house, when a familiar voice called him by name.
  • This was particularly noticeable on Nesvitski's usually laughing countenance.
  • I was going to ask you.
  • I know nothing except that it was all I could do to get here.
  • I was wrong to laugh at Mack, we're getting it still worse, said Nesvitski.
  • Kutuzov himself, he was told, was in the house with Prince Bagration and Weyrother.
  • Weyrother was the Austrian general who had succeeded Schmidt.
  • In the passage little Kozlovski was squatting on his heels in front of a clerk.
  • The clerk, with cuffs turned up, was hastily writing at a tub turned bottom upwards.
  • Just as he was going to open it the sounds ceased, the door opened, and Kutuzov with his eagle nose and puffy face appeared in the doorway.
  • There was not a trace of agitation on his face.
  • On November 1 Kutuzov had received, through a spy, news that the army he commanded was in an almost hopeless position.
  • But to forestall the French with his whole army was impossible.
  • Bagration was to make this march without resting, and to halt facing Vienna with Znaim to his rear, and if he succeeded in forestalling the French he was to delay them as long as possible.
  • Bagration replied that he was not authorized either to accept or refuse a truce and sent his adjutant to Kutuzov to report the offer he had received.
  • A truce was Kutuzov's sole chance of gaining time, giving Bagration's exhausted troops some rest, and letting the transport and heavy convoys (whose movements were concealed from the French) advance if but one stage nearer Znaim.
  • On receiving the news he immediately dispatched Adjutant General Wintzingerode, who was in attendance on him, to the enemy camp.
  • As soon as Bonaparte (who was at Schonbrunn, sixteen miles from Hollabrunn) received Murat's dispatch with the proposal of a truce and a capitulation, he detected a ruse and wrote the following letter to Murat:
  • Bonaparte himself, not trusting to his generals, moved with all the Guards to the field of battle, afraid of letting a ready victim escape, and Bagration's four thousand men merrily lighted campfires, dried and warmed themselves, cooked their porridge for the first time for three days, and not one of them knew or imagined what was in store for him.
  • The officer on duty was a handsome, elegantly dressed man with a diamond ring on his forefinger.
  • But before he had finished he felt that his jest was unacceptable and had not come off.
  • There was something peculiar about it, quite unsoldierly, rather comic, but extremely attractive.
  • At Grunth also some apprehension and alarm could be felt, but the nearer Prince Andrew came to the French lines the more confident was the appearance of our troops.
  • A stout major was pacing up and down the line, and regardless of the screams kept repeating:
  • It's fine! answered Sidorov, who was considered an adept at French.
  • The soldier to whom the laughers referred was Dolokhov.
  • Prince Andrew recognized him and stopped to listen to what he was saying.
  • Dolokhov had come from the left flank where their regiment was stationed, with his captain.
  • "Now then, go on, go on!" incited the officer, bending forward and trying not to lose a word of the speech which was incomprehensible to him.
  • Before the guns an artillery sentry was pacing up and down; he stood at attention when the officer arrived, but at a sign resumed his measured, monotonous pacing.
  • It was true that a view over nearly the whole Russian position and the greater part of the enemy's opened out from this battery.
  • To the left from that village, amid the smoke, was something resembling a battery, but it was impossible to see it clearly with the naked eye.
  • Our right flank was posted on a rather steep incline which dominated the French position.
  • The French line was wider than ours, and it was plain that they could easily outflank us on both sides.
  • Behind our position was a steep and deep dip, making it difficult for artillery and cavalry to retire.
  • His idea was, first, to concentrate all the artillery in the center, and secondly, to withdraw the cavalry to the other side of the dip.
  • Suddenly, however, he was struck by a voice coming from the shed, and its tone was so sincere that he could not but listen.
  • His eyes ran rapidly over the wide space, but he only saw that the hitherto motionless masses of the French now swayed and that there really was a battery to their left.
  • A small but distinctly visible enemy column was moving down the hill, probably to strengthen the front line.
  • Here it is! was seen even on Prince Bagration's hard brown face with its half-closed, dull, sleepy eyes.
  • Prince Andrew gazed with anxious curiosity at that impassive face and wished he could tell what, if anything, this man was thinking and feeling at that moment.
  • The Cossack was dead, but the horse still struggled.
  • It was an old-fashioned saber of a kind no longer in general use.
  • Prince Andrew remembered the story of Suvorov giving his saber to Bagration in Italy, and the recollection was particularly pleasant at that moment.
  • It seemed to Prince Andrew that the officer's remark was just and that really no answer could be made to it.
  • Prince Andrew listened attentively to Bagration's colloquies with the commanding officers and the orders he gave them and, to his surprise, found that no orders were really given, but that Prince Bagration tried to make it appear that everything done by necessity, by accident, or by the will of subordinate commanders was done, if not by his direct command, at least in accord with his intentions.
  • Prince Andrew noticed, however, that though what happened was due to chance and was independent of the commander's will, owing to the tact Bagration showed, his presence was very valuable.
  • Prince Bagration, having reached the highest point of our right flank, began riding downhill to where the roll of musketry was heard but where on account of the smoke nothing could be seen.
  • One with a bleeding head and no cap was being dragged along by two soldiers who supported him under the arms.
  • All he knew was that at the commencement of the action balls and shells began flying all over his regiment and hitting men and that afterwards someone had shouted "Cavalry!" and our men had begun firing.
  • Prince Bagration bowed his head as a sign that this was exactly what he had desired and expected.
  • Prince Andrew was struck by the changed expression on Prince Bagration's face at this moment.
  • The dull, sleepy expression was no longer there, nor the affectation of profound thought.
  • The commander of the regiment turned to Prince Bagration, entreating him to go back as it was too dangerous to remain where they were.
  • While he was speaking, the curtain of smoke that had concealed the hollow, driven by a rising wind, began to move from right to left as if drawn by an invisible hand, and the hill opposite, with the French moving about on it, opened out before them.
  • At that moment he was clearly thinking of nothing but how dashing a fellow he would appear as he passed the commander.
  • It was as if all the powers of his soul were concentrated on passing the commander in the best possible manner, and feeling that he was doing it well he was happy.
  • The order was given to halt and down knapsacks.
  • Prince Andrew felt that an invisible power was leading him forward, and experienced great happiness.
  • But at the moment the first report was heard, Bagration looked round and shouted, "Hurrah!"
  • The French were putting out the fire which the wind was spreading, and thus gave us time to retreat.
  • The retirement of the center to the other side of the dip in the ground at the rear was hurried and noisy, but the different companies did not get mixed.
  • But our left--which consisted of the Azov and Podolsk infantry and the Pavlograd hussars--was simultaneously attacked and outflanked by superior French forces under Lannes and was thrown into confusion.
  • He was seized by panic and could not go where it was dangerous.
  • Having reached the left flank, instead of going to the front where the firing was, he began to look for the general and his staff where they could not possibly be, and so did not deliver the order.
  • The command of the left flank belonged by seniority to the commander of the regiment Kutuzov had reviewed at Braunau and in which Dolokhov was serving as a private.
  • But haste was becoming imperative.
  • It was no longer possible for the hussars to retreat with the infantry.
  • However inconvenient the position, it was now necessary to attack in order to cut a way through for themselves.
  • The squadron in which Rostov was serving had scarcely time to mount before it was halted facing the enemy.
  • Ahead, the enemy was already visible.
  • He was alone in the middle of a field.
  • There was warm blood under his arm.
  • Blood was flowing from his head; he struggled but could not rise.
  • There was no one near.
  • "Where, on which side, was now the line that had so sharply divided the two armies?" he asked himself and could not answer.
  • "Can something bad have happened to me?" he wondered as he got up: and at that moment he felt that something superfluous was hanging on his benumbed left arm.
  • In among the hindmost of these men wearing similar shakos was a Russian hussar.
  • He was being held by the arms and his horse was being led behind him.
  • The foremost Frenchman, the one with the hooked nose, was already so close that the expression of his face could be seen.
  • The moral hesitation which decided the fate of battles was evidently culminating in a panic.
  • It was Timokhin's company, which alone had maintained its order in the wood and, having lain in ambush in a ditch, now attacked the French unexpectedly.
  • Dolokhov, running beside Timokhin, killed a Frenchman at close quarters and was the first to seize the surrendering French officer by his collar.
  • Our reserve units were able to join up, and the fight was at an end.
  • The man was wearing a bluish coat of broadcloth, he had no knapsack or cap, his head was bandaged, and over his shoulder a French munition pouch was slung.
  • The soldier was pale, his blue eyes looked impudently into the commander's face, and his lips were smiling.
  • Though the commander was occupied in giving instructions to Major Ekonomov, he could not help taking notice of the soldier.
  • The fire, fanned by the breeze, was rapidly spreading.
  • Only when a man was killed or wounded did he frown and turn away from the sight, shouting angrily at the men who, as is always the case, hesitated about lifting the injured or dead.
  • The soldiers, for the most part handsome fellows and, as is always the case in an artillery company, a head and shoulders taller and twice as broad as their officer--all looked at their commander like children in an embarrassing situation, and the expression on his face was invariably reflected on theirs.
  • It seemed to him that it was a very long time ago, almost a day, since he had first seen the enemy and fired the first shot, and that the corner of the field he stood on was well-known and familiar ground.
  • Though he thought of everything, considered everything, and did everything the best of officers could do in his position, he was in a state akin to feverish delirium or drunkenness.
  • In that world, the handsome drunkard Number One of the second gun's crew was "uncle"; Tushin looked at him more often than at anyone else and took delight in his every movement.
  • He imagined himself as an enormously tall, powerful man who was throwing cannon balls at the French with both hands.
  • "Now then, Matvevna, dear old lady, don't let me down!" he was saying as he moved from the gun, when a strange, unfamiliar voice called above his head: "Captain Tushin!
  • It was the staff officer who had turned him out of the booth at Grunth.
  • He was shouting in a gasping voice:
  • It was Prince Andrew.
  • The first thing he saw on riding up to the space where Tushin's guns were stationed was an unharnessed horse with a broken leg, that lay screaming piteously beside the harnessed horses.
  • Blood was gushing from its leg as from a spring.
  • "A staff officer was here a minute ago, but skipped off," said an artilleryman to Prince Andrew.
  • It was growing dark and the glow of two conflagrations was the more conspicuous.
  • The cannonade was dying down, but the rattle of musketry behind and on the right sounded oftener and nearer.
  • The cadet was Rostov.
  • With one hand he supported the other; he was pale and his jaw trembled, shivering feverishly.
  • He was placed on "Matvevna," the gun from which they had removed the dead officer.
  • The cloak they spread under him was wet with blood which stained his breeches and arm.
  • "It was the officer, your honor, stained it," answered the artilleryman, wiping away the blood with his coat sleeve, as if apologizing for the state of his gun.
  • It was all that they could do to get the guns up the rise aided by the infantry, and having reached the village of Gruntersdorf they halted.
  • This was the last French attack and was met by soldiers who had sheltered in the village houses.
  • In the darkness, it seemed as though a gloomy unseen river was flowing always in one direction, humming with whispers and talk and the sound of hoofs and wheels.
  • The gloom that enveloped the army was filled with their groans, which seemed to melt into one with the darkness of the night.
  • Drowsiness was irresistibly mastering him, but he kept awake by an excruciating pain in his arm, for which he could find no satisfactory position.
  • He kept closing his eyes and then again looking at the fire, which seemed to him dazzlingly red, and at the feeble, round-shouldered figure of Tushin who was sitting cross-legged like a Turk beside him.
  • It was no longer, as before, a dark, unseen river flowing through the gloom, but a dark sea swelling and gradually subsiding after a storm.
  • Prince Bagration was thanking the individual commanders and inquiring into details of the action and our losses.
  • When I saw, your excellency, that their first battalion was disorganized, I stopped in the road and thought: 'I'll let them come on and will meet them with the fire of the whole battalion'--and that's what I did.
  • The general had so wished to do this and was so sorry he had not managed to do it that it seemed to him as if it had really happened.
  • Several of those present smiled at Zherkov's words, expecting one of his usual jokes, but noticing that what he was saying redounded to the glory of our arms and of the day's work, they assumed a serious expression, though many of them knew that what he was saying was a lie devoid of any foundation.
  • How was it that two guns were abandoned in the center? he inquired, searching with his eyes for someone.
  • "One was damaged," answered the staff officer, "and the other I can't understand.
  • It is true that it was hot there, he added, modestly.
  • As he stepped past the generals in the crowded hut, feeling embarrassed as he always was by the sight of his superiors, he did not notice the staff of the banner and stumbled over it.
  • "How was it a gun was abandoned?" asked Bagration, frowning, not so much at the captain as at those who were laughing, among whom Zherkov laughed loudest.
  • Tushin did not say that there were no covering troops, though that was perfectly true.
  • He was afraid of getting some other officer into trouble, and silently fixed his eyes on Bagration as a schoolboy who has blundered looks at an examiner.
  • It was all so strange, so unlike what he had hoped.
  • It was they, these soldiers--wounded and unwounded--it was they who were crushing, weighing down, and twisting the sinews and scorching the flesh of his sprained arm and shoulder.
  • That affair was the same thing as this soldier with the harsh voice, and it was that affair and this soldier that were so agonizingly, incessantly pulling and pressing his arm and always dragging it in one direction.
  • It would not ache--it would be well--if only they did not pull it, but it was impossible to get rid of them.
  • He was alone now, except for a soldier who was sitting naked at the other side of the fire, warming his thin yellow body.
  • Yet I was once at home, strong, happy, and loved.
  • Next day the French army did not renew their attack, and the remnant of Bagration's detachment was reunited to Kutuzov's army.
  • Prince Vasili was not a man who deliberately thought out his plans.
  • He was merely a man of the world who had got on and to whom getting on had become a habit.
  • Pierre, on unexpectedly becoming Count Bezukhov and a rich man, felt himself after his recent loneliness and freedom from cares so beset and preoccupied that only in bed was he able to be by himself.
  • He was always hearing such words as: "With your remarkable kindness," or, "With your excellent heart," "You are yourself so honorable Count," or, "Were he as clever as you," and so on, till he began sincerely to believe in his own exceptional kindness and extraordinary intelligence, the more so as in the depth of his heart it had always seemed to him that he really was very kind and intelligent.
  • Prince Vasili had come to the conclusion that it was necessary to throw this bone--a bill for thirty thousand rubles--to the poor princess that it might not occur to her to speak of his share in the affair of the inlaid portfolio.
  • He was always busy and always felt in a state of mild and cheerful intoxication.
  • I was nearly forgetting, he added.
  • By "what was due from the Ryazan estate" Prince Vasili meant several thousand rubles quitrent received from Pierre's peasants, which the prince had retained for himself.
  • His whole time was taken up with dinners and balls and was spent chiefly at Prince Vasili's house in the company of the stout princess, his wife, and his beautiful daughter Helene.
  • Formerly in Anna Pavlovna's presence, Pierre had always felt that what he was saying was out of place, tactless and unsuitable, that remarks which seemed to him clever while they formed in his mind became foolish as soon as he uttered them, while on the contrary Hippolyte's stupidest remarks came out clever and apt.
  • Now everything Pierre said was charmant.
  • In the beginning of the winter of 1805-6 Pierre received one of Anna Pavlovna's usual pink notes with an invitation to which was added: "You will find the beautiful Helene here, whom it is always delightful to see."
  • Another group was at the tea table.
  • If he ever thought of Helene, it was just of her beauty and her remarkable skill in appearing silently dignified in society.
  • She looked at her niece, as if inquiring what she was to do with these people.
  • The aunt coughed, swallowed, and said in French that she was very pleased to see Helene, then she turned to Pierre with the same words of welcome and the same look.
  • Pierre was so used to that smile, and it had so little meaning for him, that he paid no attention to it.
  • The aunt was just speaking of a collection of snuffboxes that had belonged to Pierre's father, Count Bezukhov, and showed them her own box.
  • "That is probably the work of Vinesse," said Pierre, mentioning a celebrated miniaturist, and he leaned over the table to take the snuffbox while trying to hear what was being said at the other table.
  • She was, as always at evening parties, wearing a dress such as was then fashionable, cut very low at front and back.
  • He was conscious of the warmth of her body, the scent of perfume, and the creaking of her corset as she moved.
  • She was terribly close to him.
  • She already had power over him, and between them there was no longer any barrier except the barrier of his own will.
  • The architect had told him that it was necessary, and Pierre, without knowing why, was having his enormous Petersburg house done up.
  • But she was just as terribly close to him.
  • He had merely understood that the woman he had known as a child, of whom when her beauty was mentioned he had said absent-mindedly: "Yes, she's good looking," he had understood that this woman might belong to him.
  • Why did this thought never occur to me before? and again he told himself that it was impossible, that there would be something unnatural, and as it seemed to him dishonorable, in this marriage.
  • But at the very time he was expressing this conviction to himself, in another part of his mind her image rose in all its womanly beauty.
  • He had arranged this for himself so as to visit his neglected estates at the same time and pick up his son Anatole where his regiment was stationed, and take him to visit Prince Nicholas Bolkonski in order to arrange a match for him with the daughter of that rich old man.
  • "This is all very fine, but things must be settled," said Prince Vasili to himself, with a sorrowful sigh, one morning, feeling that Pierre who was under such obligations to him ("But never mind that") was not behaving very well in this matter.
  • Was I mistaken before, or am I mistaken now?
  • She never was abashed and is not abashed now, so she cannot be a bad woman!
  • She always addressed him with a radiantly confiding smile meant for him alone, in which there was something more significant than in the general smile that usually brightened her face.
  • Pierre knew that everyone was waiting for him to say a word and cross a certain line, and he knew that sooner or later he would step across it, but an incomprehensible terror seized him at the thought of that dreadful step.
  • Pierre was one of those who are only strong when they feel themselves quite innocent, and since that day when he was overpowered by a feeling of desire while stooping over the snuffbox at Anna Pavlovna's, an unacknowledged sense of the guilt of that desire paralyzed his will.
  • Prince Vasili was not having any supper: he went round the table in a merry mood, sitting down now by one, now by another, of the guests.
  • At one end of the table, the old chamberlain was heard assuring an old baroness that he loved her passionately, at which she laughed; at the other could be heard the story of the misfortunes of some Mary Viktorovna or other.
  • And again his handkerchief, and again: 'Sergey Kuzmich, From all sides,'... and tears, till at last somebody else was asked to read it.
  • But much as all the rest laughed, talked, and joked, much as they enjoyed their Rhine wine, saute, and ices, and however they avoided looking at the young couple, and heedless and unobservant as they seemed of them, one could feel by the occasional glances they gave that the story about Sergey Kuzmich, the laughter, and the food were all a pretense, and that the whole attention of that company was directed to-- Pierre and Helene.
  • Jests fell flat, news was not interesting, and the animation was evidently forced.
  • It seemed as if the very light of the candles was focused on those two happy faces alone.
  • Pierre felt that he was the center of it all, and this both pleased and embarrassed him.
  • He was like a man entirely absorbed in some occupation.
  • Then there was nothing.
  • And here he was sitting by her side as her betrothed, seeing, hearing, feeling her nearness, her breathing, her movements, her beauty.
  • Then it would suddenly seem to him that it was not she but he was so unusually beautiful, and that that was why they all looked so at him, and flattered by this general admiration he would expand his chest, raise his head, and rejoice at his good fortune.
  • But Pierre was so absorbed that he did not understand what was said.
  • Prince Vasili smiled, and Pierre noticed that everyone was smiling at him and Helene.
  • The old princess did not reply, she was tormented by jealousy of her daughter's happiness.
  • Now he felt that it was inevitable, but he could not make up his mind to take the final step.
  • He felt ashamed; he felt that he was occupying someone else's place here beside Helene.
  • But, as he had to say something, he began by asking her whether she was satisfied with the party.
  • Pierre rose and said it was getting late.
  • Prince Vasili gave him a look of stern inquiry, as though what Pierre had just said was so strange that one could not take it in.
  • Pierre smiled, but his smile showed that he knew it was not the story about Sergey Kuzmich that interested Prince Vasili just then, and Prince Vasili saw that Pierre knew this.
  • It seemed to Pierre that even the prince was disconcerted.
  • "The step must be taken but I cannot, I cannot!" thought Pierre, and he again began speaking about indifferent matters, about Sergey Kuzmich, asking what the point of the story was as he had not heard it properly.
  • When Prince Vasili returned to the drawing room, the princess, his wife, was talking in low tones to the elderly lady about Pierre.
  • His face was so unusually triumphant that Pierre rose in alarm on seeing it.
  • The elderly lady was using her handkerchief too.
  • Pierre was kissed, and he kissed the beautiful Helene's hand several times.
  • "Something special is always said in such cases," he thought, but could not remember what it was that people say.
  • He was about to stoop over her hand and kiss it, but with a rapid, almost brutal movement of her head, she intercepted his lips and met them with her own.
  • And now, from the hints contained in his letter and given by the little princess, he saw which way the wind was blowing, and his low opinion changed into a feeling of contemptuous ill will.
  • On the day of Prince Vasili's arrival, Prince Bolkonski was particularly discontented and out of temper.
  • Whether he was in a bad temper because Prince Vasili was coming, or whether his being in a bad temper made him specially annoyed at Prince Vasili's visit, he was in a bad temper, and in the morning Tikhon had already advised the architect not to go to the prince with his report.
  • "Can a sleigh pass?" he asked his overseer, a venerable man, resembling his master in manners and looks, who was accompanying him back to the house.
  • What she found hardest to bear was to know that on such occasions she ought to behave like Mademoiselle Bourienne, but could not.
  • The little princess was not unwell, but had such an overpowering fear of the prince that, hearing he was in a bad humor, she had decided not to appear.
  • The prince reciprocated this antipathy, but it was overpowered by his contempt for her.
  • The little princess was sitting at a small table, chattering with Masha, her maid.
  • She was much altered.
  • She was now plain rather than pretty.
  • Her cheeks had sunk, her lip was drawn up, and her eyes drawn down.
  • It was only my stupidity.
  • He was met in the avenue by coachmen and footmen, who, with loud shouts, dragged his sleighs up to one of the lodges over the road purposely laden with snow.
  • Princess Mary was sitting alone in her room, vainly trying to master her agitation.
  • The little princess and Mademoiselle Bourienne had already received from Masha, the lady's maid, the necessary report of how handsome the minister's son was, with his rosy cheeks and dark eyebrows, and with what difficulty the father had dragged his legs upstairs while the son had followed him like an eagle, three steps at a time.
  • She was no longer in the loose gown she generally wore in the morning, but had on one of her best dresses.
  • Dressed as she used to be in Petersburg society, it was still more noticeable how much plainer she had become.
  • Princess Mary's self-esteem was wounded by the fact that the arrival of a suitor agitated her, and still more so by both her companions' not having the least conception that it could be otherwise.
  • It was not the dress, but the face and whole figure of Princess Mary that was not pretty, but neither Mademoiselle Bourienne nor the little princess felt this; they still thought that if a blue ribbon were placed in the hair, the hair combed up, and the blue scarf arranged lower on the best maroon dress, and so on, all would be well.
  • The three voices, hers, Mademoiselle Bourienne's, and Katie's, who was laughing at something, mingled in a merry sound, like the chirping of birds.
  • Her voice sounded so serious and so sad that the chirping of the birds was silenced at once.
  • They looked at the beautiful, large, thoughtful eyes full of tears and of thoughts, gazing shiningly and imploringly at them, and understood that it was useless and even cruel to insist.
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne and the little princess had to own to themselves that Princess Mary in this guise looked very plain, worse than usual, but it was too late.
  • She was looking at them with an expression they both knew, an expression thoughtful and sad.
  • This expression in Princess Mary did not frighten them (she never inspired fear in anyone), but they knew that when it appeared on her face, she became mute and was not to be shaken in her determination.
  • Princess Mary was left alone.
  • She did not comply with Lise's request, she not only left her hair as it was, but did not even look in her glass.
  • In her thoughts of marriage Princess Mary dreamed of happiness and of children, but her strongest, most deeply hidden longing was for earthly love.
  • And she saw Mademoiselle Bourienne, with her ribbon and pretty face, and her unusually animated look which was fixed on him, but him she could not see, she only saw something large, brilliant, and handsome moving toward her as she entered the room.
  • She only felt a soft hand taking hers firmly, and she touched with her lips a white forehead, over which was beautiful light- brown hair smelling of pomade.
  • When she looked up at him she was struck by his beauty.
  • Anatole was not quick-witted, nor ready or eloquent in conversation, but he had the faculty, so invaluable in society, of composure and imperturbable self-possession.
  • But Anatole was dumb, swung his foot, and smilingly examined the princess' hair.
  • It was evident that he could be silent in this way for a very long time.
  • It was as if he said to them: I know you, I know you, but why should I bother about you?
  • The conversation was general and animated, thanks to Princess Lise's voice and little downy lip that lifted over her white teeth.
  • "And didn't Hippolyte tell you?" asked Prince Vasili, turning to his son and seizing the little princess' arm as if she would have run away and he had just managed to catch her, "didn't he tell you how he himself was pining for the dear princess, and how she showed him the door?
  • When Paris was mentioned, Mademoiselle Bourienne for her part seized the opportunity of joining in the general current of recollections.
  • She took the liberty of inquiring whether it was long since Anatole had left Paris and how he had liked that city.
  • The old prince dressed leisurely in his study, frowning and considering what he was to do.
  • What angered him was that the coming of these visitors revived in his mind an unsettled question he always tried to stifle, one about which he always deceived himself.
  • The question was whether he could ever bring himself to part from his daughter and give her to a husband.
  • Life without Princess Mary, little as he seemed to value her, was unthinkable to him.
  • "It was my fault, mon pere," interceded the little princess, with a blush.
  • And he sat down again, paying no more attention to his daughter, who was reduced to tears.
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne was often touched to tears as in imagination she told this story to him, her seducer.
  • So her future shaped itself in Mademoiselle Bourienne's head at the very time she was talking to Anatole about Paris.
  • After tea, the company went into the sitting room and Princess Mary was asked to play on the clavichord.
  • But Anatole's expression, though his eyes were fixed on her, referred not to her but to the movements of Mademoiselle Bourienne's little foot, which he was then touching with his own under the clavichord.
  • She feared to look round, it seemed to her that someone was there standing behind the screen in the dark corner.
  • And this someone was he--the devil--and he was also this man with the white forehead, black eyebrows, and red lips.
  • The little princess grumbled to her maid that her bed was badly made.
  • "I told you it was all lumps and holes!" the little princess repeated.
  • The insult was the more pointed because it concerned not himself but another, his daughter, whom he loved more than himself.
  • He kept telling himself that he would consider the whole matter and decide what was right and how he should act, but instead of that he only excited himself more and more.
  • The old prince knew that if he told his daughter she was making a mistake and that Anatole meant to flirt with Mademoiselle Bourienne, Princess Mary's self-esteem would be wounded and his point (not to be parted from her) would be gained, so pacifying himself with this thought, he called Tikhon and began to undress.
  • "What devil brought them here?" thought he, while Tikhon was putting the nightshirt over his dried-up old body and gray-haired chest.
  • "Devil take 'em!" he muttered, while his head was still covered by the shirt.
  • The old prince was very affectionate and careful in his treatment of his daughter that morning.
  • Last night a proposition was made me on your account and, as you know my principles, I refer it to you.
  • She lowered her head and was ready to burst into tears.
  • Her fate was decided and happily decided.
  • But what her father had said about Mademoiselle Bourienne was dreadful.
  • It was untrue to be sure, but still it was terrible, and she could not help thinking of it.
  • She was going straight on through the conservatory, neither seeing nor hearing anything, when suddenly the well-known whispering of Mademoiselle Bourienne aroused her.
  • An hour later, Tikhon came to call Princess Mary to the old prince; he added that Prince Vasili was also there.
  • When Tikhon came to her Princess Mary was sitting on the sofa in her room, holding the weeping Mademoiselle Bourienne in her arms and gently stroking her hair.
  • It was long since the Rostovs had news of Nicholas.
  • Not till midwinter was the count at last handed a letter addressed in his son's handwriting.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, though her circumstances had improved, was still living with the Rostovs.
  • "Nicholas!" was all Sonya said, instantly turning white.
  • No, but she said that it was all over and that he's now an officer.
  • She felt that Sonya was speaking the truth, that there was such love as Sonya was speaking of.
  • Now that he was already an officer and a wounded hero, would it be right to remind him of herself and, as it might seem, of the obligations to her he had taken on himself?
  • "It's because she was in love with that fat one in spectacles" (that was how Petya described his namesake, the new Count Bezukhov) "and now she's in love with that singer" (he meant Natasha's Italian singing master), "that's why she's ashamed!"
  • "Don't come in," she said to the old count who was following her.
  • The countess was crying.
  • This was quite true, but the count, the countess, and Natasha looked at her reproachfully.
  • Nicholas' letter was read over hundreds of times, and those who were considered worthy to hear it had to come to the countess, for she did not let it out of her hands.
  • I always said when he was only so high--I always said....
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, practical woman that she was, had even managed by favor with army authorities to secure advantageous means of communication for herself and her son.
  • And so it was decided to send the letters and money by the Grand Duke's courier to Boris and Boris was to forward them to Nicholas.
  • On the twelfth of November, Kutuzov's active army, in camp before Olmutz, was preparing to be reviewed next day by the two Emperors--the Russian and the Austrian.
  • That day Nicholas Rostov received a letter from Boris, telling him that the Ismaylov regiment was quartered for the night ten miles from Olmutz and that he wanted to see him as he had a letter and money for him.
  • Rostov was particularly in need of money now that the troops, after their active service, were stationed near Olmutz and the camp swarmed with well-provisioned sutlers and Austrian Jews offering all sorts of tempting wares.
  • Rostov, who had just celebrated his promotion to a cornetcy and bought Denisov's horse, Bedouin, was in debt all round, to his comrades and the sutlers.
  • Boris, in the accurate way characteristic of him, was building a little pyramid of chessmen with his delicate white fingers while awaiting Berg's move, and watched his opponent's face, evidently thinking about the game as he always thought only of whatever he was engaged on.
  • He was about to embrace his friend, but Nicholas avoided him.
  • And the Tsarevich was very gracious to all our officers.
  • ("Arnauts" was the Tsarevich's favorite expression when he was in a rage) and called for the company commander.
  • Would you believe it, Count, I was not at all alarmed, because I knew I was right.
  • So, Count, there never is any negligence in my company, and so my conscience was at ease.
  • It was not a matter of life but rather of death, as the saying is.
  • I knew I was in the right so I kept silent; was not that best, Count?...
  • The next day it was not even mentioned in the Orders of the Day.
  • "Yes, that was fine," said Rostov, smiling.
  • But Boris noticed that he was preparing to make fun of Berg, and skillfully changed the subject.
  • Rostov was a truthful young man and would on no account have told a deliberate lie.
  • In the middle of his story, just as he was saying: "You cannot imagine what a strange frenzy one experiences during an attack," Prince Andrew, whom Boris was expecting, entered the room.
  • Prince Andrew, who liked to help young men, was flattered by being asked for his assistance and being well disposed toward Boris, who had managed to please him the day before, he wished to do what the young man wanted.
  • Rostov flushed up on noticing this, but he did not care, this was a mere stranger.
  • In spite of Prince Andrew's disagreeable, ironical tone, in spite of the contempt with which Rostov, from his fighting army point of view, regarded all these little adjutants on the staff of whom the newcomer was evidently one, Rostov felt confused, blushed, and became silent.
  • Berg took the opportunity to ask, with great politeness, whether, as was rumored, the allowance of forage money to captains of companies would be doubled.
  • Only when Prince Andrew was gone did Rostov think of what he ought to have said.
  • And he was still more angry at having omitted to say it.
  • Should he go to headquarters next day and challenge that affected adjutant, or really let the matter drop, was the question that worried him all the way.
  • The whole army was extended in three lines: the cavalry in front, behind it the artillery, and behind that again the infantry.
  • A space like a street was left between each two lines of troops.
  • From the direction of Olmutz in front of them, a group was seen approaching.
  • And at that moment, though the day was still, a light gust of wind blowing over the army slightly stirred the streamers on the lances and the unfolded standards fluttered against their staffs.
  • It looked as if by that slight motion the army itself was expressing its joy at the approach of the Emperors.
  • One voice was heard shouting: "Eyes front!"
  • Then, like the crowing of cocks at sunrise, this was repeated by others from various sides and all became silent.
  • In the deathlike stillness only the tramp of horses was heard.
  • This was the Emperors' suites.
  • Amid these sounds, only the youthful kindly voice of the Emperor Alexander was clearly heard.
  • Upon them the undivided, tensely passionate attention of that whole mass of men was concentrated.
  • He longed to show that love in some way and knowing that this was impossible was ready to cry.
  • When the review was over, the newly arrived officers, and also Kutuzov's, collected in groups and began to talk about the awards, about the Austrians and their uniforms, about their lines, about Bonaparte, and how badly the latter would fare now, especially if the Essen corps arrived and Prussia took our side.
  • But the talk in every group was chiefly about the Emperor Alexander.
  • His every word and movement was described with ecstasy.
  • Prince Andrew was in and Boris was shown into a large hall probably formerly used for dancing, but in which five beds now stood, and furniture of various kinds: a table, chairs, and a clavichord.
  • One adjutant, nearest the door, was sitting at the table in a Persian dressing gown, writing.
  • A third was playing a Viennese waltz on the clavichord, while a fourth, lying on the clavichord, sang the tune.
  • Bolkonski was not there.
  • The one who was writing and whom Boris addressed turned round crossly and told him Bolkonski was on duty and that he should go through the door on the left into the reception room if he wished to see him.
  • When he entered, Prince Andrew, his eyes drooping contemptuously (with that peculiar expression of polite weariness which plainly says, "If it were not my duty I would not talk to you for a moment"), was listening to an old Russian general with decorations, who stood very erect, almost on tiptoe, with a soldier's obsequious expression on his purple face, reporting something.
  • More than ever was Boris resolved to serve in future not according to the written code, but under this unwritten law.
  • I was fussing about with Germans all day.
  • Boris smiled, as if he understood what Prince Andrew was alluding to as something generally known.
  • But it was the first time he had heard Weyrother's name, or even the term "dispositions."
  • "Yes, I was thinking"--for some reason Boris could not help blushing-- "of asking the commander-in-chief.
  • It was late in the evening when they entered the palace at Olmutz occupied by the Emperors and their retinues.
  • The council of war was just over when Prince Andrew accompanied by Boris arrived at the palace to find Dolgorukov.
  • Everyone at headquarters was still under the spell of the day's council, at which the party of the young had triumphed.
  • And do you know, my dear fellow, it seems to me that Bonaparte has decidedly lost bearings, you know that a letter was received from him today for the Emperor.
  • But what was most amusing," he continued, with a sudden, good-natured laugh, "was that we could not think how to address the reply!
  • All the same, it was Bilibin who found a suitable form for the address.
  • Count Markov was the only man who knew how to handle him.
  • Boris was excited by the thought of being so close to the higher powers as he felt himself to be at that moment.
  • "Who was that?" asked Boris.
  • Next day, the army began its campaign, and up to the very battle of Austerlitz, Boris was unable to see either Prince Andrew or Dolgorukov again and remained for a while with the Ismaylov regiment.
  • At dawn on the sixteenth of November, Denisov's squadron, in which Nicholas Rostov served and which was in Prince Bagration's detachment, moved from the place where it had spent the night, advancing into action as arranged, and after going behind other columns for about two thirds of a mile was stopped on the highroad.
  • The day was bright and sunny after a sharp night frost, and the cheerful glitter of that autumn day was in keeping with the news of victory which was conveyed, not only by the tales of those who had taken part in it, but also by the joyful expression on the faces of soldiers, officers, generals, and adjutants, as they passed Rostov going or coming.
  • One of them was leading by the bridle a fine large French horse he had taken from the prisoner.
  • The French dragoon was a young Alsatian who spoke French with a German accent.
  • He was breathless with agitation, his face was red, and when he heard some French spoken he at once began speaking to the officers, addressing first one, then another.
  • It was plain that he did not quite grasp where he was.
  • He brought with him into our rearguard all the freshness of atmosphere of the French army, which was so alien to us.
  • "But don't hurt my little horse!" said the Alsatian good-naturedly to Rostov when the animal was handed over to the hussar.
  • The Emperor! was suddenly heard among the hussars.
  • In a moment everyone was in his place, waiting.
  • He was filled with happiness at his nearness to the Emperor.
  • He was happy as a lover when the longed-for moment of meeting arrives.
  • Not daring to look round and without looking round, he was ecstatically conscious of his approach.
  • And as if in accord with Rostov's feeling, there was a deathly stillness amid which was heard the Emperor's voice.
  • A few minutes after the Emperor had passed, the Pavlograd division was ordered to advance.
  • The Emperor, surrounded by his suite of officers and courtiers, was riding a bobtailed chestnut mare, a different one from that which he had ridden at the review, and bending to one side he gracefully held a gold lorgnette to his eyes and looked at a soldier who lay prone, with blood on his uncovered head.
  • The wounded soldier was so dirty, coarse, and revolting that his proximity to the Emperor shocked Rostov.
  • Rostov saw tears filling the Emperor's eyes and heard him, as he was riding away, say to Czartoryski: What a terrible thing war is: what a terrible thing!
  • The Emperor's gratitude was announced to the vanguard, rewards were promised, and the men received a double ration of vodka.
  • He really was in love with the Tsar and the glory of the Russian arms and the hope of future triumph.
  • And he was not the only man to experience that feeling during those memorable days preceding the battle of Austerlitz: nine tenths of the men in the Russian army were then in love, though less ecstatically, with their Tsar and the glory of the Russian arms.
  • The next day the Emperor stopped at Wischau, and Villier, his physician, was repeatedly summoned to see him.
  • At headquarters and among the troops near by the news spread that the Emperor was unwell.
  • The cause of this indisposition was the strong impression made on his sensitive mind by the sight of the killed and wounded.
  • This officer was Savary.
  • At midday he was admitted to the Emperor, and an hour later he rode off with Prince Dolgorukov to the advanced post of the French army.
  • To the joy and pride of the whole army, a personal interview was refused, and instead of the Sovereign, Prince Dolgorukov, the victor at Wischau, was sent with Savary to negotiate with Napoleon if, contrary to expectations, these negotiations were actuated by a real desire for peace.
  • In the highest army circles from midday on the nineteenth, a great, excitedly bustling activity began which lasted till the morning of the twentieth, when the memorable battle of Austerlitz was fought.
  • Till midday on the nineteenth, the activity--the eager talk, running to and fro, and dispatching of adjutants--was confined to the Emperor's headquarters.
  • The concentrated activity which had begun at the Emperor's headquarters in the morning and had started the whole movement that followed was like the first movement of the main wheel of a large tower clock.
  • Just as in a clock, the result of the complicated motion of innumerable wheels and pulleys is merely a slow and regular movement of the hands which show the time, so the result of all the complicated human activities of 160,000 Russians and French--all their passions, desires, remorse, humiliations, sufferings, outbursts of pride, fear, and enthusiasm--was only the loss of the battle of Austerlitz, the so-called battle of the three Emperors--that is to say, a slow movement of the hand on the dial of human history.
  • Prince Andrew was on duty that day and in constant attendance on the commander-in-chief.
  • "Well, how d'you do, my dear fellow?" said Dolgorukov, who was sitting at tea with Bilibin.
  • "Whatever are you bothering about, gentlemen?" said Bilibin, who, till then, had listened with an amused smile to their conversation and now was evidently ready with a joke.
  • On the way home, Prince Andrew could not refrain from asking Kutuzov, who was sitting silently beside him, what he thought of tomorrow's battle.
  • That was the answer I got!
  • Shortly after nine o'clock that evening, Weyrother drove with his plans to Kutuzov's quarters where the council of war was to be held.
  • Weyrother, who was in full control of the proposed battle, by his eagerness and briskness presented a marked contrast to the dissatisfied and drowsy Kutuzov, who reluctantly played the part of chairman and president of the council of war.
  • He was like a horse running downhill harnessed to a heavy cart.
  • Whether he was pulling it or being pushed by it he did not know, but rushed along at headlong speed with no time to consider what this movement might lead to.
  • He was evidently so busy that he even forgot to be polite to the commander in chief.
  • He interrupted him, talked rapidly and indistinctly, without looking at the man he was addressing, and did not reply to questions put to him.
  • He was bespattered with mud and had a pitiful, weary, and distracted air, though at the same time he was haughty and self-confident.
  • Kutuzov was occupying a nobleman's castle of modest dimensions near Ostralitz.
  • "Since Prince Bagration is not coming, we may begin," said Weyrother, hurriedly rising from his seat and going up to the table on which an enormous map of the environs of Brunn was spread out.
  • Kutuzov, with his uniform unbuttoned so that his fat neck bulged over his collar as if escaping, was sitting almost asleep in a low chair, with his podgy old hands resting symmetrically on its arms.
  • If at first the members of the council thought that Kutuzov was pretending to sleep, the sounds his nose emitted during the reading that followed proved that the commander-in-chief at that moment was absorbed by a far more serious matter than a desire to show his contempt for the dispositions or anything else--he was engaged in satisfying the irresistible human need for sleep.
  • He really was asleep.
  • Weyrother, with the gesture of a man too busy to lose a moment, glanced at Kutuzov and, having convinced himself that he was asleep, took up a paper and in a loud, monotonous voice began to read out the dispositions for the impending battle, under a heading which he also read out:
  • Next to Weyrother sat Count Langeron who, with a subtle smile that never left his typically southern French face during the whole time of the reading, gazed at his delicate fingers which rapidly twirled by its corners a gold snuffbox on which was a portrait.
  • When the reading which lasted more than an hour was over, Langeron again brought his snuffbox to rest and, without looking at Weyrother or at anyone in particular, began to say how difficult it was to carry out such a plan in which the enemy's position was assumed to be known, whereas it was perhaps not known, since the enemy was in movement.
  • Langeron's objections were valid but it was obvious that their chief aim was to show General Weyrother--who had read his dispositions with as much self-confidence as if he were addressing school children--that he had to do, not with fools, but with men who could teach him something in military matters.
  • "In that case he is inviting his doom by awaiting our attack," said Langeron, with a subtly ironical smile, again glancing round for support to Miloradovich who was near him.
  • But Miloradovich was at that moment evidently thinking of anything rather than of what the generals were disputing about.
  • Weyrother again gave that smile which seemed to say that to him it was strange and ridiculous to meet objections from Russian generals and to have to prove to them what he had not merely convinced himself of, but had also convinced the sovereign Emperors of.
  • It was past midnight.
  • But was it really not possible for Kutuzov to state his views plainly to the Emperor?
  • He thought of her pregnancy and felt sorry for her and for himself, and in a nervously emotional and softened mood he went out of the hut in which he was billeted with Nesvitski and began to walk up and down before it.
  • The night was foggy and through the fog the moonlight gleamed mysteriously.
  • The voices were those of the orderlies who were packing up; one voice, probably a coachman's, was teasing Kutuzov's old cook whom Prince Andrew knew, and who was called Tit.
  • He was saying, "Tit, I say, Tit!"
  • That same night, Rostov was with a platoon on skirmishing duty in front of Bagration's detachment.
  • An enormous space, with our army's campfires dimly glowing in the fog, could be seen behind him; in front of him was misty darkness.
  • It seemed to him that it was getting lighter.
  • On this knoll there was a white patch that Rostov could not at all make out: was it a glade in the wood lit up by the moon, or some unmelted snow, or some white houses?
  • He was succumbing to irresistible, youthful, childish drowsiness.
  • But what was I thinking?
  • No, it was I who dared not.
  • But that's nonsense, the chief thing is not to forget the important thing I was thinking of.
  • All at once it seemed to him that he was being fired at.
  • At the moment he opened his eyes he heard in front of him, where the enemy was, the long-drawn shouts of thousands of voices.
  • The din of many voices was too great; all he could hear was: "ahahah!" and "rrrr!"
  • Rostov's horse was also getting restive: it pawed the frozen ground, pricking its ears at the noise and looking at the lights.
  • One was on a white horse.
  • In the valley he saw before him something like a river, but when he reached it he found it was a road.
  • Some more! a merry voice was saying in his soul.
  • Dolgorukov was still insisting that the French had retreated and had only lit fires to deceive us.
  • "What does that prove?" he was saying as Rostov rode up.
  • "The picket is still on the hill, your excellency, just where it was in the evening," reported Rostov, stooping forward with his hand at the salute and unable to repress the smile of delight induced by his ride and especially by the sound of the bullets.
  • The fires and shouting in the enemy's army were occasioned by the fact that while Napoleon's proclamation was being read to the troops the Emperor himself rode round his bivouacs.
  • Napoleon's proclamation was as follows:
  • At five in the morning it was still quite dark.
  • It was cold and dark.
  • The fog had grown so dense that though it was growing light they could not see ten paces ahead.
  • Every soldier felt glad to know that to the unknown place where he was going, many more of our men were going too.
  • "There now, the Kurskies have also gone past," was being said in the ranks.
  • Last night I looked at the campfires and there was no end of them.
  • Fine orders! was being repeated on different sides.
  • The cause of the confusion was that while the Austrian cavalry was moving toward our left flank, the higher command found that our center was too far separated from our right flank and the cavalry were all ordered to turn back to the right.
  • The general shouted a demand that the cavalry should be halted, the Austrian argued that not he, but the higher command, was to blame.
  • The fog that was dispersing on the hill lay still more densely below, where they were descending.
  • In front in the fog a shot was heard and then another, at first irregularly at varying intervals--trata... tat--and then more and more regularly and rapidly, and the action at the Goldbach Stream began.
  • The fourth column, with which Kutuzov was, stood on the Pratzen Heights.
  • It was nine o'clock in the morning.
  • The fog lay unbroken like a sea down below, but higher up at the village of Schlappanitz where Napoleon stood with his marshals around him, it was quite light.
  • Above him was a clear blue sky, and the sun's vast orb quivered like a huge hollow, crimson float on the surface of that milky sea of mist.
  • Not a single muscle of his face--which in those days was still thin--moved.
  • From information he had received the evening before, from the sound of wheels and footsteps heard by the outposts during the night, by the disorderly movement of the Russian columns, and from all indications, he saw clearly that the allies believed him to be far away in front of them, and that the columns moving near Pratzen constituted the center of the Russian army, and that that center was already sufficiently weakened to be successfully attacked.
  • Today was a great day for him--the anniversary of his coronation.
  • At eight o'clock Kutuzov rode to Pratzen at the head of the fourth column, Miloradovich's, the one that was to take the place of Przebyszewski's and Langeron's columns which had already gone down into the valley.
  • Prince Andrew was behind, among the immense number forming the commander-in-chief's suite.
  • He was in a state of suppressed excitement and irritation, though controlledly calm as a man is at the approach of a long-awaited moment.
  • He was firmly convinced that this was the day of his Toulon, or his bridge of Arcola.
  • His own strategic plan, which obviously could not now be carried out, was forgotten.
  • It was there Prince Andrew thought the fight would concentrate.
  • In the morning all that was left of the night mist on the heights was a hoar frost now turning to dew, but in the valleys it still lay like a milk-white sea.
  • Nothing was visible in the valley to the left into which our troops had descended and from whence came the sounds of firing.
  • Above the heights was the dark clear sky, and to the right the vast orb of the sun.
  • In front, far off on the farther shore of that sea of mist, some wooded hills were discernible, and it was there the enemy probably was, for something could be descried.
  • The commander-in-chief was standing at the end of the village letting the troops pass by him.
  • Kutuzov turned round without answering and his eye happened to fall upon Prince Andrew, who was beside him.
  • Seeing him, Kutuzov's malevolent and caustic expression softened, as if admitting that what was being done was not his adjutant's fault, and still not answering the Austrian adjutant, he addressed Bolkonski.
  • The colonel at the head of the regiment was much surprised at the commander-in-chief's order to throw out skirmishers.
  • "All right, all right!" he said to Prince Andrew, and turned to a general who, watch in hand, was saying it was time they started as all the left-flank columns had already descended.
  • Just then at a distance behind Kutuzov was heard the sound of regiments saluting, and this sound rapidly came nearer along the whole extended line of the advancing Russian columns.
  • Evidently the person they were greeting was riding quickly.
  • When the soldiers of the regiment in front of which Kutuzov was standing began to shout, he rode a little to one side and looked round with a frown.
  • One in a black uniform with white plumes in his hat rode a bobtailed chestnut horse, the other who was in a white uniform rode a black one.
  • He was slightly flushed after galloping two miles, and reining in his horse he sighed restfully and looked round at the faces of his suite, young and animated as his own.
  • The Tsar heard but obviously did not like the reply; he shrugged his rather round shoulders and glanced at Novosiltsev who was near him, as if complaining of Kutuzov.
  • "You know, Michael Ilarionovich, we are not on the Empress' Field where a parade does not begin till all the troops are assembled," said the Tsar with another glance at the Emperor Francis, as if inviting him if not to join in at least to listen to what he was saying.
  • Kutuzov had stopped and was speaking to an Austrian general.
  • Prince Andrew, who was a little behind looking at them, turned to an adjutant to ask him for a field glass.
  • But at that very instant a cloud of smoke spread all round, firing was heard quite close at hand, and a voice of naive terror barely two steps from Prince Andrew shouted, Brothers!
  • Bolkonski only tried not to lose touch with it, and looked around bewildered and unable to grasp what was happening in front of him.
  • Nesvitski with an angry face, red and unlike himself, was shouting to Kutuzov that if he did not ride away at once he would certainly be taken prisoner.
  • Blood was flowing from his cheek.
  • "Stop them!" he shouted, and at the same moment, probably realizing that it was impossible to stop them, spurred his horse and rode to the right.
  • The troops were running in such a dense mass that once surrounded by them it was difficult to get out again.
  • One was shouting, Get on!
  • Another in the same place turned round and fired in the air; a third was striking the horse Kutuzov himself rode.
  • Having forced his way out of the crowd of fugitives, Prince Andrew, trying to keep near Kutuzov, saw on the slope of the hill amid the smoke a Russian battery that was still firing and Frenchmen running toward it.
  • After this volley the regimental commander clutched at his leg; several soldiers fell, and a second lieutenant who was holding the flag let it fall from his hands.
  • A sergeant of the battalion ran up and took the flag that was swaying from its weight in Prince Andrew's hands, but he was immediately killed.
  • But he did not look at them: he looked only at what was going on in front of him--at the battery.
  • Above him there was now nothing but the sky--the lofty sky, not clear yet still immeasurably lofty, with gray clouds gliding slowly across it.
  • How was it I did not see that lofty sky before?
  • Bagration knew that as the distance between the two flanks was more than six miles, even if the messenger were not killed (which he very likely would be), and found the commander-in-chief (which would be very difficult), he would not be able to get back before evening.
  • The morning was bright, he had a good horse under him, and his heart was full of joy and happiness.
  • Give it them! he mentally exclaimed at these sounds, and again proceeded to gallop along the line, penetrating farther and farther into the region where the army was already in action.
  • After passing some Austrian troops he noticed that the next part of the line (the Guards) was already in action.
  • He was riding almost along the front line.
  • Rostov got out of their way, involuntarily noticed that one of them was bleeding, and galloped on.
  • They were our Horse Guards, advancing to attack the French cavalry that was coming to meet them.
  • Rostov could already see their faces and heard the command: "Charge!" shouted by an officer who was urging his thoroughbred to full speed.
  • Rostov, fearing to be crushed or swept into the attack on the French, galloped along the front as hard as his horse could go, but still was not in time to avoid them.
  • At that moment, as the Horse Guards, having passed him, disappeared in the smoke, Rostov hesitated whether to gallop after them or to go where he was sent.
  • This was the brilliant charge of the Horse Guards that amazed the French themselves.
  • Rostov was horrified to hear later that of all that mass of huge and handsome men, of all those brilliant, rich youths, officers and cadets, who had galloped past him on their thousand-ruble horses, only eighteen were left after the charge.
  • "But that's the Grand Duke, and I want the commander-in-chief or the Emperor," said Rostov, and was about to spur his horse.
  • And suddenly he was seized by a panic of fear for himself and for the issue of the whole battle.
  • The foreboding of evil that had suddenly come over Rostov was more and more confirmed the farther he rode into the region behind the village of Pratzen, which was full of troops of all kinds.
  • It's all up now! he was told in Russian, German, and Czech by the crowd of fugitives who understood what was happening as little as he did.
  • The highroad on which he had come out was thronged with caleches, carriages of all sorts, and Russian and Austrian soldiers of all arms, some wounded and some not.
  • Having left that soldier who was evidently drunk, Rostov stopped the horse of a batman or groom of some important personage and began to question him.
  • Rostov let go of the horse and was about to ride on, when a wounded officer passing by addressed him:
  • He was killed by a cannon ball--struck in the breast before our regiment.
  • Rostov rode on at a footpace not knowing why or to whom he was now going.
  • The Emperor was wounded, the battle lost.
  • It was impossible to doubt it now.
  • What was he now to say to the Tsar or to Kutuzov, even if they were alive and unwounded?
  • The French, who had ceased firing at this field strewn with dead and wounded where there was no one left to fire at, on seeing an adjutant riding over it trained a gun on him and fired several shots.
  • Here everyone clearly saw and said that the battle was lost.
  • Some said the report that the Emperor was wounded was correct, others that it was not, and explained the false rumor that had spread by the fact that the Emperor's carriage had really galloped from the field of battle with the pale and terrified Ober-Hofmarschal Count Tolstoy, who had ridden out to the battlefield with others in the Emperor's suite.
  • The Emperor was pale, his cheeks sunken and his eyes hollow, but the charm, the mildness of his features, was all the greater.
  • Rostov was happy in the assurance that the rumors about the Emperor being wounded were false.
  • He was happy to be seeing him.
  • Those speeches were intended for quite other conditions, they were for the most part to be spoken at a moment of victory and triumph, generally when he was dying of wounds and the sovereign had thanked him for heroic deeds, and while dying he expressed the love his actions had proved.
  • His despair was all the greater from feeling that his own weakness was the cause of his grief.
  • It was a unique chance to show his devotion to the Emperor and he had not made use of it....
  • And he turned round and galloped back to the place where he had seen the Emperor, but there was no one beyond the ditch now.
  • Some time passed in silence, and then the same joke was repeated.
  • After five o'clock it was only at the Augesd Dam that a hot cannonade (delivered by the French alone) was still to be heard from numerous batteries ranged on the slopes of the Pratzen Heights, directed at our retreating forces.
  • It was growing dusk.
  • Dolokhov--now an officer--wounded in the arm, and on foot, with the regimental commander on horseback and some ten men of his company, represented all that was left of that whole regiment.
  • Dolokhov who was in the midst of the crowd forced his way to the edge of the dam, throwing two soldiers off their feet, and ran onto the slippery ice that covered the millpool.
  • The ice bore him but it swayed and creaked, and it was plain that it would give way not only under a cannon or a crowd, but very soon even under his weight alone.
  • One of the hindmost guns that was going onto the dam turned off onto the ice.
  • Suddenly he again felt that he was alive and suffering from a burning, lacerating pain in his head.
  • "Where is it, that lofty sky that I did not know till now, but saw today?" was his first thought.
  • Above him again was the same lofty sky with clouds that had risen and were floating still higher, and between them gleamed blue infinity.
  • It was Napoleon accompanied by two aides-de-camp.
  • Bonaparte riding over the battlefield had given final orders to strengthen the batteries firing at the Augesd Dam and was looking at the killed and wounded left on the field.
  • Prince Andrew understood that this was said of him and that it was Napoleon who said it.
  • His head was burning, he felt himself bleeding to death, and he saw above him the remote, lofty, and everlasting sky.
  • He knew it was Napoleon--his hero--but at that moment Napoleon seemed to him such a small, insignificant creature compared with what was passing now between himself and that lofty infinite sky with the clouds flying over it.
  • At that moment it meant nothing to him who might be standing over him, or what was said of him; he was only glad that people were standing near him and only wished that they would help him and bring him back to life, which seemed to him so beautiful now that he had today learned to understand it so differently.
  • He did not regain consciousness till late in the day, when with other wounded and captured Russian officers he was carried to the hospital.
  • During this transfer he felt a little stronger and was able to look about him and even speak.
  • Napoleon apparently remembered seeing him on the battlefield and, addressing him, again used the epithet "young man" that was connected in his memory with Prince Andrew.
  • Prince Andrew did not see how and by whom it was replaced, but the little icon with its thin gold chain suddenly appeared upon his chest outside his uniform.
  • He was already enjoying that happiness when that little Napoleon had suddenly appeared with his unsympathizing look of shortsighted delight at the misery of others, and doubts and torments had followed, and only the heavens promised peace.
  • Toward morning all these dreams melted and merged into the chaos and darkness of unconciousness and oblivion which in the opinion of Napoleon's doctor, Larrey, was much more likely to end in death than in convalescence.
  • And Prince Andrew, with others fatally wounded, was left to the care of the inhabitants of the district.
  • Denisov was going home to Voronezh and Rostov persuaded him to travel with him as far as Moscow and to stay with him there.
  • "Do wake up, Vaska!" he went on, turning to Denisov, whose head was again nodding.
  • There was no one in the hall.
  • The well-known old door handle, which always angered the countess when it was not properly cleaned, turned as loosely as ever.
  • Old Michael was asleep on the chest.
  • Prokofy, the footman, who was so strong that he could lift the back of the carriage from behind, sat plaiting slippers out of cloth selvedges.
  • He could not distinguish which was Papa, which Natasha, and which Petya.
  • Only his mother was not there, he noticed that.
  • Sonya now was sixteen and she was very pretty, especially at this moment of happy, rapturous excitement.
  • He gave her a grateful look, but was still expectant and looking for someone.
  • Yet it was she, dressed in a new gown which he did not know, made since he had left.
  • "Vasili Denisov, your son's friend," he said, introducing himself to the count, who was looking inquiringly at him.
  • Denisov was shown to the room prepared for him, and the Rostovs all gathered round Nicholas in the sitting room.
  • In the room next their bedroom there was a confusion of sabers, satchels, sabretaches, open portmanteaus, and dirty boots.
  • There was a masculine odor and a smell of tobacco.
  • The door was opened a crack and there was a glimpse of something blue, of ribbons, black hair, and merry faces.
  • It was Natasha, Sonya, and Petya, who had come to see whether they were getting up.
  • Natasha's voice was again heard at the door.
  • Natasha had put on one spurred boot and was just getting her foot into the other.
  • Sonya, when he came in, was twirling round and was about to expand her dresses into a balloon and sit down.
  • Sitting on the sofa with the little cushions on its arms, in what used to be his old schoolroom, and looking into Natasha's wildly bright eyes, Rostov re-entered that world of home and childhood which had no meaning for anyone else, but gave him some of the best joys of his life; and the burning of an arm with a ruler as a proof of love did not seem to him senseless, he understood and was not surprised at it.
  • All that ruler business was just nonsense, but we are friends forever.
  • Isn't it? asked Natasha, so seriously and excitedly that it was evident that what she was now saying she had talked of before, with tears.
  • Vera's remark was correct, as her remarks always were, but, like most of her observations, it made everyone feel uncomfortable, not only Sonya, Nicholas, and Natasha, but even the old countess, who--dreading this love affair which might hinder Nicholas from making a brilliant match-- blushed like a girl.
  • On his return to Moscow from the army, Nicholas Rostov was welcomed by his home circle as the best of sons, a hero, and their darling Nikolenka; by his relations as a charming, attractive, and polite young man; by his acquaintances as a handsome lieutenant of hussars, a good dancer, and one of the best matches in the city.
  • The races, the English Club, sprees with Denisov, and visits to a certain house--that was another matter and quite the thing for a dashing young hussar!
  • At the beginning of March, old Count Ilya Rostov was very busy arranging a dinner in honor of Prince Bagration at the English Club.
  • The count was delighted at Anna Mikhaylovna's taking upon herself one of his commissions and ordered the small closed carriage for her.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna turned up her eyes, and profound sadness was depicted on her face.
  • The Moscovites felt that something was wrong and that to discuss the bad news was difficult, and so it was best to be silent.
  • What also conduced to Bagration's being selected as Moscow's hero was the fact that he had no connections in the city and was a stranger there.
  • In his person, honor was shown to a simple fighting Russian soldier without connections and intrigues, and to one who was associated by memories of the Italian campaign with the name of Suvorov.
  • Moreover, paying such honor to Bagration was the best way of expressing disapproval and dislike of Kutuzov.
  • Berg was mentioned, by those who did not know him, as having, when wounded in the right hand, taken his sword in the left, and gone forward.
  • A minority of those present were casual guests--chiefly young men, among whom were Denisov, Rostov, and Dolokhov--who was now again an officer in the Semenov regiment.
  • Nesvitski was there as an old member of the club.
  • Here, as elsewhere, he was surrounded by an atmosphere of subservience to his wealth, and being in the habit of lording it over these people, he treated them with absent-minded contempt.
  • In the third circle, Naryshkin was speaking of the meeting of the Austrian Council of War at which Suvorov crowed like a cock in reply to the nonsense talked by the Austrian generals.
  • Bagration was embarrassed, not wishing to avail himself of their courtesy, and this caused some delay at the doors, but after all he did at last enter first.
  • He walked shyly and awkwardly over the parquet floor of the reception room, not knowing what to do with his hands; he was more accustomed to walk over a plowed field under fire, as he had done at the head of the Kursk regiment at Schon Grabern--and he would have found that easier.
  • It was at first impossible to enter the drawing-room door for the crowd of members and guests jostling one another and trying to get a good look at Bagration over each other's shoulders, as if he were some rare animal.
  • But before he had finished reading, a stentorian major-domo announced that dinner was ready!
  • Everyone rose, feeling that dinner was more important than verses, and Bagration, again preceding all the rest, went in to dinner.
  • The dinner, both the Lenten and the other fare, was splendid, yet he could not feel quite at ease till the end of the meal.
  • As soon as the singing was over, another and another toast was proposed and Count Ilya Rostov became more and more moved, more glass was smashed, and the shouting grew louder.
  • His face was depressed and gloomy.
  • He seemed to see and hear nothing of what was going on around him and to be absorbed by some depressing and unsolved problem.
  • Pierre absolutely disbelieved both the princess' hints and the letter, but he feared now to look at Dolokhov, who was sitting opposite him.
  • Involuntarily recalling his wife's past and her relations with Dolokhov, Pierre saw clearly that what was said in the letter might be true, or might at least seem to be true had it not referred to his wife.
  • That expression was often on Dolokhov's face when looking at him.
  • Rostov was talking merrily to his two friends, one of whom was a dashing hussar and the other a notorious duelist and rake, and every now and then he glanced ironically at Pierre, whose preoccupied, absent-minded, and massive figure was a very noticeable one at the dinner.
  • When the Emperor's health was drunk, Pierre, lost in thought, did not rise or lift his glass.
  • But Rostov was otherwise engaged; he was shouting "Hurrah!"
  • The footman, who was distributing leaflets with Kutuzov's cantata, laid one before Pierre as one of the principal guests.
  • He was just going to take it when Dolokhov, leaning across, snatched it from his hand and began reading it.
  • Hearing that cry and seeing to whom it was addressed, Nesvitski and the neighbor on his right quickly turned in alarm to Bezukhov.
  • He hated her and was forever sundered from her.
  • His haggard face was yellow.
  • He was entirely absorbed by two considerations: his wife's guilt, of which after his sleepless night he had not the slightest doubt, and the guiltlessness of Dolokhov, who had no reason to preserve the honor of a man who was nothing to him....
  • When all was ready, the sabers stuck in the snow to mark the barriers, and the pistols loaded, Nesvitski went up to Pierre.
  • There was no insult on either side.
  • It was thawing and misty; at forty paces' distance nothing could be seen.
  • A feeling of dread was in the air.
  • It was evident that the affair so lightly begun could no longer be averted but was taking its course independently of men's will.
  • The smoke, rendered denser by the mist, prevented him from seeing anything for an instant, but there was no second report as he had expected.
  • He was pressing one hand to his left side, while the other clutched his drooping pistol.
  • His face was pale.
  • His left hand was bloody; he wiped it on his coat and supported himself with it.
  • His frowning face was pallid and quivered.
  • Pierre, hardly restraining his sobs, began running toward Dolokhov and was about to cross the space between the barriers, when Dolokhov cried:
  • "To your barrier!" and Pierre, grasping what was meant, stopped by his saber.
  • But on entering Moscow he suddenly came to and, lifting his head with an effort, took Rostov, who was sitting beside him, by the hand.
  • Rostov was struck by the totally altered and unexpectedly rapturous and tender expression on Dolokhov's face.
  • When he had become a little quieter, he explained to Rostov that he was living with his mother, who, if she saw him dying, would not survive it.
  • Rostov went on ahead to do what was asked, and to his great surprise learned that Dolokhov the brawler, Dolokhov the bully, lived in Moscow with an old mother and a hunchback sister, and was the most affectionate of sons and brothers.
  • Both in Petersburg and in Moscow their house was always full of visitors.
  • Yes, that was it!
  • "But in what was I to blame?" he asked.
  • I felt then that it was not so, that I had no right to do it.
  • So this is what I was proud of!
  • Her father in jest tried to rouse her jealousy, and she replied with a calm smile that she was not so stupid as to be jealous: 'Let him do what he pleases,' she used to say of me.
  • She laughed contemptuously and said she was not a fool to want to have children, and that she was not going to have any children by me.
  • "Yes, I never loved her," said he to himself; "I knew she was a depraved woman," he repeated, "but dared not admit it to myself.
  • Pierre was one of those people who, in spite of an appearance of what is called weak character, do not seek a confidant in their troubles.
  • Why did I say 'Je vous aime' * to her, which was a lie, and worse than a lie?
  • "Louis XVI was executed because they said he was dishonorable and a criminal," came into Pierre's head, "and from their point of view they were right, as were those too who canonized him and died a martyr's death for his sake.
  • Then Robespierre was beheaded for being a despot.
  • But at the moment when he imagined himself calmed by such reflections, she suddenly came into his mind as she was at the moments when he had most strongly expressed his insincere love for her, and he felt the blood rush to his heart and had again to get up and move about and break and tear whatever came to his hand.
  • * "But what the devil was he doing in that galley?"
  • Next morning when the valet came into the room with his coffee, Pierre was lying asleep on the ottoman with an open book in his hand.
  • "The countess told me to inquire whether your excellency was at home," said the valet.
  • Come now, what was this duel about?
  • Helene laughed, "that Dolokhov was my lover," she said in French with her coarse plainness of speech, uttering the word amant as casually as any other word, "and you believed it!
  • And how could you believe he was my lover?
  • He was suffering physically at that moment, there was a weight on his chest and he could not breathe.
  • He knew that he must do something to put an end to this suffering, but what he wanted to do was too terrible.
  • When Princess Mary went to him at the usual hour he was working at his lathe and, as usual, did not look round at her.
  • She was already pale, but on hearing these words her face changed and something brightened in her beautiful, radiant eyes.
  • It was as if joy--a supreme joy apart from the joys and sorrows of this world--overflowed the great grief within her.
  • She saw him tender and amused as he was when he put on the little icon.
  • Was he now there?
  • It was evident that her eyes did not see Princess Mary but were looking within... into herself... at something joyful and mysterious taking place within her.
  • Princess Mary could not lift her head, she was weeping.
  • Unobservant as was the little princess, these tears, the cause of which she did not understand, agitated her.
  • She had determined not to tell her and persuaded her father to hide the terrible news from her till after her confinement, which was expected within a few days.
  • She prayed for her brother as living and was always awaiting news of his return.
  • "Your excellency, should not Mary Bogdanovna be sent for?" said one of the maids who was present.
  • She kissed Lise and was about to leave the room.
  • The midwife was already on her way to meet her, rubbing her small, plump white hands with an air of calm importance.
  • On their faces was a quiet and solemn look.
  • Princess Mary sat alone in her room listening to the sounds in the house, now and then opening her door when someone passed and watching what was going on in the passage.
  • Everyone in the house was dominated by the same feeling that Princess Mary experienced as she sat in her room.
  • There was no laughter in the maids' large hall.
  • After a while he re-entered it as if to snuff the candles, and, seeing the prince was lying on the sofa, looked at him, noticed his perturbed face, shook his head, and going up to him silently kissed him on the shoulder and left the room without snuffing the candles or saying why he had entered.
  • Nurse Savishna, knitting in hand, was telling in low tones, scarcely hearing or understanding her own words, what she had told hundreds of times before: how the late princess had given birth to Princess Mary in Kishenev with only a Moldavian peasant woman to help instead of a midwife.
  • Princess Mary shuddered; her nurse, putting down the stocking she was knitting, went to the window and leaning out tried to catch the open casement.
  • As she was crossing the anteroom she saw through the window a carriage with lanterns, standing at the entrance.
  • Still lower, beyond the turn of the staircase, one could hear the footstep of someone in thick felt boots, and a voice that seemed familiar to Princess Mary was saying something.
  • "Gone to bed," replied the voice of Demyan the house steward, who was downstairs.
  • Yes, it was he, pale, thin, with a changed and strangely softened but agitated expression on his face.
  • "You did not get my letter?" he asked, and not waiting for a reply-- which he would not have received, for the princess was unable to speak-- he turned back, rapidly mounted the stairs again with the doctor who had entered the hall after him (they had met at the last post station), and again embraced his sister.
  • Strands of her black hair lay round her inflamed and perspiring cheeks, her charming rosy mouth with its downy lip was open and she was smiling joyfully.
  • Prince Andrew entered and paused facing her at the foot of the sofa on which she was lying.
  • She was not surprised at his having come; she did not realize that he had come.
  • Someone was holding it shut.
  • She was lying dead, in the same position he had seen her in five minutes before and, despite the fixed eyes and the pallor of the cheeks, the same expression was on her charming childlike face with its upper lip covered with tiny black hair.
  • He was standing close to the door and as soon as it opened his rough old arms closed like a vise round his son's neck, and without a word he began to sob like a child.
  • Three days later the little princess was buried, and Prince Andrew went up the steps to where the coffin stood, to give her the farewell kiss.
  • And there in the coffin was the same face, though with closed eyes.
  • "Ah, what have you done to me?" it still seemed to say, and Prince Andrew felt that something gave way in his soul and that he was guilty of a sin he could neither remedy nor forget.
  • Another five days passed, and then the young Prince Nicholas Andreevich was baptized.
  • His grandfather, who was his godfather, trembling and afraid of dropping him, carried the infant round the battered tin font and handed him over to the godmother, Princess Mary.
  • As a result he could not go to the country with the rest of the family, but was kept all summer in Moscow by his new duties.
  • Now tell me, Count, was it right, was it honorable, of Bezukhov?
  • And what was it for?
  • Why, if he was so jealous, as I see things he should have shown it sooner, but he lets it go on for months.
  • "Oh, yes, I quite understand," answered Rostov, who was under his new friend's influence.
  • The first half of the winter of 1806, which Nicholas Rostov spent in Moscow, was one of the happiest, merriest times for him and the whole family.
  • Dolokhov, who did not usually care for the society of ladies, began to come often to the house, and the question for whose sake he came (though no one spoke of it) was soon settled.
  • He was pointedly attentive to Sonya and looked at her in such a way that not only could she not bear his glances without coloring, but even the old countess and Natasha blushed when they saw his looks.
  • It was evident that this strange, strong man was under the irresistible influence of the dark, graceful girl who loved another.
  • But he was not as much at ease with Sonya and Dolokhov as before and was less frequently at home.
  • Everywhere Bonaparte was anathematized and in Moscow nothing but the coming war was talked of.
  • It was a grand farewell dinner, as he and Denisov were leaving to join their regiment after Epiphany.
  • Nicholas understood that something must have happened between Sonya and Dolokhov before dinner, and with the kindly sensitiveness natural to him was very gentle and wary with them both at dinner.
  • He called Natasha and asked her what was the matter.
  • "And I was looking for you," said Natasha running out to him.
  • Dolokhov was a suitable and in some respects a brilliant match for the dowerless, orphan girl.
  • From the point of view of the old countess and of society it was out of the question for her to refuse him.
  • This was the first time since his return that they had talked alone and about their love.
  • There was the fact that only those came who wished to dance and amuse themselves as girls of thirteen and fourteen do who are wearing long dresses for the first time.
  • Iogel had taken a ballroom in Bezukhov's house, and the ball, as everyone said, was a great success.
  • That evening, proud of Dolokhov's proposal, her refusal, and her explanation with Nicholas, Sonya twirled about before she left home so that the maid could hardly get her hair plaited, and she was transparently radiant with impulsive joy.
  • Natasha no less proud of her first long dress and of being at a real ball was even happier.
  • She was not in love with anyone in particular, but with everyone.
  • Whatever person she happened to look at she was in love with for that moment.
  • "Look how many charming young ladies-" He turned with the same request to Denisov who was also a former pupil of his.
  • Denisov did not take his eyes off her and beat time with his saber in a way that clearly indicated that if he was not dancing it was because he would not and not because he could not.
  • In the middle of a figure he beckoned to Rostov who was passing:
  • She saw that everybody was looking at her and waiting.
  • Nicholas saw that Denisov was refusing though he smiled delightedly.
  • "Please, Vasili Dmitrich," Natasha was saying, "do come!"
  • Only on horse back and in the mazurka was Denisov's short stature not noticeable and he looked the fine fellow he felt himself to be.
  • He glided silently on one foot half across the room, and seeming not to notice the chairs was dashing straight at them, when suddenly, clinking his spurs and spreading out his legs, he stopped short on his heels, stood so a second, stamped on the spot clanking his spurs, whirled rapidly round, and, striking his left heel against his right, flew round again in a circle.
  • He was at once shown to the best room, which Dolokhov had taken for that evening.
  • On the table was a pile of gold and paper money, and he was keeping the bank.
  • He laid down the seven of hearts, on which with a broken bit of chalk he had written "800 rubles" in clear upright figures; he emptied the glass of warm champagne that was handed him, smiled at Dolokhov's words, and with a sinking heart, waiting for a seven to turn up, gazed at Dolokhov's hands which held the pack.
  • On the previous Sunday the old count had given his son two thousand rubles, and though he always disliked speaking of money difficulties had told Nicholas that this was all he could let him have till May, and asked him to be more economical this time.
  • Now only twelve hundred rubles was left of that money, so that this seven of hearts meant for him not only the loss of sixteen hundred rubles, but the necessity of going back on his word.
  • The seven he needed was lying uppermost, the first card in the pack.
  • The whole interest was concentrated on Rostov.
  • Dolokhov was no longer listening to stories or telling them, but followed every movement of Rostov's hands and occasionally ran his eyes over the score against him.
  • He had fixed on that number because forty-three was the sum of his and Sonya's joint ages.
  • Rostov, leaning his head on both hands, sat at the table which was scrawled over with figures, wet with spilled wine, and littered with cards.
  • Oh, how pleasant it was at home!...
  • I was so happy, so free, so lighthearted!
  • He was flushed and bathed in perspiration, though the room was not hot.
  • Dolokhov cut him short, as if to remind him that it was not for him to jest.
  • To say "tomorrow" and keep up a dignified tone was not difficult, but to go home alone, see his sisters, brother, mother, and father, confess and ask for money he had no right to after giving his word of honor, was terrible.
  • Vera was playing chess with Shinshin in the drawing room.
  • Denisov, with sparkling eyes and ruffled hair, sat at the clavichord striking chords with his short fingers, his legs thrown back and his eyes rolling as he sang, with his small, husky, but true voice, some verses called "Enchantress," which he had composed, and to which he was trying to fit music:
  • Sonya was sitting at the clavichord, playing the prelude to Denisov's favorite barcarolle.
  • Natasha was preparing to sing.
  • Denisov was looking at her with enraptured eyes.
  • But, though she noticed it, she was herself in such high spirits at that moment, so far from sorrow, sadness, or self-reproach, that she purposely deceived herself as young people often do.
  • "Now, Sonya!" she said, going to the very middle of the room, where she considered the resonance was best.
  • At that moment she was oblivious of her surroundings, and from her smiling lips flowed sounds which anyone may produce at the same intervals and hold for the same time, but which leave you cold a thousand times and the thousand and first time thrill you and make you weep.
  • While that untrained voice, with its incorrect breathing and labored transitions, was sounding, even the connoisseurs said nothing, but only delighted in it and wished to hear it again.
  • And suddenly the whole world centered for him on anticipation of the next note, the next phrase, and everything in the world was divided into three beats: "Oh mio crudele affetto."...
  • And without noticing that he was singing, to strengthen the si he sung a second, a third below the high note.
  • Oh, how that chord vibrated, and how moved was something that was finest in Rostov's soul!
  • And this something was apart from everything else in the world and above everything in the world.
  • It was long since Rostov had felt such enjoyment from music as he did that day.
  • The count was lighting his pipe and did not notice his son's condition.
  • I was nearly forgetting.
  • "Dear me!" said his father, who was in a specially good humor.
  • "Very much," said Nicholas flushing, and with a stupid careless smile, for which he was long unable to forgive himself, "I have lost a little, I mean a good deal, a great deal--forty three thousand."
  • What nonsense! she said, hoping it was a joke.
  • I will tell him myself, and you'll listen at the door, and Natasha ran across the drawing room to the dancing hall, where Denisov was sitting on the same chair by the clavichord with his face in his hands.
  • Sonya was more tender and devoted to him than ever.
  • It was as if she wanted to show him that his losses were an achievement that made her love him all the more, but Nicholas now considered himself unworthy of her.
  • He filled the girls' albums with verses and music, and having at last sent Dolokhov the whole forty-three thousand rubles and received his receipt, he left at the end of November, without taking leave of any of his acquaintances, to overtake his regiment which was already in Poland.
  • Pierre was obliged to wait.
  • He had begun to think of the last station and was still pondering on the same question--one so important that he took no notice of what went on around him.
  • It was as if the thread of the chief screw which held his life together were stripped, so that the screw could not get in or out, but went on turning uselessly in the same place.
  • It was plain that he was lying and only wanted to get more money from the traveler.
  • And I," continued Pierre, "shot Dolokhov because I considered myself injured, and Louis XVI was executed because they considered him a criminal, and a year later they executed those who executed him--also for some reason.
  • There was no answer to any of these questions, except one, and that not a logical answer and not at all a reply to them.
  • The answer was: You'll die and all will end.
  • But dying was also dreadful.
  • God could not have put into her heart an impulse that was against His will.
  • My wife--as she once was--did not struggle, and perhaps she was right.
  • The newcomer was a short, large-boned, yellow-faced, wrinkled old man, with gray bushy eyebrows overhanging bright eyes of an indefinite grayish color.
  • His servant was also a yellow, wrinkled old man, without beard or mustache, evidently not because he was shaven but because they had never grown.
  • This active old servant was unpacking the traveler's canteen and preparing tea.
  • When everything was ready, the stranger opened his eyes, moved to the table, filled a tumbler with tea for himself and one for the beardless old man to whom he passed it.
  • The stranger's face was not genial, it was even cold and severe, but in spite of this, both the face and words of his new acquaintance were irresistibly attractive to Pierre.
  • He was afraid of any want of clearness, any weakness, in the Mason's arguments; he dreaded not to be able to believe in him.
  • The traveler was Joseph Alexeevich Bazdeev, as Pierre saw from the postmaster's book.
  • Willarski was silent throughout the drive.
  • His arms felt numb, his legs almost gave way, it seemed to him that he was tired out.
  • The room was in black darkness, only a small lamp was burning inside something white.
  • The book was the Gospel, and the white thing with the lamp inside was a human skull with its cavities and teeth.
  • After reading the first words of the Gospel: "In the beginning was the Word and the Word was with God," Pierre went round the table and saw a large open box filled with something.
  • It was a coffin with bones inside.
  • He was not at all surprised by what he saw.
  • Hoping to enter on an entirely new life quite unlike the old one, he expected everything to be unusual, even more unusual than what he was seeing.
  • This short man had on a white leather apron which covered his chest and part of his legs; he had on a kind of necklace above which rose a high white ruffle, outlining his rather long face which was lit up from below.
  • With bated breath and beating heart he moved toward the Rhetor (by which name the brother who prepared a seeker for entrance into the Brotherhood was known).
  • Drawing nearer, he recognized in the Rhetor a man he knew, Smolyaninov, and it mortified him to think that the newcomer was an acquaintance--he wished him simply a brother and a virtuous instructor.
  • "No, I considered it erroneous and did not follow it," said Pierre, so softly that the Rhetor did not hear him and asked him what he was saying.
  • The important mystery mentioned by the Rhetor, though it aroused his curiosity, did not seem to him essential, and the second aim, that of purifying and regenerating himself, did not much interest him because at that moment he felt with delight that he was already perfectly cured of his former faults and was ready for all that was good.
  • Pierre knew very well what a hieroglyph was, but dared not speak.
  • He listened to the Rhetor in silence, feeling from all he said that his ordeal was about to begin.
  • "But I have nothing here," replied Pierre, supposing that he was asked to give up all he possessed.
  • Pierre hurriedly began taking off his right boot also and was going to tuck up the other trouser leg to save this stranger the trouble, but the Mason told him that was not necessary and gave him a slipper for his left foot.
  • He was conducted from that room along passages that turned backwards and forwards and was at last brought to the doors of the Lodge.
  • Willarski coughed, he was answered by the masonic knock with mallets, the doors opened before them.
  • A bass voice (Pierre was still blindfolded) questioned him as to who he was, when and where he was born, and so on.
  • During these wanderings, Pierre noticed that he was spoken of now as the "Seeker," now as the "Sufferer," and now as the "Postulant," to the accompaniment of various knockings with mallets and swords.
  • As he was being led up to some object he noticed a hesitation and uncertainty among his conductors.
  • The candles were then extinguished and some spirit lighted, as Pierre knew by the smell, and he was told that he would now see the lesser light.
  • The bandage was taken off his eyes and, by the faint light of the burning spirit, Pierre, as in a dream, saw several men standing before him, wearing aprons like the Rhetor's and holding swords in their hands pointed at his breast.
  • Among them stood a man whose white shirt was stained with blood.
  • But the swords were drawn back from him and he was at once blindfolded again.
  • Then the candles were relit and he was told that he would see the full light; the bandage was again removed and more than ten voices said together: "Sic transit gloria mundi."
  • Let into the wall was a star-shaped light.
  • The second pair of man's gloves he was to wear at the meetings, and finally of the third, a pair of women's gloves, he said: Dear brother, these woman's gloves are intended for you too.
  • This silence was broken by one of the brethren, who led Pierre up to the rug and began reading to him from a manuscript book an explanation of all the figures on it: the sun, the moon, a hammer, a plumb line, a trowel, a rough stone and a squared stone, a pillar, three windows, and so on.
  • Then a place was assigned to Pierre, he was shown the signs of the Lodge, told the password, and at last was permitted to sit down.
  • They were very long, and Pierre, from joy, agitation, and embarrassment, was not in a state to understand what was being read.
  • The meeting was at an end, and on reaching home Pierre felt as if he had returned from a long journey on which he had spent dozens of years, had become completely changed, and had quite left behind his former habits and way of life.
  • He was joyfully planning this new life, when Prince Vasili suddenly entered the room.
  • I know all about it, and I can tell you positively that Helene is as innocent before you as Christ was before the Jews.
  • Pierre was about to reply, but Prince Vasili interrupted him.
  • He blinked, went red, got up and sat down again, struggling with himself to do what was for him the most difficult thing in life--to say an unpleasant thing to a man's face, to say what the other, whoever he might be, did not expect.
  • The duel between Pierre and Dolokhov was hushed up and, in spite of the Emperor's severity regarding duels at that time, neither the principals nor their seconds suffered for it.
  • But the story of the duel, confirmed by Pierre's rupture with his wife, was the talk of society.
  • And when after Pierre's departure Helene returned to Petersburg, she was received by all her acquaintances not only cordially, but even with a shade of deference due to her misfortune.
  • This expression suggested that she had resolved to endure her troubles uncomplainingly and that her husband was a cross laid upon her by God.
  • He shrugged his shoulders when Pierre was mentioned and, pointing to his forehead, remarked:
  • I said so even at the time when everybody was in raptures about him, when he had just returned from abroad, and when, if you remember, he posed as a sort of Marat at one of my soirees.
  • I was against this marriage even then and foretold all that has happened.
  • The novelty Anna Pavlovna was setting before her guests that evening was Boris Drubetskoy, who had just arrived as a special messenger from the Prussian army and was aide-de-camp to a very important personage.
  • Boris, grown more manly and looking fresh, rosy and self-possessed, entered the drawing room elegantly dressed in the uniform of an aide-de- camp and was duly conducted to pay his respects to the aunt and then brought back to the general circle.
  • Boris, speaking with deliberation, told them in pure, correct French many interesting details about the armies and the court, carefully abstaining from expressing an opinion of his own about the facts he was recounting.
  • For some time he engrossed the general attention, and Anna Pavlovna felt that the novelty she had served up was received with pleasure by all her visitors.
  • The greatest attention of all to Boris' narrative was shown by Helene.
  • "You absolutely must come and see me," she said in a tone that implied that, for certain considerations he could not know of, this was absolutely necessary.
  • Boris smiled circumspectly, so that it might be taken as ironical or appreciative according to the way the joke was received.
  • The war was flaming up and nearing the Russian frontier.
  • In 1806 the old prince was made one of the eight commanders in chief then appointed to supervise the enrollment decreed throughout Russia.
  • He was continually traveling through the three provinces entrusted to him, was pedantic in the fulfillment of his duties, severe to cruel with his subordinates, and went into everything down to the minutest details himself.
  • Princess Mary had ceased taking lessons in mathematics from her father, and when the old prince was at home went to his study with the wet nurse and little Prince Nicholas (as his grandfather called him).
  • The angel's upper lip was slightly raised as though about to smile, and once on coming out of the chapel Prince Andrew and Princess Mary admitted to one another that the angel's face reminded them strangely of the little princess.
  • But what was still stranger, though of this Prince Andrew said nothing to his sister, was that in the expression the sculptor had happened to give the angel's face, Prince Andrew read the same mild reproach he had read on the face of his dead wife: "Ah, why have you done this to me?"
  • He was told that the prince had gone to the nursery.
  • "If you please, your excellency, Petrusha has brought some papers," said one of the nursemaids to Prince Andrew who was sitting on a child's little chair while, frowning and with trembling hands, he poured drops from a medicine bottle into a wineglass half full of water.
  • There were in the room a child's cot, two boxes, two armchairs, a table, a child's table, and the little chair on which Prince Andrew was sitting.
  • "My dear," said Princess Mary, addressing her brother from beside the cot where she was standing, "better wait a bit... later..."
  • She drew her brother's attention to the maid who was calling him in a whisper.
  • It was the second night that neither of them had slept, watching the boy who was in a high fever.
  • He was burning hot.
  • It was a closely written letter of two sheets from Bilibin.
  • Princess Mary was still standing by the cot, gently rocking the baby.
  • And he began reading Bilibin's letter which was written in French.
  • 'Grant leave to retire to his country seat to an old man who is already in any case dishonored by being unable to fulfill the great and glorious task for which he was chosen.
  • This is the battle of Pultusk, which is considered a great victory but in my opinion was nothing of the kind.
  • We civilians, as you know, have a very bad way of deciding whether a battle was won or lost.
  • General Buxhowden was all but attacked and captured by a superior enemy force as a result of one of these maneuvers that enabled us to escape him.
  • At first Prince Andrew read with his eyes only, but after a while, in spite of himself (although he knew how far it was safe to trust Bilibin), what he had read began to interest him more and more.
  • It was not what he had read that vexed him, but the fact that the life out there in which he had now no part could perturb him.
  • He shut his eyes, rubbed his forehead as if to rid himself of all interest in what he had read, and listened to what was passing in the nursery.
  • He was seized with alarm lest something should have happened to the child while he was reading the letter.
  • Just as he went in he saw that the nurse was hiding something from him with a scared look and that Princess Mary was no longer by the cot.
  • As often happens after long sleeplessness and long anxiety, he was seized by an unreasoning panic--it occurred to him that the child was dead.
  • At last he saw him: the rosy boy had tossed about till he lay across the bed with his head lower than the pillow, and was smacking his lips in his sleep and breathing evenly.
  • Prince Andrew was as glad to find the boy like that, as if he had already lost him.
  • He bent over him and, as his sister had taught him, tried with his lips whether the child was still feverish.
  • The soft forehead was moist.
  • Prince Andrew touched the head with his hand; even the hair was wet, so profusely had the child perspired.
  • He was not dead, but evidently the crisis was over and he was convalescent.
  • The dark shadow was Princess Mary, who had come up to the cot with noiseless steps, lifted the curtain, and dropped it again behind her.
  • I was coming to tell you so.
  • Prince Andrew was the first to move away, ruffling his hair against the muslin of the curtain.
  • Despite Count Bezukhov's enormous wealth, since he had come into an income which was said to amount to five hundred thousand rubles a year, Pierre felt himself far poorer than when his father had made him an allowance of ten thousand rubles.
  • About 80,000 went in payments on all the estates to the Land Bank, about 30,000 went for the upkeep of the estate near Moscow, the town house, and the allowance to the three princesses; about 15,000 was given in pensions and the same amount for asylums; 150,000 alimony was sent to the countess; about 70,000 went for interest on debts.
  • The building of a new church, previously begun, had cost about 10,000 in each of the last two years, and he did not know how the rest, about 100,000 rubles, was spent, and almost every year he was obliged to borrow.
  • So the first task Pierre had to face was one for which he had very little aptitude or inclination--practical business.
  • On a third estate the priest, bearing a cross, came to meet him surrounded by children whom, by the count's generosity, he was instructing in reading, writing, and religion.
  • What Pierre did not know was that the place where they presented him with bread and salt and wished to build a chantry in honor of Peter and Paul was a market village where a fair was held on St. Peter's day, and that the richest peasants (who formed the deputation) had begun the chantry long before, but that nine tenths of the peasants in that villages were in a state of the greatest poverty.
  • He did not know that the brick buildings, built to plan, were being built by serfs whose manorial labor was thus increased, though lessened on paper.
  • He was pleased at the gratitude he received, but felt abashed at receiving it.
  • It was at the end of a village that stretched along the highroad in the midst of a young copse in which were a few fir trees.
  • Round the house was a garden newly laid out.
  • Pierre was struck by the modesty of the small though clean house after the brilliant surroundings in which he had last met his friend in Petersburg.
  • "Ask him to wait," and the sound was heard of a chair being pushed back.
  • He was struck by the change in him.
  • As is usually the case with people meeting after a prolonged separation, it was long before their conversation could settle on anything.
  • The preoccupation and despondency which Pierre had noticed in his friend's look was now still more clearly expressed in the smile with which he listened to Pierre, especially when he spoke with joyful animation of the past or the future.
  • It was as if Prince Andrew would have liked to sympathize with what Pierre was saying, but could not.
  • The latter began to feel that it was in bad taste to speak of his enthusiasms, dreams, and hopes of happiness or goodness, in Prince Andrew's presence.
  • Prince Andrew spoke with some animation and interest only of the new homestead he was constructing and its buildings, but even here, while on the scaffolding, in the midst of a talk explaining the future arrangements of the house, he interrupted himself:
  • "I was very much surprised when I heard of it," said Prince Andrew.
  • Pierre blushed, as he always did when it was mentioned, and said hurriedly: I will tell you some time how it all happened.
  • "What does harm to another is wrong," said Pierre, feeling with pleasure that for the first time since his arrival Prince Andrew was roused, had begun to talk, and wanted to express what had brought him to his present state.
  • The third thing--what else was it you talked about? and Prince Andrew crooked a third finger.
  • Prince Andrew expressed his ideas so clearly and distinctly that it was evident he had reflected on this subject more than once, and he spoke readily and rapidly like a man who has not talked for a long time.
  • I should be thankful to do nothing, but here on the one hand the local nobility have done me the honor to choose me to be their marshal; it was all I could do to get out of it.
  • Well, as I was saying," he continued, recovering his composure, "now there's this recruiting.
  • His eyes glittered feverishly while he tried to prove to Pierre that in his actions there was no desire to do good to his neighbor.
  • Prince Andrew, glancing at Pierre, broke the silence now and then with remarks which showed that he was in a good temper.
  • Pointing to the fields, he spoke of the improvements he was making in his husbandry.
  • But as soon as he thought of what he should say, he felt that Prince Andrew with one word, one argument, would upset all his teaching, and he shrank from beginning, afraid of exposing to possible ridicule what to him was precious and sacred.
  • The sun had sunk half below the horizon and an evening frost was starring the puddles near the ferry, but Pierre and Andrew, to the astonishment of the footmen, coachmen, and ferrymen, still stood on the raft and talked.
  • There was perfect stillness.
  • It was getting dusk when Prince Andrew and Pierre drove up to the front entrance of the house at Bald Hills.
  • The servants came out to meet them, and he asked where the old prince was and whether he was expected back soon.
  • The old prince had gone to the town and was expected back any minute.
  • Princess Mary really was disconcerted and red patches came on her face when they went in.
  • It was evident that Prince Andrew's ironical tone toward the pilgrims and Princess Mary's helpless attempts to protect them were their customary long-established relations on the matter.
  • "Really?" said Pierre, gazing over his spectacles with curiosity and seriousness (for which Princess Mary was specially grateful to him) into Ivanushka's face, who, seeing that she was being spoken about, looked round at them all with crafty eyes.
  • Princess Mary's embarrassment on her people's account was quite unnecessary.
  • And was Ivanushka with you?
  • When I was in Kiev, Crazy Cyril says to me (he's one of God's own and goes barefoot summer and winter), he says, 'Why are you not going to the right place?
  • Oh, yes, master, I was found worthy.
  • There was a general who did not believe, and said, 'The monks cheat,' and as soon as he'd said it he went blind.
  • So he was brought, quite blind, straight to her, and he goes up to her and falls down and says, 'Make me whole,' says he, 'and I'll give thee what the Tsar bestowed on me.'
  • "And was the Holy Mother promoted to the rank of general?" said Prince Andrew, with a smile.
  • She evidently felt frightened and ashamed to have accepted charity in a house where such things could be said, and was at the same time sorry to have now to forgo the charity of this house.
  • "Come, Pelageya, I was joking," said Pierre.
  • It was all my fault, and Andrew was only joking.
  • Pelageya stopped doubtfully, but in Pierre's face there was such a look of sincere penitence, and Prince Andrew glanced so meekly now at her and now at Pierre, that she was gradually reassured.
  • I'd sleep a bit and then again go and kiss the relics, and there was such peace all around, such blessedness, that one don't want to come out, even into the light of heaven again.
  • His health was better in the winter, but last spring his wound reopened and the doctor said he ought to go away for a cure.
  • The old prince was in a good temper and very gracious to Pierre.
  • Pierre was maintaining that a time would come when there would be no more wars.
  • Old women's nonsense--old women's nonsense! he repeated, but still he patted Pierre affectionately on the shoulder, and then went up to the table where Prince Andrew, evidently not wishing to join in the conversation, was looking over the papers his father had brought from town.
  • That charm was not expressed so much in his relations with him as with all his family and with the household.
  • The old prince came in to supper; this was evidently on Pierre's account.
  • And during the two days of the young man's visit he was extremely kind to him and told him to visit them again.
  • When Pierre had gone and the members of the household met together, they began to express their opinions of him as people always do after a new acquaintance has left, but as seldom happens, no one said anything but what was good of him.
  • When returning from his leave, Rostov felt, for the first time, how close was the bond that united him to Denisov and the whole regiment.
  • The regiment was also a home, and as unalterably dear and precious as his parents' house.
  • Here, in the regiment, all was clear and simple.
  • The whole world was divided into two unequal parts: one, our Pavlograd regiment; the other, all the rest.
  • And the rest was no concern of his.
  • In the regiment, everything was definite: who was lieutenant, who captain, who was a good fellow, who a bad one, and most of all, who was a comrade.
  • Our army, after repeated retreats and advances and battles at Pultusk and Preussisch-Eylau, was concentrated near Bartenstein.
  • It was awaiting the Emperor's arrival and the beginning of a new campaign.
  • Platov's division was acting independently of the main army.
  • A thaw had set in, it was muddy and cold, the ice on the river broke, and the roads became impassable.
  • In the hospitals, death was so certain that soldiers suffering from fever, or the swelling that came from bad food, preferred to remain on duty, and hardly able to drag their legs went to the front rather than to the hospitals.
  • It was very bitter, but they wandered about the fields seeking it and dug it out with their sabers and ate it, though they were ordered not to do so, as it was a noxious plant.
  • The younger ones occupied themselves as before, some playing cards (there was plenty of money, though there was no food), some with more innocent games, such as quoits and skittles.
  • Rostov brought them to his quarters, placed them in his own lodging, and kept them for some weeks while the old man was recovering.
  • Rostov took the joke as an insult, flared up, and said such unpleasant things to the officer that it was all Denisov could do to prevent a duel.
  • Denisov patted him on the shoulder and began rapidly pacing the room without looking at Rostov, as was his way at moments of deep feeling.
  • The hut was made in the following manner, which had then come into vogue.
  • A trench was dug three and a half feet wide, four feet eight inches deep, and eight feet long.
  • The trench itself was the room, in which the lucky ones, such as the squadron commander, had a board, lying on piles at the end opposite the entrance, to serve as a table.
  • On each side of the trench, the earth was cut out to a breadth of about two and a half feet, and this did duty for bedsteads and couches.
  • The roof was so constructed that one could stand up in the middle of the trench and could even sit up on the beds if one drew close to the table.
  • Denisov, who was living luxuriously because the soldiers of his squadron liked him, had also a board in the roof at the farther end, with a piece of (broken but mended) glass in it for a window.
  • In April, Rostov was on orderly duty.
  • He was pleasantly considering the probability of being promoted in a few days for his last reconnoitering expedition, and was awaiting Denisov, who had gone out somewhere and with whom he wanted a talk.
  • Rostov moved to the window to see whom he was speaking to, and saw the quartermaster, Topcheenko.
  • He could hear that Lavrushka--that sly, bold orderly of Denisov's--was talking, as well as the quartermaster.
  • Lavrushka was saying something about loaded wagons, biscuits, and oxen he had seen when he had gone out for provisions.
  • Then Denisov's voice was heard shouting farther and farther away.
  • In answer to Rostov's inquiry where he was going, he answered vaguely and crossly that he had some business.
  • A little behind the hussars came Denisov, accompanied by two infantry officers with whom he was talking.
  • "I warn you, Captain," one of the officers, a short thin man, evidently very angry, was saying.
  • If not, as the demand was booked against an infantry regiment, there will be a row and the affair may end badly.
  • When Rostov asked what was the matter, he only uttered some incoherent oaths and threats in a hoarse, feeble voice.
  • The regimental doctor, when he came, said it was absolutely necessary to bleed Denisov.
  • A deep saucer of black blood was taken from his hairy arm and only then was he able to relate what had happened to him.
  • Denisov was bandaged up again and put to bed.
  • The case, as represented by the offended parties, was that, after seizing the transports, Major Denisov, being drunk, went to the chief quartermaster and without any provocation called him a thief, threatened to strike him, and on being led out had rushed into the office and given two officials a thrashing, and dislocated the arm of one of them.
  • In answer to Rostov's renewed questions, Denisov said, laughing, that he thought he remembered that some other fellow had got mixed up in it, but that it was all nonsense and rubbish, and he did not in the least fear any kind of trial, and that if those scoundrels dared attack him he would give them an answer that they would not easily forget.
  • Every day, letters of inquiry and notices from the court arrived, and on the first of May, Denisov was ordered to hand the squadron over to the next in seniority and appear before the staff of his division to explain his violence at the commissariat office.
  • Denisov, as was his wont, rode out in front of the outposts, parading his courage.
  • In June the battle of Friedland was fought, in which the Pavlograds did not take part, and after that an armistice was proclaimed.
  • Directly Rostov entered the door he was enveloped by a smell of putrefaction and hospital air.
  • The doctor was followed by a Russian assistant.
  • "I can't tear myself to pieces," the doctor was saying.
  • Rostov explained that he wanted to see Major Denisov of the hussars, who was wounded.
  • He was evidently vexed and impatient for the talkative doctor to go.
  • He was wounded at Molliten.
  • "There was one like that," said the doctor, as if pleased.
  • The smell was so strong there that Rostov held his nose and had to pause and collect his strength before he could go on.
  • The foul air, to which he had already begun to get used in the corridor, was still stronger here.
  • It was a little different, more pungent, and one felt that this was where it originated.
  • His face was purple, his eyes were rolled back so that only the whites were seen, and on his bare legs and arms which were still red, the veins stood out like cords.
  • He was knocking the back of his head against the floor, hoarsely uttering some word which he kept repeating.
  • It was "drink, drink, a drink!"
  • His neighbor on the other side, who lay motionless some distance from him with his head thrown back, was a young soldier with a snub nose.
  • His pale waxen face was still freckled and his eyes were rolled back.
  • The first person Rostov met in the officers' ward was a thin little man with one arm, who was walking about the first room in a nightcap and hospital dressing gown, with a pipe between his teeth.
  • Denisov lay asleep on his bed with his head under the blanket, though it was nearly noon.
  • His face had the same swollen pallor as the faces of the other hospital patients, but it was not this that struck Rostov.
  • What struck him was that Denisov did not seem glad to see him, and smiled at him unnaturally.
  • Rostov even noticed that Denisov did not like to be reminded of the regiment, or in general of that other free life which was going on outside the hospital.
  • He seemed to try to forget that old life and was only interested in the affair with the commissariat officers.
  • You know the auditor told you it was a bad business.
  • Denisov was moodily silent all the evening.
  • Late in the evening, when Rostov was about to leave, he asked Denisov whether he had no commission for him.
  • In it was the petition to the Emperor drawn up by the auditor, in which Denisov, without alluding to the offenses of the commissariat officials, simply asked for pardon.
  • Boris Drubetskoy had asked the important personage on whom he was in attendance, to include him in the suite appointed for the stay at Tilsit.
  • Boris looked at his general inquiringly and immediately saw that he was being tested.
  • Boris was among the few present at the Niemen on the day the two Emperors met.
  • Zhilinski, a Pole brought up in Paris, was rich, and passionately fond of the French, and almost every day of the stay at Tilsit, French officers of the Guard and from French headquarters were dining and lunching with him and Boris.
  • The guest of honor was an aide-de-camp of Napoleon's, there were also several French officers of the Guard, and a page of Napoleon's, a young lad of an old aristocratic French family.
  • Rostov, in common with the whole army from which he came, was far from having experienced the change of feeling toward Napoleon and the French- -who from being foes had suddenly become friends--that had taken place at headquarters and in Boris.
  • As if you could come at a wrong time! said Boris, and he led him into the room where the supper table was laid and introduced him to his guests, explaining that he was not a civilian, but an hussar officer, and an old friend of his.
  • He really was in their way, for he alone took no part in the conversation which again became general.
  • At that moment Zhilinski's voice was heard calling Boris.
  • He could not himself go to the general in attendance as he was in mufti and had come to Tilsit without permission to do so, and Boris, even had he wished to, could not have done so on the following day.
  • And even if they did arrest me for being here, what would it matter? thought he, looking at an officer who was entering the house the Emperor occupied.
  • Below, under the staircase, was a door leading to the lower floor.
  • This way, to the officer on duty" (he was shown the door leading downstairs), "only it won't be accepted."
  • On hearing this indifferent voice, Rostov grew frightened at what he was doing; the thought of meeting the Emperor at any moment was so fascinating and consequently so alarming that he was ready to run away, but the official who had questioned him opened the door, and Rostov entered.
  • This man was speaking to someone in the adjoining room.
  • "A good figure and in her first bloom," he was saying, but on seeing Rostov, he stopped short and frowned.
  • Rostov turned and was about to go, but the man in the braces stopped him.
  • It was a cavalry general who had obtained the Emperor's special favor during this campaign, and who had formerly commanded the division in which Rostov was serving.
  • In the uniform of the Preobrazhensk regiment--white chamois-leather breeches and high boots-- and wearing a star Rostov did not know (it was that of the Legion d'honneur), the monarch came out into the porch, putting on his gloves and carrying his hat under his arm.
  • Again the crowd of members of the suite and street gazers (among whom was Rostov) moved nearer to the Emperor.
  • He was riding a very fine thoroughbred gray Arab horse with a crimson gold-embroidered saddlecloth.
  • It struck him as a surprise that Alexander treated Bonaparte as an equal and that the latter was quite at ease with the Tsar, as if such relations with an Emperor were an everyday matter to him.
  • The crowd unexpectedly found itself so close to the Emperors that Rostov, standing in the front row, was afraid he might be recognized.
  • This was said by the undersized Napoleon, looking up straight into Alexander's eyes.
  • Alexander listened attentively to what was said to him and, bending his head, smiled pleasantly.
  • Napoleon, without looking, pressed two fingers together and the badge was between them.
  • All on silver plate, one of them was saying.
  • The day before yesterday it was 'Napoleon, France, bravoure'; yesterday, 'Alexandre, Russie, grandeur.'
  • In his mind, a painful process was going on which he could not bring to a conclusion.
  • He caught himself harboring such strange thoughts that he was frightened.
  • But besides considerations of foreign policy, the attention of Russian society was at that time keenly directed on the internal changes that were being undertaken in all the departments of government.
  • On other estates the serfs' compulsory labor was commuted for a quitrent.
  • A trained midwife was engaged for Bogucharovo at his expense, and a priest was paid to teach reading and writing to the children of the peasants and household serfs.
  • Prince Andrew spent half his time at Bald Hills with his father and his son, who was still in the care of nurses.
  • He was not thinking of anything, but looked absent-mindedly and cheerfully from side to side.
  • In the forest it was almost hot, no wind could be felt.
  • The coarse evergreen color of the small fir trees scattered here and there among the birches was an unpleasant reminder of winter.
  • But apparently the coachman's sympathy was not enough for Peter, and he turned on the box toward his master.
  • Probably ten times the age of the birches that formed the forest, it was ten times as thick and twice as tall as they.
  • During this journey he, as it were, considered his life afresh and arrived at his old conclusion, restful in its hopelessness: that it was not for him to begin anything anew--but that he must live out his life, content to do no harm, and not disturbing himself or desiring anything.
  • Prince Andrew had to see the Marshal of the Nobility for the district in connection with the affairs of the Ryazan estate of which he was trustee.
  • This Marshal was Count Ilya Rostov, and in the middle of May Prince Andrew went to visit him.
  • It was now hot spring weather.
  • The whole forest was already clothed in green.
  • It was dusty and so hot that on passing near water one longed to bathe.
  • Prince Andrew, depressed and preoccupied with the business about which he had to speak to the Marshal, was driving up the avenue in the grounds of the Rostovs' house at Otradnoe.
  • The girl was shouting something but, seeing that he was a stranger, ran back laughing without looking at him.
  • In 1809 Count Ilya Rostov was living at Otradnoe just as he had done in former years, that is, entertaining almost the whole province with hunts, theatricals, dinners, and music.
  • He was glad to see Prince Andrew, as he was to see any new visitor, and insisted on his staying the night.
  • During the dull day, in the course of which he was entertained by his elderly hosts and by the more important of the visitors (the old count's house was crowded on account of an approaching name day), Prince Andrew repeatedly glanced at Natasha, gay and laughing among the younger members of the company, and asked himself each time, What is she thinking about?
  • That night, alone in new surroundings, he was long unable to sleep.
  • It was hot in the room, the inside shutters of which were closed.
  • The night was fresh, bright, and very still.
  • Just before the window was a row of pollard trees, looking black on one side and with a silvery light on the other.
  • Farther back beyond the dark trees a roof glittered with dew, to the right was a leafy tree with brilliantly white trunk and branches, and above it shone the moon, nearly at its full, in a pale, almost starless, spring sky.
  • His room was on the first floor.
  • She was evidently leaning right out, for the rustle of her dress and even her breathing could be heard.
  • Everything was stone-still, like the moon and its light and the shadows.
  • There never, never was such a lovely night before!
  • Again all was silent, but Prince Andrew knew she was still sitting there.
  • It was already the beginning of June when on his return journey he drove into the birch forest where the gnarled old oak had made so strange and memorable an impression on him.
  • Somewhere a storm was gathering, but only a small cloud had scattered some raindrops lightly, sprinkling the road and the sappy leaves.
  • The left side of the forest was dark in the shade, the right side glittered in the sunlight, wet and shiny and scarcely swayed by the breeze.
  • Everything was in blossom, the nightingales trilled, and their voices reverberated now near, now far away.
  • "Yes, here in this forest was that oak with which I agreed," thought Prince Andrew.
  • "Yes, it is the same oak," thought Prince Andrew, and all at once he was seized by an unreasoning springtime feeling of joy and renewal.
  • And if anyone came into his room at such moments he was particularly cold, stern, and above all unpleasantly logical.
  • It was the time when the youthful Speranski was at the zenith of his fame and his reforms were being pushed forward with the greatest energy.
  • That same August the Emperor was thrown from his caleche, injured his leg, and remained three weeks at Peterhof, receiving Speranski every day and no one else.
  • A few days later Prince Andrew received notice that he was to go to see the Minister of War, Count Arakcheev.
  • Prince Andrew for the second time asked the adjutant on duty to take in his name, but received an ironical look and was told that his turn would come in due course.
  • Then suddenly the grating sound of a harsh voice was heard from the other side of the door, and the officer--with pale face and trembling lips--came out and passed through the waiting room, clutching his head.
  • After this Prince Andrew was conducted to the door and the officer on duty said in a whisper, "To the right, at the window."
  • Prince Andrew was most favorably placed to secure good reception in the highest and most diverse Petersburg circles of the day.
  • The reforming party cordially welcomed and courted him, in the first place because he was reputed to be clever and very well read, and secondly because by liberating his serfs he had obtained the reputation of being a liberal.
  • The party of the old and dissatisfied, who censured the innovations, turned to him expecting his sympathy in their disapproval of the reforms, simply because he was the son of his father.
  • "It was a small estate that brought in no profit," replied Prince Andrew, trying to extenuate his action so as not to irritate the old man uselessly.
  • He rose, took Prince Andrew by the arm, and went to meet a tall, bald, fair man of about forty with a large open forehead and a long face of unusual and peculiar whiteness, who was just entering.
  • Speranski's whole figure was of a peculiar type that made him easily recognizable.
  • This was Speranski, Secretary of State, reporter to the Emperor and his companion at Erfurt, where he had more than once met and talked with Napoleon.
  • Speranski did not shift his eyes from one face to another as people involuntarily do on entering a large company and was in no hurry to speak.
  • He spoke slowly, with assurance that he would be listened to, and he looked only at the person with whom he was conversing.
  • It was clear that he thought it necessary to interest himself in Bolkonski.
  • He was too much absorbed in observing the famous man's personality.
  • The smile vanished from Speranski's white face, which was much improved by the change.
  • But he was so busy for whole days together that he had no time to notice that he was thinking of nothing.
  • Had Speranski sprung from the same class as himself and possessed the same breeding and traditions, Bolkonski would soon have discovered his weak, human, unheroic sides; but as it was, Speranski's strange and logical turn of mind inspired him with respect all the more because he did not quite understand him.
  • In Prince Andrew's eyes Speranski was the man he would himself have wished to be--one who explained all the facts of life reasonably, considered important only what was rational, and was capable of applying the standard of reason to everything.
  • If he replied and argued, it was only because he wished to maintain his independence and not submit to Speranski's opinions entirely.
  • Everything was right and everything was as it should be: only one thing disconcerted Prince Andrew.
  • This was Speranski's cold, mirrorlike look, which did not allow one to penetrate to his soul, and his delicate white hands, which Prince Andrew involuntarily watched as one does watch the hands of those who possess power.
  • He was unpleasantly struck, too, by the excessive contempt for others that he observed in Speranski, and by the diversity of lines of argument he used to support his opinions.
  • (This last resource was one he very frequently employed.)
  • It was evident that the thought could never occur to him which to Prince Andrew seemed so natural, namely, that it is after all impossible to express all one thinks; and that he had never felt the doubt, "Is not all I think and believe nonsense?"
  • And it was just this peculiarity of Speranski's mind that particularly attracted Prince Andrew.
  • Prince Andrew said that for that work an education in jurisprudence was needed which he did not possess.
  • Joseph Alexeevich was not in Petersburg--he had of late stood aside from the affairs of the Petersburg lodges, and lived almost entirely in Moscow.
  • Pierre began to feel dissatisfied with what he was doing.
  • The Petersburg Freemasons all came to see him, tried to ingratiate themselves with him, and it seemed to them all that he was preparing something for them and concealing it.
  • A solemn meeting of the lodge of the second degree was convened, at which Pierre promised to communicate to the Petersburg Brothers what he had to deliver to them from the highest leaders of their order.
  • The meeting was a full one.
  • This aim was that of Christianity itself.
  • At that time, when everything was plunged in darkness, preaching alone was of course sufficient.
  • It was long since there had been so stormy a meeting.
  • At that meeting he was struck for the first time by the endless variety of men's minds, which prevents a truth from ever presenting itself identically to two persons.
  • Even those members who seemed to be on his side understood him in their own way with limitations and alterations he could not agree to, as what he always wanted most was to convey his thought to others just as he himself understood it.
  • He was told that it would not, and without waiting for the usual formalities he left the lodge and went home.
  • Again Pierre was overtaken by the depression he so dreaded.
  • It was just then that he received a letter from his wife, who implored him to see her, telling him how grieved she was about him and how she wished to devote her whole life to him.
  • Pierre saw that there was a conspiracy against him and that they wanted to reunite him with his wife, and in the mood he then was, this was not even unpleasant to him.
  • Compared to what preoccupied him, was it not a matter of indifference whether he lived with his wife or not?
  • My mother-in-law came to me in tears and said that Helene was here and that she implored me to hear her; that she was innocent and unhappy at my desertion, and much more.
  • She need not know how hard it was for me to see her again.
  • At that time, as always happens, the highest society that met at court and at the grand balls was divided into several circles, each with its own particular tone.
  • The largest of these was the French circle of the Napoleonic alliance, the circle of Count Rumyantsev and Caulaincourt.
  • She was visited by the members of the French embassy and by many belonging to that circle and noted for their intellect and polished manners.
  • To be received in the Countess Bezukhova's salon was regarded as a diploma of intellect.
  • Young men read books before attending Helene's evenings, to have something to say in her salon, and secretaries of the embassy, and even ambassadors, confided diplomatic secrets to her, so that in a way Helene was a power.
  • Pierre was just the husband needed for a brilliant society woman.
  • He was that absent-minded crank, a grand seigneur husband who was in no one's way, and far from spoiling the high tone and general impression of the drawing room, he served, by the contrast he presented to her, as an advantageous background to his elegant and tactful wife.
  • He entered his wife's drawing room as one enters a theater, was acquainted with everybody, equally pleased to see everyone, and equally indifferent to them all.
  • Among the many young men who frequented her house every day, Boris Drubetskoy, who had already achieved great success in the service, was the most intimate friend of the Bezukhov household since Helene's return from Erfurt.
  • Her smile for him was the same as for everybody, but sometimes that smile made Pierre uncomfortable.
  • But a complex and difficult process of internal development was taking place all this time in Pierre's soul, revealing much to him and causing him many spiritual doubts and joys.
  • It was Boris Drubetskoy who was admitted.
  • I nominated him and was the Rhetor.
  • A strange feeling agitated me all the time I was alone with him in the dark chamber.
  • It seemed to me that his object in entering the Brotherhood was merely to be intimate and in favor with members of our lodge.
  • After this, three pages were left blank in the diary, and then the following was written:
  • Awoke late, read the Scriptures but was apathetic.
  • I wished to meditate, but instead my imagination pictured an occurrence of four years ago, when Dolokhov, meeting me in Moscow after our duel, said he hoped I was enjoying perfect peace of mind in spite of my wife's absence.
  • I flared up and said much that was unpleasant and even rude to him.
  • He became silent, and I recollected myself only when it was too late.
  • After dinner I fell asleep and as I was drowsing off I clearly heard a voice saying in my left ear, "Thy day!"
  • I dreamed that I was walking in the dark and was suddenly surrounded by dogs, but I went on undismayed.
  • I looked round and saw Brother A. standing on the fence and pointing me to a broad avenue and garden, and in the garden was a large and beautiful building.
  • I dreamed that Joseph Alexeevich was sitting in my house, and that I was very glad and wished to entertain him.
  • But as soon as I drew near I saw that his face had changed and grown young, and he was quietly telling me something about the teaching of our order, but so softly that I could not hear it.
  • He was telling me something, and I wished to show him my sensibility, and not listening to what he was saying I began picturing to myself the condition of my inner man and the grace of God sanctifying me.
  • And tears came into my eyes, and I was glad he noticed this.
  • Abashed by this question, I replied that sloth was my chief temptation.
  • To this he replied that one should not deprive a wife of one's embraces and gave me to understand that that was my duty.
  • And I awoke and found in my mind the text from the Gospel: The life was the light of men.
  • I saw that I was in Moscow in my house, in the big sitting room, and Joseph Alexeevich came in from the drawing room.
  • I looked at him, still holding him in my arms, and saw that his face was young, but that he had no hair on his head and his features were quite changed.
  • And I seemed to know that this maiden was nothing else than a representation of the Song of Songs.
  • And looking at those drawings I dreamed I felt that I was doing wrong, but could not tear myself away from them.
  • Soon after their arrival in Petersburg Berg proposed to Vera and was accepted.
  • In 1809 he was a captain in the Guards, wore medals, and held some special lucrative posts in Petersburg.
  • Though some skeptics smiled when told of Berg's merits, it could not be denied that he was a painstaking and brave officer, on excellent terms with his superiors, and a moral young man with a brilliant career before him and an assured position in society.
  • Berg's proposal was at first received with a perplexity that was not flattering to him.
  • Well, you will be coming," he was going to say, "to dine," but changed his mind and said "to take tea with us," and quickly doubling up his tongue he blew a small round ring of tobacco smoke, perfectly embodying his dream of happiness.
  • After the first feeling of perplexity aroused in the parents by Berg's proposal, the holiday tone of joyousness usual at such times took possession of the family, but the rejoicing was external and insincere.
  • The count was so disconcerted by this long-foreseen inquiry that without consideration he gave the first reply that came into his head.
  • Berg smiled meekly, kissed the count on the shoulder, and said that he was very grateful, but that it was impossible for him to arrange his new life without receiving thirty thousand in ready money.
  • Natasha was sixteen and it was the year 1809, the very year to which she had counted on her fingers with Boris after they had kissed four years ago.
  • Before Sonya and her mother, if Boris happened to be mentioned, she spoke quite freely of that episode as of some childish, long-forgotten matter that was not worth mentioning.
  • But in the secret depths of her soul the question whether her engagement to Boris was a jest or an important, binding promise tormented her.
  • "Nowadays old friends are not remembered," the countess would say when Boris was mentioned.
  • The memory of Natasha was his most poetic recollection.
  • He had a brilliant position in society thanks to his intimacy with Countess Bezukhova, a brilliant position in the service thanks to the patronage of an important personage whose complete confidence he enjoyed, and he was beginning to make plans for marrying one of the richest heiresses in Petersburg, plans which might very easily be realized.
  • When he entered the Rostovs' drawing room Natasha was in her own room.
  • Boris kissed Natasha's hand and said that he was astonished at the change in her.
  • Boris' uniform, spurs, tie, and the way his hair was brushed were all comme il faut and in the latest fashion.
  • He looked round more frequently toward her, and broke off in what he was saying.
  • It seemed to her mother and Sonya that Natasha was in love with Boris as of old.
  • She was finishing her last prayer: "Can it be that this couch will be my grave?"
  • Seeing that her mother was still praying she ran on tiptoe to the bed and, rapidly slipping one little foot against the other, pushed off her slippers and jumped onto the bed the countess had feared might become her grave.
  • This couch was high, with a feather bed and five pillows each smaller than the one below.
  • The countess finished her prayers and came to the bed with a stern face, but seeing, that Natasha's head was covered, she smiled in her kind, weak way.
  • In her behavior to her mother Natasha seemed rough, but she was so sensitive and tactful that however she clasped her mother she always managed to do it without hurting her or making her feel uncomfortable or displeased.
  • At your age I was married.
  • Natasha was lying looking steadily straight before her at one of the mahogany sphinxes carved on the corners of the bedstead, so that the countess only saw her daughter's face in profile.
  • Natasha was listening and considering.
  • Speak! said she, turning to her mother, who was tenderly gazing at her daughter and in that contemplation seemed to have forgotten all she had wished to say.
  • He was not always old.
  • Was anybody ever so much in love with you?
  • It was a long time before she could sleep.
  • She kept thinking that no one could understand all that she understood and all there was in her.
  • Police were stationed at the brightly lit entrance which was carpeted with red baize, and not only gendarmes but dozens of police officers and even the police master himself stood at the porch.
  • Don't you see the plumes?... was whispered among the crowd.
  • Marya Ignatevna Peronskaya, a thin and shallow maid of honor at the court of the Dowager Empress, who was a friend and relation of the countess and piloted the provincial Rostovs in Petersburg high society, was to accompany them to the ball.
  • Natasha was going to her first grand ball.
  • The countess was to wear a claret-colored velvet dress, and the two girls white gauze over pink silk slips, with roses on their bodices and their hair dressed a la grecque.
  • Sonya was finishing dressing and so was the countess, but Natasha, who had bustled about helping them all, was behindhand.
  • She was still sitting before a looking-glass with a dressing jacket thrown over her slender shoulders.
  • Sonya stood ready dressed in the middle of the room and, pressing the head of a pin till it hurt her dainty finger, was fixing on a last ribbon that squeaked as the pin went through it.
  • "That's not the way, that's not the way, Sonya!" cried Natasha turning her head and clutching with both hands at her hair which the maid who was dressing it had not time to release.
  • I can't do it like that, said the maid who was holding Natasha's hair.
  • When her hair was done, Natasha, in her short petticoat from under which her dancing shoes showed, and in her mother's dressing jacket, ran up to Sonya, scrutinized her, and then ran to her mother.
  • The cause of the delay was Natasha's skirt, which was too long.
  • A third with pins in her mouth was running about between the countess and Sonya, and a fourth held the whole of the gossamer garment up high on one uplifted hand.
  • He was wearing a blue swallow-tail coat, shoes and stockings, and was perfumed and his hair pomaded.
  • "If you please, Miss! allow me," said the maid, who on her knees was pulling the skirt straight and shifting the pins from one side of her mouth to the other with her tongue.
  • The dress was too long.
  • "I'll arrange it," and she rushed forward so that the maids who were tacking up her skirt could not move fast enough and a piece of gauze was torn off.
  • Really it was not my fault!
  • Peronskaya was quite ready.
  • In spite of her age and plainness she had gone through the same process as the Rostovs, but with less flurry – for to her it was a matter of routine.
  • She had washed behind her ears just as carefully, and when she entered her drawing room in her yellow dress, wearing her badge as maid of honor, her old lady's maid was as full of rapturous admiration as the Rostovs' servants had been.
  • The prospect was so splendid that she hardly believed it would come true, so out of keeping was it with the chill darkness and closeness of the carriage.
  • And this was the very attitude that became her best.
  • All was blended into one brilliant procession.
  • The host also followed Natasha with his eyes and asked the count which was his daughter.
  • Peronskaya was pointing out to the countess the most important people at the ball.
  • That gray-haired man, she said, indicating an old man with a profusion of silver-gray curly hair, who was surrounded by ladies laughing at something he said.
  • She pointed to a lady who was crossing the room followed by a very plain daughter.
  • Natasha at once recognized the shorter and younger man in the white uniform: it was Bolkonski, who seemed to her to have grown much younger, happier, and better-looking.
  • She was not concerned about the Emperor or any of those great people whom Peronskaya was pointing out--she had but one thought: Is it possible no one will ask me, that I shall not be among the first to dance?
  • The count was at the other end of the room.
  • The handsome Anatole was smilingly talking to a partner on his arm and looked at Natasha as one looks at a wall.
  • She did not listen to or look at Vera, who was telling her something about her own green dress.
  • Natasha gazed at them and was ready to cry because it was not she who was dancing that first turn of the waltz.
  • Baron Firhoff was talking to him about the first sitting of the Council of State to be held next day.
  • Prince Andrew was watching these men abashed by the Emperor's presence, and the women who were breathlessly longing to be asked to dance.
  • He recognized her, guessed her feelings, saw that it was her debut, remembered her conversation at the window, and with an expression of pleasure on his face approached Countess Rostova.
  • Prince Andrew was one of the best dancers of his day and Natasha danced exquisitely.
  • For one of the merry cotillions before supper Prince Andrew was again her partner.
  • And such was Natasha, with her surprise, her delight, her shyness, and even her mistakes in speaking French.
  • In the middle of the cotillion, having completed one of the figures, Natasha, still out of breath, was returning to her seat when another dancer chose her.
  • Such as she are rare here, he thought, as Natasha, readjusting a rose that was slipping on her bodice, settled herself beside him.
  • When the cotillion was over the old count in his blue coat came up to the dancers.
  • He invited Prince Andrew to come and see them, and asked his daughter whether she was enjoying herself.
  • She was at that height of bliss when one becomes completely kind and good and does not believe in the possibility of evil, unhappiness, or sorrow.
  • He was gloomy and absent-minded.
  • That was all he thought about yesterday's ball, and after his morning tea he set to work.
  • But either from fatigue or want of sleep he was ill-disposed for work and could get nothing done.
  • He kept criticizing his own work, as he often did, and was glad when he heard someone coming.
  • The visitor was Bitski, who served on various committees, frequented all the societies in Petersburg, and a passionate devotee of the new ideas and of Speranski, and a diligent Petersburg newsmonger--one of those men who choose their opinions like their clothes according to the fashion, but who for that very reason appear to be the warmest partisans.
  • A very simple thought occurred to him: What does it matter to me or to Bitski what the Emperor was pleased to say at the Council?
  • He was going to dine that evening at Speranski's, "with only a few friends," as the host had said when inviting him.
  • Someone--it sounded like Speranski--was distinctly ejaculating ha-ha-ha.
  • It seemed to him that this was not Speranski but someone else.
  • Before Magnitski had finished his story someone else was anxious to relate something still funnier.
  • It seemed that in this company the insignificance of those people was so definitely accepted that the only possible attitude toward them was one of good humored ridicule.
  • In the midst of a conversation that was started about Napoleon's Spanish affairs, which they all agreed in approving, Prince Andrew began to express a contrary opinion.
  • He was interrupted several times by applause.
  • He remembered how carefully and at what length everything relating to form and procedure was discussed at those meetings, and how sedulously and promptly all that related to the gist of the business was evaded.
  • Natasha was one of the first to meet him.
  • She was wearing a dark-blue house dress in which Prince Andrew thought her even prettier than in her ball dress.
  • Now this world disconcerted him no longer and was no longer alien to him, but he himself having entered it found in it a new enjoyment.
  • He had absolutely nothing to weep about yet he was ready to weep.
  • Having lit his candle he sat up in bed, then got up, then lay down again not at all troubled by his sleeplessness: his soul was as fresh and joyful as if he had stepped out of a stuffy room into God's own fresh air.
  • Pierre was right when he said one must believe in the possibility of happiness in order to be happy, and now I do believe in it.
  • Berg explained so clearly why he wanted to collect at his house a small but select company, and why this would give him pleasure, and why though he grudged spending money on cards or anything harmful, he was prepared to run into some expense for the sake of good society--that Pierre could not refuse, and promised to come.
  • Just then Count Bezukhov was announced.
  • There was a shade of condescension and patronage in his treatment of Berg and Vera.
  • Everything was just as everybody always has it, especially so the general, who admired the apartment, patted Berg on the shoulder, and with parental authority superintended the setting out of the table for boston.
  • The general sat down by Count Ilya Rostov, who was next to himself the most important guest.
  • Everything was just as it was everywhere else.
  • At the card table he happened to be directly facing Natasha, and was struck by a curious change that had come over her since the ball.
  • She was silent, and not only less pretty than at the ball, but only redeemed from plainness by her look of gentle indifference to everything around.
  • She was sitting by her sister at the tea table, and reluctantly, without looking at him, made some reply to Boris who sat down beside her.
  • After playing out a whole suit and to his partner's delight taking five tricks, Pierre, hearing greetings and the steps of someone who had entered the room while he was picking up his tricks, glanced again at Natasha.
  • Prince Andrew was standing before her, saying something to her with a look of tender solicitude.
  • She, having raised her head, was looking up at him, flushed and evidently trying to master her rapid breathing.
  • After six rubbers the general got up, saying that it was no use playing like that, and Pierre was released.
  • Natasha on one side was talking with Sonya and Boris, and Vera with a subtle smile was saying something to Prince Andrew.
  • Vera, having noticed Prince Andrew's attentions to Natasha, decided that at a party, a real evening party, subtle allusions to the tender passion were absolutely necessary and, seizing a moment when Prince Andrew was alone, began a conversation with him about feelings in general and about her sister.
  • Vera was saying with an arch smile.
  • This return to the subject of Natalie caused Prince Andrew to knit his brows with discomfort: he was about to rise, but Vera continued with a still more subtle smile:
  • Now you know, Count," she said to Pierre, "even our dear cousin Boris, who, between ourselves, was very far gone in the land of tenderness..."
  • "Oh, there was childish love?" suddenly asked Prince Andrew, blushing unexpectedly.
  • Berg was satisfied and happy.
  • The party was very successful and quite like other parties he had seen.
  • Everything was similar: the ladies' subtle talk, the cards, the general raising his voice at the card table, and the samovar and the tea cakes; only one thing was lacking that he had always seen at the evening parties he wished to imitate.
  • Sonya was afraid to leave Natasha and afraid of being in the way when she was with them.
  • She told her how he had complimented her, how he told her he was going abroad, asked her where they were going to spend the summer, and then how he had asked her about Boris.
  • It was as if she feared this strange, unexpected happiness of meeting again the very man she had then chosen (she was firmly convinced she had done so) and of finding him, as it seemed, not indifferent to her.
  • At that very time Prince Andrew was sitting with Pierre and telling him of his love for Natasha and his firm resolve to make her his wife.
  • Toward midnight, after he had left the countess' apartments, he was sitting upstairs in a shabby dressing gown, copying out the original transaction of the Scottish lodge of Freemasons at a table in his low room cloudy with tobacco smoke, when someone came in.
  • It was Prince Andrew.
  • Prince Andrew seemed, and really was, quite a different, quite a new man.
  • Where was his spleen, his contempt for life, his disillusionment?
  • Pierre was the only person to whom he made up his mind to speak openly; and to him he told all that was in his soul.
  • "I should not have believed anyone who told me that I was capable of such love," said Prince Andrew.
  • He could not comprehend how anyone could wish to alter his life or introduce anything new into it, when his own life was already ending.
  • In the first place the marriage was not a brilliant one as regards birth, wealth, or rank.
  • On the second and third day it was the same.
  • She blushed continually and was irritable.
  • It seemed to her that everybody knew about her disappointment and was laughing at her and pitying her.
  • Natasha was looking at the mirror, but did not see herself.
  • When she saw herself, her face was pale.
  • Again he glanced at her, and that glance convinced her that she was not mistaken.
  • She wished to love him as a son, but felt that to her he was a stranger and a terrifying man.
  • Sonya said that Natasha was in her bedroom.
  • Natasha was sitting on the bed, pale and dry eyed, and was gazing at the icons and whispering something as she rapidly crossed herself.
  • He looked at her and was struck by the serious impassioned expression of her face.
  • The present feeling, though not so bright and poetic as the former, was stronger and more serious.
  • Natasha repeated suddenly, only now realizing that the marriage was to be postponed for a year.
  • Naturally neither Natasha nor her parents wished to hear of this, but Prince Andrew was firm.
  • It was as if they had not known each other till now.
  • At first the family felt some constraint in intercourse with Prince Andrew; he seemed a man from another world, and for a long time Natasha trained the family to get used to him, proudly assuring them all that he only appeared to be different, but was really just like all of them, and that she was not afraid of him and no one else ought to be.
  • Prince Andrew was afraid and ashamed to speak of it.
  • He was talking to the countess, and Natasha sat down beside a little chess table with Sonya, thereby inviting Prince Andrew to come too.
  • Nor did she cry when he was gone; but for several days she sat in her room dry-eyed, taking no interest in anything and only saying now and then, "Oh, why did he go away?"
  • He grew still more irritable, and it was Princess Mary who generally bore the brunt of his frequent fits of unprovoked anger.
  • Whatever was spoken of he would bring round to the superstitiousness of old maids, or the petting and spoiling of children.
  • All the complex laws of man centered for her in one clear and simple law--the law of love and self-sacrifice taught us by Him who lovingly suffered for mankind though He Himself was God.
  • Soon after Prince Andrew had gone, Princess Mary wrote to her friend Julie Karagina in Petersburg, whom she had dreamed (as all girls dream) of marrying to her brother, and who was at that time in mourning for her own brother, killed in Turkey.
  • Five years have passed since then, and already I, with my petty understanding, begin to see clearly why she had to die, and in what way that death was but an expression of the infinite goodness of the Creator, whose every action, though generally incomprehensible to us, is but a manifestation of His infinite love for His creatures.
  • Perhaps, I often think, she was too angelically innocent to have the strength to perform all a mother's duties.
  • "Besides," he wrote, "the matter was not then so definitely settled as it is now.
  • The princess was about to reply, but her father would not let her speak and, raising his voice more and more, cried:
  • And latterly, to her surprise and bewilderment, Princess Mary noticed that her father was really associating more and more with the Frenchwoman.
  • Prince Andrew had loved his wife, she died, but that was not enough: he wanted to bind his happiness to another woman.
  • There was one pilgrim, a quiet pockmarked little woman of fifty called Theodosia, who for over thirty years had gone about barefoot and worn heavy chains.
  • Princess Mary was particularly fond of her.
  • Once, when in a room with a lamp dimly lit before the icon Theodosia was talking of her life, the thought that Theodosia alone had found the true path of life suddenly came to Princess Mary with such force that she resolved to become a pilgrim herself.
  • Often, listening to the pilgrims' tales, she was so stimulated by their simple speech, mechanical to them but to her so full of deep meaning, that several times she was on the point of abandoning everything and running away from home.
  • She wept quietly, and felt that she was a sinner who loved her father and little nephew more than God.
  • The Bible legend tells us that the absence of labor--idleness--was a condition of the first man's blessedness before the Fall.
  • Rostov had become a bluff, good-natured fellow, whom his Moscow acquaintances would have considered rather bad form, but who was liked and respected by his comrades, subordinates, and superiors, and was well contented with his life.
  • Reading these letters, Nicholas felt a dread of their wanting to take him away from surroundings in which, protected from all the entanglements of life, he was living so calmly and quietly.
  • It was all dreadfully difficult and complicated; and he replied to his mother in cold, formal letters in French, beginning: "My dear Mamma," and ending: "Your obedient son," which said nothing of when he would return.
  • The count was so weak, and trusted Mitenka so much, and was so good-natured, that everybody took advantage of him and things were going from bad to worse.
  • The right thing now was, if not to retire from the service, at any rate to go home on leave.
  • His hussar comrades--not only those of his own regiment, but the whole brigade--gave Rostov a dinner to which the subscription was fifteen rubles a head, and at which there were two bands and two choirs of singers.
  • Thoughts of home grew stronger the nearer he approached it--far stronger, as though this feeling of his was subject to the law by which the force of attraction is in inverse proportion to the square of the distance.
  • What was new in them was a certain uneasiness and occasional discord, which there used not to be, and which, as Nicholas soon found out, was due to the bad state of their affairs.
  • Sonya was nearly twenty; she had stopped growing prettier and promised nothing more than she was already, but that was enough.
  • Petya was a big handsome boy of thirteen, merry, witty, and mischievous, with a voice that was already breaking.
  • I was in love with Boris, with my teacher, and with Denisov, but this is quite different.
  • Nicholas was silent and agreed with her.
  • She was even- tempered and calm and quite as cheerful as of old.
  • It always seemed to him that there was something not quite right about this intended marriage.
  • After reaching home Nicholas was at first serious and even dull.
  • He was worried by the impending necessity of interfering in the stupid business matters for which his mother had called him home.
  • To throw off this burden as quickly as possible, on the third day after his arrival he went, angry and scowling and without answering questions as to where he was going, to Mitenka's lodge and demanded an account of everything.
  • (This shrubbery was a well-known haven of refuge for culprits at Otradnoe.
  • Mitenka's wife and sisters-in-law thrust their heads and frightened faces out of the door of a room where a bright samovar was boiling and where the steward's high bedstead stood with its patchwork quilt.
  • The countess, who heard at once from the maids what had happened at the lodge, was calmed by the thought that now their affairs would certainly improve, but on the other hand felt anxious as to the effect this excitement might have on her son.
  • The weather was already growing wintry and morning frosts congealed an earth saturated by autumn rains.
  • It was the best time of the year for the chase.
  • It was frosty and the air was sharp, but toward evening the sky became overcast and it began to thaw.
  • On the fifteenth, when young Rostov, in his dressing gown, looked out of the window, he saw it was an unsurpassable morning for hunting: it was as if the sky were melting and sinking to the earth without any wind.
  • The only motion in the air was that of the dripping, microscopic particles of drizzling mist.
  • There was a smell of decaying leaves and of dog.
  • This scorn was not offensive to his master.
  • "What orders, your excellency?" said the huntsman in his deep bass, deep as a proto-deacon's and hoarse with hallooing--and two flashing black eyes gazed from under his brows at his master, who was silent.
  • Though Daniel was not a big man, to see him in a room was like seeing a horse or a bear on the floor among the furniture and surroundings of human life.
  • Daniel himself felt this, and as usual stood just inside the door, trying to speak softly and not move, for fear of breaking something in the master's apartment, and he hastened to say all that was necessary so as to get from under that ceiling, out into the open under the sky once more.
  • But just as Daniel was about to go Natasha came in with rapid steps, not having done up her hair or finished dressing and with her old nurse's big shawl wrapped round her.
  • In an hour's time the whole hunting party was at the porch.
  • Nicholas, with a stern and serious air which showed that now was no time for attending to trifles, went past Natasha and Petya who were trying to tell him something.
  • The old count's horse, a sorrel gelding called Viflyanka, was led by the groom in attendance on him, while the count himself was to drive in a small trap straight to a spot reserved for him.
  • I was sure of it," began "Uncle."
  • (He was a distant relative of the Rostovs', a man of small means, and their neighbor.)
  • (This was "Uncle's" favorite expression.)
  • She was followed by Petya who always kept close to her, by Michael, a huntsman, and by a groom appointed to look after her.
  • Petya, who was laughing, whipped and pulled at his horse.
  • Rostov, having finally settled with "Uncle" where they should set on the hounds, and having shown Natasha where she was to stand--a spot where nothing could possibly run out--went round above the ravine.
  • Karay was a shaggy old dog with a hanging jowl, famous for having tackled a big wolf unaided.
  • Having straightened his coat and fastened on his hunting knives and horn, he mounted his good, sleek, well-fed, and comfortable horse, Viflyanka, which was turning gray, like himself.
  • Beside him was Simon Chekmar, his personal attendant, an old horseman now somewhat stiff in the saddle.
  • He was somewhat flushed with the wine and the drive.
  • The thin, hollow-cheeked Chekmar, having got everything ready, kept glancing at his master with whom he had lived on the best of terms for thirty years, and understanding the mood he was in expected a pleasant chat.
  • A third person rode up circumspectly through the wood (it was plain that he had had a lesson) and stopped behind the count.
  • This person was a gray-bearded old man in a woman's cloak, with a tall peaked cap on his head.
  • He was the buffoon, who went by a woman's name, Nastasya Ivanovna.
  • After listening a few moments in silence, the count and his attendant convinced themselves that the hounds had separated into two packs: the sound of the larger pack, eagerly giving tongue, began to die away in the distance, the other pack rushed by the wood past the count, and it was with this that Daniel's voice was heard calling ulyulyu.
  • "Back!" cried Simon to a borzoi that was pushing forward out of the wood.
  • The count and Simon galloped out of the wood and saw on their left a wolf which, softly swaying from side to side, was coming at a quiet lope farther to the left to the very place where they were standing.
  • But Simon was no longer there.
  • He was galloping round by the bushes while the field was coming up on both sides, all trying to head the wolf, but it vanished into the wood before they could do so.
  • By the way the hunt approached and receded, by the cries of the dogs whose notes were familiar to him, by the way the voices of the huntsmen approached, receded, and rose, he realized what was happening at the copse.
  • He knew that young and old wolves were there, that the hounds had separated into two packs, that somewhere a wolf was being chased, and that something had gone wrong.
  • The height of happiness was reached--and so simply, without warning, or noise, or display, that Rostov could not believe his eyes and remained in doubt for over a second.
  • She was an old animal with a gray back and big reddish belly.
  • Old Karay had turned his head and was angrily searching for fleas, baring his yellow teeth and snapping at his hind legs.
  • Nicholas did not hear his own cry nor feel that he was galloping, nor see the borzois, nor the ground over which he went: he saw only the wolf, who, increasing her speed, bounded on in the same direction along the hollow.
  • The first to come into view was Milka, with her black markings and powerful quarters, gaining upon the wolf.
  • Nearer and nearer... now she was ahead of it; but the wolf turned its head to face her, and instead of putting on speed as she usually did Milka suddenly raised her tail and stiffened her forelegs.
  • "Karay, ulyulyu!..." he shouted, looking round for the old borzoi who was now his only hope.
  • There was still hope.
  • Thanks to the delay caused by this crossing of the wolf's path, the old dog with its felted hair hanging from its thigh was within five paces of it.
  • But here Nicholas only saw that something happened to Karay--the borzoi was suddenly on the wolf, and they rolled together down into a gully just in front of them.
  • That instant, when Nicholas saw the wolf struggling in the gully with the dogs, while from under them could be seen her gray hair and outstretched hind leg and her frightened choking head, with her ears laid back (Karay was pinning her by the throat), was the happiest moment of his life.
  • With his hand on his saddlebow, he was ready to dismount and stab the wolf, when she suddenly thrust her head up from among that mass of dogs, and then her forepaws were on the edge of the gully.
  • "Uncle's" huntsman was galloping from the other side across the wolf's path and his borzois once more stopped the animal's advance.
  • She was again hemmed in.
  • It was evident to the dogs, the hunters, and to the wolf herself that all was now over.
  • Nicholas was about to stab her, but Daniel whispered, Don't!
  • When she was touched, she jerked her bound legs and looked wildly yet simply at everybody.
  • The old count went home, and Natasha and Petya promised to return very soon, but as it was still early the hunt went farther.
  • He saw the whips in their red caps galloping along the edge of the ravine, he even saw the hounds, and was expecting a fox to show itself at any moment on the ryefield opposite.
  • Now they drew close to the fox which began to dodge between the field in sharper and sharper curves, trailing its brush, when suddenly a strange white borzoi dashed in followed by a black one, and everything was in confusion; the borzois formed a star-shaped figure, scarcely swaying their bodies and with tails turned away from the center of the group.
  • Several of the field galloped to the spot where the fight was going on.
  • While still at a distance he took off his cap and tried to speak respectfully, but he was pale and breathless and his face was angry.
  • One of his eyes was black, but he probably was not even aware of it.
  • And it was my gray bitch that caught it!
  • Instead of an enemy, Nicholas found in Ilagin a stately and courteous gentleman who was particularly anxious to make the young count's acquaintance.
  • The way to Iligin's upland was across the fields.
  • Rostov was particularly struck by the beauty of a small, pure-bred, red- spotted bitch on Ilagin's leash, slender but with muscles like steel, a delicate muzzle, and prominent black eyes.
  • The latter was riding with a sullen expression on his face.
  • Natasha saw and felt the agitation the two elderly men and her brother were trying to conceal, and was herself excited by it.
  • But before the whip could reply, the hare, scenting the frost coming next morning, was unable to rest and leaped up.
  • The hare they had started was a strong and swift one.
  • "Once she had missed it and turned it away, any mongrel could take it," Ilagin was saying at the same time, breathless from his gallop and his excitement.
  • "Uncle's" offer was accepted.
  • A huntsman was sent to Otradnoe for a trap, while Nicholas rode with Natasha and Petya to "Uncle's" house.
  • The house, with its bare, unplastered log walls, was not overclean--it did not seem that those living in it aimed at keeping it spotless--but neither was it noticeably neglected.
  • In the entry there was a smell of fresh apples, and wolf and fox skins hung about.
  • Leading from the study was a passage in which a partition with ragged curtains could be seen.
  • They looked at one another (now that the hunt was over and they were in the house, Nicholas no longer considered it necessary to show his manly superiority over his sister), Natasha gave him a wink, and neither refrained long from bursting into a peal of ringing laughter even before they had a pretext ready to account for it.
  • And Natasha felt that this costume, the very one she had regarded with surprise and amusement at Otradnoe, was just the right thing and not at all worse than a swallow-tail or frock coat.
  • "Uncle" too was in high spirits and far from being offended by the brother's and sister's laughter (it could never enter his head that they might be laughing at his way of life) he himself joined in the merriment.
  • On the tray was a bottle of herb wine, different kinds of vodka, pickled mushrooms, rye cakes made with buttermilk, honey in the comb, still mead and sparkling mead, apples, nuts (raw and roasted), and nut-and-honey sweets.
  • All this was the fruit of Anisya Fedorovna's housekeeping, gathered and prepared by her.
  • After a casual pause, such as often occurs when receiving friends for the first time in one's own house, "Uncle," answering a thought that was in his visitors' minds, said:
  • "Uncle's" face was very significant and even handsome as he said this.
  • It was the custom for Mitka to play the balalayka in the huntsmen's room when "Uncle" returned from the chase.
  • "Uncle" was fond of such music.
  • The air was repeated a hundred times.
  • The balalayka was retuned several times and the same notes were thrummed again, but the listeners did not grow weary of it and wished to hear it again and again.
  • Nicholas too was greatly pleased by "Uncle's" playing, and "Uncle" played the piece over again.
  • As a result of this the unconsidered tune, like the song of a bird, was extraordinarily good.
  • Natasha was in ecstasies over "Uncle's" singing.
  • Petya was carried out like a log and laid in the larger of the two traps.
  • The night was dark and damp.
  • But she was very happy.
  • Well, you see, first I thought that Rugay, the red hound, was like Uncle, and that if he were a man he would always keep Uncle near him, if not for his riding, then for his manner.
  • And then I was saying to myself all the way, 'How well Anisya carried herself, how well!'
  • There was still the hunting establishment which Nicholas had enlarged.
  • The count moved in his affairs as in a huge net, trying not to believe that he was entangled but becoming more and more so at every step, and feeling too feeble to break the meshes or to set to work carefully and patiently to disentangle them.
  • Karagina had replied that for her part she was agreeable, and everything depend on her daughter's inclination.
  • Several times the countess, with tears in her eyes, told her son that now both her daughters were settled, her only wish was to see him married.
  • It is your happiness I wish for, she added, feeling that she was telling an untruth and was becoming entangled.
  • Nicholas was spending the last of his leave at home.
  • Natasha was still as much in love with her betrothed, found the same comfort in that love, and was still as ready to throw herself into all the pleasures of life as before; but at the end of the fourth month of their separation she began to have fits of depression which she could not master.
  • She felt sorry for herself: sorry that she was being wasted all this time and of no use to anyone-- while she felt herself so capable of loving and being loved.
  • It was the dullest time of the day.
  • The old count was resting in his study.
  • The countess was playing patience.
  • Natasha came into the room, went up to Sonya, glanced at what she was doing, and then went up to her mother and stood without speaking.
  • There an old maidservant was grumbling at a young girl who stood panting, having just run in through the cold from the serfs' quarters.
  • On her way past the butler's pantry she told them to set a samovar, though it was not at all the time for tea.
  • Foka, the butler, was the most ill-tempered person in the house.
  • He distrusted the order and asked whether the samovar was really wanted.
  • "Nastasya Ivanovna, what sort of children shall I have?" she asked the buffoon, who was coming toward her in a woman's jacket.
  • The governesses were discussing whether it was cheaper to live in Moscow or Odessa.
  • "The island of Madagascar," she said, "Ma-da-gas-car," she repeated, articulating each syllable distinctly, and, not replying to Madame Schoss who asked her what she was saying, she went out of the room.
  • Her brother Petya was upstairs too; with the man in attendance on him he was preparing fireworks to let off that night.
  • She was in a mood for brooding on the past.
  • "Yes it was exactly the same," thought Natasha.
  • That's just how she started and just how she came up smiling timidly when all this happened before," thought Natasha, "and in just the same way I thought there was something lacking in her."
  • She sat awhile, wondering what the meaning of it all having happened before could be, and without solving this problem, or at all regretting not having done so, she again passed in fancy to the time when she was with him and he was looking at her with a lover's eyes.
  • The servants stood round the table--but Prince Andrew was not there and life was going on as before.
  • I have felt like that when everything was all right and everyone was cheerful.
  • The thought has come into my mind that I was already tired of it all, and that we must all die.
  • Once in the regiment I had not gone to some merrymaking where there was music... and suddenly I felt so depressed...
  • When I was quite little that used to be so with me.
  • Do you remember when I was punished once about some plums?
  • And I was innocent--that was the chief thing, said Natasha.
  • He was gray, you remember, and had white teeth, and stood and looked at us...
  • Was that real or not?
  • It was dark in the room especially where they were sitting on the sofa, but through the big windows the silvery light of the full moon fell on the floor.
  • "Do you know," said Natasha in a whisper, moving closer to Nicholas and Sonya, "that when one goes on and on recalling memories, one at last begins to remember what happened before one was in the world..."
  • How do I know what I was before?
  • It is now today, and it will be tomorrow, and always; and there was yesterday, and the day before...
  • Standing as usual in the middle of the hall and choosing the place where the resonance was best, Natasha began to sing her mother's favorite song.
  • She had said she did not want to sing, but it was long since she had sung, and long before she again sang, as she did that evening.
  • Sonya, as she listened, thought of the immense difference there was between herself and her friend, and how impossible it was for her to be anything like as bewitching as her cousin.
  • She thought of Natasha and of her own youth, and of how there was something unnatural and dreadful in this impending marriage of Natasha and Prince Andrew.
  • Half an hour later there appeared among the other mummers in the ballroom an old lady in a hooped skirt--this was Nicholas.
  • An hussar was Natasha, and a Circassian was Sonya with burnt-cork mustache and eyebrows.
  • Melyukova was a widow, who, with her family and their tutors and governesses, lived three miles from the Rostovs.
  • It was decided that the count must not go, but that if Louisa Ivanovna (Madame Schoss) would go with them, the young ladies might go to the Melyukovs', Sonya, generally so timid and shy, more urgently than anyone begging Louisa Ivanovna not to refuse.
  • Sonya's costume was the best of all.
  • Everyone told her she looked very handsome, and she was in a spirited and energetic mood unusual with her.
  • Natasha was foremost in setting a merry holiday tone, which, passing from one to another, grew stronger and reached its climax when they all came out into the frost and got into the sleighs, talking, calling to one another, laughing, and shouting.
  • Two of the troykas were the usual household sleighs, the third was the old count's with a trotter from the Orlov stud as shaft horse, the fourth was Nicholas' own with a short shaggy black shaft horse.
  • It was so light that he could see the moonlight reflected from the metal harness disks and from the eyes of the horses, who looked round in alarm at the noisy party under the shadow of the porch roof.
  • The side horses, pressing against the shafts of the middle horse, sank in the snow, which was dry and glittered like sugar, and threw it up.
  • It was only by the keener wind that met them and the jerks given by the side horses who pulled harder--ever increasing their gallop--that one noticed how fast the troyka was flying.
  • Zakhar held back his horses and turned his face, which was already covered with hoarfrost to his eyebrows.
  • "I think this used to be Natasha," thought Nicholas, "and that was Madame Schoss, but perhaps it's not, and this Circassian with the mustache I don't know, but I love her."
  • But here was a fairy forest with black moving shadows, and a glitter of diamonds and a flight of marble steps and the silver roofs of fairy buildings and the shrill yells of some animals.
  • It really was Melyukovka, and maids and footmen with merry faces came running, out to the porch carrying candles.
  • Pelageya Danilovna Melyukova, a broadly built, energetic woman wearing spectacles, sat in the drawing room in a loose dress, surrounded by her daughters whom she was trying to keep from feeling dull.
  • "Here, hand some fruit jelly to the Turk!" she ordered the butler who was handing things round.
  • It was lucky the maids ran in just then...
  • It seemed to him that it was only today, thanks to that burnt-cork mustache, that he had fully learned to know her.
  • And really, that evening, Sonya was brighter, more animated, and prettier than Nicholas had ever seen her before.
  • They told her where the barn was and how she should stand and listen, and they handed her a fur cloak.
  • Outside, there was the same cold stillness and the same moon, but even brighter than before.
  • The light was so strong and the snow sparkled with so many stars that one did not wish to look up at the sky and the real stars were unnoticed.
  • A tree in the garden snapped with the frost, and then all was again perfectly silent.
  • She was only a couple of paces away when she saw him, and to her too he was not the Nicholas she had known and always slightly feared.
  • He was in a woman's dress, with tousled hair and a happy smile new to Sonya.
  • "Sonya!... Nicholas!"... was all they said.
  • I was beginning to be vexed with you.
  • Mamma said she was angling for you.
  • "Then it's all right?" said Nicholas, again scrutinizing the expression of his sister's face to see if she was in earnest.
  • But ready as she was to take the smallest speck for the image of a man or of a coffin, she saw nothing.
  • "Of course she will!" whispered Natasha, but did not finish... suddenly Sonya pushed away the glass she was holding and covered her eyes with her hand.
  • What was it? exclaimed Natasha, holding up the looking glass.
  • Sonya had not seen anything, she was just wanting to blink and to get up when she heard Natasha say, "Of course she will!"
  • She did not wish to disappoint either Dunyasha or Natasha, but it was hard to sit still.
  • At first there was nothing, then I saw him lying down.
  • His face was cheerful, and he turned to me.
  • After that, I could not make out what there was; something blue and red...
  • Natasha began, and without replying to Sonya's words of comfort she got into bed, and long after her candle was out lay open-eyed and motionless, gazing at the moonlight through the frosty windowpanes.
  • Nicholas, for the first time, felt that his mother was displeased with him and that, despite her love for him, she would not give way.
  • Sonya listened silently with downcast eyes to the countess' cruel words, without understanding what was required of her.
  • She was ready to sacrifice everything for her benefactors.
  • Self- sacrifice was her most cherished idea but in this case she could not see what she ought to sacrifice, or for whom.
  • She was silent and sad and did not reply.
  • The countess, with a coldness her son had never seen in her before, replied that he was of age, that Prince Andrew was marrying without his father's consent, and he could do the same, but that she would never receive that intriguer as her daughter.
  • Sonya was unhappy at the separation from Nicholas and still more so on account of the hostile tone the countess could not help adopting toward her.
  • The count was more perturbed than ever by the condition of his affairs, which called for some decisive action.
  • It hurt her to think that while she lived only in the thought of him, he was living a real life, seeing new places and new people that interested him.
  • There was still no improvement in the countess' health, but it was impossible to defer the journey to Moscow any longer.
  • Pierre felt that she was right, and to avoid compromising her went away to Moscow.
  • Moscow society, from the old women down to the children, received Pierre like a long-expected guest whose place was always ready awaiting him.
  • For Moscow society Pierre was the nicest, kindest, most intellectual, merriest, and most magnanimous of cranks, a heedless, genial nobleman of the old Russian type.
  • His purse was always empty because it was open to everyone.
  • There was never a dinner or soiree at the club without him.
  • As soon as he sank into his place on the sofa after two bottles of Margaux he was surrounded, and talking, disputing, and joking began.
  • At balls he danced if a partner was needed.
  • Young ladies, married and unmarried, liked him because without making love to any of them, he was equally amiable to all, especially after supper.
  • Pierre was one of those retired gentlemen-in-waiting of whom there were hundreds good-humoredly ending their days in Moscow.
  • But instead of all that--here he was, the wealthy husband of an unfaithful wife, a retired gentleman-in-waiting, fond of eating and drinking and, as he unbuttoned his waistcoat, of abusing the government a bit, a member of the Moscow English Club, and a universal favorite in Moscow society.
  • For a long time he could not reconcile himself to the idea that he was one of those same retired Moscow gentlemen-in-waiting he had so despised seven years before.
  • Sometimes he consoled himself with the thought that he was only living this life temporarily; but then he was shocked by the thought of how many, like himself, had entered that life and that club temporarily, with all their teeth and hair, and had only left it when not a single tooth or hair remained.
  • Pierre no longer suffered moments of despair, hypochondria, and disgust with life, but the malady that had formerly found expression in such acute attacks was driven inwards and never left him for a moment.
  • We all profess the Christian law of forgiveness of injuries and love of our neighbors, the law in honor of which we have built in Moscow forty times forty churches--but yesterday a deserter was knouted to death and a minister of that same law of love and forgiveness, a priest, gave the soldier a cross to kiss before his execution.
  • Every sphere of work was connected, in his eyes, with evil and deception.
  • It was too dreadful to be under the burden of these insoluble problems, so he abandoned himself to any distraction in order to forget them.
  • Though the doctors warned him that with his corpulence wine was dangerous for him, he drank a great deal.
  • He was only quite at ease when having poured several glasses of wine mechanically into his large mouth he felt a pleasant warmth in his body, an amiability toward all his fellows, and a readiness to respond superficially to every idea without probing it deeply.
  • Only after emptying a bottle or two did he feel dimly that the terribly tangled skein of life which previously had terrified him was not as dreadful as he had thought.
  • She did not go out into society; everyone knew that her father would not let her go anywhere without him, and his failing health prevented his going out himself, so that she was not invited to dinners and evening parties.
  • Julie, with whom she had corresponded for the last five years, was in Moscow, but proved to be quite alien to her when they met.
  • She was surrounded by young men who, she fancied, had suddenly learned to appreciate her worth.
  • On Thursdays Princess Mary remembered with a mournful smile that she now had no one to write to, since Julie--whose presence gave her no pleasure was here and they met every week.
  • But what distressed the princess most of all was her father's irritability, which was always directed against her and had of late amounted to cruelty.
  • In 1811 there was living in Moscow a French doctor--Metivier--who had rapidly become the fashion.
  • He was enormously tall, handsome, amiable as Frenchmen are, and was, as all Moscow said, an extraordinarily clever doctor.
  • He was received in the best houses not merely as a doctor, but as an equal.
  • It happened that on that morning of his name day the prince was in one of his worst moods.
  • At first she heard only Metivier's voice, then her father's, then both voices began speaking at the same time, the door was flung open, and on the threshold appeared the handsome figure of the terrified Metivier with his shock of black hair, and the prince in his dressing gown and fez, his face distorted with fury and the pupils of his eyes rolled downwards.
  • Had he not told her, yes, told her to make a list, and not to admit anyone who was not on that list?
  • Then why was that scoundrel admitted?
  • She was the cause of it all.
  • The prince's house did not belong to what is known as fashionable society, but his little circle--though not much talked about in town-- was one it was more flattering to be received in than any other.
  • The guests were reluctant to address her, feeling that she was in no mood for their conversation.
  • Prince Bolkonski listened as a presiding judge receives a report, only now and then, silently or by a brief word, showing that he took heed of what was being reported to him.
  • The tone of the conversation was such as indicated that no one approved of what was being done in the political world.
  • Incidents were related evidently confirming the opinion that everything was going from bad to worse, but whether telling a story or giving an opinion the speaker always stopped, or was stopped, at the point beyond which his criticism might touch the sovereign himself.
  • Count Rostopchin paused, feeling that he had reached the limit beyond which censure was impossible.
  • "I have read our protests about the Oldenburg affair and was surprised how badly the Note was worded," remarked Count Rostopchin in the casual tone of a man dealing with a subject quite familiar to him.
  • There was a momentary pause in the conversation; the old general cleared his throat to draw attention.
  • On this fact relating to the Emperor personally, it was impossible to pass any judgment.
  • He was here; they admitted him in spite of my request that they should let no one in, he went on, glancing angrily at his daughter.
  • And he narrated his whole conversation with the French doctor and the reasons that convinced him that Metivier was a spy.
  • After the roast, champagne was served.
  • When they went into the drawing room where coffee was served, the old men sat together.
  • She did not even notice the special attentions and amiabilities shown her during dinner by Boris Drubetskoy, who was visiting them for the third time already.
  • Pierre was in an agreeable after-dinner mood.
  • But without finishing what she was saying, Princess Mary burst into tears.
  • I was told they are coming soon.
  • When they had last met on the old prince's name day, she had answered at random all his attempts to talk sentimentally, evidently not listening to what he was saying.
  • She was twenty-seven.
  • She was by now decidedly plain, but thought herself not merely as good-looking as before but even far more attractive.
  • That winter the Karagins' house was the most agreeable and hospitable in Moscow.
  • Though nothing of the kind had happened to her she was regarded in that light, and had even herself come to believe that she had suffered much in life.
  • Julie said this was charming
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, who often visited the Karagins, while playing cards with the mother made careful inquiries as to Julie's dowry (she was to have two estates in Penza and the Nizhegorod forests).
  • His leave was expiring.
  • Julie was offended and replied that it was true that a woman needs variety, and the same thing over and over again would weary anyone.
  • Boris began, wishing to sting her; but at that instant the galling thought occurred to him that he might have to leave Moscow without having accomplished his aim, and have vainly wasted his efforts--which was a thing he never allowed to happen.
  • There was no need to say more: Julie's face shone with triumph and self- satisfaction; but she forced Boris to say all that is said on such occasions--that he loved her and had never loved any other woman more than her.
  • The countess was still unwell and unable to travel but it was impossible to wait for her recovery.
  • Now take off your things, quick! she shouted to the count who was going to kiss her hand.
  • Next morning Marya Dmitrievna took the young ladies to the Iberian shrine of the Mother of God and to Madame Suppert-Roguet, who was so afraid of Marya Dmitrievna that she always let her have costumes at a loss merely to get rid of her.
  • I am glad for your sake and I've known him since he was so high.
  • She loved and knew Prince Andrew, he loved her only, and was to come one of these days and take her.
  • Natasha, on the other hand, having put on her best gown, was in the highest spirits.
  • The footman who had gone to announce them was stopped by another in the large hall and they whispered to one another.
  • At last an old, cross looking footman came and announced to the Rostovs that the prince was not receiving, but that the princess begged them to walk up.
  • The first person who came to meet the visitors was Mademoiselle Bourienne.
  • The count had devised this diplomatic ruse (as he afterwards told his daughter) to give the future sisters-in-law an opportunity to talk to one another freely, but another motive was to avoid the danger of encountering the old prince, of whom he was afraid.
  • Natasha felt offended by the hesitation she had noticed in the anteroom, by her father's nervousness, and by the unnatural manner of the princess who--she thought--was making a favor of receiving her, and so everything displeased her.
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne was the first to recover herself after this apparition and began speaking about the prince's indisposition.
  • When the count returned, Natasha was impolitely pleased and hastened to get away: at that moment she hated the stiff, elderly princess, who could place her in such an embarrassing position and had spent half an hour with her without once mentioning Prince Andrew.
  • The same thought was meanwhile tormenting Princess Mary.
  • When the count was already leaving the room, Princess Mary went up hurriedly to Natasha, took her by the hand, and said with a deep sigh:
  • She paused, feeling that she was not telling the truth.
  • "What have I said and what have I done?" thought she, as soon as she was out of the room.
  • But if you only knew how offensive it was... as if I...
  • Marya Dmitrievna, who knew how the prince had received the Rostovs, pretended not to notice how upset Natasha was and jested resolutely and loudly at table with the count and the other guests.
  • Natasha did not want to go, but could not refuse Marya Dmitrievna's kind offer which was intended expressly for her.
  • When she came ready dressed into the ballroom to await her father, and looking in the large mirror there saw that she was pretty, very pretty, she felt even more sad, but it was a sweet, tender sadness.
  • Natasha at that moment felt so softened and tender that it was not enough for her to love and know she was beloved, she wanted now, at once, to embrace the man she loved, to speak and hear from him words of love such as filled her heart.
  • Through the closed doors the music was already audible.
  • Natasha's looks, as everyone told her, had improved in the country, and that evening thanks to her agitation she was particularly pretty.
  • Behind them, wearing a smile and leaning over with an ear to Julie's mouth, was Boris' handsome smoothly brushed head.
  • Their box was pervaded by that atmosphere of an affianced couple which Natasha knew so well and liked so much.
  • He was in the Caucasus and ran away from there.
  • While Natasha was fixing her gaze on her for the second time the lady looked round and, meeting the count's eyes, nodded to him and smiled.
  • She was the Countess Bezukhova, Pierre's wife, and the count, who knew everyone in society, leaned over and spoke to her.
  • The floor of the stage consisted of smooth boards, at the sides was some painted cardboard representing trees, and at the back was a cloth stretched over boards.
  • She knew what it was all meant to represent, but it was so pretentiously false and unnatural that she first felt ashamed for the actors and then amused at them.
  • She did not realize who and where she was, nor what was going on before her.
  • As she looked and thought, the strangest fancies unexpectedly and disconnectedly passed through her mind: the idea occurred to her of jumping onto the edge of the box and singing the air the actress was singing, then she wished to touch with her fan an old gentleman sitting not far from her, then to lean over to Helene and tickle her.
  • At a moment when all was quiet before the commencement of a song, a door leading to the stalls on the side nearest the Rostovs' box creaked, and the steps of a belated arrival were heard.
  • This was Anatole Kuragin whom she had seen and noticed long ago at the ball in Petersburg.
  • He was now in an adjutant's uniform with one epaulet and a shoulder knot.
  • Though the performance was proceeding, he walked deliberately down the carpeted gangway, his sword and spurs slightly jingling and his handsome perfumed head held high.
  • Shinshin, lowering his voice, began to tell the count of some intrigue of Kuragin's in Moscow, and Natasha tried to overhear it just because he had said she was "charmante."
  • The first act was over.
  • In the state of intoxication she was in, everything seemed simple and natural.
  • Natasha knew he was talking about her and this afforded her pleasure.
  • She even turned so that he should see her profile in what she thought was its most becoming aspect.
  • While conversing with Pierre, Natasha heard a man's voice in Countess Bezukhova's box and something told her it was Kuragin.
  • In the second act there was scenery representing tombstones, there was a round hole in the canvas to represent the moon, shades were raised over the footlights, and from horns and contrabass came deep notes while many people appeared from right and left wearing black cloaks and holding things like daggers in their hands.
  • They did not drag her away at once, but sang with her for a long time and then at last dragged her off, and behind the scenes something metallic was struck three times and everyone knelt down and sang a prayer.
  • When the second act was over Countess Bezukhova rose, turned to the Rostovs' box--her whole bosom completely exposed--beckoned the old count with a gloved finger, and paying no attention to those who had entered her box began talking to him with an amiable smile.
  • She was so pleased by praise from this brilliant beauty that she blushed with pleasure.
  • She could say what she did not think--especially what was flattering--quite simply and naturally.
  • (He was Duport, who received sixty thousand rubles a year for this art.)
  • Kuragin was much more sensible and simple with women than among men.
  • Natasha knew for certain that he was enraptured by her.
  • When she was not looking at him she felt that he was looking at her shoulders, and she involuntarily caught his eye so that he should look into hers rather than this.
  • But looking into his eyes she was frightened, realizing that there was not that barrier of modesty she had always felt between herself and other men.
  • She did not know how it was that within five minutes she had come to feel herself terribly near to this man.
  • Natasha kept turning to Helene and to her father, as if asking what it all meant, but Helene was engaged in conversation with a general and did not answer her look, and her father's eyes said nothing but what they always said: Having a good time?
  • She felt all the time that by talking to him she was doing something improper.
  • Natasha did not understand what he was saying any more than he did himself, but she felt that his incomprehensible words had an improper intention.
  • But as soon as she had turned away she felt that he was there, behind, so close behind her.
  • She smiled just as he was doing, gazing straight into his eyes.
  • All that was going on before her now seemed quite natural, but on the other hand all her previous thoughts of her betrothed, of Princess Mary, or of life in the country did not once recur to her mind and were as if belonging to a remote past.
  • In the fourth act there was some sort of devil who sang waving his arm about, till the boards were withdrawn from under him and he disappeared down below.
  • That was the only part of the fourth act that Natasha saw.
  • She felt agitated and tormented, and the cause of this was Kuragin whom she could not help watching.
  • As he was putting Natasha in he pressed her arm above the elbow.
  • He was looking at her with glittering eyes, smiling tenderly.
  • Only after she had reached home was Natasha able clearly to think over what had happened to her, and suddenly remembering Prince Andrew she was horrified, and at tea to which all had sat down after the opera, she gave a loud exclamation, flushed, and ran out of the room.
  • What was that terror I felt of him?
  • Only to the old countess at night in bed could Natasha have told all she was feeling.
  • So Natasha tried to solve what was torturing her by herself.
  • As Shinshin had remarked, from the time of his arrival Anatole had turned the heads of the Moscow ladies, especially by the fact that he slighted them and plainly preferred the gypsy girls and French actresses--with the chief of whom, Mademoiselle George, he was said to be on intimate relations.
  • He had never missed a carousal at Danilov's or other Moscow revelers', drank whole nights through, outvying everyone else, and was at all the balls and parties of the best society.
  • There was talk of his intrigues with some of the ladies, and he flirted with a few of them at the balls.
  • There was a special reason for this, as he had got married two years before--a fact known only to his most intimate friends.
  • Anatole was always content with his position, with himself, and with others.
  • He was instinctively and thoroughly convinced that it was impossible for him to live otherwise than as he did and that he had never in his life done anything base.
  • He was convinced that, as a duck is so made that it must live in water, so God had made him such that he must spend thirty thousand rubles a year and always occupy a prominent position in society.
  • He was not a gambler, at any rate he did not care about winning.
  • He was not vain.
  • He was not mean, and did not refuse anyone who asked of him.
  • Dolokhov, who had reappeared that year in Moscow after his exile and his Persian adventures, and was leading a life of luxury, gambling, and dissipation, associated with his old Petersburg comrade Kuragin and made use of him for his own ends.
  • Anatole was sincerely fond of Dolokhov for his cleverness and audacity.
  • Apart from the advantage he derived from Anatole, the very process of dominating another's will was in itself a pleasure, a habit, and a necessity to Dolokhov.
  • Anatole had no notion and was incapable of considering what might come of such love-making, as he never had any notion of the outcome of any of his actions.
  • She was expecting Prince Andrew any moment and twice that day sent a manservant to the Vozdvizhenka to ascertain whether he had come.
  • To the family Natasha seemed livelier than usual, but she was far less tranquil and happy than before.
  • Her whole house was scrubbed and cleaned on Saturdays; neither she nor the servants worked, and they all wore holiday dress and went to church.
  • But in nothing in the house was the holiday so noticeable as in Marya Dmitrievna's broad, stern face, which on that day wore an invariable look of solemn festivity.
  • Natasha brightened up and felt almost in love with this woman, who was so beautiful and so kind.
  • Helene for her part was sincerely delighted with Natasha and wished to give her a good time.
  • Anatole had asked her to bring him and Natasha together, and she was calling on the Rostovs for that purpose.
  • As she was leaving the Rostovs she called her protegee aside.
  • She was still too agitated by the encounter to be able to talk of the affair calmly.
  • Count Rostov was displeased to see that the company consisted almost entirely of men and women known for the freedom of their conduct.
  • Mademoiselle George was standing in a corner of the drawing room surrounded by young men.
  • The count decided not to sit down to cards or let his girls out of his sight and to get away as soon as Mademoiselle George's performance was over.
  • Anatole was at the door, evidently on the lookout for the Rostovs.
  • Helene welcomed Natasha delightedly and was loud in admiration of her beauty and her dress.
  • Anatole moved a chair for Natasha and was about to sit down beside her, but the count, who never lost sight of her, took the seat himself.
  • Their enthusiastic whispering was audible to those three rows away.
  • "Adorable! divine! delicious!" was heard from every side.
  • She only felt herself again completely borne away into this strange senseless world--so remote from her old world--a world in which it was impossible to know what was good or bad, reasonable or senseless.
  • Natasha remarked to her father who had also risen and was moving through the crowd toward the actress.
  • Anatole asked Natasha for a valse and as they danced he pressed her waist and hand and told her she was bewitching and that he loved her.
  • Natasha lifted her frightened eyes to him, but there was such confident tenderness in his affectionate look and smile that she could not, whilst looking at him, say what she had to say.
  • Anatole was not upset or pained by what she had said.
  • Wherever she went and whomever she was speaking to, she felt his eyes upon her.
  • She was tormented by the insoluble question whether she loved Anatole or Prince Andrew.
  • But she also loved Anatole, of that there was no doubt.
  • If, after that, I could return his smile when saying good-by, if I was able to let it come to that, it means that I loved him from the first.
  • After breakfast, which was her best time, Marya Dmitrievna sat down in her armchair and called Natasha and the count to her.
  • Having found what she was looking for in the reticule she handed it to Natasha.
  • It was a letter from Princess Mary.
  • Princess Mary wrote that she was in despair at the misunderstanding that had occurred between them.
  • Whatever her father's feelings might be, she begged Natasha to believe that she could not help loving her as the one chosen by her brother, for whose happiness she was ready to sacrifice everything.
  • With trembling hands Natasha held that passionate love letter which Dolokhov had composed for Anatole, and as she read it she found in it an echo of all that she herself imagined she was feeling.
  • That evening Marya Dmitrievna was going to the Akharovs' and proposed to take the girls with her.
  • As she read she glanced at the sleeping Natasha, trying to find in her face an explanation of what she was reading, but did not find it.
  • Her face was calm, gentle, and happy.
  • How was it I noticed nothing?
  • She probably opened the letter without knowing who it was from.
  • As soon as I saw him I felt he was my master and I his slave, and that I could not help loving him.
  • At that party Natasha again met Anatole, and Sonya noticed that she spoke to him, trying not to be overheard, and that all through dinner she was more agitated than ever.
  • When they got home Natasha was the first to begin the explanation Sonya expected.
  • He was glad I was free to refuse him.
  • Hard as it was for Sonya, she watched her friend and did not let her out of her sight.
  • The day before the count was to return, Sonya noticed that Natasha sat by the drawing-room window all the morning as if expecting something and that she made a sign to an officer who drove past, whom Sonya took to be Anatole.
  • Sonya began watching her friend still more attentively and noticed that at dinner and all that evening Natasha was in a strange and unnatural state.
  • There was something particularly pathetic and resolute in her face today.
  • At Kamenka a relay of horses was to wait which would take them to the Warsaw highroad, and from there they would hasten abroad with post horses.
  • Dolokhov was counting the money and noting something down.
  • Balaga was a famous troyka driver who had known Dolokhov and Anatole some six years and had given them good service with his troykas.
  • More than once when Anatole's regiment was stationed at Tver he had taken him from Tver in the evening, brought him to Moscow by daybreak, and driven him back again the next night.
  • Get on! when it was impossible to go any faster.
  • He liked giving a painful lash on the neck to some peasant who, more dead than alive, was already hurrying out of his way.
  • Balaga was a fair-haired, short, and snub-nosed peasant of about twenty- seven; red-faced, with a particularly red thick neck, glittering little eyes, and a small beard.
  • It wasn't a case of urging them on, there was no holding them in till we reached the place.
  • Balaga was about to leave the room.
  • "And then so, do you see?" and he pushed Anatole's head forward to meet the gap left by the collar, through which Matrena's brilliant smile was seen.
  • The whistle was answered, and a maidservant ran out.
  • He was met by Gabriel, Marya Dmitrievna's gigantic footman.
  • Dolokhov, after Anatole entered, had remained at the wicket gate and was struggling with the yard porter who was trying to lock it.
  • Sonya was sitting sobbing in the corridor.
  • She was in just the same position in which Marya Dmitrievna had left her.
  • Marya Dmitrievna was to speak again but Natasha cried out:
  • But Natasha was not asleep; with pale face and fixed wide-open eyes she looked straight before her.
  • He was in very good spirits; the affair with the purchaser was going on satisfactorily, and there was nothing to keep him any longer in Moscow, away from the countess whom he missed.
  • She was evidently expecting news of him and that he would come or would write to her.
  • In reply to the count's anxious inquiries as to why she was so dejected and whether anything had happened to her betrothed, she assured him that nothing had happened and asked him not to worry.
  • From the pretense of illness, from his daughter's distress, and by the embarrassed faces of Sonya and Marya Dmitrievna, the count saw clearly that something had gone wrong during his absence, but it was so terrible for him to think that anything disgraceful had happened to his beloved daughter, and he so prized his own cheerful tranquillity, that he avoided inquiries and tried to assure himself that nothing particularly had happened; and he was only dissatisfied that her indisposition delayed their return to the country.
  • When he returned to Moscow Pierre was handed a letter from Marya Dmitrievna asking him to come and see her on a matter of great importance relating to Andrew Bolkonski and his betrothed.
  • Anatole was sitting upright in the classic pose of military dandies, the lower part of his face hidden by his beaver collar and his head slightly bent.
  • His face was fresh and rosy, his white-plumed hat, tilted to one side, disclosed his curled and pomaded hair besprinkled with powdery snow.
  • Pierre raised his shoulders and listened open-mouthed to what was told him, scarcely able to believe his own ears.
  • That Prince Andrew's deeply loved affianced wife--the same Natasha Rostova who used to be so charming--should give up Bolkonski for that fool Anatole who was already secretly married (as Pierre knew), and should be so in love with him as to agree to run away with him, was something Pierre could not conceive and could not imagine.
  • "They are all alike!" he said to himself, reflecting that he was not the only man unfortunate enough to be tied to a bad woman.
  • He did not know that Natasha's soul was overflowing with despair, shame, and humiliation, and that it was not her fault that her face happened to assume an expression of calm dignity and severity.
  • It's true this engagement never was much to my liking.
  • Pierre saw that the count was much upset and tried to change the subject, but the count returned to his troubles.
  • Natasha, pale and stern, was sitting beside Marya Dmitrievna, and her eyes, glittering feverishly, met Pierre with a questioning look the moment he entered.
  • She did not smile or nod, but only gazed fixedly at him, and her look asked only one thing: was he a friend, or like the others an enemy in regard to Anatole?
  • She was evidently unable to speak and made a sign with her hands that they should leave her alone.
  • He was not at the ice hills, nor at the gypsies', nor at Komoneno's.
  • In the club all was going on as usual.
  • One of Pierre's acquaintances, while they were talking about the weather, asked if he had heard of Kuragin's abduction of Rostova which was talked of in the town, and was it true?
  • Pierre laughed and said it was nonsense for he had just come from the Rostovs'.
  • One man told him he had not come yet, and another that he was coming to dinner.
  • Pierre felt it strange to see this calm, indifferent crowd of people unaware of what was going on in his soul.
  • Anatole, for whom Pierre was looking, dined that day with Dolokhov, consulting him as to how to remedy this unfortunate affair.
  • When Pierre returned home after vainly hunting all over Moscow, his valet informed him that Prince Anatole was with the countess.
  • The countess' drawing room was full of guests.
  • Pierre without greeting his wife whom he had not seen since his return-- at that moment she was more repulsive to him than ever--entered the drawing room and seeing Anatole went up to him.
  • Pierre, taking him by the arm, pulled him toward himself and was leading him from the room.
  • "You're a scoundrel and a blackguard, and I don't know what deprives me from the pleasure of smashing your head with this!" said Pierre, expressing himself so artificially because he was talking French.
  • "Though it was tête-à-tête," Anatole continued, "still I can't..."
  • The whole house was in a state of alarm and commotion.
  • It seemed to Pierre that it was his duty to conceal the whole affair and re-establish Natasha's reputation.
  • He was awaiting Prince Andrew's return with dread and went every day to the old prince's for news of him.
  • She sighed, looking toward the door of the room where Prince Andrew was, evidently intending to express her sympathy with his sorrow, but Pierre saw by her face that she was glad both at what had happened and at the way her brother had taken the news of Natasha's faithlessness.
  • The conversation was about Speranski--the news of whose sudden exile and alleged treachery had just reached Moscow.
  • Pierre now recognized in his friend a need with which he was only too familiar, to get excited and to have arguments about extraneous matters in order to stifle thoughts that were too oppressive and too intimate.
  • His face was gloomy and his lips compressed.
  • Pierre saw that Prince Andrew was going to speak of Natasha, and his broad face expressed pity and sympathy.
  • "He could not marry, for he was married already," said Pierre.
  • Tell Countess Rostova that she was and is perfectly free and that I wish her all that is good.
  • Looking at them Pierre realized what contempt and animosity they all felt for the Rostovs, and that it was impossible in their presence even to mention the name of her who could give up Prince Andrew for anyone else.
  • At dinner the talk turned on the war, the approach of which was becoming evident.
  • Natasha was in bed, the count at the club, and Pierre, after giving the letters to Sonya, went to Marya Dmitrievna who was interested to know how Prince Andrew had taken the news.
  • Natasha was standing in the middle of the drawing room, emaciated, with a pale set face, but not at all shamefaced as Pierre expected to find her.
  • "Peter Kirilovich," she began rapidly, "Prince Bolkonski was your friend--is your friend," she corrected herself.
  • Till then he had reproached her in his heart and tried to despise her, but he now felt so sorry for her that there was no room in his soul for reproach.
  • Natasha was evidently dismayed at the thought of what he might think she had meant.
  • But when he said it he was amazed at his own words.
  • It was clear and frosty.
  • It seemed to Pierre that this comet fully responded to what was passing in his own softened and uplifted soul, now blossoming into a new life.
  • It naturally seemed to Napoleon that the war was caused by England's intrigues (as in fact he said on the island of St. Helena).
  • To us it is incomprehensible that millions of Christian men killed and tortured each other either because Napoleon was ambitious or Alexander was firm, or because England's policy was astute or the Duke of Oldenburg wronged.
  • The actions of Napoleon and Alexander, on whose words the event seemed to hang, were as little voluntary as the actions of any soldier who was drawn into the campaign by lot or by conscription.
  • Before leaving, Napoleon showed favor to the emperor, kings, and princes who had deserved it, reprimanded the kings and princes with whom he was dissatisfied, presented pearls and diamonds of his own--that is, which he had taken from other kings--to the Empress of Austria, and having, as his historian tells us, tenderly embraced the Empress Marie Louise--who regarded him as her husband, though he had left another wife in Paris--left her grieved by the parting which she seemed hardly able to bear.
  • The army was moving from west to east, and relays of six horses carried him in the same direction.
  • Early in the morning of the twelfth of June he came out of his tent, which was pitched that day on the steep left bank of the Niemen, and looked through a spyglass at the streams of his troops pouring out of the Vilkavisski forest and flowing over the three bridges thrown across the river.
  • On the faces of all was one common expression of joy at the commencement of the long-expected campaign and of rapture and devotion to the man in the gray coat who was standing on the hill.
  • On the thirteenth of June a rather small, thoroughbred Arab horse was brought to Napoleon.
  • He mounted it and rode at a gallop to one of the bridges over the Niemen, deafened continually by incessant and rapturous acclamations which he evidently endured only because it was impossible to forbid the soldiers to express their love of him by such shouting, but the shouting which accompanied him everywhere disturbed him and distracted him from the military cares that had occupied him from the time he joined the army.
  • What did he say? was heard in the ranks of the Polish uhlans when one of the aides-de-camp rode up to them.
  • The order was to find a ford and to cross the river.
  • He gave an angry thrust to his horse, which had grown restive under him, and plunged into the water, heading for the deepest part where the current was swift.
  • They tried to make their way forward to the opposite bank and, though there was a ford one third of a mile away, were proud that they were swimming and drowning in this river under the eyes of the man who sat on the log and was not even looking at what they were doing.
  • For him it was no new conviction that his presence in any part of the world, from Africa to the steppes of Muscovy alike, was enough to dumfound people and impel them to insane self-oblivion.
  • Nothing was ready for the war that everyone expected and to prepare for which the Emperor had come from Petersburg.
  • There was no general plan of action.
  • Each of the three armies had its own commander-in-chief, but there was no supreme commander of all the forces, and the Emperor did not assume that responsibility himself.
  • All the efforts of those who surrounded the sovereign seemed directed merely to making him spend his time pleasantly and forget that war was impending.
  • This idea was eagerly received.
  • The lady who was thought to be most pleasing to the Emperor was invited to act as hostess.
  • It was a gay and brilliant fete.
  • Countess Bezukhova was present among other Russian ladies who had followed the sovereign from Petersburg to Vilna and eclipsed the refined Polish ladies by her massive, so-called Russian type of beauty.
  • Boris was now a rich man who had risen to high honors and no longer sought patronage but stood on an equal footing with the highest of those of his own age.
  • He was meeting Helene in Vilna after not having seen her for a long time and did not recall the past, but as Helene was enjoying the favors of a very important personage and Boris had only recently married, they met as good friends of long standing.
  • At midnight dancing was still going on.
  • Boris, coolly looking at Helene's dazzling bare shoulders which emerged from a dark, gold-embroidered, gauze gown, talked to her of old acquaintances and at the same time, unaware of it himself and unnoticed by others, never for an instant ceased to observe the Emperor who was in the same room.
  • The Emperor was not dancing, he stood in the doorway, stopping now one pair and now another with gracious words which he alone knew how to utter.
  • As the mazurka began, Boris saw that Adjutant General Balashev, one of those in closest attendance on the Emperor, went up to him and contrary to court etiquette stood near him while he was talking to a Polish lady.
  • All the time Boris was going through the figures of the mazurka, he was worried by the question of what news Balashev had brought and how he could find it out before others.
  • He was satisfied with the form in which he had expressed his thoughts, but displeased that Boris had overheard it.
  • Boris understood that this was meant for him and, closing his eyes, slightly bowed his head.
  • Boris was thus the first to learn the news that the French army had crossed the Niemen and, thanks to this, was able to show certain important personages that much that was concealed from others was usually known to him, and by this means he rose higher in their estimation.
  • The unexpected news of the French having crossed the Niemen was particularly startling after a month of unfulfilled expectations, and at a ball.
  • Next day the following letter was sent to Napoleon:
  • In fact, the ambassador, as he himself has declared, was never authorized to make that demand, and as soon as I was informed of it I let him know how much I disapproved of it and ordered him to remain at his post.
  • There he was stopped by French cavalry sentinels.
  • The sun was only just appearing from behind the clouds, the air was fresh and dewy.
  • A herd of cattle was being driven along the road from the village, and over the fields the larks rose trilling, one after another, like bubbles rising in water.
  • The French colonel with difficulty repressed a yawn, but was polite and evidently understood Balashev's importance.
  • The colonel said that the commander of the division was a mile and a quarter away and would receive Balashev and conduct him to his destination.
  • Balashev was only two horses' length from the equestrian with the bracelets, plumes, necklaces, and gold embroidery, who was galloping toward him with a theatrically solemn countenance, when Julner, the French colonel, whispered respectfully: "The King of Naples!"
  • It was, in fact, Murat, now called "King of Naples."
  • "Well, General, it all looks like war," as if regretting a circumstance of which he was unable to judge.
  • "Your Majesty," replied Balashev, "my master, the Emperor, does not desire war and as Your Majesty sees..." said Balashev, using the words Your Majesty at every opportunity, with the affectation unavoidable in frequently addressing one to whom the title was still a novelty.
  • He referred to the fact that the Emperor Napoleon had resented the demand that he should withdraw his troops from Prussia, especially when that demand became generally known and the dignity of France was thereby offended.
  • Balashev replied that there was "nothing offensive in the demand, because..." but Murat interrupted him.
  • But instead of that, at the next village the sentinels of Davout's infantry corps detained him as the pickets of the vanguard had done, and an adjutant of the corps commander, who was fetched, conducted him into the village to Marshal Davout.
  • This inevitability alone can explain how the cruel Arakcheev, who tore out a grenadier's mustache with his own hands, whose weak nerves rendered him unable to face danger, and who was neither an educated man nor a courtier, was able to maintain his powerful position with Alexander, whose own character was chivalrous, noble, and gentle.
  • Davout allowed himself that pleasure when Balashev was brought in.
  • He became still more absorbed in his task when the Russian general entered, and after glancing over his spectacles at Balashev's face, which was animated by the beauty of the morning and by his talk with Murat, he did not rise or even stir, but scowled still more and sneered malevolently.
  • Four days before, sentinels of the Preobrazhensk regiment had stood in front of the house to which Balashev was conducted, and now two French grenadiers stood there in blue uniforms unfastened in front and with shaggy caps on their heads, and an escort of hussars and uhlans and a brilliant suite of aides-de-camp, pages, and generals, who were waiting for Napoleon to come out, were standing at the porch, round his saddle horse and his Mameluke, Rustan.
  • Though Balashev was used to imperial pomp, he was amazed at the luxury and magnificence of Napoleon's court.
  • After some minutes, the gentleman-in-waiting who was on duty came into the great reception room and, bowing politely, asked Balashev to follow him.
  • He heard hurried footsteps beyond the door, both halves of it were opened rapidly; all was silent and then from the study the sound was heard of other steps, firm and resolute--they were those of Napoleon.
  • It was evident, too, that he was in the best of spirits that day.
  • It was plain that Balashev's personality did not interest him at all.
  • Judging by the calmly moderate and amicable tone in which the French Emperor spoke, Balashev was firmly persuaded that he wished for peace and intended to enter into negotiations.
  • Instead of the demand of four months earlier to withdraw from Pomerania, only a withdrawal beyond the Niemen was now demanded.
  • Balashev noticed that his left leg was quivering faster than before and his face seemed petrified in its stern expression.
  • This quivering of his left leg was a thing Napoleon was conscious of.
  • The whole purport of his remarks now was evidently to exalt himself and insult Alexander--just what he had least desired at the commencement of the interview.
  • Their king was insane and they changed him for another-- Bernadotte, who promptly went mad--for no Swede would ally himself with Russia unless he were mad.
  • Napoleon was in that state of irritability in which a man has to talk, talk, and talk, merely to convince himself that he is in the right.
  • Yes, I will throw you back beyond the Dvina and beyond the Dnieper, and will re- erect against you that barrier which it was criminal and blind of Europe to allow to be destroyed.
  • Napoleon was silent, still looking derisively at him and evidently not listening to him.
  • The Emperor was in very good spirits after his ride through Vilna, where crowds of people had rapturously greeted and followed him.
  • This reply of Balashev's, which hinted at the recent defeats of the French in Spain, was much appreciated when he related it at Alexander's court, but it was not much appreciated at Napoleon's dinner, where it passed unnoticed.
  • So little was his rejoinder appreciated that Napoleon did not notice it at all and naively asked Balashev through what towns the direct road from there to Moscow passed.
  • Balashev, who was on the alert all through the dinner, replied that just as "all roads lead to Rome," so all roads lead to Moscow: there were many roads, and "among them the road through Poltava, which Charles XII chose."
  • Napoleon was in that well-known after-dinner mood which, more than any reasoned cause, makes a man contented with himself and disposed to consider everyone his friend.
  • It seemed to him that he was surrounded by men who adored him: and he felt convinced that, after his dinner, Balashev too was his friend and worshiper.
  • Has he not thought that I may do the same? and he turned inquiringly to Balashev, and evidently this thought turned him back on to the track of his morning's anger, which was still fresh in him.
  • Balashev bowed his head with an air indicating that he would like to make his bow and leave, and only listened because he could not help hearing what was said to him.
  • To have one's ear pulled by the Emperor was considered the greatest honor and mark of favor at the French court.
  • The letter taken by Balashev was the last Napoleon sent to Alexander.
  • Pierre had warned his brother-in-law that Prince Andrew was on his track.
  • He was now concerned only with the nearest practical matters unrelated to his past interests, and he seized on these the more eagerly the more those past interests were closed to him.
  • Of the activities that presented themselves to him, army service was the simplest and most familiar.
  • Kutuzov, who was already weary of Bolkonski's activity which seemed to reproach his own idleness, very readily let him go and gave him a mission to Barclay de Tolly.
  • Before joining the Western Army which was then, in May, encamped at Drissa, Prince Andrew visited Bald Hills which was directly on his way, being only two miles off the Smolensk highroad.
  • The same old stateliness, the same cleanliness, the same stillness reigned there, and inside there was the same furniture, the same walls, sounds, and smell, and the same timid faces, only somewhat older.
  • Dessalles, the tutor he had brought from Switzerland, was wearing a coat of Russian cut and talking broken Russian to the servants, but was still the same narrowly intelligent, conscientious, and pedantic preceptor.
  • The household was divided into two alien and hostile camps, who changed their habits for his sake and only met because he was there.
  • During his stay at Bald Hills all the family dined together, but they were ill at ease and Prince Andrew felt that he was a visitor for whose sake an exception was being made and that his presence made them all feel awkward.
  • In the evening, when Prince Andrew went to him and, trying to rouse him, began to tell him of the young Count Kamensky's campaign, the old prince began unexpectedly to talk about Princess Mary, blaming her for her superstitions and her dislike of Mademoiselle Bourienne, who, he said, was the only person really attached to him.
  • The old prince said that if he was ill it was only because of Princess Mary: that she purposely worried and irritated him, and that by indulgence and silly talk she was spoiling little Prince Nicholas.
  • The old prince knew very well that he tormented his daughter and that her life was very hard, but he also knew that he could not help tormenting her and that she deserved it.
  • He sought in himself either remorse for having angered his father or regret at leaving home for the first time in his life on bad terms with him, and was horrified to find neither.
  • What meant still more to him was that he sought and did not find in himself the former tenderness for his son which he had hoped to reawaken by caressing the boy and taking him on his knee.
  • And giving her no further reply, he began thinking of the glad vindictive moment when he would meet Kuragin who he knew was now in the army.
  • The first army, with which was the Emperor, occupied the fortified camp at Drissa; the second army was retreating, trying to effect a junction with the first one from which it was said to be cut off by large French forces.
  • Everyone was dissatisfied with the general course of affairs in the Russian army, but no one anticipated any danger of invasion of the Russian provinces, and no one thought the war would extend farther than the western, the Polish, provinces.
  • As there was not a single town or large village in the vicinity of the camp, the immense number of generals and courtiers accompanying the army were living in the best houses of the villages on both sides of the river, over a radius of six miles.
  • Barclay de Tolly was quartered nearly three miles from the Emperor.
  • Anatole Kuragin, whom Prince Andrew had hoped to find with the army, was not there.
  • He had gone to Petersburg, but Prince Andrew was glad to hear this.
  • His mind was occupied by the interests of the center that was conducting a gigantic war, and he was glad to be free for a while from the distraction caused by the thought of Kuragin.
  • But the question whether the camp was advantageous or disadvantageous remained for him undecided.
  • The Emperor was with the first army, but not as commander-in-chief.
  • In the orders issued it was stated, not that the Emperor would take command, but only that he would be with the army.
  • In attendance on him was the head of the imperial staff, Quartermaster General Prince Volkonski, as well as generals, imperial aides-de-camp, diplomatic officials, and a large number of foreigners, but not the army staff.
  • But this was only the external condition; the essential significance of the presence of the Emperor and of all these people, from a courtier's point of view (and in an Emperor's vicinity all became courtiers), was clear to everyone.
  • It was this: the Emperor did not assume the title of commander-in-chief, but disposed of all the armies; the men around him were his assistants.
  • Arakcheev was a faithful custodian to enforce order and acted as the sovereign's bodyguard.
  • Bennigsen was a landlord in the Vilna province who appeared to be doing the honors of the district, but was in reality a good general, useful as an adviser and ready at hand to replace Barclay.
  • The Grand Duke was there because it suited him to be.
  • Armfeldt virulently hated Napoleon and was a general full of self-confidence, a quality that always influenced Alexander.
  • With Pfuel was Wolzogen, who expressed Pfuel's thoughts in a more comprehensible way than Pfuel himself (who was a harsh, bookish theorist, self-confident to the point of despising everyone else) was able to do.
  • The second party was directly opposed to the first; one extreme, as always happens, was met by representatives of the other.
  • They were Russians: Bagration, Ermolov (who was beginning to come to the front), and others.
  • At that time a famous joke of Ermolov's was being circulated, that as a great favor he had petitioned the Emperor to make him a German.
  • The men of that party, remembering Suvorov, said that what one had to do was not to reason, or stick pins into maps, but to fight, beat the enemy, keep him out of Russia, and not let the army get discouraged.
  • Of a fourth opinion the most conspicuous representative was the Tsarevich, who could not forget his disillusionment at Austerlitz, where he had ridden out at the head of the Guards, in his casque and cavalry uniform as to a review, expecting to crush the French gallantly; but unexpectedly finding himself in the front line had narrowly escaped amid the general confusion.
  • This view was very general in the upper army circles and found support also in Petersburg and from the chancellor, Rumyantsev, who, for other reasons of state, was in favor of peace.
  • The eighth and largest group, which in its enormous numbers was to the others as ninety-nine to one, consisted of men who desired neither peace nor war, neither an advance nor a defensive camp at the Drissa or anywhere else, neither Barclay nor the Emperor, neither Pfuel nor Bennigsen, but only the one most essential thing--as much advantage and pleasure for themselves as possible.
  • In the troubled waters of conflicting and intersecting intrigues that eddied about the Emperor's headquarters, it was possible to succeed in many ways unthinkable at other times.
  • Another who wished to gain some advantage would attract the Emperor's attention by loudly advocating the very thing the Emperor had hinted at the day before, and would dispute and shout at the council, beating his breast and challenging those who did not agree with him to duels, thereby proving that he was prepared to sacrifice himself for the common good.
  • From among all these parties, just at the time Prince Andrew reached the army, another, a ninth party, was being formed and was beginning to raise its voice.
  • This was the party of the elders, reasonable men experienced and capable in state affairs, who, without sharing any of those conflicting opinions, were able to take a detached view of what was going on at the staff at headquarters and to consider means of escape from this muddle, indecision, intricacy, and weakness.
  • Just at the time Prince Andrew was living unoccupied at Drissa, Shishkov, the Secretary of State and one of the chief representatives of this party, wrote a letter to the Emperor which Arakcheev and Balashev agreed to sign.
  • That arousing of the people by their sovereign and his call to them to defend their country--the very incitement which was the chief cause of Russia's triumph in so far as it was produced by the Tsar's personal presence in Moscow--was suggested to the Emperor, and accepted by him, as a pretext for quitting the army.
  • And that morning Colonel Michaud had ridden round the Drissa fortifications with the Emperor and had pointed out to him that this fortified camp constructed by Pfuel, and till then considered a chef-d'oeuvre of tactical science which would ensure Napoleon's destruction, was an absurdity, threatening the destruction of the Russian army.
  • Chernyshev was sitting at a window in the first room with a French novel in his hand.
  • This adjutant was also there and sat dozing on the rolled-up bedding, evidently exhausted by work or by feasting.
  • It was not a council of war, but, as it were, a council to elucidate certain questions for the Emperor personally.
  • There was about him something of Weyrother, Mack, and Schmidt, and many other German theorist-generals whom Prince Andrew had seen in 1805, but he was more typical than any of them.
  • Pfuel was short and very thin but broad-boned, of coarse, robust build, broad in the hips, and with prominent shoulder blades.
  • His face was much wrinkled and his eyes deep set.
  • He nodded hurriedly in reply to Chernyshev, and smiled ironically on hearing that the sovereign was inspecting the fortifications that he, Pfuel, had planned in accord with his theory.
  • Prince Andrew did not catch what he said and would have passed on, but Chernyshev introduced him to Pfuel, remarking that Prince Andrew was just back from Turkey where the war had terminated so fortunately.
  • Pfuel, always inclined to be irritably sarcastic, was particularly disturbed that day, evidently by the fact that they had dared to inspect and criticize his camp in his absence.
  • From this short interview with Pfuel, Prince Andrew, thanks to his Austerlitz experiences, was able to form a clear conception of the man.
  • Pfuel was evidently of that sort.
  • The Emperor was following him, and Bennigsen had hastened on to make some preparations and to be ready to receive the sovereign.
  • Chernyshev and Prince Andrew went out into the porch, where the Emperor, who looked fatigued, was dismounting.
  • Marquis Paulucci was talking to him with particular warmth and the Emperor, with his head bent to the left, was listening with a dissatisfied air.
  • He was followed by Prince Peter Mikhaylovich Volkonski and Baron Stein, and the door closed behind them.
  • Prince Andrew, taking advantage of the Emperor's permission, accompanied Paulucci, whom he had known in Turkey, into the drawing room where the council was assembled.
  • The first to speak was General Armfeldt who, to meet the difficulty that presented itself, unexpectedly proposed a perfectly new position away from the Petersburg and Moscow roads.
  • It was one of the millions of proposals, one as good as another, that could be made as long as it was quite unknown what character the war would take.
  • Pfuel only snorted contemptuously and turned away, to show that he would never demean himself by replying to such nonsense as he was now hearing.
  • So when Prince Volkonski, who was in the chair, called on him to give his opinion, he merely said:
  • But when Volkonski said, with a frown, that it was in the Emperor's name that he asked his opinion, Pfuel rose and, suddenly growing animated, began to speak:
  • Of all those present, evidently he alone was not seeking anything for himself, nursed no hatred against anyone, and only desired that the plan, formed on a theory arrived at by years of toil, should be carried out.
  • He was ridiculous, and unpleasantly sarcastic, but yet he inspired involuntary respect by his boundless devotion to an idea.
  • From the tone in which the courtiers addressed him and the way Paulucci had allowed himself to speak of him to the Emperor, but above all from a certain desperation in Pfuel's own expressions, it was clear that the others knew, and Pfuel himself felt, that his fall was at hand.
  • And despite his self-confidence and grumpy German sarcasm he was pitiable, with his hair smoothly brushed on the temples and sticking up in tufts behind.
  • Though he concealed the fact under a show of irritation and contempt, he was evidently in despair that the sole remaining chance of verifying his theory by a huge experiment and proving its soundness to the whole world was slipping away from him.
  • No one was or is able to foresee in what condition our or the enemy's armies will be in a day's time, and no one can gauge the force of this or that detachment.
  • Bagration was the best, Napoleon himself admitted that.
  • So thought Prince Andrew as he listened to the talking, and he roused himself only when Paulucci called him and everyone was leaving.
  • On receiving this letter, Nicholas did not even make any attempt to get leave of absence or to retire from the army, but wrote to his parents that he was sorry Natasha was ill and her engagement broken off, and that he would do all he could to meet their wishes.
  • It was, in fact, only the commencement of the campaign that prevented Rostov from returning home as he had promised and marrying Sonya.
  • But now the campaign was beginning, and he had to remain with his regiment.
  • And since it had to be so, Nicholas Rostov, as was natural to him, felt contented with the life he led in the regiment and was able to find pleasure in that life.
  • Each step of the retreat was accompanied by a complicated interplay of interests, arguments, and passions at headquarters.
  • For the Pavlograd hussars, however, the whole of this retreat during the finest period of summer and with sufficient supplies was a very simple and agreeable business.
  • If they regretted having to retreat, it was only because they had to leave billets they had grown accustomed to, or some pretty young Polish lady.
  • Rostov remembered Sventsyani, because on the first day of their arrival at that small town he changed his sergeant major and was unable to manage all the drunken men of his squadron who, unknown to him, had appropriated five barrels of old beer.
  • On the twelfth of July, on the eve of that action, there was a heavy storm of rain and hail.
  • In general, the summer of 1812 was remarkable for its storms.
  • Rostov, smoking his pipe and turning his head about as the water trickled down his neck, listened inattentively, with an occasional glance at Ilyin, who was pressing close to him.
  • And so he did not like Zdrzhinski's tale, nor did he like Zdrzhinski himself who, with his mustaches extending over his cheeks, bent low over the face of his hearer, as was his habit, and crowded Rostov in the narrow shanty.
  • Mary Hendrikhovna was the wife of the regimental doctor, a pretty young German woman he had married in Poland.
  • Rostov threw his cloak over his shoulders, shouted to Lavrushka to follow with the things, and--now slipping in the mud, now splashing right through it--set off with Ilyin in the lessening rain and the darkness that was occasionally rent by distant lightning.
  • Mary Hendrikhovna, a plump little blonde German, in a dressing jacket and nightcap, was sitting on a broad bench in the front corner.
  • A fire was made up in the dilapidated brick stove.
  • A board was found, fixed on two saddles and covered with a horsecloth, a small samovar was produced and a cellaret and half a bottle of rum, and having asked Mary Hendrikhovna to preside, they all crowded round her.
  • She, seeing herself surrounded by such brilliant and polite young men, beamed with satisfaction, try as she might to hide it, and perturbed as she evidently was each time her husband moved in his sleep behind her.
  • "But you take it without sugar?" she said, smiling all the time, as if everything she said and everything the others said was very amusing and had a double meaning.
  • At Rostov's suggestion it was agreed that whoever became "King" should have the right to kiss Mary Hendrikhovna's hand, and that the "Booby" should go to refill and reheat the samovar for the doctor when the latter awoke.
  • His face was sad and depressed.
  • When he had gone, taking his wife with him, and had settled down with her in their covered cart, the officers lay down in the tavern, covering themselves with their wet cloaks, but they did not sleep for a long time; now they exchanged remarks, recalling the doctor's uneasiness and his wife's delight, now they ran out into the porch and reported what was taking place in the covered trap.
  • Day was breaking, the rain had ceased, and the clouds were dispersing.
  • As they left the tavern in the twilight of the dawn, Rostov and Ilyin both glanced under the wet and glistening leather hood of the doctor's cart, from under the apron of which his feet were sticking out, and in the middle of which his wife's nightcap was visible and her sleepy breathing audible.
  • "She really is a dear little thing," said Rostov to Ilyin, who was following him.
  • Half an hour later the squadron was lined up on the road.
  • The command was heard to "mount" and the soldiers crossed themselves and mounted.
  • It was growing lighter and lighter.
  • To ride this horse was a pleasure to him, and he thought of the horse, of the morning, of the doctor's wife, but not once of the impending danger.
  • He knew from experience the tormenting expectation of terror and death the cornet was suffering and knew that only time could help him.
  • Dress your ranks! the order of the regimental commander was heard ahead.
  • Again all was silent and then again it sounded as if someone were walking on detonators and exploding them.
  • The uhlans started, the streamers on their spears fluttering, and trotted downhill toward the French cavalry which was seen below to the left.
  • Rostov gazed at what was happening before him as at a hunt.
  • He felt instinctively that if the hussars struck at the French dragoons now, the latter could not withstand them, but if a charge was to be made it must be done now, at that very moment, or it would be too late.
  • A captain, standing beside him, was gazing like himself with eyes fixed on the cavalry below them.
  • Rostov, without waiting to hear him out, touched his horse, galloped to the front of his squadron, and before he had time to finish giving the word of command, the whole squadron, sharing his feeling, was following him.
  • The bullets were whining and whistling so stimulatingly around him and his horse was so eager to go that he could not restrain himself.
  • One Uhlan stopped, another who was on foot flung himself to the ground to avoid being knocked over, and a riderless horse fell in among the hussars.
  • That Frenchman, by his uniform an officer, was going at a gallop, crouching on his gray horse and urging it on with his saber.
  • The French dragoon officer was hopping with one foot on the ground, the other being caught in the stirrup.
  • His pale and mud-stained face--fair and young, with a dimple in the chin and light-blue eyes--was not an enemy's face at all suited to a battlefield, but a most ordinary, homelike face.
  • On all sides, the hussars were busy with the dragoons; one was wounded, but though his face was bleeding, he would not give up his horse; another was perched up behind an hussar with his arms round him; a third was being helped by an hussar to mount his horse.
  • When sent for by Count Ostermann, Rostov, remembering that he had charged without orders, felt sure his commander was sending for him to punish him for breach of discipline.
  • All that day and the next his friends and comrades noticed that Rostov, without being dull or angry, was silent, thoughtful, and preoccupied.
  • And how was he to blame, with his dimple and blue eyes?
  • But while Nicholas was considering these questions and still could reach no clear solution of what puzzled him so, the wheel of fortune in the service, as often happens, turned in his favor.
  • After the affair at Ostrovna he was brought into notice, received command of an hussar battalion, and when a brave officer was needed he was chosen.
  • Natasha's illness was so serious that, fortunately for her and for her parents, the consideration of all that had caused the illness, her conduct and the breaking off of her engagement, receded into the background.
  • She was so ill that it was impossible for them to consider in how far she was to blame for what had happened.
  • She could not eat or sleep, grew visibly thinner, coughed, and, as the doctors made them feel, was in danger.
  • Doctors came to see her singly and in consultation, talked much in French, German, and Latin, blamed one another, and prescribed a great variety of medicines for all the diseases known to them, but the simple idea never occurred to any of them that they could not know the disease Natasha was suffering from, as no disease suffered by a live man can be known, for every living person has his own peculiarities and always has his own peculiar, personal, novel, complicated disease, unknown to medicine--not a disease of the lungs, liver, skin, heart, nerves, and so on mentioned in medical books, but a disease consisting of one of the innumerable combinations of the maladies of those organs.
  • This simple thought could not occur to the doctors (as it cannot occur to a wizard that he is unable to work his charms) because the business of their lives was to cure, and they received money for it and had spent the best years of their lives on that business.
  • But, above all, that thought was kept out of their minds by the fact that they saw they were really useful, as in fact they were to the whole Rostov family.
  • Even to Natasha herself it was pleasant to see that so many sacrifices were being made for her sake, and to know that she had to take medicine at certain hours, though she declared that no medicine would cure her and that it was all nonsense.
  • And it was even pleasant to be able to show, by disregarding the orders, that she did not believe in medical treatment and did not value her life.
  • But when he had gone into another room, to which the countess hurriedly followed him, he assumed a grave air and thoughtfully shaking his head said that though there was danger, he had hopes of the effect of this last medicine and one must wait and see, that the malady was chiefly mental, but...
  • The symptoms of Natasha's illness were that she ate little, slept little, coughed, and was always low-spirited.
  • In spite of the many pills she swallowed and the drops and powders out of the little bottles and boxes of which Madame Schoss who was fond of such things made a large collection, and in spite of being deprived of the country life to which she was accustomed, youth prevailed.
  • Natasha was calmer but no happier.
  • She said and felt at that time that no man was more to her than Nastasya Ivanovna, the buffoon.
  • But it was gone forever.
  • It comforted her to reflect that she was not better as she had formerly imagined, but worse, much worse, than anybody else in the world.
  • But this was not enough.
  • But there was nothing to come.
  • There was no joy in life, yet life was passing.
  • She hardly ever left the house and of those who came to see them was glad to see only one person, Pierre.
  • But she was not even grateful to him for it; nothing good on Pierre's part seemed to her to be an effort, it seemed so natural for him to be kind to everyone that there was no merit in his kindness.
  • She noticed this and attributed it to his general kindness and shyness, which she imagined must be the same toward everyone as it was to her.
  • After those involuntary words--that if he were free he would have asked on his knees for her hand and her love--uttered at a moment when she was so strongly agitated, Pierre never spoke to Natasha of his feelings; and it seemed plain to her that those words, which had then so comforted her, were spoken as all sorts of meaningless words are spoken to comfort a crying child.
  • She was afraid of being late for Matins.
  • On her way home at an early hour when she met no one but bricklayers going to work or men sweeping the street, and everybody within the houses was still asleep, Natasha experienced a feeling new to her, a sense of the possibility of correcting her faults, the possibility of a new, clean life, and of happiness.
  • It was said that the Emperor was leaving the army because it was in danger, it was said that Smolensk had surrendered, that Napoleon had an army of a million and only a miracle could save Russia.
  • It was a hot July day.
  • But she was always imagining that.
  • It always seemed to her that everyone who looked at her was thinking only of what had happened to her.
  • With a sinking heart, wretched as she always was now when she found herself in a crowd, Natasha in her lilac silk dress trimmed with black lace walked- -as women can walk--with the more repose and stateliness the greater the pain and shame in her soul.
  • She knew for certain that she was pretty, but this no longer gave her satisfaction as it used to.
  • From habit she scrutinized the ladies' dresses, condemned the bearing of a lady standing close by who was not crossing herself properly but in a cramped manner, and again she thought with vexation that she was herself being judged and was judging others, and suddenly, at the sound of the service, she felt horrified at her own vileness, horrified that the former purity of her soul was again lost to her.
  • A comely, fresh-looking old man was conducting the service with that mild solemnity which has so elevating and soothing an effect on the souls of the worshipers.
  • The gates of the sanctuary screen were closed, the curtain was slowly drawn, and from behind it a soft mysterious voice pronounced some words.
  • She listened to every word about the victory of Moses over Amalek, of Gideon over Midian, and of David over Goliath, and about the destruction of "Thy Jerusalem," and she prayed to God with the tenderness and emotion with which her heart was overflowing, but without fully understanding what she was asking of God in that prayer.
  • But neither could she doubt the righteousness of the prayer that was being read on bended knees.
  • From the day when Pierre, after leaving the Rostovs' with Natasha's grateful look fresh in his mind, had gazed at the comet that seemed to be fixed in the sky and felt that something new was appearing on his own horizon--from that day the problem of the vanity and uselessness of all earthly things, that had incessantly tormented him, no longer presented itself.
  • "Wherefore?" which had come to him amid every occupation, was now replaced, not by another question or by a reply to the former question, but by her image.
  • He felt that the condition he was in could not continue long, that a catastrophe was coming which would change his whole life, and he impatiently sought everywhere for signs of that approaching catastrophe.
  • And there was given unto him a mouth speaking great things and blasphemies; and power was given unto him to continue forty and two months.
  • How, or by what means, he was connected with the great event foretold in the Apocalypse he did not know, but he did not doubt that connection for a moment.
  • Among these letters was one from Nicholas Rostov to his father.
  • His coachman did not even ask whether he was to wait.
  • He knew that when his master was at the Rostovs' he stayed till midnight.
  • The first person he saw in the house was Natasha.
  • She was practicing solfa exercises in the music room.
  • But I don't want to interrupt you, he added, and was about to go to the drawing room.
  • What do you think?"--she was speaking hurriedly, evidently afraid her strength might fail her-- "Will he ever forgive me?
  • Petya was now a handsome rosy lad of fifteen with full red lips and resembled Natasha.
  • He was preparing to enter the university, but he and his friend Obolenski had lately, in secret, agreed to join the hussars.
  • Pierre walked up and down the drawing room, not listening to what Petya was saying.
  • Pierre was about to begin reading.
  • Pierre had been silent and preoccupied all through dinner, seeming not to grasp what was said.
  • After dinner the count settled himself comfortably in an easy chair and with a serious face asked Sonya, who was considered an excellent reader, to read the appeal.
  • Before Shinshin had time to utter the joke he was ready to make on the count's patriotism, Natasha jumped up from her place and ran to her father.
  • At this moment, Petya, to whom nobody was paying any attention, came up to his father with a very flushed face and said in his breaking voice that was now deep and now shrill:
  • Be quiet, I tell you! cried the count, with a glance at his wife, who had turned pale and was staring fixedly at her son.
  • Pierre was agitated and undecided.
  • "Because I love you!" was what he wanted to say, but he did not say it, and only blushed till the tears came, and lowered his eyes.
  • That morning Petya was a long time dressing and arranging his hair and collar to look like a grown-up man.
  • Petya decided to go straight to where the Emperor was and to explain frankly to some gentleman-in-waiting (he imagined the Emperor to be always surrounded by gentlemen-in-waiting) that he, Count Rostov, in spite of his youth wished to serve his country; that youth could be no hindrance to loyalty, and that he was ready to...
  • But the farther he went and the more his attention was diverted by the ever-increasing crowds moving toward the Kremlin, the less he remembered to walk with the sedateness and deliberation of a man.
  • But within the Trinity Gateway he was so pressed to the wall by people who probably were unaware of the patriotic intentions with which he had come that in spite of all his determination he had to give in, and stop while carriages passed in, rumbling beneath the archway.
  • After standing some time in the gateway, Petya tried to move forward in front of the others without waiting for all the carriages to pass, and he began resolutely working his way with his elbows, but the woman just in front of him, who was the first against whom he directed his efforts, angrily shouted at him:
  • But it was impossible to smarten oneself up or move to another place, because of the crowd.
  • One of the generals who drove past was an acquaintance of the Rostovs', and Petya thought of asking his help, but came to the conclusion that that would not be a manly thing to do.
  • When the carriages had all passed in, the crowd, carrying Petya with it, streamed forward into the Kremlin Square which was already full of people.
  • For a while the crowd was less dense, but suddenly all heads were bared, and everyone rushed forward in one direction.
  • Petya was being pressed so that he could scarcely breathe, and everybody shouted, "Hurrah! hurrah! hurrah!"
  • "Hurrah!" was heard on all sides.
  • But in spite of this he continued to struggle desperately forward, and from between the backs of those in front he caught glimpses of an open space with a strip of red cloth spread out on it; but just then the crowd swayed back--the police in front were pushing back those who had pressed too close to the procession: the Emperor was passing from the palace to the Cathedral of the Assumption--and Petya unexpectedly received such a blow on his side and ribs and was squeezed so hard that suddenly everything grew dim before his eyes and he lost consciousness.
  • When he came to himself, a man of clerical appearance with a tuft of gray hair at the back of his head and wearing a shabby blue cassock--probably a church clerk and chanter--was holding him under the arm with one hand while warding off the pressure of the crowd with the other.
  • A tradesman's wife was showing a rent in her shawl and telling how much the shawl had cost; another was saying that all silk goods had now got dear.
  • The clerk who had rescued Petya was talking to a functionary about the priests who were officiating that day with the bishop.
  • Suddenly the sound of a firing of cannon was heard from the embankment, to celebrate the signing of peace with the Turks, and the crowd rushed impetuously toward the embankment to watch the firing.
  • The firing was still proceeding when officers, generals, and gentlemen-in-waiting came running out of the cathedral, and after them others in a more leisurely manner: caps were again raised, and those who had run to look at the cannon ran back again.
  • While the Emperor was dining, Valuev, looking out of the window, said:
  • The dinner was nearly over, and the Emperor, munching a biscuit, rose and went out onto the balcony.
  • He sprang forward and upset an old woman who was catching at a biscuit; the old woman did not consider herself defeated though she was lying on the ground--she grabbed at some biscuits but her hand did not reach them.
  • I said if only we waited--and so it was! was being joyfully said by various people.
  • Happy as Petya was, he felt sad at having to go home knowing that all the enjoyment of that day was over.
  • He did not go straight home from the Kremlin, but called on his friend Obolenski, who was fifteen and was also entering the regiment.
  • On returning home Petya announced resolutely and firmly that if he was not allowed to enter the service he would run away.
  • In the noblemen's hall there was an incessant movement and buzz of voices.
  • On all these faces, as on the faces of the crowd Petya had seen in the Square, there was a striking contradiction: the general expectation of a solemn event, and at the same time the everyday interests in a boston card party, Peter the cook, Zinaida Dmitrievna's health, and so on.
  • Pierre was there too, buttoned up since early morning in a nobleman's uniform that had become too tight for him.
  • He was agitated; this extraordinary gathering not only of nobles but also of the merchant- class--les etats generaux (States-General)--evoked in him a whole series of ideas he had long laid aside but which were deeply graven in his soul: thoughts of the Contrat Social and the French Revolution.
  • Pierre pushed his way into the middle of the group, listened, and convinced himself that the man was indeed a liberal, but of views quite different from his own.
  • It was indicative of dissipation and the exercise of authority.
  • (He was well acquainted with the senator, but thought it necessary on this occasion to address him formally.)
  • Not only was Pierre's attempt to speak unsuccessful, but he was rudely interrupted, pushed aside, and people turned away from him as from a common enemy.
  • Having heard that Count Mamonov was furnishing a regiment, Bezukhov at once informed Rostopchin that he would give a thousand men and their maintenance.
  • In historical works on the year 1812 French writers are very fond of saying that Napoleon felt the danger of extending his line, that he sought a battle and that his marshals advised him to stop at Smolensk, and of making similar statements to show that the danger of the campaign was even then understood.
  • And not only was Napoleon not afraid to extend his line, but he welcomed every step forward as a triumph and did not seek battle as eagerly as in former campaigns, but very lazily.
  • At the very beginning of the war our armies were divided, and our sole aim was to unite them, though uniting the armies was no advantage if we meant to retire and lure the enemy into the depths of the country.
  • The enormous Drissa camp was formed on Pfuel's plan, and there was no intention of retiring farther.
  • In August he was at Smolensk and thought only of how to advance farther, though as we now see that advance was evidently ruinous to him.
  • The Emperor was with the army to encourage it, but his presence and ignorance of what steps to take, and the enormous number of advisers and plans, destroyed the first army's energy and it retired.
  • But as Barclay did not inspire confidence his power was limited.
  • And by this visit of the Emperor to Moscow the strength of the Russian army was trebled.
  • A general was sent to survey the position.
  • It was necessary to fight an unexpected battle at Smolensk to save our lines of communication.
  • The battle was fought and thousands were killed on both sides.
  • Smolensk was abandoned contrary to the wishes of the Emperor and of the whole people.
  • He was ill and did not leave his study.
  • She feared for her brother who was in it, was horrified by and amazed at the strange cruelty that impels men to kill one another, but she did not understand the significance of this war, which seemed to her like all previous wars.
  • And truly though the enemy was twice stronger than we, we were unshakable.
  • The prince's tone was so calm and confident that Princess Mary unhesitatingly believed him.
  • All that July the old prince was exceedingly active and even animated.
  • The only thing that made Princess Mary anxious about him was that he slept very little and, instead of sleeping in his study as usual, changed his sleeping place every day.
  • On August 1, a second letter was received from Prince Andrew.
  • "There was a letter from Prince Andrew today," he said to Princess Mary- -"Haven't you read it?"
  • While he was away Princess Mary, Dessalles, Mademoiselle Bourienne, and even little Nicholas exchanged looks in silence.
  • He was examining the plan, evidently engrossed in his own ideas.
  • Dessalles looked in amazement at the prince, who was talking of the Niemen when the enemy was already at the Dnieper, but Princess Mary, forgetting the geographical position of the Niemen, thought that what her father was saying was correct.
  • Princess Mary saw Dessalles' embarrassed and astonished look fixed on her father, noticed his silence, and was struck by the fact that her father had forgotten his son's letter on the drawing-room table; but she was not only afraid to speak of it and ask Dessalles the reason of his confusion and silence, but was afraid even to think about it.
  • She gave it to him and, unpleasant as it was to her to do so, ventured to ask him what her father was doing.
  • When Michael Ivanovich returned to the study with the letter, the old prince, with spectacles on and a shade over his eyes, was sitting at his open bureau with screened candles, holding a paper in his outstretched hand, and in a somewhat dramatic attitude was reading his manuscript-- his "Remarks" as he termed it--which was to be transmitted to the Emperor after his death.
  • It was already late when he rose after sealing the letter.
  • Every place seemed unsatisfactory, but worst of all was his customary couch in the study.
  • It was unsatisfactory everywhere, but the corner behind the piano in the sitting room was better than other places: he had never slept there yet.
  • He was not meditating, but only deferring the moment of making the effort to lift those legs up and turn over on the bed.
  • Ah yes, there was something else important, very important, that I was keeping till I should be in bed.
  • No, it was something, something in the drawing room.
  • The same evening that the prince gave his instructions to Alpatych, Dessalles, having asked to see Princess Mary, told her that, as the prince was not very well and was taking no steps to secure his safety, though from Prince Andrew's letter it was evident that to remain at Bald Hills might be dangerous, he respectfully advised her to send a letter by Alpatych to the Provincial Governor at Smolensk, asking him to let her know the state of affairs and the extent of the danger to which Bald Hills was exposed.
  • Dessalles wrote this letter to the Governor for Princess Mary, she signed it, and it was given to Alpatych with instructions to hand it to the Governor and to come back as quickly as possible if there was danger.
  • The larger bell was muffled and the little bells on the harness stuffed with paper.
  • He was a stout, dark, red- faced peasant in the forties, with thick lips, a broad knob of a nose, similar knobs over his black frowning brows, and a round belly.
  • Wearing a waistcoat over his cotton shirt, Ferapontov was standing before his shop which opened onto the street.
  • It was a sunny morning and by eight o'clock it was already hot.
  • At eight o'clock the booming of cannon was added to the sound of musketry.
  • Many people were hurrying through the streets and there were many soldiers, but cabs were still driving about, tradesmen stood at their shops, and service was being held in the churches as usual.
  • In the offices and shops and at the post office everyone was talking about the army and about the enemy who was already attacking the town, everybody was asking what should be done, and all were trying to calm one another.
  • This man, an ex-captain of police, was saying angrily:
  • Involuntarily listening now to the firing, which had drawn nearer and was increasing in strength, Alpatych hurried to his inn.
  • The coachman was asleep.
  • The noise of wheels, hoofs, and bells was heard from the gateway as a little trap passed out.
  • It was by now late in the afternoon.
  • Half the street was in shadow, the other half brightly lit by the sun.
  • Suddenly the strange sound of a far-off whistling and thud was heard, followed by a boom of cannon blending into a dull roar that set the windows rattling.
  • The town was being bombarded by a hundred and thirty guns which Napoleon had ordered up after four o'clock.
  • Alpatych was getting into his trap.
  • "What are you staring at?" he shouted to the cook, who in her red skirt, with sleeves rolled up, swinging her bare elbows, had stepped to the corner to listen to what was being said.
  • Once more something whistled, but this time quite close, swooping downwards like a little bird; a flame flashed in the middle of the street, something exploded, and the street was shrouded in smoke.
  • At that moment the pitiful wailing of women was heard from different sides, the frightened baby began to cry, and people crowded silently with pale faces round the cook.
  • The loudest sound in that crowd was her wailing.
  • As Alpatych was driving out of the gate he saw some ten soldiers in Ferapontov's open shop, talking loudly and filling their bags and knapsacks with flour and sunflower seeds.
  • On seeing the soldiers he was about to shout at them, but suddenly stopped and, clutching at his hair, burst into sobs and laughter:
  • Ferapontov's wife and children were also sitting in a cart waiting till it was possible to drive out.
  • This fire was already burning itself out.
  • Alpatych went up to a large crowd standing before a high barn which was blazing briskly.
  • The walls were all on fire and the back wall had fallen in, the wooden roof was collapsing, and the rafters were alight.
  • The crowd was evidently watching for the roof to fall in, and Alpatych watched for it too.
  • Prince Andrew in his riding cloak, mounted on a black horse, was looking at Alpatych from the back of the crowd.
  • There was another terrible crash and something huge collapsed.
  • "Well then," continued Prince Andrew to Alpatych, "report to them as I have told you"; and not replying a word to Berg who was now mute beside him, he touched his horse and rode down the side street.
  • On the tenth of August the regiment Prince Andrew commanded was marching along the highroad past the avenue leading to Bald Hills.
  • The unreaped corn was scorched and shed its grain.
  • Only at night and in the forests while the dew lasted was there any freshness.
  • But on the road, the highroad along which the troops marched, there was no such freshness even at night or when the road passed through the forest; the dew was imperceptible on the sandy dust churned up more than six inches deep.
  • Some of this dust was kneaded by the feet and wheels, while the rest rose and hung like a cloud over the troops, settling in eyes, ears, hair, and nostrils, and worst of all in the lungs of the men and beasts as they moved along that road.
  • There was no wind, and the men choked in that motionless atmosphere.
  • Prince Andrew was in command of a regiment, and the management of that regiment, the welfare of the men and the necessity of receiving and giving orders, engrossed him.
  • He was entirely devoted to the affairs of his regiment and was considerate and kind to his men and officers.
  • But he was kind and gentle only to those of his regiment, to Timokhin and the like--people quite new to him, belonging to a different world and who could not know and understand his past.
  • Everything that reminded him of his past was repugnant to him, and so in his relations with that former circle he confined himself to trying to do his duty and not to be unfair.
  • Riding past the pond where there used always to be dozens of women chattering as they rinsed their linen or beat it with wooden beetles, Prince Andrew noticed that there was not a soul about and that the little washing wharf, torn from its place and half submerged, was floating on its side in the middle of the pond.
  • An old peasant whom Prince Andrew in his childhood had often seen at the gate was sitting on a green garden seat, plaiting a bast shoe.
  • He was deaf and did not hear Prince Andrew ride up.
  • He was sitting on the seat the old prince used to like to sit on, and beside him strips of bast were hanging on the broken and withered branch of a magnolia.
  • The shutters were all closed, except at one window which was open.
  • Alpatych, having sent his family away, was alone at Bald Hills and was sitting indoors reading the Lives of the Saints.
  • "If you noticed some disorder in the garden," said Alpatych, "it was impossible to prevent it.
  • A group of bareheaded peasants was approaching across the meadow toward the prince.
  • The old man was still sitting in the ornamental garden, like a fly impassive on the face of a loved one who is dead, tapping the last on which he was making the bast shoe, and two little girls, running out from the hot house carrying in their skirts plums they had plucked from the trees there, came upon Prince Andrew.
  • Prince Andrew was somewhat refreshed by having ridden off the dusty highroad along which the troops were moving.
  • It was past one o'clock.
  • There was no wind.
  • One fair-haired young soldier of the third company, whom Prince Andrew knew and who had a strap round the calf of one leg, crossed himself, stepped back to get a good run, and plunged into the water; another, a dark noncommissioned officer who was always shaggy, stood up to his waist in the water joyfully wriggling his muscular figure and snorted with satisfaction as he poured the water over his head with hands blackened to the wrists.
  • Everywhere on the bank, on the dam, and in the pond, there was healthy, white, muscular flesh.
  • I swear to you on my honor that Napoleon was in such a fix as never before and might have lost half his army but could not have taken Smolensk.
  • He gave me his word he would not retreat, but suddenly sent instructions that he was retiring that night.
  • The progress of the war was eagerly followed, and only the reports most flattering to our army were circulated.
  • In Helene's circle the war in general was regarded as a series of formal demonstrations which would very soon end in peace, and the view prevailed expressed by Bilibin--who now in Petersburg was quite at home in Helene's house, which every clever man was obliged to visit--that not by gunpowder but by those who invented it would matters be settled.
  • Anna Pavlovna's circle on the contrary was enraptured by this enthusiasm and spoke of it as Plutarch speaks of the deeds of the ancients.
  • This was quite correct on the twenty-fourth of July.
  • That same day Kutuzov was appointed commander-in- chief with full powers over the armies and over the whole region occupied by them.
  • The latter was very attentive to Anna Pavlovna because he wanted to be appointed director of one of the educational establishments for young ladies.
  • He sees well enough, said Prince Vasili rapidly, in a deep voice and with a slight cough--the voice and cough with which he was wont to dispose of all difficulties.
  • The "man of great merit," who was still a novice in court circles, wishing to flatter Anna Pavlovna by defending her former position on this question, observed:
  • It is said that the Emperor was reluctant to give Kutuzov those powers.
  • While this was taking place in Petersburg the French had already passed Smolensk and were drawing nearer and nearer to Moscow.
  • Napoleon's historian Thiers, like other of his historians, trying to justify his hero says that he was drawn to the walls of Moscow against his will.
  • He is as right as other historians who look for the explanation of historic events in the will of one man; he is as right as the Russian historians who maintain that Napoleon was drawn to Moscow by the skill of the Russian commanders.
  • "The Cossack, not knowing in what company he was, for Napoleon's plain appearance had nothing about it that would reveal to an Oriental mind the presence of a monarch, talked with extreme familiarity of the incidents of the war," says Thiers, narrating this episode.
  • Napoleon did not smile, though he was evidently in high good humor, and he ordered these words to be repeated.
  • The fact was accordingly conveyed to Lavrushka.
  • All his loquacity was suddenly arrested and replaced by a naive and silent feeling of admiration.
  • Rostov was just mounting to go for a ride round the neighboring villages with Ilyin; he let Lavrushka have another horse and took him along with him.
  • Princess Mar