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That Sentence Examples

  • I thought that was the best way to carry her.
  • I can't imagine what he was thinking to hide a thing like that from you.
  • That was when Mary decided to relieve her mind of a troubling thought.
  • Well, if my cooking is that bad...
  • It was the first time she thought of Katie that way.
  • The suitcase didn't seem that heavy at the time.
  • At some point, that stopped bugging her and became an attraction.
  • He spoke so well that everybody was pleased.
  • Alex had provided the money to remodel the home, but insisted that it stay in her name only.
  • "What do you mean by that?" asked the little Wizard, greatly puzzled.
  • After that other people brought water from a brook and sprinkled the earth.
  • "If that is so," said the boy, "how could he do that wonderful trick with the nine tiny piglets?"
  • But not a sound had broken the stillness since the strangers had arrived, except that of their own voices.
  • That is, if Jim has had enough of the pink grass.
  • I wish you would go and fetch my satchel, two lanterns, and a can of kerosene oil that is under the seat.
  • I am greater than any thorn-covered sorcerer that every grew in your garden.
  • He stooped and picked up a bird's nest that had fallen upon the ground.
  • On that subject she was adamant.
  • Here and there were groups of houses that seemed made of clear glass, because they sparkled so brightly.
  • I perceive that you are curiously constructed, and that if you cannot breathe you cannot keep alive.
  • I wonder why it is that we can walk so easily in the air.
  • But I've noticed that many queer things happen in fairy countries.
  • "I have an idea," said the Wizard, "that there are fishes in these brooks.
  • Eureka helped him by flying into the faces of the enemy and scratching and biting furiously, and the kitten ruined so many vegetable complexions that the Mangaboos feared her as much as they did the horse.
  • Two other baby birds were there, that had not fallen out.
  • It is with a kind of fear that I begin to write the history of my life.
  • Pierre pushed his way into the middle of the group, listened, and convinced himself that the man was indeed a liberal, but of views quite different from his own.
  • All that did was to enwich the pwiests' sons and thieves and wobbahs....
  • The nobility don't gwudge theah lives--evewy one of us will go and bwing in more wecwuits, and the sov'weign" (that was the way he referred to the Emperor) "need only say the word and we'll all die fo' him!" added the orator with animation.
  • "I think that before discussing these questions," Pierre continued, "we should ask the Emperor--most respectfully ask His Majesty--to let us know the number of our troops and the position in which our army and our forces now are, and then..."
  • He felt that his words, apart from what meaning they conveyed, were less audible than the sound of his opponent's voice.
  • Pierre wished to say that he was ready to sacrifice his money, his serfs, or himself, only one ought to know the state of affairs in order to be able to improve it, but he was unable to speak.
  • Glinka, the editor of the Russian Messenger, who was recognized (cries of "author! author!" were heard in the crowd), said that "hell must be repulsed by hell," and that he had seen a child smiling at lightning flashes and thunderclaps, but "we will not be that child."
  • In addition to the assistance from the renters, the money finally gave her an income of her own, and the token independence that went with it.
  • Did Alex think of her that way?
  • Did I ever tell you that you're the most handsome man I've ever seen?
  • "Later," he said with a grin that summoned the dimple below one eye.
  • If Alex knew that, he gave no indication - and she had no intention of telling him.
  • What are you going to hide from me that I haven't already seen?
  • No one could deny that Alex was a devoted husband and father.
  • That made all their children her aunts and uncles, and their grandchildren her cousins.
  • Apparently his greatest concern was the fact that his mother was married to his adoptive father at the time he was conceived.
  • That was a double-edged hurt, though, because Alex adored his adoptive father.
  • With so many people at their house, it was fortunate that the weather was warm and dry so they could utilize the courtyard for the children.
  • That idea was troublesome to Carmen as well.
  • When Josh died, Mary had indicated that she felt Carmen was at least partially responsible.
  • She wasn't vain enough to think that turned him to drinking, though.
  • Whatever the case, Mary questioned anything that might indicate discord between Carmen and Alex.
  • All I could think about was that I had a living father-in-law.
  • Alex swung around, his eyes twinkling with humor and that cute dimple teasing his cheek.
  • He wouldn't have approved - of that she was certain.
  • Would he be disappointed that Lori got it?
  • That was a no-brainer.
  • It should have arrived at Hugson's Siding at midnight, but it was already five o'clock and the gray dawn was breaking in the east when the little train slowly rumbled up to the open shed that served for the station-house.
  • The conductor helped her off the car and then the engineer started his train again, so that it puffed and groaned and moved slowly away up the track.
  • He laughed at that, and his laugh was merry and frank.
  • "I named my kitten that because I found it," she explained.
  • Dorothy thought he just wiggled one of his drooping ears, but that was all.
  • "Thought that train would never come," observed the boy.
  • I've waited at that station for five hours.
  • "Isn't that a great deal?" she asked, doubtfully.
  • "That was an awful big quake," replied Zeb, with a white face.
  • It almost got us that time, Dorothy.
  • The sudden rush into space confused them so that they could not think.
  • The top of the buggy caught the air like a parachute or an umbrella filled with wind, and held them back so that they floated downward with a gentle motion that was not so very disagreeable to bear.
  • The worst thing was their terror of reaching the bottom of this great crack in the earth, and the natural fear that sudden death was about to overtake them at any moment.
  • Also, turning her head, she found that she could see the boy beside her, who had until now remained as still and silent as she herself.
  • Dorothy was too dazed to say much, but she watched one of Jim's big ears turn to violet and the other to rose, and wondered that his tail should be yellow and his body striped with blue and orange like the stripes of a zebra.
  • Then she looked at Zeb, whose face was blue and whose hair was pink, and gave a little laugh that sounded a bit nervous.
  • "As for that, we are in the same scrape ourselves," answered Dorothy, cheerfully.
  • All this was so terrible and unreal that he could not understand it at all, and so had good reason to be afraid.
  • "Oh, I'm not so sure of that," replied the girl.
  • The houses of the city were all made of glass, so clear and transparent that one could look through the walls as easily as through a window.
  • "Look out!" cried Dorothy, who noticed that the beautiful man did not look where he was going; "be careful, or you'll fall off!"
  • Can you remember any breakfast that I've had today? growled Jim, as if he resented Zeb's speech.
  • Then, remembering the stones that had fallen with them and passed them long before they had reached this place, he answered:
  • "How can we do that?" asked the girl.
  • That I am not prepared to say.
  • There was even a thorn upon the tip of his nose and he looked so funny that Dorothy laughed when she saw him.
  • We only know that yesterday came a Rain of Stones upon us, which did much damage and injured some of our people.
  • "By the way," said the man with the star, looking steadily at the Sorcerer, "you told us yesterday that there would not be a second Rain of Stones.
  • Yet one has just occurred that was even worse than the first.
  • Immediately the Prince and all of his people flocked out of the hall into the street, that they might see what was about to happen.
  • Far up in the air was an object that looked like a balloon.
  • It was all they could do, for to go away and leave that strange sight was impossible; nor could they hurry its fall in any way.
  • Gradually the balloon grew bigger, which was proof that it was settling down upon the Land of the Mangaboos.
  • I had let so much gas out of my balloon that I could not rise again, and in a few minutes the earth closed over my head.
  • "Ah, you shall prove that," said the Prince.
  • "That remains to be seen," said the other.
  • "That does not sound especially pleasant," said the little man, looking at the one with the star uneasily.
  • He placed one upon the floor, so that it could run around, and pulled apart the other, making three piglets in all; and then one of these was pulled apart, making four piglets.
  • The little man gave a bow to the silent throng that had watched him, and then the Prince said, in his cold, calm voice:
  • Dorothy and Zeb now got out of the buggy and walked beside the Prince, so that they might see and examine the flowers and plants better.
  • "That depends upon the care we take of ourselves," he replied.
  • "That is a matter I have not quite decided upon," was the reply.
  • "That is no excuse," declared the Prince, coldly.
  • The beautiful creature passed her hands over her eyes an instant, tucked in a stray lock of hair that had become disarranged, and after a look around the garden made those present a gracious bow and said, in a sweet but even toned voice:
  • Instantly the Princess turned and faced him, and when he saw that she was picked the Prince stood still and began to tremble.
  • "I did not know that you were ripe," answered the Prince, in a low voice.
  • Slowly he took the shining star from his own brow and placed it upon that of the Princess.
  • There is no reason, that I can see, why they may not exist in the waters of this strange country.
  • Then she happened to remember that in a corner of her suit-case were one or two crackers that were left over from her luncheon on the train, and she went to the buggy and brought them.
  • "What are those holes up there?" enquired the boy, pointing to some openings that appeared near the top of the dome.
  • "You forget that stairs are unnecessary," observed the Wizard.
  • There is nothing else that I care about.
  • But even that did not satisfy the Princess.
  • The Mangaboos were much impressed because they had never before seen any light that did not come directly from their suns.
  • The advisors of the Princess did not like this test; but she commanded them to step into the flame and one by one they did so, and were scorched so badly that the air was soon filled with an odor like that of baked potatoes.
  • Some of the Mangaboos fell down and had to be dragged from the fire, and all were so withered that it would be necessary to plant them at once.
  • At once the Mangaboos began piling up the rocks of glass again, and as the little man realized that they were all about to be entombed in the mountain he said to the children:
  • Noticing that the light was growing dim he picked up his nine piglets, patted each one lovingly on its fat little head, and placed them carefully in his inside pocket.
  • The cavern did not come to an end, as they had expected it would, but slanted upward through the great glass mountain, running in a direction that promised to lead them to the side opposite the Mangaboo country.
  • The fruit was so daintily colored and so fragrant, and looked so appetizing and delicious that Dorothy stopped and exclaimed:
  • "I'll bet it's because they ate that peach!" cried the kitten.
  • One of the chairs pushed back from the table, and this was so astonishing and mysterious that Dorothy was almost tempted to run away in fright.
  • Are you surprised that you are unable to see the people of Voe?
  • As he spoke the voice came so near to Zeb that he jumped back in alarm.
  • "What curious animal is that which is eating the grass on my lawn?" enquired the man's voice.
  • "That is the one evil of our country," answered the invisible man.
  • Yes; for they eat of the dama-fruit, as we all do, and that keeps them from being seen by any eye, whether human or animal.
  • The dama-fruit is the most delicious thing that grows, and when it makes us invisible the bears cannot find us to eat us up.
  • In front of each place was a plate bearing one of the delicious dama-fruit, and the perfume that rose from these was so enticing and sweet that they were sorely tempted to eat of them and become invisible.
  • But the fishes that swim in our brooks we can see, and often we catch them to eat.
  • The children were inclined to be frightened by the sight of the small animal, which reminded them of the bears; but Dorothy reassured them by explaining that Eureka was a pet and could do no harm even if she wished to.
  • "Did you see that, Dorothy?" she gasped.
  • As for reaching the top of the earth, I have never heard that it is possible to do that, and if you succeeded in getting there you would probably fall off.
  • And if he was invis'ble, and the bears invis'ble, who knows that they really ate him up?
  • Fruits and flowers grew plentifully all about, and there were many of the delicious damas that the people of Voe were so fond of.
  • About noon they stopped to allow Jim to rest in the shade of a pretty orchard.
  • You cannot escape the bears that way.
  • "Oh, there is no need of that," said the voice, which from its gentle tones seemed to belong to a young girl.
  • The third time that he thrust out the weapon there was a loud roar and a fall, and suddenly at his feet appeared the form of a great red bear, which was nearly as big as the horse and much stronger and fiercer.
  • "That is true," agreed the Wizard, "and as the river seems to be flowing in the direction of the Pyramid Mountain it will be the easiest way for us to travel."
  • Dorothy nearly went with them, but she was holding fast to the iron rail of the seat, and that saved her.
  • The mountain before them was shaped like a cone and was so tall that its point was lost in the clouds.
  • So they began to ascend the stairs, Dorothy and the Wizard first, Jim next, drawing the buggy, and then Zeb to watch that nothing happened to the harness.
  • The light was dim, and soon they mounted into total darkness, so that the Wizard was obliged to get out his lanterns to light the way.
  • But this enabled them to proceed steadily until they came to a landing where there was a rift in the side of the mountain that let in both light and air.
  • Looking through this opening they could see the Valley of Voe lying far below them, the cottages seeming like toy houses from that distance.
  • Mortals who stand upon the earth and look up at the sky cannot often distinguish these forms, but our friends were now so near to the clouds that they observed the dainty fairies very clearly.
  • "No place at all," answered the man with the braids; "that is, not recently.
  • That made an extraordinary long hole, as you may imagine, and reached far down into the earth; and, as I leaned over it to try to see to the bottom, I lost my balance and tumbled in.
  • On peering out all they could see was rolling banks of clouds, so thick that they obscured all else.
  • To his delight they were now plainly visible, which proved that they had passed beyond the influence of the magical Valley of Voe.
  • "In that case," she said, "I'll leave them alone.
  • "That is right, Eureka," remarked the Wizard, earnestly.
  • Then he halted, ducked down and began to back up, so that he nearly fell with the buggy onto the others.
  • Others had flat noses, protruding eyes, and ears that were shaped like those of an elephant.
  • The tops of their heads had no hair, but were carved into a variety of fantastic shapes, some having a row of points or balls around the top, others designs resembling flowers or vegetables, and still others having squares that looked like waffles cut criss-cross on their heads.
  • He got his satchel from the buggy and, opening it, took out two deadly looking revolvers that made the children shrink back in alarm just to look at.
  • "But why fight at all, in that case?" asked the girl.
  • Crack! crash! bang! went his iron-shod hoofs against the wooden bodies of the Gargoyles, and they were battered right and left with such force that they scattered like straws in the wind.
  • "That is what I advise," said the Wizard.
  • The Wizard raised one of his revolvers and fired into the throng of his enemies, and the shot resounded like a clap of thunder in that silent place.
  • Zeb ran and picked up one of the Gargoyles that lay nearest to him.
  • Before this crowned Gargoyle had recovered himself Zeb had wound a strap several times around its body, confining its wings and arms so that it could not move.
  • By that time, the others had all retired.
  • Dorothy was captured in the same way, and numbers of the Gargoyles clung to Jim's legs, so weighting him down that the poor beast was helpless.
  • The creatures had sense enough to reason that way, and the only mistake they made was in supposing the earth people were unable to overcome such ordinary difficulties.
  • "That," said Zeb, "explains why this house is used by them for a prison.
  • "Do you see that big rock standing on the hillside yonder?" he continued, pointing with his finger.
  • So, if we had the wings, and could escape the Gargoyles, we might fly to that rock and be saved.
  • Just you light out and make for that rock, Jim; and don't waste any time about it, either.
  • The main point, however, was that they flew, and flew swiftly, if a bit unevenly, toward the rock for which they had headed.
  • Then he poured over them all the kerosene oil that was left in his oil-can, and lighting a match set fire to the pile.
  • "That will prove a barrier for some time to come," said the little man, smiling pleasantly all over his wrinkled face at the success of their stratagem.
  • Hearing these words our friends turned in the direction of the sound, and the Wizard held his lanterns so that their light would flood one of the little pockets in the rock.
  • "What's that?" asked Dorothy, gazing fearfully at the great scaley head, the yawning mouth and the big eyes.
  • Quite young, I grieve to say; and all of my brothers and sisters that you see here are practically my own age.
  • "But that isn't young!" cried Dorothy, in amazement.
  • "Permit me to say," returned the dragonette, "that you are rather impolite to call us names, knowing that we cannot resent your insults.
  • Can you match that pedigree, little girl?
  • The heads of the dragonettes were as big as barrels and covered with hard, greenish scales that glittered brightly under the light of the lanterns.
  • "It occurs to me," said the Wizard, "that we ought to get out of this place before the mother dragon comes back."
  • "That is not a fair question to ask us," declared another dragonette.
  • But at length they came unexpectedly upon a huge rock that shut off the passage and blocked them from proceeding a single step farther.
  • This appeared so unexpectedly that they were unprepared to take advantage of it at first, and allowed the rocky wall to swing around again before they had decided to pass over.
  • But they knew now that there was a means of escape and so waited patiently until the path appeared for the second time.
  • "I'm not so sure of that," returned Dorothy.
  • The lanterns were beginning to grow dim, and the Wizard poured the remaining oil from one into the other, so that the one light would last longer.
  • That meant that their world--the real world--was not very far away, and that the succession of perilous adventures they had encountered had at last brought them near the earth's surface, which meant home to them.
  • That meant that their world--the real world--was not very far away, and that the succession of perilous adventures they had encountered had at last brought them near the earth's surface, which meant home to them.
  • "But we're ALMOST on earth again," cried Dorothy, "for there is the sun--the most BEAU'FUL sun that shines!" and she pointed eagerly at the crack in the distant roof.
  • It wouldn't be possible for even me to get up to that crack--or through it if I got there.
  • "It appears that the path ends here," announced the Wizard, gloomily.
  • And the whole thing has been unnatural because that cat and I are both able to talk your language, and to understand the words you say.
  • The Wizard told them of the misfortune that had overtaken the wanderers.
  • "I don't believe we'll realize anything, when it comes to that," remarked Dorothy, who had been deep in thought.
  • "The girl that rules the marvelous Land of Oz," was the reply.
  • "Where is that Magic Belt?" enquired the Wizard, who had listened with great interest.
  • "Do you mean that Princess Ozma will see this cave in her enchanted picture, and see all of us here, and what we are doing?" demanded Zeb.
  • The little man looked at his watch--a big silver one that he carried in his vest pocket.
  • "Then we must wait for half an hour," she continued; "but it won't take long, after that, to carry us all to the Emerald City."
  • She felt that Jim would know more about the Saw-Horse later on.
  • One moment Dorothy sat beside them with the kitten in her lap, and a moment later the horse, the piglets, the Wizard and the boy were all that remained in the underground prison.
  • "I believe we will soon follow her," announced the Wizard, in a tone of great relief; "for I know something about the magic of the fairyland that is called the Land of Oz.
  • "Will it hurt?" asked the boy, in a voice that trembled a little.
  • And that was the way it did happen.
  • For they were in the streets of a beautiful emerald-green city, bathed in a grateful green light that was especially pleasing to their eyes, and surrounded by merry faced people in gorgeous green-and-gold costumes of many extraordinary designs.
  • "But I assure you, my good people, that I do not wish to rule the Emerald City," he added, earnestly.
  • "In that case you are very welcome!" cried all the servants, and it pleased the Wizard to note the respect with which the royal retainers bowed before him.
  • He had seen considerable of life in the cities in his younger days, and knew that this regal palace was no place for him.
  • "Do you mean that I'm a freak?" asked Jim, angrily.
  • This mollified Jim a little, and after some thought the green maiden decided to give the cab-horse a room in the palace, such a big building having many rooms that were seldom in use.
  • So Zeb unharnessed Jim, and several of the servants then led the horse around to the rear, where they selected a nice large apartment that he could have all to himself.
  • It will seem like being at home again, for I lived in that room for many, many years.
  • Zeb was also escorted to a room--so grand and beautiful that he almost feared to sit in the chairs or lie upon the bed, lest he might dim their splendor.
  • In the closets he discovered many fancy costumes of rich velvets and brocades, and one of the attendants told him to dress himself in any of the clothes that pleased him and to be prepared to dine with the Princess and Dorothy in an hour's time.
  • "What does that mean?" asked the Princess.
  • Throwing my voice into any object I pleased, to make it appear that the object was speaking instead of me.
  • I told them I was a Wizard, and showed them some easy tricks that amazed them; and when they saw the initials painted on the balloon they called me Oz.
  • After many adventures I reached Omaha, only to find that all my old friends were dead or had moved away.
  • "That is quite a history," said Ozma; "but there is a little more history about the Land of Oz that you do not seem to understand--perhaps for the reason that no one ever told it you.
  • "That is quite a history," said Ozma; "but there is a little more history about the Land of Oz that you do not seem to understand--perhaps for the reason that no one ever told it you.
  • That was why the people were so glad to see you, and why they thought from your initials that you were their rightful ruler.
  • That was why the people were so glad to see you, and why they thought from your initials that you were their rightful ruler.
  • "But, at that time," said the Wizard, thoughtfully, "there were two Good Witches and two Wicked Witches ruling in the land."
  • "And that is the safest kind of a Wizard to have," replied Ozma, promptly.
  • I'm very certain, Oz, that you gave me the best brains in the world, for I can think with them day and night, when all other brains are fast asleep.
  • But Ozma soon conquered her, with the help of Glinda the Good, and after that I went to live with Nick Chopper, the Tin Woodman.
  • But the little girl gave the angry kitten such a severe cuff that it jumped down again without daring to scratch.
  • Is that the way to treat my friends?
  • "Seems to me the same way," said Billina, scornfully, "if that beastly cat is one of them."
  • But it was never noticed that they became very warm friends, for all of that.
  • And now the Tin Woodman arrived, his body most beautifully nickle-plated, so that it shone splendidly in the brilliant light of the room.
  • "I'm glad to hear that," said the Wizard.
  • I was afraid it would get moldy in that tin body of yours.
  • Then they told him dinner would be served directly and he replied that they could not serve it too quickly to suit his convenience.
  • "Take that stuff away!" he commanded.
  • Is there nothing that is decent to eat in this palace?
  • "You are at least six feet high, and that is higher than any other animal in this country," said the Steward.
  • The Sawhorse stopped at the same time and stared at the other with its queer protruding eyes, which were mere knots in the log that formed its body.
  • "Is it possible that you are a Real Horse?" he murmured.
  • You do not know the relief of brushing away a fly that has bitten you, nor the delight of eating delicious food, nor the satisfaction of drawing a long breath of fresh, pure air.
  • Your chief fault, my friend, is in being made of wood, and that I suppose you cannot help.
  • "Princess Ozma did that," was the reply; "and it saves my legs from wearing out.
  • "That is doubtless a matter of taste," returned the Lion.
  • "I'm glad of that," said Jim; "for I, also, have a conscience, and it tells me not to crush in your skull with a blow of my powerful hoof."
  • I was then for a time the Head of the finest Flying Machine that was ever known to exist, and we did many wonderful things.
  • "That I have forgotten," replied the Gump's Head, "and I do not think it is of much importance.
  • After breakfast Ozma announced that she had ordered a holiday to be observed throughout the Emerald City, in honor of her visitors.
  • In the center was a large emerald-green star, and all over the four quarters were sewn spangles that glittered beautifully in the sunshine.
  • The boys wore long hair and striped sweaters and yelled their college yell every other step they took, to the great satisfaction of the populace, which was glad to have this evidence that their lungs were in good condition.
  • This act he repeated until all of the nine tiny piglets were visible, and they were so glad to get out of his pocket that they ran around in a very lively manner.
  • But although the Munchkin was hardly tall enough to come to Zeb's shoulder he was so strong and clever that he laid the boy three times on his back with apparent ease.
  • This made Zeb laugh, in turn, and the boy felt comforted to find that Ozma laughed as merrily at her weeping subject as she had at him.
  • "It isn't that," said the Sawhorse, modestly; "but I never tire, and you do."
  • "That is what we are trying to find out," remarked the Scarecrow.
  • The object of a race is to see who can win it--or at least that is what my excellent brains think.
  • The first one that passes the place where the Princess sits shall be named the winner.
  • "Never mind that," said the Sawhorse.
  • Its wooden legs moved so fast that their twinkling could scarcely be seen, and although so much smaller than the cab-horse it covered the ground much faster.
  • Jellia at once departed on the errand, and she was gone so long that they had almost forgotten her mission when the green robed maiden returned with a troubled face.
  • So the two went to the dressing-room of the Princess and searched carefully in every corner and among the vases and baskets and ornaments that stood about the pretty boudoir.
  • The fact is that I left my little pet in my dressing-room lying asleep upon the table; and you must have stolen in without my knowing it.
  • And the Woggle-Bug shall be the Public Accuser, because he is so learned that no one can deceive him.
  • He drew from his inside pocket one of the eight tiny piglets that were remaining and continued:
  • "What's that?" asked the Scarecrow.
  • And we know the thing is true, because since the time of that interview there is no piglet to be found anywhere.
  • But I remember that our great poet once said:
  • If he can produce but seven, then this is not the piglet that was lost, but another one.
  • "The piglet that belonged to the Princess wore an emerald collar," said Eureka, loudly enough for all to hear.
  • I will confess that I intended to eat the little pig for my breakfast; so I crept into the room where it was kept while the Princess was dressing and hid myself under a chair.
  • Instead of keeping still, so I could eat him comfortably, he trembled so with fear that he fell off the table into a big vase that was standing on the floor.
  • Then the crowd cheered lustily and Dorothy hugged the kitten in her arms and told her how delighted she was to know that she was innocent.
  • Eureka was much surprised to find herself in disgrace; but she was, in spite of the fact that she had not eaten the piglet.
  • "This is a fine country, and I like all the people that live in it," he told Dorothy.
  • That last evening was so delightful that the boy will never forget it as long as he lives.
  • That last evening was so delightful that the boy will never forget it as long as he lives.
  • "Do so, my child," said the Minister; "and I hope that when you grow up you will become a wise man and a great orator."
  • "You may choose any subject that you like best," said the teacher.
  • Some of them thought that "Home" was a good subject.
  • That is the way to write a composition.
  • "Well, I know what that is," he said to himself; and he wrote the word _turnip_ on his slate.
  • Many years after that, some funny little verses about Mr. Finney's turnip were printed in a newspaper.
  • Some people said that they were what Henry Longfellow wrote on his slate that day at school.
  • On the day that he was seven years old, his mother gave him a few pennies.
  • It was the first money that he had ever had.
  • Boston is now a great city, but at that time it was only a little town.
  • "I wish I had that whistle," he said.
  • Benjamin Franklin lived to be a very old man, but he never forgot that lesson.
  • His life was such that no man could ever say, "Ben Franklin has wronged me."
  • At last James Hogg said, "It's of no use; all we can do is to go home and tell the master that we have lost his whole flock."
  • The men hurried down and soon saw that the flock was a large one.
  • They counted them and were surprised to find that not one lamb of the great flock of seven hundred was missing.
  • But there was no shepherd in Scotland that could have done better than Sirrah did that night.
  • Long afterward James Hogg said, "I never felt so grateful to any creature below the sun as I did to Sirrah that morning."
  • By some means, however, he learned to read; and after that he loved nothing so much as a good book.
  • When he had finished, he bowed, and waited, hoping that he would be rewarded.
  • The caliph laughed outright, and so did every one that heard him.
  • The people of Egypt were very proud; for they believed that they were the first and oldest of all nations.
  • "It was in our country that the first men and women lived," they said.
  • Then he called his wisest men together and asked them, "Is it really true that the first people in the world were Egyptians?"
  • After that, whenever the children were hungry, they cried out, "Becos! becos! becos!" till the shepherd gave them something to eat.
  • Some time later, the shepherd went to the city and told the king that the children had learned to speak one word, but how or from whom, he did not know.
  • "What is that word?" asked the king.
  • May each evening see that all thy wishes have been performed.
  • He was ready to serve his country in any way that he could.
  • Some of the king's soldiers are going to Concord to get the powder that is there.
  • "I will do all that I can," said his friend.
  • He was very proud to think of this, and he wished that he might grow up to be like them.
  • One day word came that a savage wolf had been seen in the forest.
  • Men said that it was a very large wolf and that it had killed some of the farmers' sheep.
  • "How I should like to meet that wolf," said little Gilbert.
  • Perhaps we may see that wolf among the trees.
  • His mother smiled, for she felt quite sure that there was no danger.
  • Gilbert looked up from his play and saw that his mother was very deeply interested in her book.
  • "This is just the place for that wolf," he thought.
  • It was only a pet calf that had come there to browse among the bushes.
  • Then he told her all that had happened.
  • You were very brave, and it is lucky that the wolf was not there.
  • His name is remembered in our country as that of a brave and noble man.
  • It's the same old wolf that has been skulking around here all winter.
  • They show that three toes have been lost from the left forefoot.
  • They say she has a family of young wolves up there; and that is why she kills so many lambs.
  • At last he saw something in the darkness that looked like two balls of fire.
  • He knew that these were the eyes of the wolf.
  • They feared that the wolf was upon him; but he wished only to get his gun.
  • She growled so loudly that the men and boys outside were frightened.
  • It was no fun to be pulled over the sharp stones in that way; but it was better than to be bitten by the wolf.
  • Putnam stayed in the cave so long that his friends began to be alarmed.
  • The king looked, and saw that his soldiers were beaten, and that the battle was everywhere going against him.
  • Now the landlord prided himself upon keeping a first-class hotel, and he feared that his guests would not like the rough-looking traveler.
  • I met him as he rode into town, and he said that he intended to stop at this hotel.
  • "That was Mr. Jefferson," said the gentleman.
  • Was that the vice president?
  • You were so bespattered with mud that I thought you were some old farmer.
  • "That fellow has no manners," she said.
  • "See here," said the Dean in a stern voice, "that is not the way to deliver a message here.
  • Just step inside and make believe that you are Dean Swift.
  • I will go out and make believe that I am bringing him a present.
  • "I'll agree to that," said the man; and he stepped inside.
  • The lesson in manners was not forgotten; for, always after that, the man was very polite when he brought his presents.
  • His older brothers were quite willing that he should go to sea.
  • They said that a bright boy like George would not long be a common sailor.
  • The little chest that held his clothing had been carried down to the bank.
  • He knew that she did not wish him to go.
  • As he came nearer he saw that the boy held a charred stick in his hand, with which he was drawing something on a flat rock.
  • The lad was so much interested in his work that he did not see the stranger.
  • It was the picture of a sheep, and it was drawn so well that the stranger was filled with astonishment.
  • "I should like to learn to do that--oh, ever so much!" he answered.
  • "I know that the lad can draw pictures wonderfully well," he said.
  • There was once a painter whose name was Zeuxis. He could paint pictures so life-like that they were mistaken for the real things which they represented.
  • At one time he painted the picture of some fruit which was so real that the birds flew down and pecked at it.
  • It was that of a boy carrying a basket of ripe red cherries.
  • Men have told me that there is no riddle so cunning that you can not solve it.
  • The wreaths were so nearly alike that none of those who were with the king could point out any difference.
  • "I have heard that you are the wisest man in the world," she said, "and surely this simple thing ought not to puzzle you."
  • He remembered that close by his window there was a climbing vine filled with beautiful sweet flowers.
  • He remembered that he had seen many bees flying among these flowers and gathering honey from them.
  • Indeed, there were few things that he loved more.
  • They thought that pictures might take one's mind away from things that were better or more useful.
  • So busy was he with the drawing that he did not think of anything else.
  • The good woman was so overjoyed that she caught him in her arms and kissed him.
  • Does thee suppose that it is very wrong for Benjamin to do such a thing?
  • He turned the picture this way and that, and looked at it from every side.
  • It may be that the hand of the Lord is in this.
  • It was then that the long war, called the Revolutionary War, began.
  • "Come with us," they said, "and we will teach you that the king's soldiers are not to be trifled with."
  • The slim, tall boy seemed to grow taller, as he answered, "I'll not be the servant of any Englishman that ever lived."
  • He soon learned all that his teacher could teach; for he was bright and quick, and had a good memory.
  • His father hoped that Daniel would grow up to be a wise and famous man.
  • So it was decided that the boy should go to some school where he might be prepared for college.
  • There were no railroads at that time, and Exeter was nearly fifty miles away.
  • "Who is going to ride that nag?" asked Daniel.
  • Yet there was something in his manner and voice that caused everybody to admire him.
  • The next one that whispers must come out and stand in the middle of the floor.
  • And so the fun went on until the clock showed that it lacked only ten minutes till school would be dismissed.
  • They knew that the master would be as good as his word.
  • Could it be possible that he would receive that thrashing?
  • Everybody loved her, and this was the first time she had whispered that day.
  • She was very much ashamed and hurt, for it was the first time that she had ever been in disgrace at school.
  • The other girls felt sorry that she should suffer for so small a fault.
  • Everybody was astonished, for that boy was the best scholar in the school, and he had never been known to break a rule.
  • One day when they were with their mother, she showed them a wonderful book that some rich friend had given her.
  • If you could only read, you might learn that story and enjoy it.
  • "And I would rather have a young hawk that has been trained to hunt" said Ethelbert.
  • "Mother," he said, "will you let me see that beautiful book again?"
  • And Alfred did grow up to become the wisest and noblest king that England ever had.
  • But after he had learned to read, she taught him to look in books for that which he wished to know.
  • Read books that are true.
  • Read about things that are beautiful and good.
  • No book is worth reading that does not make you better or wiser.
  • It is said that he could speak and write forty languages.
  • Cyrus was so tall and strong and handsome that his grandfather was very proud of him.
  • He therefore gave him many beautiful gifts and everything that could please a prince.
  • "Well," said he, "all these rich foods that were prepared for the feast are yours.
  • He thinks that he makes a fine figure when he waits on you.
  • He saw that Cyrus had a will of his own, and this pleased him very much.
  • For the other day, when you sat at dinner with your officers, I noticed that the wine made you act queerly.
  • You forgot that you were king.
  • I am afraid to drink anything that makes men act in that way.
  • He drinks to quench his thirst, and that is all.
  • He was a very wise and powerful ruler, and he made his country the greatest of any that was then known.
  • For in that country, people never wear shoes in the house, but take them off at the door.
  • It is the man who rose to go out, and two young princes contended for the honor of giving him his shoes but at last agreed that each should offer him one.
  • I hope that I shall never do anything to make them careless of their duties.
  • They did nothing that was beneath the dignity of princes.
  • When Otanes was twelve years old, his parents wished to send him to a distant city to study in a famous school that was there.
  • So it was arranged that the boy should travel with a small company of merchants who were going to the same place.
  • Love that which is beautiful.
  • Despise that which is base, said his mother.
  • "That is a good story" he said.
  • You can't make me believe that, said the robber; and he hurried away to rob one of the rich merchants.
  • Otanes answered, I have already told two of your men that I have forty pieces of gold in my hat.
  • No one would have thought that a child like you had gold about him.
  • He thought of the number of times that he himself had been a coward.
  • Mount your horse, and my own men will ride with you and see that you reach the end of your journey in safety.
  • He led the great king to his palace and begged that he would dine with him.
  • "It was not for gold that I came here," said Alexander.
  • The second man then spoke up and said, It is true that I sold him the ground, but I did not reserve anything he might find in it.
  • "And is that what you call justice?" asked the shah.
  • Then we may be sure that he will never trouble us again.
  • Some of the Greeks said that an eagle caught him in her beak and carried him unharmed to the bottom.
  • But that is not likely.
  • I think that he must have fallen upon some bushes and vines that grew in some parts of the chasm.
  • His army was the greatest that the Romans had ever seen.
  • They knew that they were helpless before so strong an enemy.
  • Agree to obey the laws that I shall make for you.
  • The two noble women were willing to do all that they could to save their city.
  • When they heard that Arion had a large sum of money with him they began to make plans to get it.
  • Then he sang a wonderful song, so sweet, so lively, so touching, that many of the sailors were moved to tears.
  • He has a mind to spend the rest of his life in that country.
  • They were so astonished that they fell upon their knees before the king and confessed their crime.
  • Old story-tellers say that he alighted on the back of a large fish, called a dolphin, which had been charmed by his music and was swimming near the ship.
  • Other people think that the dolphin which saved Arion was not a fish, but a ship named the _Dolphin_.
  • They say that Arion, being a good swimmer, kept himself afloat until this ship happened to pass by and rescued him from the waves.
  • You may believe the story that you like best.
  • The name of Arion is still remembered as that of a most wonderful musician.
  • At Christmas time he scattered crumbs of bread under the trees, so that the tiny creatures could feast and be happy.
  • They were so tame that they sat on the shoulders of St. Francis and ate from his hand.
  • Then, when they saw that he was about to speak, they nestled softly in the grass and listened.
  • They spread their wings and opened their mouths to show that they understood his words.
  • This answer pleased the rich man so well that he bought Aesop at once, and took him to his home on the island of Samos.
  • They saw that all these fables taught some great truth, and they wondered how Aesop could have thought of them.
  • His master was so much pleased with him that he gave him his freedom.
  • One day the Mice met to talk about the great harm that she was doing them.
  • It grew so dark that the people could not see their way along the streets.
  • "I move that we adjourn," said a third.
  • His voice was clear and strong, and all knew that he, at least, was not afraid.
  • But I am sure that it is my duty to stand at my post as long as I live.
  • So, let us go on with the work that is before us.
  • He had not gone farther than to the end of the innkeeper's field, when to his surprise he found that the road forked.
  • "We hope that he will get what he deserves," they said.
  • We shall put you ashore on the first island that we see.
  • So they filled a small boat with the things that he would need the most--an ax, a hoe, a kettle, and some other things.
  • He had written many stories which people at that time liked to read.
  • He soon found that his mother's words were true.
  • He swam to an island that was not far away.
  • At last a ship happened to pass that way and Robinson was taken on board.
  • The poor child was so tired after his night's work that he could not keep awake.
  • I thank you for it, and pray that God will bless you.
  • It is true that I have been asleep, but I know nothing about this money.
  • And people say that fortune comes to us in our sleep.
  • You may send the gold pieces to your mother with my compliments; and tell her that the king will take care of both her and you.
  • "Who is that one?" asked the king.
  • "That is Robert the Bruce," said the woman.
  • "That is not right," said the brave woman.
  • "That is my brother Edward's voice," said the king.
  • He looked more closely and saw that it was an ant.
  • As Tamerlane looked, he saw that there was a hole in the tree only a little way above, and that this was the home of the ant.
  • "Ah! that is just what I want," said the old man.
  • "I cannot do that," said the market man.
  • He had heard all that was said.
  • "Well, that is lucky," said the old man, smiling.
  • I happen to be going that way, and I will carry your turkey, if you will allow me.
  • "Who is that polite old gentleman who carried my turkey for me?" he asked of the market man.
  • That is John Marshall, Chief Justice of the United States.
  • He wished to teach you that no man should feel himself too fine to carry his own packages.
  • That is his way.
  • When they wanted to move the boat from one place to another they had to pole it; that is, they pushed against a long pole, the lower end of which reached the bottom of the stream.
  • "Yes, there is a better way, and that is by rowing," said Christopher.
  • His aunt laughed and said, "Well, I hope that you will succeed."
  • The rod was bent in the middle so that it could be turned as with a crank.
  • "Oh, I have thought of that," said Robert.
  • That night when Christopher went home he had a wonderful story to tell.
  • "I wonder why we didn't think of something like that long ago," said his father.
  • It looks easy enough, now that Bob has shown how it is done.
  • He kept on, planning and thinking and working, until at last he succeeded in making a boat with paddle wheels that could be run by steam.
  • The caliph was so well pleased with these jewels that he bought them and paid the merchant a large sum of money.
  • As the merchant was walking along, he came to a river that flowed gently between green and shady banks.
  • Very few people ever came that way.
  • But I have met with such bad luck that I am forced to sell them.
  • I pray that you will look at them and take them at your own price.
  • Al Mansour noticed that the merchant was very sad and downcast.
  • Find all the old men that live on the mountains or in the flat country around, and command them to appear before me one week from to-day.
  • Most of the old men answered that they did not know of any such person.
  • A few said that there was one man in their neighborhood who seemed to have had some sort of good luck.
  • A year ago he was so poor that he had scarcely clothes for his back.
  • He also ordered that the merchant should come at the same time.
  • "Good friend," he said, "if you should find something that we have lost, what would you do with it?"
  • The gardener put his hand under his cloak and drew out the very bag that the merchant had lost.
  • "Tell us," said Al Mansour to the gardener, "tell us how you came to find that bag."
  • I ran to pick it up and was surprised to find that it was a bag full of bright gold pieces.
  • So I took ten gold pieces from the many that were in the bag.
  • But, as I came to your palace this morning, I kept saying to myself, 'When our lord Al Mansour learns just how it was that I borrowed the gold, I have no doubt that in his kindness of heart he will forgive me the debt.'
  • "Take the bag and count the money that is in it," he said.
  • Saying this, he ordered that ten gold pieces be given to the merchant in place of those that were lacking.
  • It was so close to the sea that those who lived in it could hear the waves forever beating against the shore.
  • They drew up closer to the fire and felt thankful that they were safe from the raging storm.
  • Let us have a good old song that will help to keep us warm.
  • But when they looked, they saw that his seat was vacant.
  • He thought that a wonderful light was shining around him.
  • At first he was so bewildered that he could not answer.
  • It was for this reason that I left my fellows in the abbey kitchen and came here to be alone.
  • It must be written down so that people in other places and in other times may hear it read and sung.
  • It was the wish of his father and mother that every day of his life should be a day of perfect happiness.
  • He had never gone beyond the beautiful gardens that surrounded his father's palace.
  • Everything that was evil or disagreeable had been carefully kept out of his sight.
  • He knew only of those things that give joy and health and peace.
  • They told him that there were beautiful things at home--why go away to see other things less beautiful?
  • But when they saw that his mind was set on going, they said no more.
  • At first he did not see anything that disturbed him; for word had gone before him to remove from sight everything that might be displeasing or painful.
  • "Who is that man?" asked Gautama, "and why is his face so pinched and his hair so white?
  • "Why is that man lying there at this time of day?" asked the prince.
  • "What does that mean?" asked the prince.
  • "And is this the great, beautiful, happy world that I have been told about?" cried the prince.
  • I will spend all my life, and give all that I have, to lessen the distress and sorrow with which this world seems filled.
  • And to this day, millions of people remember and honor the name of Gautama, as that of the great lover of men.
  • Who is that child?
  • Then she saw that the child's face was very pale and that he neither opened his eyes nor moved.
  • That on the children's bed is best.
  • I thought of the big fire in the queen's kitchen, and knew that the cook would never allow a half-drowned child to be carried into that fine place.
  • "There is no hurry about that," said the child.
  • We must let her know that you are safe.
  • "Of course she will be glad to know that," said the boy; "but she has no time to bother about me to-night."
  • "That is my tutor," whispered the little stranger.
  • Now, you charcoal man, where is that child?
  • Not dressed in that way? said the cardinal.
  • He had just noticed that the king was wearing poor Charlot's Sunday suit instead of his own.
  • Towards evening he told his men to ride home by the main road while he went by another way that was somewhat longer.
  • "They say that King Henry always has a number of men with him," said the boy; "how shall I know which is he?"
  • "Oh, that will be easy enough," was the answer.
  • Do you mean that the one with his hat on will be the king?
  • The merchant felt sure that the fishermen were having a good haul.
  • "How much will you take for the fish that you are drawing in?" he asked.
  • "Well, I will give three pieces of silver for all that are in the net," answered the merchant.
  • But it held a beautiful golden tripod that was worth more than a thousand fishes.
  • You were to have all the fish that happened to be in the net and nothing else.
  • Give not the merchant nor the fishermen the prize; But give it to that one who is wisest of the wise.
  • He taught that men ought to be kind even to their enemies.
  • He taught, also, that a friend is the greatest blessing that any one can have.
  • "The oracle did not intend that I should have it," he said.
  • Give not the merchant nor the fishermen the prize; But give it to that one who is wisest of the wise.
  • "It is well," said he, "that neither a merchant nor a fisherman shall have it; for such men think only of their business and care really nothing for beauty."
  • "Educate the children," he said; and for that reason his name is remembered to this day.
  • They told him that it was not for sale, but that it was to be given to the wisest of the wise.
  • "Well, you will not find that man in Rhodes," said he.
  • When he heard that some men had come to Corinth with a very costly golden tripod, he had them brought before him.
  • "I have heard all about that tripod," he said, "and I know why you are carrying it from one place to another.
  • "We hope that you are the man," said the messengers.
  • They learned that Chilon was a very quiet man, that he never spoke about himself, and that he spent all his time in trying to make his country great and strong and happy.
  • Chilon was so busy that the messengers had to wait several days before they could see him.
  • The oracle at Delphi has ordered that it shall be given to the wisest of wise men, and for that reason we have brought it to you.
  • It is to him that you should have taken the tripod.
  • He was the chief ruler of that great city.
  • It is a simple premise and yet, at the same time, an article of faith—a faith that the future would be better than the past.
  • By the midpoint of the twentieth century, America's dreamers were preoccupied with the future—and not just any old future, but the great and glorious future that seemed inevitable.
  • The speech he gave in September 1962, announcing that goal, spent a good amount of time justifying the expense and explaining the urgency.
  • But nowhere in it was there even a hint that it might not be possible.
  • But I am making a simple statement that life is better now than it has ever been.
  • Why should we expect that to change?
  • If you have an unwavering commitment to an idea that all things will be good all the time, then that is irrational.
  • But what about a reasoned belief based on a balanced look at both history and current reality that leads you to be optimistic?
  • Obviously, that is rational.
  • And as I look to the past and the present, I see two phenomena that especially drive my optimism.
  • From that vantage point, if you had tried to look fifty years ahead to what the world would be like in the year 2500 BC, you would have expected very little change.
  • This book is about that future and what it is going to look like—how it will be a place glorious and spectacular beyond our wildest hopes.
  • But that is changing.
  • In the end, our fundamental challenge is to become better individuals, and technology offers little help on that front; it is up to each one of us to solve that for ourselves.
  • But the five phenomena I chose to tackle in this book are among the great blights on humanity that I believe the Internet and technology will help solve.
  • Could you have foreseen that the advent of a technology called "air conditioning" in homes would alter the social fabric of the nation?
  • That it would mean people would no longer know their neighbors?
  • And because of this, we would therefore lose the inevitable relationships that naturally formed?
  • That this democratization of information and opinion would lead to vigorous debate and encourage a young monk to question the church?
  • And that that same technology would allow his questions to be spread across Europe, thereby igniting the Protestant Reformation?
  • Bigger than TV and cars and anything that has come before it.
  • So isn't it just possible that it could end ignorance, disease, poverty, hunger, and war?
  • And wouldn't that be something?
  • The first error is to assert that history unfolds in a basically linear fashion, that there is a fundamental continuity between the past, present, and future.
  • A wild-eyed, crazed techno-optimist of the nineteenth century concluded that in fifty years there would be a telephone in every town in America.
  • I include them to point out that history is discontinuous.
  • The second methodology error that futurists often commit is the exact opposite of the first.
  • Or astounding technological breakthroughs that have no precedent in reality.
  • A third way to predict the future that I believe is reliable rejects both the slavish following of the straight line and the purely speculative approach.
  • It seemed as if no one saw that coming because, frankly, no one could conceive of it happening.
  • History is full of radical breaks with the past that only seem to have come out of nowhere but were, in fact, predictable.
  • You would have said that was crazy.
  • And yet, that happened.
  • I don't use history to predict the future, like some talisman that lets me pick winning lottery numbers (don't I wish).
  • However, I often have thought that a second sentence should follow: "Also, those who do know history are doomed to repeat it."
  • Why is it that history repeats itself?
  • At the very least, history can clearly show the range of outcomes that are likely.
  • I submit that the Internet is not defined in that way because it is a technology without an implicit purpose.
  • Sometimes the new technology so overwhelms the old that when looking back, we explain the old technology in terms of the new.
  • And I think that helps explain why no one quite foresaw the rise of the Internet: because it doesn't have an offline corollary of its own.
  • The essence of my car is that it takes me places I want to go.
  • We are at the point, finally, where we are seeing uses of the Internet that have no offline corollary.
  • Nothing exists that even remotely looks like Twitter before the Internet.
  • The mark of these technologies is that they are greeted with universal skepticism at first.
  • That is because they seem so far out of the daily experience of most people that they cannot conceive of how or why they would use them.
  • That is because they seem so far out of the daily experience of most people that they cannot conceive of how or why they would use them.
  • When you hear about a new company and your response is, "Why in the world would anyone want to do that?" it will be because there is no offline corollary.
  • And that leads us to a critical question: Who decides what we will make the Internet do?
  • When it comes to starting a new business, nothing that previously existed can rival the Internet in terms of both ease of entry and breadth of potential.
  • That is the basic unit—me.
  • What if the basic unit was a couple, a relationship, and what if that relationship had an identity?
  • She creates premium services on her site that cost just $9.95 a year that include a number of additional features and virtual goods.
  • Today, success still requires good execution, but the larger question is: "Can you discover and fulfill a hitherto-unknown, latent desire in people that the Internet enables?"
  • In just eighteen months from now, we will have duplicated that again and effectively doubled our computation power.
  • We often see other technologies race toward a point and then stop growing along that axis.
  • Could we make a car that can go 300 mph?
  • Sure, but we don't need that from the technology.
  • And what seems clear is that, sooner or later, we will get there.
  • But that movement was, by its nature, backward looking.
  • There must be several times that by now.
  • More than that in Facebook status updates every day.
  • It was not at all clear at the time that his work would transcend the ages.
  • In fact, it's likelier that kids of that day were forbidden by proper parents from hanging out at the Globe Theater.
  • I can't tell you which clips will be watched in a century, but I'm certain that some will be.
  • Actually, I could make guesses, but they might well be spectacularly wrong and a guy doesn't want that haunting him ten years from now.
  • But the truth is that almost all furniture back in the day was cheaply made junk and only a very few high-quality pieces survived.
  • We are suitably impressed that Da Vinci sketched a design for a submarine and a flying machine.
  • Today, that is vastly more true and widespread.
  • These few were given the tools to achieve their maximum potential, to live that dream.
  • Now a billion or more can achieve that dream, and I foresee a time not far off when everyone on the planet can.
  • But all that is about to change.
  • Imagine a world where everyone on the planet has access to this expanded canvas of human expression that technology has created.
  • That movement helped a former lieutenant named Adolf Hitler come to power.
  • Maybe it was inevitable at that point that some spark would set off the powder keg of Europe.
  • It would not be the first time, or the last, that ignorance in the world exacted a high price.
  • And Croesus was so amazed that he endowed the Oracle at Delphi with all kinds of gifts and planned to run all-important questions by this oracle.
  • Scholars today are pretty sure that in the case of Delphi, the oracle was inadvertently breathing gases that rose from the cave in which she sat.
  • It is wisdom that King Solomon asked God for, not intelligence.
  • Wise machines are dramatically more valuable than machines that just store and retrieve information.
  • We will finally be able to build an oracle, and we will use that tool, that collection of life experiences, to optimize our own lives.
  • But even if I had a robot that knew everything, I couldn't really say, "Tell me every custom they have here" and be fully informed.
  • But even that is not enough.
  • "If only I had known," we often lament, in the widespread belief that to know everything would mean we would never make mistakes.
  • And I think that is what the Internet will deliver.
  • To avoid privacy issues at this point, let's stipulate that everything is recorded only for your future reference.
  • Imagine that every word you said was recorded by your personal recorder and automatically transcribed.
  • Then imagine GPS is layered in—very accurate GPS that tracks your every move, even in your own home.
  • Not just that you went to a certain address but that the address was a movie theater and—based on where you sat and that you ordered tickets online—you saw Episode VII of Star Wars.
  • Everything you saw, that your eyeballs tracked to, how long you looked at it—and not just everything you ever looked at, but your physiological response.
  • Now my expectations have changed so much that I'm annoyed everything isn't already connected to the Internet.
  • Remember the notion that the Internet wouldn't turn out to be only for one purpose—that while my car is clearly for taking me places, the Internet won't be for doing one single task, but many?
  • That said, if I had to pick one function I think the Internet will turn out to "be," it is this: The Internet will become a repository and a set of applications for storing the sum total of all life experiences of all people on earth.
  • Before we take that further, let's consider something the Internet has taught us about ourselves.
  • Well, that tells us something new about ourselves—in fact, a lot of things: the kinds of information we want to share, the kinds of information we want to consume, and the immediacy with which we want it all to occur.
  • The Internet is full of sites that offer good to humanity and yield no profit for the people working on them.
  • People who take time out of their schedule to do something that helps just one person.
  • Given that, I consider it highly likely that people will share their Digital Echo.
  • We are talking about a setting to your Digital Echo file that says, "Information that isn't tied to me personally can be contributed to pools of rolled-up data."
  • You probably have a device, such as a smart phone, that has an Internet connection and a GPS.
  • That device can track where you are at any time.
  • People will only contribute to the extent that their most personal information is protected.
  • Even today, the scientific method involves experimentation that almost always necessitates some amount of data collection.
  • Remember Eric Schmidt's statement that more information is created every two days than in all of human history prior to 2003?
  • We will be completely insulated from the collecting and researching of data so that we can focus entirely on turning data into knowledge.
  • It is an answer engine, but one that attempts to answer questions that have never before been asked.
  • It is a safe bet that no one has ever asked that question before, and yet this system is designed to answer it.
  • You could start looking around for lines that connect things we didn't previously think were connected.
  • Or that a certain group of people who do a seemingly unrelated set of a dozen activities report levels of happiness higher than average?
  • To make my case that machines will bring about the end of ignorance, I begin with a company I admire: Amazon.com, the world's largest online retailer.
  • Additionally, right below that is a section called, "What Do Customers Ultimately Buy After Viewing This Item?"
  • Over time, Amazon has achieved such scale and thus has collected so much data that their suggestions are really useful.
  • The salesperson offers, "I find that my customers who buy this suit almost always get wingtips."
  • So the salesperson says, "If you like that suit, then come over here and try this one from Ralph Lauren."
  • That said, the suggestions of the twenty-five-year sales veteran wouldn't stand a chance against Amazon.
  • Two hundred years later, William Rutherford thought he had calculated it to 208 digits but only got the first 152 correct, so we will give him credit that far.
  • So now that the task of remembering past purchases and using that information to suggest future purchases is completely transitioned to machines, it operates on a whole different scale.
  • Four things will then happen that will make the suggestion engine get vastly better over time:
  • Once that is achieved, the sort of event that will happen is: You will be online to order, say, a replacement water filter, and the suggestion engine will propose that along with the filter, you might like to buy ... a pogo stick.
  • You will find that you probably really did want a pogo stick.
  • They might balk at getting on an airline flight flown by a computer and prefer having a pilot on board to take over if he "feels in his gut" that something is wrong (even if that feeling is the airport burrito he had for lunch).
  • That is what we humans do.
  • And that is why, if we are to use the Internet and technology to end ignorance, we still need people like Jim Haynes.
  • These guidebooks are lists of people who live in that area who would be willing to meet you for coffee.
  • To him that is what seeing the world is about.
  • Remember your Digital Echo file, that record of everything you do and say?
  • We all have had that turn out poorly!
  • And not just where do they go, but where is it that people drive the farthest to get to?
  • The system has data from all their GPS records and infers that to drive across town several times for a place is a stronger vote than eating at the corner restaurant.
  • This system will look at all the Italian restaurants around the country that you already like and look at all the ingredients they order online and look for restaurants in San Francisco using the same set of ingredients.
  • It will look at all this and a million other factors that would seem to be unrelated.
  • What's more, the algorithms used to make that recommendation are self-learning and will improve their suggestions over time.
  • Over time, we will feel that kind of confidence in this kind of system.
  • You may be thinking that choosing the right place to eat Italian food doesn't constitute wisdom in a King Solomon kind of way.
  • But I contend that only matters of degree separate it from the weightier matters we conventionally associate with wisdom.
  • "Where should I go to college?" is a much bigger choice that people face.
  • What have the professors at that college ordered online that you have ordered as well?
  • How many people similar to you went to that college and are now on antidepressants?
  • We cannot deal with equations that big—but a computer will solve for that in a minute if it has enough data.
  • That brings us back to the need to share data—and to our online example with Amazon, and our offline example with our salesperson.
  • When the salesperson rings up your purchase, no one tells him he had better forget what shoes he sold you with that suit and not to use that information to advise any future clients.
  • And no one is concerned or even notices much, because your association with that data is so removed from you.
  • This gives me confidence that, in the wisdom-seeking systems of the future, people will be willing to share data to make the algorithms better.
  • These will be waters to navigate carefully, in order to make sure that the right to privacy, a cornerstone of a free society, is not destroyed.
  • But that has nothing to do with the anonymous sharing of data.
  • What will change is the amount of data that will be recorded, the speed of the processors, and the cost of storage and computation.
  • The idea was that it would be great to make machines that behaved like us and, through that, we could harness their abilities.
  • As we move toward that future, it is a great tragedy that the experiences of all the people of the past are lost to us.
  • We never will have the opportunity to learn from the details of their lives and the trillions upon trillions of trial-and-error learning that humankind has repeated again and again.
  • The amount of data stored is so vast that even if we put a number on it, it would be beyond our comprehension.
  • To that definition, I would respectfully offer this qualification: I would say that disease has a well-defined center and very fuzzy edges.
  • Some people's bodies break in ways that we don't understand.
  • We know for certain that these feats, and hundreds more like them, are true.
  • As we move out from that defined center, we come to disorders and disabilities—impairments of bodily systems that are brought about by injury, disease, or genetics.
  • Next would come all the various syndromes, which are sets of clinically recognizable symptoms that occur together without a known cause.
  • Can that be prevented?
  • So where does that leave us in our quest to end disease?
  • What would that look like?
  • All genetic conditions that one would reasonably wish to alter would also be altered.
  • I do not know and certainly don't want to try to prove to you that the future will be like that.
  • By the end of disease, we accomplish all that the preceding paragraphs describe—the full spectrum of human ailments, vanquished from the globe.
  • What a future that will be!
  • Today, it is hard for us to imagine what that time was like.
  • What an accomplishment that is!
  • Wars in that same period—the most destructive wars in all of history—took a fraction of that number.
  • Next, imagine that happening every week for one hundred years.
  • That is the dreadful history of the final, and deadliest, century of smallpox.
  • Around 430 BC, Athens, embroiled in the Second Peloponnesian War, endured three years of epidemics that wiped out a third of its inhabitants.
  • The second was that the disease clearly passed from person to person, though by what mechanism was not clear.
  • Jenner reasoned that the pox contracted by dairymaids could be used to impart immunity to others.
  • If the conditions weren't sterile—a word that was not even comprehended at the time—the inoculation didn't work, or worse, introduced a new disease.
  • Well, the diseases that human beings focus on are the ones considered most unbearable.
  • We are most horrified by that which strikes closest to us and reminds us of our own mortality.
  • I think that is the case with polio and smallpox, which means they weren't eliminated because they were easy, but because they were awful.
  • Third: It is always the case that diseases are eliminated first in the healthy, well-developed, rich countries, then gradually around the world.
  • The factors that enable us to solve for and eliminate disease are getting better all the time, like wind at our back, pushing us forward.
  • Read on to see how that momentum has built over time, and continues to build.
  • And then we come to Greece, the home of Hippocrates, the "Father of Modern Medicine," who left us not just the oath that bears his name but also a corpus of roughly sixty medical texts based on his teaching.
  • (The use of such practices continued into the scientific age: While Jenner was inoculating people with his new smallpox vaccine, doctors were draining half a gallon of blood from George Washington for his sore throat, a procedure that hastened his death.
  • In 1628, the first complete explanation that blood flows through the body in arteries was published.
  • From that point, medicine would never be the same.
  • In 1747, it was discovered that lemons prevent scurvy.
  • At the same time in Germany, Robert Koch identified the bacteria that caused tuberculosis and the one that caused cholera.
  • Two years later, an anthrax vaccine; the year after that, a rabies vaccine.
  • After that, more in five years than those twenty.
  • Some years ago, a few people taking Wellbutrin reported that their cravings for cigarettes diminished.
  • I think it is likely that the answers to almost all our medical problems could be found in the data we may already be collecting.
  • Now, you don't know if the radishes make the people get better or if something that makes people crave radishes also beats back skin cancer.
  • Then we see that only people in certain parts of the country are getting better.
  • Why would that be the case?
  • The computers would then see that most people who got better bought their radishes in stores stocked from certain farms.
  • And not just certain farms, but farms that used a certain pesticide.
  • Not just a certain pesticide, but pesticides that contained a certain chemical.
  • The same happenchance brought us the learning that children in schools with fluorescent lights get fewer cavities than those in schools with incandescent lighting.
  • Our brains weren't designed for that, which is completely fine—that's why we build computers.
  • It is not to our discredit that machines can perform calculations so wondrously fast; rather it is to our credit that we conceived of and built such machines.
  • So you make sure that if your population of redheads had a million people with a certain distribution of age, the distribution in your non-redhead sample is exactly the same.
  • The computer reveals that redheads go to the ER more often and break bones more often.
  • That sends you down another line of thought.
  • And of the redheads themselves, are there factors among the clumsy ones that are different than the coordinated ones?
  • Is it actually that blue-eyed redheads have the same number of accidents as non-redheads, but brown-eyed redheads are even more clumsy, accident prone, and traffic hazards?
  • Or is it something about them that predates their Oscar triumph and helped them win?
  • It is said that tall people live shorter lives than short people.
  • What is it about them and their lives that made them live so long or so well?
  • Some have suggested that doing crossword puzzles helps keep the mind active.
  • In the future, we'll not only know if that is so, but why: Perhaps mental agility is a result of their extensive exposure to a chemical in pencil lead and newsprint that they got by doing all those puzzles.
  • Or maybe smart old people just direct that energy to crosswords and it is not the crosswords doing the job at all ...
  • Then that person might choose to publish those results and others could verify them.
  • Essentially, we will be able to run as many controlled experiments as we can imagine instantly and for no cost—and that will revolutionize medicine.
  • You won't be able to identify the other people; you will simply see that 1600 other people seem to have this same corn dog issue.
  • How would we ever know that today?
  • That issue alone could fill an entire chapter.
  • In 1902, an American named Walter Sutton noticed that chromosomes duplicated themselves before cells divided so that each new cell had a full copy of the chromosomes.
  • Then in the 1940s, another American, Oswald Avery, was able to show, through an ingenious method, that the genetic information had to be carried by the DNA.
  • In 1953, James Watson and Francis Crick announced to the scientific world that they had solved the puzzle.
  • Stop and consider that for a moment.
  • That three-billion-letter recipe for making you is what was sequenced—deciphered and written down—in the human genome project.
  • That is what we mean by "decoding."
  • That difference gives me brown eyes and you blue eyes.
  • Some chunks of your DNA do nothing useful (that we know of yet), but other chunks we call genes.
  • While we have deciphered the genome in that we have written it all down, we aren't at all sure which parts do what, as noted before.
  • We hear of treatments that work some percent of the time or we hear phrases like, "They are not responding to treatment."
  • My guess is that such people have some genetic factor protecting them against the adverse effects of bacon.
  • But my guess is that we will be able to do this and even make existing "good" genes perform better.
  • They have sequenced the cacao tree, the mosquito, coral, the Tasmanian devil, the bald eagle, the leafcutter ant, a germ that attacks wheat plants, and the extinct woolly mammoth.
  • Understanding the recipes that make our pathogenic enemies is a huge advantage.
  • It boggles the mind, especially when you consider that this science is in its infancy.
  • We will discuss the molecular machines called nanites—tiny, molecular-sized robots that will swim around in your body fighting disease, repairing damage, and alerting you to problems (and will likely dramatically increase the human lifespan).
  • And yet, in that world, scientific breakthroughs happened.
  • It is said that in ancient China, doctors were paid when their patients were well.
  • In fact, if you stayed sick long enough in that culture, the doctor had to pay you!
  • Others contend, and feel they have science to support, that humans can live beyond five hundred.
  • Biomedical gerontologist Aubrey de Grey maintains that aging is caused by seven underlying factors, each of which can, in theory, be countered.
  • He predicts that within twenty years, the first person to live to one thousand will be born.
  • In any event, this much is certain: We will see medical advances in the future that seem impossible today.
  • If you take low-worth items or raw materials and apply labor to them to make something that has value, you have created wealth.
  • And it really is composed of two separate components that need to be understood in their own right.
  • How can it be said that trade actually generates wealth?
  • The first is that we all value things differently, such as in our jelly bean example.
  • This is a good thing because it means that high degrees of utility (the economists' word for "happiness") can be achieved with a wide variety of goods.
  • That means that as you get more of them, you value each new one less.
  • That means that as you get more of them, you value each new one less.
  • It is safe to say that the man with seventeen puppies is creating more happiness by giving one each to sixteen friends than he is forgoing by his loss of puppies.
  • That is why money was invented.
  • It means I can trade you a good or service for an intermediate store of value known as money, and then trade that money to the person who actually has the goods I want.
  • Governments (and thieves, for that matter) reallocate wealth—but they do it by increasing the wealth of one party at the expense of another party.
  • Everyone wins in trade, because goods are reallocated in a way that increases utility to all parties involved.
  • To the extent that the Internet is able to increase trade, it increases utility.
  • Consider just a few of the mechanisms by which the Internet promotes trade that otherwise would not have occurred.
  • The ability to instantly and, for a very low cost, reliably transfer money to anyone on the planet is a key ingredient in increasing the amount of trade that occurs online.
  • I am fascinated by credit cards and the fact that the entire free enterprise system relies on the honesty of almost all people.
  • If I get my credit card bill and call up and dispute a charge, the benefit of the doubt is given to me, that I am telling the truth.
  • They offer millions of products at good prices, delivered tomorrow if that is what I want.
  • They allow for easy return of merchandise that doesn't meet my expectations, decreasing my fear of making a bad purchasing decision.
  • This works toward maximizing the utility that item can bring to someone. eBay is not alone in this regard.
  • Often, a buying decision hinges on a piece of arcane information about a product that is difficult to locate.
  • To the extent that I get accurate information from other consumers of the product, I will tend to make better choices.
  • Imagine that you personally had to create everything you wanted to use.
  • When a person learns to do one job and specializes in that one job, she gets really good at it.
  • Smith says that if one man tried to make pins by himself, he might make one per day.
  • And in this efficiency that is generated by specialization, wealth is created.
  • It doesn't matter that the person selling pencils doesn't know how the pencil is made; he only needs to know how to sell them.
  • And it doesn't matter that the person who paints the pencils doesn't know how the paint is made, for his job is to paint them.
  • For the foreseeable future, technological advance will drive the world of wealth creation—and it is capable of producing more wealth than everything that has come before it.
  • There is an optimal distribution that can be achieved.
  • Given perfect information, frictionless markets, and other theoretical impossibilities, a finite amount of utility can be achieved in that way.
  • Technological advance, however, is not limited in that way.
  • Once someone knows how to make a factory that can produce 48,000 pins a day with ten people, someone else can figure out how to make one that makes 100,000 a day with five people.
  • We won't talk at this point about the distribution of that wealth; that will come later.
  • And the mechanisms that will bring that about are also the ones that will end poverty forever.
  • You could power generators that could light up a stadium.
  • The point is that the cost of making almost everything is mostly energy and intellect, not raw materials.
  • But what if that energy cost fell to zero?
  • The earth has an enormous molten core that contains vast amounts of energy.
  • That is serious money!
  • An energy crop could be a permanent forest of trees that convert sunlight to liquid fuel and deliver the fuel directly through their roots to a network of underground pipelines.
  • If these two advances could be combined, we would have a supply of solar energy that was cheap, abundant, and environmentally benign.
  • A genetically engineered tree that converts sunlight into fuel and then pumps the fuel through its roots to where it is needed.
  • That was indeed the hope for atomic energy in that era, and it did not pan out.
  • That was indeed the hope for atomic energy in that era, and it did not pan out.
  • That is what we expect to be able to do, because it is theoretically possible in a hundred different ways.
  • I don't mean that in a motivational poster kind of way but in a literal sense: Failures (and what we learn from them) will help build the energy solutions for our future.
  • And in that future, I believe the world can have—in fact, will have—plentiful, free, clean energy that will result in dramatically lower costs for everything, everywhere.
  • Was it some kind of rhetorical flourish, just words that sounded good?
  • I doubted that, as Feynman was precise in his usage of words.
  • He had died by the time I read that passage in one of his books, so I couldn't write him, as is my normal practice when an author's words puzzle me.
  • Here is what I think he meant: If you could see a theoretical possibility for something in physics—"something that might be true"—then given enough time, you eventually could achieve it in reality.
  • And like our example with energy, technology and human innovation could make other things that are now scarce—or that we think of now as scarce—not so at all.
  • That amount, if melted, would form a cube fifty-five feet on each side.
  • And beyond that, billions more ounces of gold may be buried beneath the ocean floor.
  • We compute the maximum amount of food the world can produce by beginning with total acres of land considered arable, but that is based on assumptions about the future of technology and agriculture.
  • But that, too, is a function of present technology.
  • First, many things in the physical world that we think of as scarce are not really scarce, just presently beyond our ability to capture.
  • So they threw their sabots, a kind of clog shoe, into the machinery to break it—an act that gave us the word sabotage.
  • He explained to me that with a lawnmower, one person would be able to do the job and eleven men would be unemployed.
  • (I answered, "They should get jobs at the factory that would make the lawnmowers; it would pay better.") Personal computers and the Internet have come under criticism in this regard.
  • As we envision a world where machines do more and more work that people used to do, our minds naturally turn to those who would be displaced by technological advance.
  • Technological advances that displace human workers are similar in effect to two other concepts with which we are very familiar in the modern age: outsourcing and free trade.
  • Consider a factory that makes widgets for a dollar each.
  • It is tempting to say that but entirely wrong.
  • That is completely real.
  • But Chad merely stopped selling his labor to the employer for that price.
  • You might argue that since there is now a surplus of labor in Chad's neighborhood, the price of labor is lowered and Chad will only find work paying $9.75 an hour.
  • But that is not what will happen.
  • If the company pollutes, it should bear the cost of that pollution.
  • If workers are in unsafe work environments, they are bearing a risk that has a measurable negative cost.
  • We have established that outsourcing, free trade, and technological advance all have the same effect on the system: They lower prices and increase net wealth.
  • The minimum is either set by a minimum wage law or determined by the demand and supply of that labor.
  • They form a union and get laws passed that no burgers can be flipped except by a union member.
  • Who do you think makes more money: the person who hauls bricks on his back or the person who operates the forklift that moves the bricks?
  • Any task that could be done a machine is, by definition, dehumanizing to a human being.
  • If you like having sore muscles at the end of a day or working a job that requires little of your mental capacity so you can contemplate Nietzsche, hey, more power to you.
  • If every job that could be done by a machine was done by a machine tomorrow, the standard of living of virtually everyone on the planet would rise.
  • And that brings me to my final italicized point: The most underutilized resource in the universe is human potential.
  • Have I convinced you that replacing people with machines frees people from the bondage of doing machine work?
  • Everyone has to believe there are rules and that they apply to everyone.
  • If this is not the case, people will not trade their labor for things that can easily or capriciously be taken away. 3.
  • Although nations create governments to establish such protections, history shows that all too often, governments fail to do so.
  • The fact that an unprecedented number of earth's inhabitants today live in poverty is an indictment of governments, not a reflection of some underlying natural limit.
  • The prosperity of some does not require that others be poor.
  • People simply cannot move that fast.
  • All the jobs that can, in theory, be done by machines—the jobs that I think suck the life force out of people—will in fact be done by machines.
  • To that extent, the contraption that automatically metes out the daily allotment of cat food for your pet is a robot.
  • We have fallen into the habit of anthropomorphizing computers and robots for a simple reason: The more we program them to do things that we presently do, the more we think of them as being like us.
  • People play chess, so that object playing the Grand Master must be a person.
  • Your natural expectation would be that they would talk, at least as well as Scooby does.
  • It is altogether possible that many people would want to have conversations with their dogs mainly because they regard their dogs as sentient.
  • I might enjoy that kind of banter with a real person I will never meet, talking to me from a distant state.
  • They still have the hand-operated machine from the 1940s that was used to make the first Legos, but it is of course now a museum piece.
  • In the future, we will paint surfaces with substances full of nanites that will absorb sunlight and turn it into electricity, transforming any object we paint into a clean energy creator.
  • Plus, they will be able to convert heat to electricity as well, so anything that heats up will become an energy source.
  • Nanotechnology will give us metals that don't bend, or bend and yet remember their original shape.
  • Paints that warn of overheating.
  • Medical surfaces that detect pathogens.
  • Windows that can't be broken and can switch from opaque to clear.
  • Coatings that keep wood buildings from burning.
  • Smart creams that let your skin absorb an optimal amount of sunlight.
  • Frictionless coatings that never wear out in machines that last for centuries.
  • Or how about nanites that process each piece of trash in our garbage and turn it into something useful?
  • Or nanites that clean up any toxic chemicals they find and turn them into harmless agents?
  • But more than that, nanotechnology will create new opportunities that we cannot now see.
  • If we obtained this ten-thousand-fold increase simply by allowing specialization and dividing work up among people, then what astronomical gains will we achieve by outsourcing that work to robots capable of working with unimaginable precision at unimaginable speed?
  • Let that sink in: By dividing work up among people so they could specialize, we went from bows and arrows to Apollo moon missions.
  • And that was almost half a century ago!
  • Robots can manipulate matter smaller than we can even see, and robots can effortlessly manipulate objects that weigh many tons.
  • The report also cited a mid-1950s report that found 85 percent of economic growth was attributed to technological change in the period 1890 to 1950.
  • Taken together, those findings suggest that almost all economic growth in the last 120-plus years was from technology.
  • The memory for that computer cost me $40 per MB, just under $200.
  • Fifteen years after that, I got the computer on which I currently am typing.
  • That would be like the price of a Mercedes falling from $50,000 to a nickel.
  • I remember that in 1993 I needed a big hard drive at work and got a 1GB drive.
  • Everyone knows that has been happening for computer stuff.
  • But that won't happen with the Mercedes.
  • If the labor to build the Mercedes becomes completely robotic and computerized, then why won't we see that same increase in efficiency?
  • One would argue that energy costs will remain high.
  • That could be true, but I don't think so, for reasons laid out in the chapter on scarcity.
  • I think no matter what, energy costs will fall dramatically in the future, probably to near zero, because the economic incentives to unlock that technical puzzle are so overwhelming.
  • The second would be to argue that the cost of materials to build the Mercedes won't fall by a thousandfold.
  • Finally, you might argue that fees paid as royalties to the owners of the intellectual property needed to build the Mercedes for $50 will not fall by a thousandfold.
  • I know that sounds preposterous—but only based on our assumptions that the future will be like the past.
  • (If you can reserve judgment on that statement, I'll explain my reasoning in the book's next section.)
  • Imagine when a five-cent computer in your shoe warns you that the way you are walking will lead to spine problems.
  • Buying that pan increases your wealth by $20.
  • This pan's nanite coating means to clean it, you just wipe it with a nanite rag that doesn't stain.
  • How much would you pay for that pan today?
  • But surely a pan that warns you if your house is burning down or your food will kill you has to be worth $200 to you.
  • Houses will be built by robots using materials not yet invented that are cheaper and more energy efficient.
  • Housing is a huge industry that will reward innovative products.
  • It will have windows that cannot be broken and doors that cannot be forced.
  • About clothes, and how robots will weave garments that never wear out from materials not yet invented that will cost very little.
  • Anything that requires the unamplified direct labor of a person won't either, such as a personal trainer, a babysitter, or a masseuse.
  • Think of the shape of that curve and project it into the future.
  • That brings us back to the thousandfold increase in wealth, which the world will soon experience.
  • But I expect that technology and free enterprise will take us across a threshold where things formerly regarded as scarce will not be so any more.
  • My guess of the thousandfold increase in wealth is just that, a guess.
  • That means your $40,000 salary will have the purchasing power of a $4,000,000 salary today.
  • That can best be understood by studying wealth and poverty in history.
  • If you have almost no productivity, amplifying it won't really help all that much.
  • An exception worth noting is that the poor who get better products at cheaper prices will see their wealth rise accordingly.
  • A poor person with a six-year-old car today has more wealth than a poor person with a six-year-old car did back in 1911, for the simple reason that cars are so much better now.
  • Given that inequalities in income are likely to grow, how I can I contend that we will see an end of poverty?
  • Let's address that by looking at two phenomena: the changing definitions of poverty over time, and the effect of a large gap between the incomes of the rich and poor.
  • My relative definition of poverty is "the state of being unable to reliably purchase a bundle of goods that allow one to participate in the economic norms of one's society."
  • Think about that: Poverty in the United States is defined as higher than the average income of the planet.
  • By the government's calculation, about 40 percent of India's population, or half a billion people, are below that level.
  • This speaks to the fabulous wealth of this country and how our expectation of material possessions has risen so fast that we have redefined poverty to include what once were deemed luxury items.
  • Governments respond to that inflation by freezing prices.
  • When that happens, refusal to accept the currency is swiftly outlawed and punished harshly.
  • At that point, people flee the land looking for a better deal.
  • A second method of radical redistribution is to increase marginal tax rates to a point that is confiscatory.
  • That meant for every pound someone made, he owed more than a pound in taxes.
  • Sometimes countries simply nationalize industries, so that an enterprise once owned by a private company, often a foreign-based one, is taken over by the government or "the people."
  • Expropriation is an act that simultaneously violates two of the three ingredients for prosperity that I have enumerated: private property and rule of law.
  • Economically, that hasn't turned out as well as they had hoped.
  • Nationalization and expropriation are wealth-extraction methods that typically only work once.
  • One way that society keeps a lid on the powder keg of tension between the rich and poor is through the welfare state.
  • Although the poor may not believe that wealth is attainable for them, they do not want to rock the boat and risk disrupting the system that guarantees them at least some income.
  • We have surmised the future widening of the gap between the rich and poor, and looked at how that has played out in history.
  • We have looked at factors that increase animosity between the rich and poor and situations in which they can live harmoniously.
  • If governments are created to protect the life, liberty, and property of their citizenry, what all does that entail?
  • Nations can do this by acquiring enough military might that an attempted land grab would cost their neighbors more than they would get if successful.
  • People broadly agree that government should do at least this much.
  • Didn't Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of Independence, believe the Constitution should be rewritten every twenty years so that no one was governed by a document they had no say in creating?
  • That is all the government needs to tax to bring in the $300 per person per year.
  • It is safe to say that more than a majority of people in rich nations feel this way.
  • It seems that as national income rises, people choose to create larger governments that offer more entitlements and have more expansive powers.
  • It is a tale that history repeats with surprising consistency.
  • It seems that we can afford to spend more on government as income rises.
  • Like a TV star that doesn't scale back his expenses after his show is cancelled, these benefits expand, not contract, during periods of economic decline, for two main reasons.
  • Or, at least you have that purchasing power.
  • That is something like what I expect will happen, but on a worldwide scale.
  • Let's think about that for a moment.
  • We understand that you can, in theory, save and save and save and then live off the interest of your savings forever.
  • In fact, your children, their children, and their children forever could live off that interest.
  • Now, consider the child that lives off the interest payments of all the money her parents saved.
  • Most people would not term that welfare, which has become a loaded phrase associated with the state making a payment to individuals.
  • They used that money to buy part of Coca Cola in the form of common stock.
  • This is simply returning to the people a portion of income from land that is publicly owned.
  • I think that incomes will rise dramatically to many times what they presently are, in real dollars.
  • In that world, everyone will be guaranteed a minimum income.
  • It will be regarded as a dividend of the work of the one hundred prior generations that got the world to this point.
  • Is there a logical end to that—a physical or economic law of some kind that says only 10 percent or 20 percent or 30 percent of people can ever be this wealthy?
  • All it takes is so much wealth that it is self-sustaining—that the productivity of that wealth can support everyone.
  • In a world without abundance, socialism removes the one reliable creator of abundance—the individual profit motive—and that results in a lower standard of living for everyone.
  • In a world without scarcity, or that has scarcity at such a trivial level it is hardly noticeable, all the conventional theories and dogmas lose their meaning.
  • The implication is always that some people are simply unable to do any job that a machine cannot do.
  • It is a legitimate question that deserves a carefully reasoned answer.
  • First, I would contend that the size of this problem is substantially smaller than many people would guess.
  • We see with our eyes many people doing mind-numbingly boring jobs and assume that is all they are capable of doing.
  • First, it would be tempting to assume the person hauling manure can only do that, and if that job disappeared he would have no useful skills.
  • But in describing that job spectrum, I never said anything about his absolute ability—I said only that he was at the bottom of the list relative to others.
  • It may seem intuitive at first glance, this idea that somehow there are only so many jobs and if you replace people with machines, people have fewer jobs.
  • This idea that there are a finite number of jobs misses the point entirely of what makes a job.
  • Jobs are created when someone starts a business that takes a thing, adds labor and technology to it, and makes a new thing.
  • If a million people lose their jobs to a machine, then entrepreneurs start businesses that hire those people to do other things.
  • As I've already said, I believe we will be experiencing so much prosperity in the not-too-distant future that no one will have to work.
  • There will be so much wealth that a minimum income will be guaranteed to everyone.
  • It will be regarded as a human right—a dividend for being born a human being, your share of the inheritance that all the prior generations accumulated.
  • They will take advantage of the freedom from financial want that the modern age gives them and will focus on improving themselves and the world they live in.
  • But it is my belief that many more people will choose the first choice.
  • But many people's lives do follow humdrum, dispiriting patterns because we employ too many people doing work that machines should be doing.
  • As children, we had all these things we liked to do that interested and excited us.
  • But as we grew up, reality set in that market forces did not allow those activities to pay enough to support us, so at some point we all figured out we had to "earn a living."
  • And that meant, for too many of us, ditching what we loved to do and doing the work of a machine.
  • It turns out that he loves to paint.
  • Instead, he gets a job monitoring security cameras, which pays $10 an hour—until, of course, he loses that job to Chang.
  • They have something they love and want to do, but if market forces are not such that they can support themselves doing that, they have to do something else.
  • What if everyone on the planet had that luxury?
  • I base that expectation in part on the fact that today, many of us already live in more comfort than the richest king in the world did two hundred years ago.
  • But we take it largely for granted—and I think that is just fine.
  • It is their right—but it is my belief that these people will be few.
  • And in that world, no one is left behind.
  • Economic changes that have long-term positive benefits for society often have short-term negative ones.
  • Citizens in these countries are grateful for any job that pays anything at all, and their primary concern is simply survival.
  • For computations, we developed processes that required us to perform many intermediate, error-prone steps to achieve an answer.
  • That period when human improvement must end?
  • As machines do ever more things that we used to do, we will have more choices for how we spend our time.
  • Jobs done by people will be only the ones that require uniquely human capabilities to do.
  • These jobs can be market jobs that have the potential to make a person vastly richer, creating more and more wealth on the planet.
  • And if history is an accurate guide, that wealth will be partially redistributed to the poor—even the poorest of the poor, the bottom billion.
  • I know of no case in history that says otherwise.
  • I reasoned that if I could show how poverty will end, then of course hunger would end as well—how many rich people do you hear about going hungry?
  • So the problem must be that we have stretched the planet past its ability to feed its inhabitants, right?
  • People riot when convinced that food is unjustly being kept from them.
  • I personally think the establishment of charitable organizations was driven by the same spirit that drove the creation of new businesses.
  • And he used his decades of dominance on the national scene, as well as his fantastic oratorical ability, to advance that belief and essentially invent the Democratic Party we know today.
  • After this came the Great Depression, which so overwhelmed the social support structures that Americans turned to the government for help and have never turned back.
  • The thought was that the overseer, being local, would be able to separate the lazy from the truly needy.
  • This abuse resulted in an overhaul of the system that sought to tie the poor to their original parish.
  • The theory was that life in the workhouse had to be worse than life outside the workhouse, otherwise it would be overrun with the poor.
  • That notwithstanding, de Tocqueville's "voluntary associations" are still alive and well in the United States.
  • And that doesn't even count the many other charitable organizations that have not filed for this tax-exempt status with the federal government.
  • An important point to make here is this: Historically, the welfare state only emerges to solve problems that private charities either cannot or will not solve.
  • In any case, as the song says, The times, they are a-changin'—and they are changing in a manner that governments probably can't keep up with.
  • It is a shame that de Tocqueville's voluntary associations aren't more prominent around the world today—but in the future, they may be.
  • That number is 30 percent higher than it was only ten years ago.
  • Add to that how food itself is changing, our food choices change, our lifestyles change, and all along the way we are aging.
  • If someone notices that she gets a headache when she eats MSG—or artichokes, or grasshoppers—that first-person, anecdotal experience will shape her nutritional philosophy.
  • First, it is only useful for factors that are immediately bad for you, not factors that will kill you in ten years.
  • How do you know that isn't doing the trick?
  • And that can be hard to hear.
  • When you read somewhere else that food produced by large corporations saved millions of lives, you won't believe that.
  • Computers, especially computers of the future, will have no trouble handling all the variables that influence nutrition, though there will be millions of them.
  • Some methods and technologies that show promise to end famine are controversial.
  • But in the future when we have more and better information, if it turns out that some of these methods are not net gains, we will know that and look elsewhere for solutions.
  • More than half the hungry people in the world live in just these three nations—nations that are all net food exporters.
  • My point here is that currently the planet is producing enough food to feed everyone on it.
  • The United Nations has estimated that earth's population will pass nine billion by 2050, and ten billion by 2100.
  • It is most unlikely that this process of improvement will not continue in the future.
  • And that fact is driven home by its generally low price in most locations.
  • And that is paying full retail prices in an air-conditioned Western supermarket; by the ton, this food costs much less.
  • At one point, Tiger Woods got a dime for every box of Wheaties cereal with his photo on it, while the farmer was paid only a nickel for the wheat in that same box—and the farmer still made a profit.
  • The problem is not that the world doesn't have enough food.
  • The problem is that the poor don't have enough money to afford the food.
  • To me, this makes the problem of hunger that much sadder in the present—to realize that the planet has enough food, just not enough generosity.
  • But in a real sense, it also makes the problem that much easier to solve in the future.
  • In that case, the subsidy goes straight from the taxpayer in the other country to the purchaser of the subsidized crop.
  • In that case, they have to compete with rich, high-tech, government-subsidized industries.
  • Food security is a real issue, and nations that do not at least produce some kinds of food are at risk.
  • When few people own land and most people live in cities, it is quite common to have high degrees of hunger in a nation that is exporting food.
  • But the problem, of course, was that food prices went up, the people went hungry, and riots ensued.
  • Six hundred years after that, we get the windmill for irrigation.
  • The 2000s saw the rise of commercially viable seeds created by transgenesis, that is, the insertion of DNA from one species into another species.
  • Stakman had determined that immunity to these diseases, or at least resistance, could be bred into crops.
  • Throughout this time, Borlaug constantly battled wheat's arch-nemesis: rust, a fungus that feeds on wheat, oats, and barley.
  • Although there was cultural opposition in India to Borlaug's methods and seeds, the famine was so bad by 1965 that the government stepped in and urged the project forward.
  • From our point of view, the job of the plant is to convert sunlight into energy and store that energy in a tasty way; then when we eat the plant, we get that energy.
  • To deal in generalities, plants capture, on average, about 5 percent of the solar energy that falls on their leaves.
  • A fascinating character and an extremely patient experimenter, Mendel was a German friar and scientist who figured out that plants (and presumably animals) had inheritable characteristics.
  • He noticed that when he bred a tall one with a short one, sometimes he got tall offspring and sometimes a short offspring.
  • He then noticed that when he bred short ones with short ones, he always got short ones.
  • That range between the smallest pea plant and the largest is the full spectrum of what that plant can be.
  • That range between the smallest pea plant and the largest is the full spectrum of what that plant can be.
  • All the seeds we have today have these inherent limits built into them that we still haven't figured out how to change.
  • They are alike in name only, in that they are both factories—but they are completely different.
  • Because the most efficient farms in the world are those that operate at vast scale.
  • The system will see that just the right amounts of black-eyed peas, potatoes, and corn are grown.
  • The farm of today already has tractors that use GPS to make perfectly parallel rows with great precision.
  • In the future, that will be easy.
  • Instead, it is a large, open-air farm with a robot assigned to make each turnip be all that it can be.
  • How do I reconcile my personal choices with my statement that the farm of the future is a good thing?
  • Recall my comparison of a nineteenth-century London factory to a factory that makes Volvos today.
  • You can't do something that long and not have some strong opinions on the matter.
  • This dairyman also makes some of the milk into cheese and we use a lot of that as well.
  • The proverbial "Little Timmy" will find it hard to believe that food isn't manufactured like electronics but grown like an animal.
  • Let's briefly discuss that possibility.
  • Both of these are hugely important parts of life, and I know of no one who would trade them away for a pill they swallow in the morning that gives them all their nutrition for the day.
  • That said, my "end hunger" case doesn't hang on the viability of GM crops.
  • And we all know about those that optimize for cost and nutrition but the resulting food tastes awful; I have consumed enough wheatgrass to attest to this.
  • Since one cannot have everything, seed makers invariably will make trade-offs that might be different than what I would make.
  • In a recent survey, only a quarter of Americans answered that question with a "yes."
  • Presently, labeling of GMO content isn't a requirement—and since labeling is a complex and controversial issue that has no bearing on my thesis, I will pass it by.
  • An example of that is a breed of cat called "Scottish Fold."
  • Thus we had genetic modifications in plants that could have occurred in nature but probably wouldn't have.
  • This is the part that makes some people even more nervous.
  • UNICEF has said a program that gives children two large doses a year of vitamin A could all but eliminate VAD, although more frequent, smaller doses would be better.
  • In Africa, most genetically engineered crops that could grow well there are not welcome.
  • GMO could make this a crop that Africa could easily use to feed itself, gain food independence, and maybe even export.
  • They should be advocating that genetically modified crops be created not because it would result in better looking strawberries, but because GM crops don't require fertilizer or pesticides.
  • Wouldn't that be something: Plants that would convert nitrogen from the atmosphere directly into ammonia they could use or plants that gave off the odor of other plants that pests avoid?
  • Or that taste like meat, taking pastureland off the grid.
  • If you worry about gas emissions from cows contributing to climate change, lobby for a cow that doesn't have gas.
  • As far as scientific advancements go, that would be right up there with the proverbial sliced bread.
  • (If that can be achieved, to my readers under age twelve, I hold out the possibility of Brussels sprouts that taste like chocolate.)
  • By taking this "Absolutely no GMOs" stance they completely remove themselves from the debate and as such have no voice in the discussion about what direction to take GM: what are safe testing practices, what factors will we optimize for, and the whole host of questions that face us on this, the eve of a momentous leap forward.
  • Weigh that against the certainty that nearly a billion people are hungry right now and I don't know why we would decline to acquire this knowledge.
  • We can make better food that uses fewer resources.
  • How about flowers that bloom in different colors when they are on top of land mines?
  • Bacteria can process toxic wastes and oil spills into harmless biodegradable materials.
  • Collaboration, communication, access to information, and the other advantages that the Internet brings will all come to bear here.
  • We can't remember all that we hear, so we make pens and paper.
  • But the end of hunger also will be hastened by a host of Internet technologies that will dramatically change agriculture.
  • Remember my earlier statement that a farmer treats a thousand acres of corn as a single entity because it is not cost effective to deal with each corn stalk separately?
  • That is also the case because humans couldn't do a very good job at a stalk-by-stalk approach.
  • Everything that happens to it will be recorded.
  • When a promising new finding emerges, that information will be shared with other farms and those techniques will be tested there.
  • Farming will be done on such a scale that thousands of experiments can be happening at any one time, putting a tiny fraction of the produce at risk.
  • That is, before Eleni Zaude Gabre-Madhin came along.
  • These are the kinds of solutions that will change the world.
  • The United Nations World Food Programme was so inspired by this success that pilot programs for an exchange were launched in twenty-one countries.
  • The access to information that mobile phones are bringing virtually everywhere on the planet is helping people raise their standard of living and will do so even more dramatically in the years to come.
  • Dictatorships are toppling, and the Internet is helping that along.
  • With the help of local agencies around the world that have experience in micro-loans, a would-be borrower—say, a fish seller in the Philippines—uploads a picture and an explanation of what she wants the loan for.
  • All that we have explored in this section—rising incomes, advances in nutrition and genomics, innovations in agricultural technologies—will eventually end hunger.
  • I am not saying governments are supposed to feed the world or that food should be free.
  • It was his view that "the attainment of human rights in the fullest sense cannot be achieved so long as hundreds of millions of poverty-stricken people lack the basic necessities for life."
  • That is, agree in principle but decline any personal accountability.
  • Some might say something I consider even worse: It is inexcusable that some go hungry while you have so much.
  • If you have a problem with that, take it up with the man with the gun.
  • It is better to let half of the people die so that the other half can eat their fill.
  • And if that were not enough, he killed by starvation in the name of a program called—I kid you not—"The Super Great Leap Forward."
  • Everyone, by contrast, would kiss the hand that fed them, regardless of how bloody it was.
  • Before his death, Pol Pot conceded that his regime certainly killed people, but ''to say that millions died is too much.''
  • Water isn't free; someone is paying a bill to purify the water that comes through that fountain.
  • But the cost is so negligible that no one thinks much of it.
  • The full quote runs: "Necessitous men are not, truly speaking, free men, but, to answer a present exigency, will submit to any terms that the crafty may impose upon them."
  • That set-up didn't turn out so well.
  • Roosevelt is saying that freedom itself cannot exist apart from some amount of economic liberty.
  • I hope that someday the whole world has only this nation's level of problems.
  • Food in the United States is so inexpensive as a percentage of national income that it literally is a throwaway item.
  • If you knew someone who was a good business partner, was fun to hang out with, but let one of his children starve to death so that he could enjoy a higher standard of living, what would be your opinion of this person?
  • Is our nation so poor or so weak that we must resort to the ultimate in pragmatism and befriend nations in the name of commerce or prosperity or military security while turning a blind eye to the suffering of their people?
  • What would we have the centuries to come to say about us: That we were so eager to maximize our position of power and wealth that we turned a blind eye to injustice?
  • What would we have the centuries to come to say about us: That we were so eager to maximize our position of power and wealth that we turned a blind eye to injustice?
  • But over time, as incomes around the world rise, people will migrate more and more to products associated with social practices that match their own ideals.
  • We will radically improve the primitive, inefficient process that agriculture is today.
  • As we understand our own genome better, we will know better how to eat in a way that is custom tailored for us.
  • But I also believe that hunger will end when we decide to end it, not only at the point when we are able to end it.
  • That is a hard truth, but a truth nonetheless.
  • But in making the case that war can and will be ended, I have my work cut out for me.
  • I contend that it is.
  • Is that a distant bugle I hear?
  • All right then, not the cavalry, but a marshaling of arguments and observations that will show how the end of war is inevitable, or nearly so.
  • No silver bullet is in this chapter, no "aha" insight that will instantly persuade you.
  • I outline forty-five different ways this will happen—surely enough that even if you don't agree with them all, you will still have plenty of reason to be optimistic.
  • For they cut the cheeks of the males with a sword, so that before they receive the nourishment of milk they must learn to endure wounds.
  • The implication is that any time they nursed, they felt pain as well, to learn at an early age that there is no pleasure to be had in life without pain.
  • The Bulgarian king Samuel was so stricken by the sight of his mighty army staggering back home that he suffered a stroke and died two days later.
  • It should be noted that the Byzantines were among the most civilized people in all the world at that time.
  • I offer these stories not to demonstrate that people can be cruel.
  • The only thing that separates us from that world is this thing called civilization.
  • I want to spend some time talking about civilization, but first I want to recount the progress that we have made through civilization.
  • There was a period when intellectuals believed and spoke openly of the idea that the "breeding" of the "unfit" should be limited.
  • In the past, when the power of the state was absolute in many parts of the world, it was harder to argue that every person on the planet had rights no monarch or state could violate.
  • Even acknowledging that human rights exist is a great advance of civilization.
  • And that advance continues, as the group of rights so acknowledged keeps expanding.
  • The idea that a person can be a political prisoner, jailed for his beliefs about government, politics, or politicians, is ancient but happily fading.
  • The very fact that we have debated in recent years whether we can use torture to get information that will save lives is a sign of the effects of civilization.
  • Republics consist of codified laws that apply to everyone, regardless of public sentiment.
  • At a farmers' market I recently visited, one vendor boasted that all his chickens "retained their dignity throughout their life."
  • Murder isn't the only form of violent crime that is falling.
  • They do this for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is that it often works.
  • As Scottish historian Thomas Carlyle once observed, "Man seldom, or rather never for a length of time and deliberately, rebels against anything that does not deserve rebelling against."
  • It is true that there is much disagreement over how to achieve these ideals, but the fact remains we want a just society for all.
  • That is not the point.
  • The point is that it is now illegal in every state, with Louisiana being the last to outlaw it in 2008.
  • That is not the important point.
  • The point is that he went to jail for it.
  • We have created documents that enshrine our values as a method of articulating and preserving them.
  • It is not surprising that we are taking awhile to get it right.
  • Our forebears bore that burden.
  • It is through this civilizing process that I find hope we will end war.
  • War is the ultimate barbarism, the primitive belief that fighting determines who is right—but of course it doesn't.
  • Maybe we need it as a release valve that lets off societal pressure ...
  • By declaring a pretty broad range of things worth killing and dying for, we say that each of those is more precious to us than human life.
  • Of course, the people making that judgment call and the people doing the actual dying usually are not one and the same, and therein lies the problem.
  • Early in his presidency, in a 1953 address that would become known as his "Cross of Iron" speech, he declared, "Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed.
  • Their aim, he said, was nothing less than "the lifting, from the backs and from the hearts of men, of their burden of arms and of fears, so that they may find before them a golden age of freedom and of peace."
  • So did de Tocqueville, touring nineteenth-century America, when he wrote that "All those who seek to destroy the liberties of a democratic nation ought to know that war is the surest and shortest means to accomplish it."
  • So realistically, we know that we either must end war, or face the prospect that war will end us.
  • If we conclude that we must end war, the next question is: Is that even possible?
  • But it is obvious to me that we can end war.
  • It is an acknowledgement that war is completely a choice and our choice can be "no."
  • It was a way for that generation to ask, Why is there war?
  • I will not propose that we should "give peace a chance."
  • My aim is to show you how war will end and convince you that the end of war is inevitable.
  • (Yes, I know that statement should earn the "Screamingly Obvious Statement of the Year Award," but bear with me.)
  • If it can be demonstrated that in the future, peace will always be preferable to all nations, then war will end.
  • These laws provide recourse in the event that one citizen infringes on the rights of another.
  • Nation-states allow groups of people to create governments that reflect their common values.
  • Accountability must be at as low a level as possible, so that if government officials mess up, they answer to constituents in their locality.
  • For these reasons and a hundred more, government should be the smallest unit that is economically and politically viable.
  • I won't speculate on what that size is, but it certainly is not a size 0.
  • And that debate ended overnight.
  • No one I knew of had ever seriously considered the possibility that without any conflict, treaty, war, or even a coin toss, the Soviet Union would simply vote itself into nonexistence in 1991.
  • You could have the libertarian state, the green state, the clothing-optional state, the state with free public housing for all, the state where puns are outlawed, the state with a two-drink minimum, the fiercely pro-business state—even a state that guarantees free speech but requires that you sing your speech like a show tune.
  • Then someone else decides to send that child, at eighteen, to another land to kill people and to die?
  • That is exactly what happens, again and again, with unspeakable results: dead bodies by the millions, each someone's child, and millions more mutilated.
  • Who really believes that whoever can prevail in war must be right?
  • The demise of war, now that is inevitable.
  • In the 1968 book The Lessons of History, Will and Ariel Durant calculated that, "In the last 3,421 years of recorded history only 268 have seen no war."
  • Even in civilized corporate offices, professionals in business attire say their work tasks place them "down in the trenches" or that a certain "campaign" requires "guerrilla" marketing.
  • We live in a chillingly martial world.
  • Just as there is no single cause of war, there will be no single way that war will end.
  • Lest I try the patience of my readers, I will offer, in no particular order, forty-three that seem most worthy.
  • Technically speaking, I have included a few that are not dependent on the Internet per se, but in which the Internet and technology plays some role.
  • Because military accomplishments were one way to do that, the military attracted the most ambitious young men eager to prove themselves—and "proving themselves" meant battle.
  • While military service was less important to securing work in commerce, that was not a particularly noteworthy occupation.
  • Young boys compete with other boys in sports and races and tug-of-wars and, well, in everything, because that is simply how they are wired.
  • It is not just that the price of weapons falls and that their destructive ability increases.
  • It is this combined with the fact that their targets, too, are worth more; the cost of rebuilding a modern city today dwarfs the cost of rebuilding that city fifty years ago.
  • The reasoning behind MAD was that if we can annihilate the Soviets or the Chinese and they in turn can annihilate us, then none of us will start a war.
  • I propose that peace will be maintained in the future by something I will call Mutually Assured Poverty, or MAP.
  • That is good for peace.
  • That makes us all de facto millionaires, and very committed to remaining so.
  • This isn't the final triumph of consumerism—nothing nearly that sinister.
  • This is not to say that if another Pearl Harbor or another 9/11 occurred, people in any country wouldn't rise to the occasion and make great sacrifices if needed.
  • This means that non-military manufacturing interests in the United States no longer profit as in the past from war.
  • This is not to say that businesses are so materialistic they will favor a war to get a government contract.
  • What I am saying is that as more factors align toward peace, peace becomes ever more the better economic option.
  • I assume that virtually everyone working in defense industries believes they are serving their country and protecting freedom.
  • In that hypothetical situation, what would the defense contractor want?
  • You would argue that no other widget on the market can beat the C2000, no nation can ever gain widget superiority if the government just buys the C2000—and so they do.
  • (Not to mention the fact that, if the stuff all hits the fan, widget factories like yours would almost certainly be marked with bull's-eyes on the enemy's aerial bombing maps.)
  • Even if you don't accept this, try to accept that war is financially disadvantageous to 99 percent of the business owners in the country and that this is new and meaningful.
  • As we just noted, when nations buy each other's goods, that promotes peace.
  • Anything that creates a more intertwined world without compromising autonomy, self-rule, and self-determination is good for peace.
  • Now we have an interlocked banking system that moves money around the world at light speed.
  • In addition to that, many Americans own stock in other countries through their retirement savings.
  • All this together means that our economic fates are more intertwined than ever.
  • It used to be that if you conquered another nation, your soldiers became looters and the military got to haul off everything of value in the country.
  • The arch not only celebrates this military victory, it points out that it was profitable.
  • It is bad in that it allows a few to harm the many.
  • That said, it also has its plus side.
  • Roughly a quarter of the way through our list of factors that will end war, we have reached the end of the economic ones.
  • We will avoid war because it is unprofitable; and while that is not a moral reason, any reason that brings peace is fine by me.
  • As true as that was in Jefferson's time, our age has amplified all of it: both the miseries war can produce and the blessings peace can produce.
  • Now, let's move on to the political factors that will cause war to cease.
  • The theory is that democracies do not go to war with other democracies.
  • No matter why the theory works, is it good for the world that it does.
  • That should have been the end of it, right?
  • In military alliances, however, it is much likelier that when nations choose their friends, they create enemies where there were none before.
  • We could go on here and talk about other military powers and alliances, but the simple fact is that large countries are less willing to risk war in defense of small ones.
  • This is exactly the sort of thinking that makes nation-states useful.
  • The fact that small nations can adopt standard treaties, laws, currencies, and international practices of larger countries means that a small economic unit can be viable.
  • I am saying that for small nations to be economically and politically viable is good news for peace.
  • From the northwest angle of Nova Scotia, viz., that angle which is formed by a line drawn due north from the source of St. Croix River to the highlands; along the said highlands which divide those rivers that empty themselves into the river St. Lawrence ...
  • By making expectations explicit and public, these agreements reduce the number of sparks that can set off the powder keg of war.
  • But having your starlet drive eighty mph whilst liquored up, well, that was fine.
  • Many people alive today were adults when signs that said "Whites Only" were common.
  • However, if it were stigmatized, and public opinion dramatically and pervasively changed, that would force policy change.
  • That is never bad.
  • Third, the web acts as a feedback loop in that it allows all people to say what is on their minds.
  • Very seldom is that, "I should go to war to force others to my will."
  • It is inefficient because I must know to follow people in order to receive their updates, and that knowing spreads haphazardly.
  • I have no doubt there are all kinds of things in the Twitterverse that I want to know about, but I only find the ones that I first knew to look for.
  • It is an altogether new concept that meets a need we didn't even know existed.
  • We tend to regard information that comes to us through our friend network as more authentic and reliable than information we receive from traditional media.
  • For instance, if you have a Facebook friend Abigail in Albania whom you only met once at a rock-paper-scissors competition years ago, you will generally regard Abigail's first-hand account as authoritative, even though you don't really know Abigail all that well.
  • Seldom will one decide that war with a friend's nation is the only recourse.
  • Friedman goes on to point out that almost anywhere in the world today, it would be impossible to get away with this fraud.
  • I mention FactCheck and Snopes as two examples of the many enterprises on the Internet that subject every government utterance to scrutiny in something approximating real time.
  • If this happens, the government becomes an agent that works against the very ideals it purports to protect.
  • News and information that undermine their credibility or authority aren't so welcome either.
  • More information leads to more peace, unless you want to argue that ignorance is more peaceful.
  • O'Neill observed that scrutiny of government had become so intense that officials never could have gotten away with that—and he was writing in the late 1980s.
  • According to Portio Research7.8 trillion SMS messages were sent in 2011, and it is expected that 2012's number will come in at ten trillion.
  • That would average over three SMS messages per day per person on the planet.
  • But if that is the case, they will fall in due course.
  • Around the world, more than a billion mobile devices that both take and send photographs are currently in use, spread even to the poorest parts of the globe.
  • Imagine if today everyone spoke one language and I said that in the future we will speak hundreds of different languages and not be able to understand each other.
  • Nations will maintain their own traditions, holidays, music, idioms, diets, and a thousand things that make them different from other nations.
  • Keeping that one comes at a large financial price: Learn proficiency at two languages or remain separate from the world economy.
  • It seems fitting to end this part of the list—ways that information and communication will help end war—by noting that every day, every moment, more and more people have access to the Internet.
  • By 2020, it is estimated that five billion people will be online, representing two-thirds the population of the planet.
  • The final ten cover a range of topics that don't fit neatly elsewhere.
  • It is to this end that we want to educate you ...
  • On the other end of the education spectrum, college degrees are up: A recent Harvard University study reports that 6.7 percent of the world has a college degree, up from 5.9 percent in 2000.
  • That is a huge change and a force for peace.
  • More people using passports to travel internationally will increase understanding and help reduce touch points that could lead to war.
  • This is a force for peace—to the extent that as we share the same set of cultural references, we understand each other better.
  • It isn't just that we can communicate better but that we actually relate to each other better.
  • Now, on a regular basis, videos appear which bring to life something that would otherwise be merely an ill-formed image in our minds.
  • YouTube's contribution to world peace is not simply to add empathy to current events, although that would be enough.
  • It is the same spirit that makes people fanatical about a certain sports team, regardless of the players or the score.
  • The population at that time was a tenth of what it is today.
  • Can you imagine the public reaction to that today: A quarter of a million people killed or wounded in a single day?
  • So that ends my list.
  • I hope that along the way you thought of a few I missed, a few trends or developments that lead toward peace.
  • I believe that increasingly, they will not.
  • We will live out the realization that, as Bertrand Russell said, "War does not determine who is right, only who is left."
  • This is how our Founding Fathers intended our nation to behave: To try to achieve our foreign policy aims through negotiation and, if that failed, through economic sanctions.
  • Anything that looks too much like The Matrix movies or The Terminator movies is just, well, kind of creepy.
  • My answer to that begins in the past, in the time of William Shakespeare.
  • All these things are the same today as they were in Shakespeare's time, and because of that, his stories are still very relevant to us.
  • Under the terms of the definition I offered earlier, that makes Shakespeare the epitome of art—that is, something that continues to speak to future generations.
  • He convinces Othello that Desdemona, Othello's wife, is unfaithful to him.
  • Hold that thought, as we will return to it.
  • Later that evening when Simonides was at a banquet with Scopas, he got word that two young men were outside looking for him.
  • The implication was that Castor and Pollux, knowing of the imminent collapse of the roof, had come calling with the purpose of saving Simonides's life as their payment for the poem.
  • Two millennia later, it is fair to assume that humans are still capable of this kind of memory.
  • When Augustine finally asked, "What are you doing?," Ambrose replied that he was reading.
  • Ambrose replied that he was looking at the words and reading them that way.
  • Augustine records that this idea blew his mind (or words to that effect).
  • The libraries that existed, such as the one at Alexandria, contained reading rooms because when you read a book, you read it aloud.
  • Processing aurally was familiar to Augustine while reading silently was revelatory, so noteworthy that he wrote it in his autobiography.
  • I think they would have said, That is kind of creepy.
  • That is just so alien to me.
  • In both those cases, a technology or technique came along that actually changed the way people think.
  • So in the present and future, when a technology comes along that represents such a change—that saves details of our activities with which to advise us later, or has us speaking to machines as if they were creatures—it will simply be more of the same.
  • So it was natural that to earn extra money, Jason and I would buy cool, old cars we found in junkyards for a few hundred dollars apiece.
  • It turns out that, even when doing what you love, both passion and profit matter—but that particular piece of wisdom came later with age.
  • Yet at the time that we devised each plan, we were confident it would succeed.
  • The title of Ralph Nader's book was right: That car was Unsafe at Any Speed, at least with the master cylinder removed.
  • The problem for us was always that it is easier to get a car running than it is to fix the brakes.
  • Though the world foreseen in this book may seem far away to you, I believe it will be achieved—and once achieved, that it will grow in stability over time.
  • At that point, the iffy parts of human history are behind us and it is blue skies and clean sailing ahead.
  • Well, that seems riddled with pitfalls.
  • Then we will list the things that might derail us on the way to that future.
  • We have achieved all that we have today in a very low-tech world.
  • That is to say, wealth creation is about to skyrocket.
  • The economy makes new machines that replace manual labor because many thousands of people are paid very well to do so.
  • We are heading toward that, which makes progress ever more certain.
  • I can list a few that might eliminate it and a few more that might delay it.
  • Having said all of that, government should certainly be watched with a suspicious eye, for it could conceivably delay or derail our ascent to the next golden age.
  • I think the range of problems that technology can solve is confined to technological problems.
  • All these problems that technology will solve have made our underlying differences worse—but removing these problems will not eliminate those underlying differences.
  • This book began with the assertion that it is the optimists who get things done.
  • I will end on that same topic.
  • That claim is simply not true.
  • It is pessimism that says, "We are doomed."
  • It is based on the idea that what we believe about the future determines what we do in the present.
  • My goal is not to convince people that the world will be perfect in the future.
  • Rather, I aim to show that the world will be what we make it to be.
  • I hope that, after reading this far, you appreciate that for our age, this is no idle boast.
  • After all, we live in a universe that looks like it has plenty of room for us to expand into.
  • So, far from reaching that point the pessimists foretold—where we have exhausted the meager resources of earth and find ourselves dwindling away—something entirely different is happening.
  • At the time in history when our future has never looked brighter, it is baffling that some people are more pessimistic than ever.
  • We were not born in that age that had no word for change.
  • But we will see it begin to take shape and will know that we were there the moment the world changed.
  • I lived, up to the time of the illness that deprived me of my sight and hearing, in a tiny house consisting of a large square room and a small one, in which the servant slept.
  • I am told that while I was still in long dresses I showed many signs of an eager, self-asserting disposition.
  • Everything that I saw other people do I insisted upon imitating.
  • It was the word "water," and I continued to make some sound for that word after all other speech was lost.
  • There was great rejoicing in the family that morning, but no one, not even the doctor, knew that I should never see or hear again.
  • I fancy I still have confused recollections of that illness.
  • But during the first nineteen months of my life I had caught glimpses of broad, green fields, a luminous sky, trees and flowers which the darkness that followed could not wholly blot out.
  • I only know that I sat in my mother's lap or clung to her dress as she went about her household duties.
  • Was it bread that I wanted?
  • Indeed, I owe to her loving wisdom all that was bright and good in my long night.
  • One day some gentlemen called on my mother, and I felt the shutting of the front door and other sounds that indicated their arrival.
  • I do not remember when I first realized that I was different from other people; but I knew it before my teacher came to me.
  • I had noticed that my mother and my friends did not use signs as I did when they wanted anything done, but talked with their mouths.
  • This made me so angry at times that I kicked and screamed until I was exhausted.
  • Many of them were so tame that they would eat from my hand and let me feel them.
  • When we were fortunate enough to find a nest I never allowed her to carry the eggs home, making her understand by emphatic signs that she might fall and break them.
  • Of course I did not know what it was all about, but I enjoyed the pleasant odours that filled the house and the tidbits that were given to Martha Washington and me to keep us quiet.
  • We were sadly in the way, but that did not interfere with our pleasure in the least.
  • The younger child was blind--that was I--and the other was Martha Washington.
  • We were busy cutting out paper dolls; but we soon wearied of this amusement, and after cutting up our shoestrings and clipping all the leaves off the honeysuckle that were within reach, I turned my attention to Martha's corkscrews.
  • Thinking that turn and turn about is fair play, she seized the scissors and cut off one of my curls, and would have cut them all off but for my mother's timely interference.
  • Many incidents of those early years are fixed in my memory, isolated, but clear and distinct, making the sense of that silent, aimless, dayless life all the more intense.
  • The fire leaped into life; the flames encircled me so that in a moment my clothes were blazing.
  • I made a terrified noise that brought Viny, my old nurse, to the rescue.
  • This most naughty prank of mine convinced my parents that I must be taught as soon as possible.
  • Then I learned what those papers were, and that my father edited one of them.
  • She is so near to me that it almost seems indelicate to speak of her.
  • I knew that I had ceased to be my mother's only darling, and the thought filled me with jealousy.
  • At that time I had a much-petted, much-abused doll, which I afterward named Nancy.
  • She was, alas, the helpless victim of my outbursts of temper and of affection, so that she became much the worse for wear.
  • After awhile the need of some means of communication became so urgent that these outbursts occurred daily, sometimes hourly.
  • We lived a long way from any school for the blind or the deaf, and it seemed unlikely that any one would come to such an out-of-the-way place as Tuscumbia to teach a child who was both deaf and blind.
  • My father made holes in these so that I could string them, and for a long time they kept me happy and contented.
  • It was the most comical shapeless thing, this improvised doll, with no nose, mouth, ears or eyes--nothing that even the imagination of a child could convert into a face.
  • I pulled two beads off and indicated to her that I wanted her to sew them on my doll.
  • On the afternoon of that eventful day, I stood on the porch, dumb, expectant.
  • I guessed vaguely from my mother's signs and from the hurrying to and fro in the house that something unusual was about to happen, so I went to the door and waited on the steps.
  • The afternoon sun penetrated the mass of honeysuckle that covered the porch, and fell on my upturned face.
  • I was like that ship before my education began, only I was without compass or sounding-line, and had no way of knowing how near the harbour was.
  • "Light! give me light!" was the wordless cry of my soul, and the light of love shone on me in that very hour.
  • I did not know that I was spelling a word or even that words existed; I was simply making my fingers go in monkey-like imitation.
  • In the days that followed I learned to spell in this uncomprehending way a great many words, among them pin, hat, cup and a few verbs like sit, stand and walk.
  • But my teacher had been with me several weeks before I understood that everything has a name.
  • I felt my teacher sweep the fragments to one side of the hearth, and I had a sense of satisfaction that the cause of my discomfort was removed.
  • That living word awakened my soul, gave it light, hope, joy, set it free!
  • There were barriers still, it is true, but barriers that could in time be swept away.
  • That was because I saw everything with the strange, new sight that had come to me.
  • That was because I saw everything with the strange, new sight that had come to me.
  • I learned a great many new words that day.
  • I do not remember what they all were; but I do know that mother, father, sister, teacher were among them--words that were to make the world blossom for me, "like Aaron's rod, with flowers."
  • I recall many incidents of the summer of 1887 that followed my soul's sudden awakening.
  • I did nothing but explore with my hands and learn the name of every object that I touched; and the more I handled things and learned their names and uses, the more joyous and confident grew my sense of kinship with the rest of the world.
  • I learned how the sun and the rain make to grow out of the ground every tree that is pleasant to the sight and good for food, how birds build their nests and live and thrive from land to land, how the squirrel, the deer, the lion and every other creature finds food and shelter.
  • She linked my earliest thoughts with nature, and made me feel that "birds and flowers and I were happy peers."
  • But about this time I had an experience which taught me that nature is not always kind.
  • The shade was grateful, and the tree was so easy to climb that with my teacher's assistance I was able to scramble to a seat in the branches.
  • It was so cool up in the tree that Miss Sullivan proposed that we have our luncheon there.
  • I knew it, it was the odour that always precedes a thunderstorm, and a nameless fear clutched at my heart.
  • I longed for my teacher's return; but above all things I wanted to get down from that tree.
  • A shiver ran through the tree, and the wind sent forth a blast that would have knocked me off had I not clung to the branch with might and main.
  • I had learned a new lesson--that nature "wages open war against her children, and under softest touch hides treacherous claws."
  • It was the sweet allurement of the mimosa tree in full bloom that finally overcame my fears.
  • I felt my way to the end of the garden, knowing that the mimosa tree was near the fence, at the turn of the path.
  • After that I spent many happy hours in my tree of paradise, thinking fair thoughts and dreaming bright dreams.
  • Sometimes a new word revived an image that some earlier experience had engraved on my brain.
  • I remember the morning that I first asked the meaning of the word, "love."
  • It seemed to me that there could be nothing more beautiful than the sun, whose warmth makes all things grow.
  • I thought it strange that my teacher could not show me love.
  • In a flash I knew that the word was the name of the process that was going on in my head.
  • "Love is something like the clouds that were in the sky before the sun came out," she replied.
  • You cannot touch love either; but you feel the sweetness that it pours into everything.
  • The beautiful truth burst upon my mind--I felt that there were invisible lines stretched between my spirit and the spirits of others.
  • From the beginning of my education Miss Sullivan made it a practice to speak to me as she would speak to any hearing child; the only difference was that she spelled the sentences into my hand instead of speaking them.
  • I quickly learned that each printed word stood for an object, an act, or a quality.
  • I took my "Reader for Beginners" and hunted for the words I knew; when I found them my joy was like that of a game of hide-and-seek.
  • She introduced dry technicalities of science little by little, making every subject so real that I could not help remembering what she taught.
  • I built dams of pebbles, made islands and lakes, and dug river-beds, all for fun, and never dreamed that I was learning a lesson.
  • She made raised maps in clay, so that I could feel the mountain ridges and valleys, and follow with my fingers the devious course of rivers.
  • The illustrative strings and the orange stick representing the poles seemed so real that even to this day the mere mention of temperate zone suggests a series of twine circles; and I believe that if any one should set about it he could convince me that white bears actually climb the North Pole.
  • After I had learned a great many interesting things about the life and habits of the children of the sea--how in the midst of dashing waves the little polyps build the beautiful coral isles of the Pacific, and the foraminifera have made the chalk-hills of many a land--my teacher read me "The Chambered Nautilus," and showed me that the shell-building process of the mollusks is symbolical of the development of the mind.
  • Again, it was the growth of a plant that furnished the text for a lesson.
  • It was because she seized the right moment to impart knowledge that made it so pleasant and acceptable to me.
  • My teacher is so near to me that I scarcely think of myself apart from her.
  • I feel that her being is inseparable from my own, and that the footsteps of my life are in hers.
  • All the best of me belongs to her--there is not a talent, or an aspiration or a joy in me that has not been awakened by her loving touch.
  • When I learned that there was a gift for each child, I was delighted, and the kind people who had prepared the tree permitted me to hand the presents to the children.
  • That night, after I had hung my stocking, I lay awake a long time, pretending to be asleep and keeping alert to see what Santa Claus would do when he came.
  • Little Tim was so tame that he would hop on my finger and eat candied cherries out of my hand.
  • It delighted me inexpressibly to find that they knew the manual alphabet.
  • It took me some time to appreciate the fact that my new friends were blind.
  • I knew I could not see; but it did not seem possible that all the eager, loving children who gathered round me and joined heartily in my frolics were also blind.
  • I remember the surprise and the pain I felt as I noticed that they placed their hands over mine when I talked to them and that they read books with their fingers.
  • But they were so happy and contented that I lost all sense of pain in the pleasure of their companionship.
  • I could not quite convince myself that there was much world left, for I regarded Boston as the beginning and the end of creation.
  • I could touch it, and perhaps that made the coming of the Pilgrims and their toils and great deeds seem more real to me.
  • I have often held in my hand a little model of the Plymouth Rock which a kind gentleman gave me at Pilgrim Hall, and I have fingered its curves, the split in the centre and the embossed figures "1620," and turned over in my mind all that I knew about the wonderful story of the Pilgrims.
  • I idealized them as the bravest and most generous men that ever sought a home in a strange land.
  • I was keenly surprised and disappointed years later to learn of their acts of persecution that make us tingle with shame, even while we glory in the courage and energy that gave us our "Country Beautiful."
  • Mr. Endicott told me about the great ships that came sailing by from Boston, bound for Europe.
  • I saw him many times after that, and he was always a good friend to me; indeed, I was thinking of him when I called Boston "the City of Kind Hearts."
  • Just before the Perkins Institution closed for the summer, it was arranged that my teacher and I should spend our vacation at Brewster, on Cape Cod, with our dear friend, Mrs. Hopkins.
  • My most vivid recollection of that summer is the ocean.
  • So my little heart leaped high with eager excitement when I knew that my wish was at last to be realized.
  • I felt of him and thought it very strange that he should carry his house on his back.
  • It suddenly occurred to me that he might make a delightful pet; so I seized him by the tail with both hands and carried him home.
  • I was never still a moment; my life was as full of motion as those little insects that crowd a whole existence into one brief day.
  • Here were great oaks and splendid evergreens with trunks like mossy pillars, from the branches of which hung garlands of ivy and mistletoe, and persimmon trees, the odour of which pervaded every nook and corner of the wood--an illusive, fragrant something that made the heart glad.
  • It was delightful to lose ourselves in the green hollows of that tangled wood in the late afternoon, and to smell the cool, delicious odours that came up from the earth at the close of day.
  • It was very difficult to walk over, the ties were wide apart and so narrow that one felt as if one were walking on knives.
  • I recall my surprise on discovering that a mysterious hand had stripped the trees and bushes, leaving only here and there a wrinkled leaf.
  • But during the night the fury of the wind increased to such a degree that it thrilled us with a vague terror.
  • The rays of the sun fell upon the trees, so that the twigs sparkled like diamonds and dropped in showers when we touched them.
  • So dazzling was the light, it penetrated even the darkness that veils my eyes.
  • As the days wore on, the drifts gradually shrunk, but before they were wholly gone another storm came, so that I scarcely felt the earth under my feet once all winter.
  • Our favourite amusement during that winter was tobogganing.
  • For one wild, glad moment we snapped the chain that binds us to earth, and joining hands with the winds we felt ourselves divine!
  • It was in the spring of 1890 that I learned to speak.
  • I was pleased with anything that made a noise and liked to feel the cat purr and the dog bark.
  • This feeling began to agitate me with a vexing, forward-reaching sense of a lack that should be filled.
  • I resolved that I, too, would learn to speak.
  • It is an unspeakable boon to me to be able to speak in winged words that need no interpretation.
  • As I talked, happy thoughts fluttered up out of my words that might perhaps have struggled in vain to escape my fingers.
  • But it must not be supposed that I could really talk in this short time.
  • Nor is it true that, after I had learned these elements, I did the rest of the work myself.
  • Discouragement and weariness cast me down frequently; but the next moment the thought that I should soon be at home and show my loved ones what I had accomplished, spurred me on, and I eagerly looked forward to their pleasure in my achievement.
  • My eyes fill with tears now as I think how my mother pressed me close to her, speechless and trembling with delight, taking in every syllable that I spoke, while little Mildred seized my free hand and kissed it and danced, and my father expressed his pride and affection in a big silence.
  • I thought then that I was "making up a story," as children say, and I eagerly sat down to write it before the ideas should slip from me.
  • Now, if words and images come to me without effort, it is a pretty sure sign that they are not the offspring of my own mind, but stray waifs that I regretfully dismiss.
  • At that time I eagerly absorbed everything I read without a thought of authorship, and even now I cannot be quite sure of the boundary line between my ideas and those I find in books.
  • I suppose that is because so many of my impressions come to me through the medium of others' eyes and ears.
  • At dinner it was read to the assembled family, who were surprised that I could write so well.
  • It was suggested that I should change the title from "Autumn Leaves" to "The Frost King," which I did.
  • How well I remember the graceful draperies that enfolded me, the bright autumn leaves that wreathed my head, and the fruit and grain at my feet and in my hands, and beneath all the piety of the masque the oppressive sense of coming ill that made my heart heavy.
  • Something I said made her think she detected in my words a confession that I did remember Miss Canby's story of "The Frost Fairies," and she laid her conclusions before Mr. Anagnos, although I had told her most emphatically that she was mistaken.
  • He believed, or at least suspected, that Miss Sullivan and I had deliberately stolen the bright thoughts of another and imposed them on him to win his admiration.
  • As I lay in my bed that night, I wept as I hope few children have wept.
  • But the fact remains that Miss Canby's story was read to me once, and that long after I had forgotten it, it came back to me so naturally that I never suspected that it was the child of another mind.
  • Miss Canby herself wrote kindly, "Some day you will write a great story out of your own head, that will be a comfort and help to many."
  • For a long time, when I wrote a letter, even to my mother, I was seized with a sudden feeling of terror, and I would spell the sentences over and over, to make sure that I had not read them in a book.
  • At the time I was writing "The Frost King," and this letter, like many others, contains phrases which show that my mind was saturated with the story.
  • It shows me that I could express my appreciation of beautiful and poetic ideas in clear and animated language.
  • Everything I found in books that pleased me I retained in my memory, consciously or unconsciously, and adapted it.
  • It is only after years of this sort of practice that even great men have learned to marshal the legion of words which come thronging through every byway of the mind.
  • It is certain that I cannot always distinguish my own thoughts from those I read, because what I read becomes the very substance and texture of my mind.
  • It seems to me that the great difficulty of writing is to make the language of the educated mind express our confused ideas, half feelings, half thoughts, when we are little more than bundles of instinctive tendencies.
  • My only regret is that it resulted in the loss of one of my dearest friends, Mr. Anagnos.
  • Since the publication of "The Story of My Life" in the Ladies' Home Journal, Mr. Anagnos has made a statement, in a letter to Mr. Macy, that at the time of the "Frost King" matter, he believed I was innocent.
  • Mr. Anagnos states that he cast his vote with those who were favourable to me.
  • For two years he seems to have held the belief that Miss Sullivan and I were innocent.
  • I recall with delight that home-going.
  • The thought that what I wrote might not be absolutely my own tormented me.
  • At other times, in the midst of a paragraph I was writing, I said to myself, "Suppose it should be found that all this was written by some one long ago!"
  • An impish fear clutched my hand, so that I could not write any more that day.
  • It was with the hope of restoring my self-confidence that she persuaded me to write for the Youth's Companion a brief account of my life.
  • I wrote timidly, fearfully, but resolutely, urged on by my teacher, who knew that if I persevered, I should find my mental foothold again and get a grip on my faculties.
  • It seems strange to many people that I should be impressed by the wonders and beauties of Niagara.
  • They are always asking: What does this beauty or that music mean to you?
  • Mr. Higinbotham, President of the World's Fair, kindly gave me permission to touch the exhibits, and with an eagerness as insatiable as that with which Pizarro seized the treasures of Peru, I took in the glories of the Fair with my fingers.
  • I searched in the washings for a diamond and found it myself--the only true diamond, they said, that was ever found in the United States.
  • In the electrical building we examined the telephones, autophones, phonographs, and other inventions, and he made me understand how it is possible to send a message on wires that mock space and outrun time, and, like Prometheus, to draw fire from the sky.
  • Miss Sullivan and I were at that time in Hulton, Pennsylvania, visiting the family of Mr. William Wade.
  • Mr. Irons, a neighbour of theirs, was a good Latin scholar; it was arranged that I should study under him.
  • There it was arranged that I should go to the Wright-Humason School for the Deaf in New York City.
  • I remember especially the walks we all took together every day in Central Park, the only part of the city that was congenial to me.
  • The teachers at the Wright-Humason School were always planning how they might give the pupils every advantage that those who hear enjoy--how they might make much of few tendencies and passive memories in the cases of the little ones--and lead them out of the cramping circumstances in which their lives were set.
  • Before I left New York, these bright days were darkened by the greatest sorrow that I have ever borne, except the death of my father.
  • So long as we felt his loving presence and knew that he took a watchful interest in our work, fraught with so many difficulties, we could not be discouraged.
  • His going away left a vacancy in our lives that has never been filled.
  • When asked why I would not go to Wellesley, I replied that there were only girls there.
  • When I left New York the idea had become a fixed purpose; and it was decided that I should go to Cambridge.
  • For a while, indeed, I had to copy my Latin in braille, so that I could recite with the other girls.
  • Each day Miss Sullivan went to the classes with me and spelled into my hand with infinite patience all that the teachers said.
  • The tedium of that work is hard to conceive.
  • But, though everybody was kind and ready to help us, there was only one hand that could turn drudgery into pleasure.
  • Burke's speech was more instructive than any other book on a political subject that I had ever read.
  • I wondered more and more, while Burke's masterly speech rolled on in mighty surges of eloquence, how it was that King George and his ministers could have turned a deaf ear to his warning prophecy of our victory and their humiliation.
  • I thought how strange it was that such precious seeds of truth and wisdom should have fallen among the tares of ignorance and corruption.
  • I rejoiced over all his successes, I shut my eyes to his faults, and wondered, not that he had them, but that they had not crushed or dwarfed his soul.
  • Some of the girls learned to speak to me, so that Miss Sullivan did not have to repeat their conversation.
  • Perhaps an explanation of the method that was in use when I took my examinations will not be amiss here.
  • Mr. Gilman sat beside me and read the paper through first, then sentence by sentence, while I repeated the words aloud, to make sure that I understood him perfectly.
  • I wish to say here that I have not had this advantage since in any of my examinations.
  • In that case I correct only such mistakes as I can recall in the few minutes allowed, and make notes of these corrections at the end of my paper.
  • Mr. Gilman sent my written work to the examiners with a certificate that I, candidate No. 233, had written the papers.
  • I remember that the day the Latin paper was brought to us, Professor Schilling came in and informed me I had passed satisfactorily in German.
  • Mr. Gilman had agreed that that year I should study mathematics principally.
  • Algebra and geometry were the only studies that continued to defy my efforts to comprehend them.
  • It was not until Mr. Keith taught me that I had a clear idea of mathematics.
  • Just before the books came, Mr. Gilman had begun to remonstrate with Miss Sullivan on the ground that I was working too hard, and in spite of my earnest protestations, he reduced the number of my recitations.
  • At the beginning we had agreed that I should, if necessary, take five years to prepare for college, but at the end of the first year the success of my examinations showed Miss Sullivan, Miss Harbaugh (Mr.
  • Mr. Gilman at first agreed to this; but when my tasks had become somewhat perplexing, he insisted that I was overworked, and that I should remain at his school three years longer.
  • It is true that I was familiar with all literary braille in common use in this country--English, American, and New York Point; but the various signs and symbols in geometry and algebra in the three systems are very different, and I had used only the English braille in my algebra.
  • To my dismay I found that it was in the American notation.
  • Indeed, I am not sure now that I read all the signs correctly.
  • But if they unintentionally placed obstacles in my way, I have the consolation of knowing that I overcame them all.
  • Before I entered college, however, it was thought best that I should study another year under Mr. Keith.
  • I knew that there were obstacles in the way; but I was eager to overcome them.
  • But I soon discovered that college was not quite the romantic lyceum I had imagined.
  • Many of the dreams that had delighted my young inexperience became beautifully less and "faded into the light of common day."
  • Gradually I began to find that there were disadvantages in going to college.
  • Many scholars forget, it seems to me, that our enjoyment of the great works of literature depends more upon the depth of our sympathy than upon our understanding.
  • The trouble is that very few of their laborious explanations stick in the memory.
  • It happens too often that your trumpet call is unheeded.
  • It is most perplexing and exasperating that just at the moment when you need your memory and a nice sense of discrimination, these faculties take to themselves wings and fly away.
  • Just then the proctor informs you that the time is up.
  • It comes over me that in the last two or three pages of this chapter I have used figures which will turn the laugh against me.
  • One of them is the precious science of patience, which teaches us that we should take our education as we would take a walk in the country, leisurely, our minds hospitably open to impressions of every sort.
  • Indeed, books have meant so much more in my education than in that of others, that I shall go back to the time when I began to read.
  • I read my first connected story in May, 1887, when I was seven years old, and from that day to this I have devoured everything in the shape of a printed page that has come within the reach of my hungry finger tips.
  • I think that was all; but I read them over and over, until the words were so worn and pressed I could scarcely make them out.
  • It was during my first visit to Boston that I really began to read in good earnest.
  • I remember she asked me if I liked little Pearl, and explained some of the words that had puzzled me.
  • Then she told me that she had a beautiful story about a little boy which she was sure I should like better than "The Scarlet Letter."
  • But we did not begin the story until August; the first few weeks of my stay at the seashore were so full of discoveries and excitement that I forgot the very existence of books.
  • We had hurried through the dish-washing after luncheon, in order that we might have as long an afternoon as possible for the story.
  • As we hastened through the long grass toward the hammock, the grasshoppers swarmed about us and fastened themselves on our clothes, and I remember that my teacher insisted upon picking them all off before we sat down, which seemed to me an unnecessary waste of time.
  • Before we began the story Miss Sullivan explained to me the things that she knew I should not understand, and as we read on she explained the unfamiliar words.
  • I took the book in my hands and tried to feel the letters with an intensity of longing that I can never forget.
  • Circumscribed as my life was in so many ways, I had to look between the covers of books for news of the world that lay outside my own.
  • Later I read the book again in French, and I found that, in spite of the vivid word-pictures, and the wonderful mastery of language, I liked it no better.
  • It was the Iliad that made Greece my paradise.
  • It is not necessary that one should be able to define every word and give it its principal parts and its grammatical position in the sentence in order to understand and appreciate a fine poem.
  • I read it as much as possible without the help of notes or dictionary, and I always like to translate the episodes that please me especially.
  • Still there is much in the Bible against which every instinct of my being rebels, so much that I regret the necessity which has compelled me to read it through from beginning to end.
  • I do not think that the knowledge which I have gained of its history and sources compensates me for the unpleasant details it has forced upon my attention.
  • Yet how different is the life of these simple country folks from that of the Persian capital!
  • The Bible gives me a deep, comforting sense that "things seen are temporal, and things unseen are eternal."
  • I do not remember a time since I have been capable of loving books that I have not loved Shakespeare.
  • I cannot tell exactly when I began Lamb's "Tales from Shakespeare"; but I know that I read them at first with a child's understanding and a child's wonder.
  • Anger seized me, my fingers refused to move, I sat rigid for one long moment, the blood throbbing in my temples, and all the hatred that a child can feel concentrated in my heart.
  • I remember that I was sorry for them.
  • I felt vaguely that they could not be good even if they wished to, because no one seemed willing to help them or to give them a fair chance.
  • It seems strange that my first reading of Shakespeare should have left me so many unpleasant memories.
  • The first book that gave me any real sense of the value of history was Swinton's "World History," which I received on my thirteenth birthday.
  • When he speaks, it is not to impress others, but because his heart would burst if he did not find an outlet for the thoughts that burn in his soul.
  • Of all the French writers that I have read, I like Moliere and Racine best.
  • I trust that my readers have not concluded from the preceding chapter on books that reading is my only pleasure; my pleasures and amusements are many and varied.
  • It is fun to try to steer by the scent of watergrasses and lilies, and of bushes that grow on the shore.
  • Tacking and jibbing, we wrestled with opposing winds that drove us from side to side with impetuous fury.
  • Our hearts beat fast, and our hands trembled with excitement, not fear, for we had the hearts of vikings, and we knew that our skipper was master of the situation.
  • As they passed us, the large craft and the gunboats in the harbour saluted and the seamen shouted applause for the master of the only little sail-boat that ventured out into the storm.
  • Thus it is that Even as the roots, shut in the darksome earth, Share in the tree-top's joyance, and conceive Of sunshine and wide air and winged things, By sympathy of nature, so do I gave evidence of things unseen.
  • There is a tradition that under this tree King Philip, the heroic Indian chief, gazed his last on earth and sky.
  • I had another tree friend, gentle and more approachable than the great oak--a linden that grew in the dooryard at Red Farm.
  • We went out to see the hero that had withstood so many tempests, and it wrung my heart to see him prostrate who had mightily striven and was now mightily fallen.
  • But I must not forget that I was going to write about last summer in particular.
  • We knew that beyond the border of our Eden men were making history by the sweat of their brows when they might better make a holiday.
  • They forget that my whole body is alive to the conditions about me.
  • In the country one sees only Nature's fair works, and one's soul is not saddened by the cruel struggle for mere existence that goes on in the crowded city.
  • Oh, would that men would leave the city, its splendour and its tumult and its gold, and return to wood and field and simple, honest living!
  • The squares are cut out, so that the men stand in them firmly.
  • The chessmen are of two sizes, the white larger than the black, so that I have no trouble in following my opponent's maneuvers by moving my hands lightly over the board after a play.
  • I find even the smallest child excellent company, and I am glad to say that children usually like me.
  • I feel in Diana's posture the grace and freedom of the forest and the spirit that tames the mountain lion and subdues the fiercest passions.
  • A medallion of Homer hangs on the wall of my study, conveniently low, so that I can easily reach it and touch the beautiful, sad face with loving reverence.
  • Be this as it may, I know that I can feel the heart-throbs of the ancient Greeks in their marble gods and goddesses.
  • Mr. Jefferson let me touch his face so that I could imagine how he looked on waking from that strange sleep of twenty years, and he showed me how poor old Rip staggered to his feet.
  • He asked me to indicate as far as I could the gestures and action that should go with the lines.
  • I shall never forget the ripple of alternating joy and woe that ran through that beautiful little play, or the wonderful child who acted it.
  • Is it not true, then, that my life with all its limitations touches at many points the life of the World Beautiful?
  • The perplexities, irritations and worries that have absorbed us pass like unpleasant dreams, and we wake to see with new eyes and hear with new ears the beauty and harmony of God's real world.
  • The solemn nothings that fill our everyday life blossom suddenly into bright possibilities.
  • In a word, while such friends are near us we feel that all is well.
  • I do not understand quite what that means.
  • I have met people so empty of joy, that when I clasped their frosty finger tips, it seemed as if I were shaking hands with a northeast storm.
  • Others there are whose hands have sunbeams in them, so that their grasp warms my heart.
  • My spirit could not reach up to his, but he gave me a real sense of joy in life, and I never left him without carrying away a fine thought that grew in beauty and depth of meaning as I grew.
  • Love your Heavenly Father with your whole heart and soul, love every child of God as much as ever you can, and remember that the possibilities of good are greater than the possibilities of evil; and you have the key to Heaven.
  • God in all that liberates and lifts, In all that humbles, sweetens and consoles.
  • Bishop Brooks taught me no special creed or dogma; but he impressed upon my mind two great ideas--the fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of man, and made me feel that these truths underlie all creeds and forms of worship.
  • In spite of the lapse of years, they seem so close to me that I should not think it strange if at any moment they should clasp my hand and speak words of endearment as they used to before they went away.
  • He knew so much and was so genial that it was impossible to feel dull in his presence.
  • There was an odour of print and leather in the room which told me that it was full of books, and I stretched out my hand instinctively to find them.
  • After that I saw Dr. Holmes many times and learned to love the man as well as the poet.
  • He was delighted that I could pronounce the words so well, and said that he had no difficulty in understanding me.
  • He said he was the little boy in the poem, and that the girl's name was Sally, and more which I have forgotten.
  • Here in Dr. Bell's laboratory, or in the fields on the shore of the great Bras d'Or, I have spent many delightful hours listening to what he had to tell me about his experiments, and helping him fly kites by means of which he expects to discover the laws that shall govern the future air-ship.
  • He makes you feel that if you only had a little more time, you, too, might be an inventor.
  • One does not need to read "A Boy I Knew" to understand him--the most generous, sweet-natured boy I ever knew, a good friend in all sorts of weather, who traces the footprints of love in the life of dogs as well as in that of his fellowmen.
  • Much that I hold sweetest, much that I hold most precious, I owe to her.
  • When I find my work particularly difficult and discouraging, she writes me letters that make me feel glad and brave; for she is one of those from whom we learn that one painful duty fulfilled makes the next plainer and easier.
  • I also knew Mr. Charles Dudley Warner, the most delightful of story-tellers and the most beloved friend, whose sympathy was so broad that it may be truly said of him, he loved all living things and his neighbour as himself.
  • This reminds me that Dr. Hale used to give a personal touch to his letters to me by pricking his signature in braille.
  • I received from them gifts that have the gentle concurrence of the heart, books containing their own thoughts, soul-illumined letters, and photographs that I love to have described again and again.
  • Thus it is that my friends have made the story of my life.
  • In that year Miss Keller entered college.
  • She showed me a tiny atze that very rich ladies in China wear because their feet never grow large.
  • I am very sorry that Eva and Bessie are sick.
  • I am very sorry that poor little Peregrine is dead now.
  • I did see the rock in Plymouth and a little ship like the Mayflower and the cradle that dear little Peregrine slept in and many old things that came in the Mayflower.
  • It was in this way that she learned to use correctly words of sound and vision which express ideas outside of her experience.
  • The stars are so far away that people cannot tell much about them, without very excellent instruments.
  • The engine-bell tells the passengers that they are coming to a station, and it tells the people to keep out of the way.
  • The other day I broke my doll's head off; but that was not a dreadful accident, because dolls do not live and feel, like people.
  • My teacher says, if children learn to be patient and gentle while they are little, that when they grow to be young ladies and gentlemen they will not forget to be kind and loving and brave.
  • I am very sorry that you are going so far away.
  • I am so glad that Eva is coming to stay with me this summer.
  • It hobbled, and that made me laugh; but it is wrong to laugh at the poor animals!
  • Give my love to all the little girls, and tell them that Helen loves them very, very much.
  • I am so glad that Lester and Henry are good little infants.
  • My Dear Mr. Wade:--I have just received a letter from my mother, telling me that the beautiful mastiff puppy you sent me had arrived in Tuscumbia safely.
  • EXCEEDINGLY is one that I learned yesterday.
  • I think she will laugh when I tell her she is a vertebrate, a mammal, a quadruped; and I shall be very sorry to tell her that she belongs to the order Carnivora.
  • I was very sorry that the poor little girl with the browns and the "tangled golden curls" died.
  • When I walk out in my garden I cannot see the beautiful flowers but I know that they are all around me; for is not the air sweet with their fragrance?
  • I know too that the tiny lily-bells are whispering pretty secrets to their companions else they would not look so happy.
  • One carried me in his arms so that my feet would not touch the water.
  • I shall always keep them, and it will make me very happy to think that you found them, on that far away island, from which Columbus sailed to discover our dear country.
  • Are you very glad that you could make so many happy?
  • I am sorry that you have no little children to play with you sometimes; but I think you are very happy with your books, and your many, many friends.
  • Do you think the lovely moon was glad that I could speak to her?
  • My teacher told me Tuesday that you wanted to know how I came to wish to talk with my mouth.
  • I did not know then that it was very naughty to do so.
  • This good and happy news delighted me exceedingly, for then I was sure that I should learn also.
  • That lady was yourself.
  • How did God tell people that his home was in heaven?
  • Please tell me something that you know about God.
  • Simpson, that is my brother, brought me some beautiful pond lilies yesterday--he is a very brother to me.
  • But now I want to tell you how glad I am that you are so happy and enjoying your home so very much.
  • Let me tell you how it seems to me that we come to know about our heavenly Father.
  • We like to think that the sunshine and the winds and the trees are able to love in some way of their own, for it would make us know that they were happy if we knew that they could love.
  • All the love that is in our hearts comes from him, as all the light which is in the flowers comes from the sun.
  • I told you that I was very happy because of your happiness.
  • But do you not think that God is happy too because you are happy?
  • He wants that most of all.
  • He knows that we can be really happy only when we are good.
  • A great deal of the trouble that is in the world is medicine which is very bad to take, but which it is good to take because it makes us better.
  • "We KNOW that He loves us," He says.
  • And, Helen, He loves men still, and He loves us, and He tells us that we may love Him.
  • That is the beautiful answer which the Bible gives.
  • It gratifies me very much to find that you remember me so kindly.
  • I rejoice to know that you are well and happy.
  • I am very much delighted to hear of your new acquisition--that you "talk with your mouth" as well as with your fingers.
  • It does great credit, not only to you, but to your instructors, who have so broken down the walls that seemed to shut you in that now your outlook seems more bright and cheerful than that of many seeing and hearing children.
  • It makes me very happy to know that I have kind and loving friends in the far-away State of Maine.
  • I did not imagine, when I studied about the forests of Maine, that a strong and beautiful ship would go sailing all over the world, carrying wood from those rich forests, to build pleasant homes and schools and churches in distant countries.
  • Please tell the brave sailors, who have charge of the HELEN KELLER, that little Helen who stays at home will often think of them with loving thoughts.
  • How I wish I could see you this lovely morning, and tell you all that has happened since I left home!
  • But I cannot see you and talk to you, so I will write and tell you all that I can think of.
  • I am sorry to say that our train was delayed in several places, which made us late in reaching New York.
  • At first I was very sorry when I found that the sun had hidden his shining face behind dull clouds, but afterwards I thought why he did it, and then I was happy.
  • The sun knows that you like to see the world covered with beautiful white snow and so he kept back all his brightness, and let the little crystals form in the sky.
  • I hope your Christmas Day will be a very happy one and that the New Year will be full of brightness and joy for you and every one.
  • From here he was to be sent to an almshouse, for at that time there was no other place for him in Pennsylvania.
  • She wanted him brought to Boston, and when she was told that money would be needed to get him a teacher, she answered, "We will raise it."
  • Helen asked that the contributions, which people were sending from all over America and England, be devoted to Tommy's education.
  • It makes me very happy indeed to know that I have such dear friends in other lands.
  • It makes me think that all people are good and loving.
  • I have read that the English and Americans are cousins; but I am sure it would be much truer to say that we are brothers and sisters.
  • My friends have told me about your great and magnificent city, and I have read a great deal that wise Englishmen have written.
  • Once the Earl of Meath came to see me, and he told me that the queen was much beloved by her people, because of her gentleness and wisdom.
  • It is very beautiful to think that people far away in England feel sorry for a little helpless child in America.
  • I used to think, when I read in my books about your great city, that when I visited it the people would be strangers to me, but now I feel differently.
  • It seems to me that all people who have loving, pitying hearts, are not strangers to each other.
  • You will be glad to hear that Tommy has a kind lady to teach him, and that he is a pretty, active little fellow.
  • He loves to climb much better than to spell, but that is because he does not know yet what a wonderful thing language is.
  • It is very beautiful to think that you can tell so many people of the heavenly Father's tender love for all His children even when they are not gentle and noble as He wishes them to be.
  • I hope too, that Bishop Brooks' whole life will be as rich in happiness as the month of May is full of blossoms and singing birds.
  • He has found out that doors have locks, and that little sticks and bits of paper can be got into the key-hole quite easily; but he does not seem very eager to get them out after they are in.
  • He loves to climb the bed-posts and unscrew the steam valves much better than to spell, but that is because he does not understand that words would help him to make new and interesting discoveries.
  • I hope that good people will continue to work for Tommy until his fund is completed, and education has brought light and music into his little life.
  • I cannot begin to tell you how delighted I was when Mr. Anagnos told me that you had sent him some money to help educate "Baby Tom."
  • Then I knew that you had not forgotten the dear little child, for the gift brought with it the thought of tender sympathy.
  • I am very sorry to say that Tommy has not learned any words yet.
  • Did you know that the blind children are going to have their commencement exercises in Tremont Temple, next Tuesday afternoon?
  • I enclose a ticket, hoping that you will come.
  • Yesterday I thought for the first time what a beautiful thing motion was, and it seemed to me that everything was trying to get near to God, does it seem that way to you?
  • My dear Mr. Munsell, Surely I need not tell you that your letter was very welcome.
  • I enjoyed every word of it and wished that it was longer.
  • It is evident that something has displeased his Majesty but I cannot imagine what it can be.
  • Perhaps the Old Sea God as he lay asleep upon the shore, heard the soft music of growing things--the stir of life in the earth's bosom, and his stormy heart was angry, because he knew that his and Winter's reign was almost at an end.
  • Now, dear friend, Please accept these few words because of the love that is linked with them.
  • We guide the pencil with the right hand, and feel carefully with the forefinger of the left hand to see that we shape and space the letters correctly.
  • Need I tell you that I was more than delighted to hear that you are really interested in the "tea"?
  • Please let Bishop Brooks know our plans, so that he may arrange to be with us.
  • Please give your dear aunt teacher's and my love and tell her that we enjoyed our little visit very much indeed.
  • You remember teacher and I told you Sunday that I wanted to have a little tea in aid of the kindergarten.
  • We thought everything was arranged: but we found Monday that Mrs. Elliott would not be willing to let us invite more than fifty people, because Mrs. Howe's house is quite small.
  • Teacher said yesterday, that perhaps Mrs. Spaulding would be willing to let us have her beautiful house, and [I] thought I would ask you about it.
  • Kind people will not disappoint me, when they know that I plead for helpless little children who live in darkness and ignorance.
  • But teacher came to me and taught my little fingers to use the beautiful key that has unlocked the door of my dark prison and set my spirit free.
  • My dear Carrie--You are to look upon it as a most positive proof of my love that I write to you to-day.
  • Nevertheless, I must tell you that we are alive,--that we reached home safely, and that we speak of you daily, and enjoy your interesting letters very much.
  • Please give my love to Miss Derby and tell her that I hope she gave my sweetest love to Baby Ruth.
  • I am glad, very glad that such a kind, beautiful lady loves me.
  • Teacher's eyes have been hurting her so that she could not write to any one, and I have been trying to fulfil a promise which I made last summer.
  • We received the Silent Worker which you sent, and I wrote right away to the editor to tell him that it was a mistake.
  • It is because my books are full of the riches of which Mr. Ruskin speaks that I love them so dearly.
  • I do try to think that he is still near, very near; but sometimes the thought that he is not here, that I shall not see him when I go to Boston,--that he is gone,--rushes over my soul like a great wave of sorrow.
  • In reading this letter about Niagara one should remember that Miss Keller knows distance and shape, and that the size of Niagara is within her experience after she has explored it, crossed the bridge and gone down in the elevator.
  • A lady seemed surprised that I loved flowers when I could not see their beautiful colors, and when I assured her I did love them, she said, "no doubt you feel the colors with your fingers."
  • But of course, it is not alone for their bright colors that we love the flowers....
  • But after a minute I answered that beauty was a form of goodness--and he went away.
  • The hotel was so near the river that I could feel it rushing past by putting my hand on the window.
  • We went down a hundred and twenty feet in an elevator that we might see the violent eddies and whirlpools in the deep gorge below the Falls.
  • Oh, I do so hope and pray that I shall speak well some day!...
  • I hope when I visit Venice, as I surely shall some day, that Mr. Munsell will go with me.
  • That is my castle in the air.
  • In a prefatory note which Miss Sullivan wrote for St. Nicholas, she says that people frequently said to her, "Helen sees more with her fingers than we do with our eyes."
  • I sat in King Ludwig's armchair and felt like a queen when Dr. Gillett remarked that I had many loyal subjects.
  • That was fine fun.
  • That is why I thought about starting one.
  • I did not like to trouble them while I was trying to get money for poor little Tommy, for of course it was more important that he should be educated than that my people should have books to read. 4.
  • I do not know what books we have, but I think it is a miscellaneous (I think that is the word) collection....
  • We are all discoverers in one sense, being born quite ignorant of all things; but I hardly think that is what she meant.
  • ...You know our kind teachers take us to see everything which they think will interest us, and we learn a great deal in that delightful way.
  • I had known about them for a long time; but I had never thought that I should see them, and talk to them; and I can scarcely realize now that this great pleasure has been mine!
  • (If that is the way to spell the name.)
  • I was much disappointed not to see her, but I hope I shall have that pleasure some other time.
  • Was that not very kind?
  • As I sit by the window writing to you, it is so lovely to have the soft, cool breezes fan my cheek and to feel that the hard work of last year is over!
  • We had looked forward to seeing you there, and so we were greatly disappointed that you did not come.
  • The "examinations" mentioned in this letter were merely tests given in the school, but as they were old Harvard papers, it is evident that in some subjects Miss Keller was already fairly well prepared for Radcliffe.
  • You will be glad to hear that I passed my examinations successfully.
  • You must tell Mr. Howells when you see him, that we are living in his house....
  • It is such a delight to be with the other girls, and do everything that they do.
  • All the time I was preparing for the great ordeal, I could not suppress an inward fear and trembling lest I should fail, and now it is an unspeakable relief to know that I have passed the examinations with credit.
  • But what I consider my crown of success is the happiness and pleasure that my victory has brought dear Teacher.
  • Indeed, I feel that the success is hers more than mine; for she is my constant inspiration....
  • I think Greek is the loveliest language that I know anything about.
  • If it is true that the violin is the most perfect of musical instruments, then Greek is the violin of human thought.
  • I find I get on faster, and do better work with Mr. Keith than I did in the classes at the Cambridge School, and I think it was well that I gave up that kind of work.
  • Besides, I have been told that "sociables" cost more than other kinds of bicycles.
  • I cannot help wishing sometimes that I could have some of the fun that other girls have.
  • You will be glad to hear that I enjoy Mathematics now.
  • Would a college at Havana not be the noblest and most enduring monument that could be raised to the brave men of the "Maine," as well as a source of infinite good to all concerned?
  • In it there would be no suggestion of hatred or revenge, nor a trace of the old-time belief that might makes right.
  • On the other hand, it would be a pledge to the world that we intend to stand by our declaration of war, and give Cuba to the Cubans, as soon as we have fitted them to assume the duties and responsibilities of a self-governing people....
  • Was that not lovely?
  • Perhaps you never got that letter.
  • You will be glad to hear that the books from England are coming now.
  • There is but one cloud in my sky at present; but that is one which casts a dark shadow over my life, and makes me very anxious at times.
  • But it is most distressing to me to feel that she is sacrificing her sight for me.
  • I would like so much to show him in some way how deeply I appreciate all that he is doing for me, and I cannot think of anything better to do.
  • However, I am glad that I am not debarred from all pleasure in the pictures.
  • We are all so glad and thankful that Mr. Kipling did not die!
  • You will be glad to hear that my mother, and little sister and brother are coming north to spend this summer with me.
  • She has not had a vacation for twelve years, think of it, and all that time she has been the sunshine of my life.
  • She said I had already shown the world that I could do the college work, by passing all my examinations successfully, in spite of many obstacles.
  • Her arguments seemed so wise and practical, that I could not but yield.
  • But, while we were discussing plans for the winter, a suggestion which Dr. Hale had made long ago flashed across Teacher's mind--that I might take courses somewhat like those offered at Radcliffe, under the instruction of the professors in these courses.
  • Why, you yourself seem to think that I taught you American braille, when you do not know a single letter in the system!
  • So you may imagine that we look quite like peacocks, only we've no trains....
  • Colonel Roosevelt was there, on Harvard's side; but bless you, he wore a white sweater, and no crimson that we know of!
  • There were about twenty-five thousand people at the game, and, when we went out, the noise was so terrific, we nearly jumped out of our skins, thinking it was the din of war, and not of a football game that we heard.
  • Dr. Greer read so slowly, that my teacher could tell me every word.
  • I do not think I have told you that my dear teacher is reading "The Faery Queen" to me.
  • You know a student's life is of necessity somewhat circumscribed and narrow and crowds out almost everything that is not in books....
  • My friends think it very strange that they should hesitate so long, especially when I have not asked them to simplify my work in the least, but only to modify it so as to meet the existing circumstances.
  • They were very kind; but I could not help feeling that they spoke more from a business than a humanitarian point of view.
  • Still I could not shut my eyes to the force and weight of their arguments, and I saw plainly that I must abandon--'s scheme as impracticable.
  • I considered this suggestion carefully, then I told Mr. Rhoades that I should be proud and glad to have wise friends to whom I could always turn for advice in all important matters.
  • This morning we received word that mother had given her consent to this arrangement.
  • At the same time Dr. Bell added that I could rest content and fight my way through Radcliffe in competition with seeing and hearing girls, while the great desire of my heart was being fulfilled.
  • I'm enjoying my work even more than I expected to, which is another way of saying that I'm glad I came.
  • She said that Maud was born deaf and lost her sight when she was only three months old, and that when she went to the Institution a few weeks ago, she was quite helpless.
  • Miss Watkins adds that she is very pretty.
  • I have written to her that when Maud learns to read, I shall have many stories to send her.
  • The dear, sweet little girl, it makes my heart ache to think how utterly she is cut off from all that is good and desirable in life.
  • I was in New York not long ago and I saw Miss Rhoades, who told me that she had seen Katie McGirr.
  • I was much surprised to hear all this; for I judged from your letters that Katie was a very precocious girl....
  • Now, however, I see the folly of attempting to hitch one's wagon to a star with harness that does not belong to it.
  • It never occurred to me that it might be worth while to make my own observations and describe the experiences peculiarly my own.
  • Did I tell you in my last letter that I had a new dress, a real party dress with low neck and short sleeves and quite a train?
  • I have worn it only once, but then I felt that Solomon in all his glory was not to be compared with me!
  • TO MR. WILLIAM WADE Cambridge, February 2, 1901. ...By the way, have you any specimens of English braille especially printed for those who have lost their sight late in life or have fingers hardened by long toil, so that their touch is less sensitive than that of other blind people?
  • Why, it is the print that can be most readily adapted to many different languages.
  • It is evident that the blind should have a good magazine, not a special magazine for the blind, but one of our best monthlies, printed in embossed letters.
  • It would be splendid to have The Great Round World printed in "language that can be felt."
  • To be able to read for one's self what is being willed, thought and done in the world--the world in whose joys and sorrows, failures and successes one feels the keenest interest--that would indeed be a happiness too deep for words.
  • I trust that the effort of The Great Round World to bring light to those who sit in darkness will receive the encouragement and support it so richly deserves.
  • He had just constructed a boat that could be propelled by a kite with the wind in its favor, and one day he tried experiments to see if he could steer the kite against the wind.
  • On one of them I noticed that the strings were of wire, and having had some experience in bead work, I said I thought they would break.
  • After that he asked me if the strings were all right and changed them at once when I answered in the negative.
  • Words are powerless to describe the desolation of that prison-house, or the joy of the soul that is delivered out of its captivity.
  • It was written out of my heart, and perhaps that is why it met a sympathetic response in other hearts.
  • I will ask Dr. Hale to lend me the letter, so that I can make a copy of it for you.
  • I know you will be amused when I tell you that I am deeply interested in politics.
  • It is fitting that Miss Keller's "Story of My Life" should appear at this time.
  • He quoted the passages in which she explains that college is not the "universal Athens" she had hoped to find, and cited the cases of other remarkable persons whose college life had proved disappointing.
  • But it is to be remembered that Miss Keller has written many things in her autobiography for the fun of writing them, and the disillusion, which the writer of the editorial took seriously, is in great part humorous.
  • That is why her teacher's records may be found to differ in some particulars from Miss Keller's account.
  • She saw, too, that her story properly fell into short chapters and redivided it.
  • Mark Twain has said that the two most interesting characters of the nineteenth century are Napoleon and Helen Keller.
  • Indeed, at one time it was believed that the best way for them to communicate was through systematized gestures, the sign language invented by the Abbe de l'Epee.
  • When Miss Keller speaks, her face is animated and expresses all the modes of her thought--the expressions that make the features eloquent and give speech half its meaning.
  • When she met Dr. Furness, the Shakespearean scholar, he warned her not to let the college professors tell her too many assumed facts about the life of Shakespeare; all we know, he said, is that Shakespeare was baptized, married, and died.
  • "That," he said, "is your prize-fighting bump."
  • Miss Keller's humour is that deeper kind of humour which is courage.
  • It was this same perseverance that made her go to college.
  • Her whimsical and adventuresome spirit puts her so much on her mettle that she makes rather a poor subject for the psychological experimenter.
  • When a psychologist asked her if Miss Keller spelled on her fingers in her sleep, Miss Sullivan replied that she did not think it worth while to sit up and watch, such matters were of so little consequence.
  • When the organ was played for her in St. Bartholomew's, the whole building shook with the great pedal notes, but that does not altogether account for what she felt and enjoyed.
  • It is amusing to read in one of the magazines of 1895 that Miss Keller "has a just and intelligent appreciation of different composers from having literally felt their music, Schumann being her favourite."
  • Miss Sullivan, who knows her pupil's mind, selects from the passing landscape essential elements, which give a certain clearness to Miss Keller's imagined view of an outer world that to our eyes is confused and overloaded with particulars.
  • Most that she knows at first hand comes from her sense of touch.
  • She suggests herself that she can know them better than we do, because she can get the true dimensions and appreciate more immediately the solid nature of a sculptured figure.
  • It is, however, in her daily life that one can best measure the delicacy of her senses and her manual skill.
  • Most blind people are aided by the sense of sound, so that a fair comparison is hard to make, except with other deaf-blind persons.
  • He says that she did pretty well and managed to make, after models, some conventional designs of the outlines of leaves and rosettes.
  • The manual alphabet is that in use among all educated deaf people.
  • The time that one of Miss Keller's friends realizes most strongly that she is blind is when he comes on her suddenly in the dark and hears the rustle of her fingers across the page.
  • Miss Sullivan says that both she and Miss Keller remember "in their fingers" what they have said.
  • This much is certain, she cannot have any sense that other people may not have, and the existence of a special sense is not evident to her or to any one who knows her.
  • Miss Keller is distinctly not a singular proof of occult and mysterious theories, and any attempt to explain her in that way fails to reckon with her normality.
  • All that she is, all that she has done, can be explained directly, except such things in every human being as never can be explained.
  • She does not, it would seem, prove the existence of spirit without matter, or of innate ideas, or of immortality, or anything else that any other human being does not prove.
  • It should be said that any double-case watch with the crystal removed serves well enough for a blind person whose touch is sufficiently delicate to feel the position of the hands and not disturb or injure them.
  • The finer traits of Miss Keller's character are so well known that one needs not say much about them.
  • Now that she has grown up, nobody thinks of being less frank with her than with any other intelligent young woman.
  • She has not even learned that exhibition on which so many pride themselves, of 'righteous indignation.'
  • After thinking a little while, she added, 'I think Shakespeare made it very terrible so that people would see how fearful it is to do wrong.'
  • Once when some one asked her to define "love," she replied, "Why, bless you, that is easy; it is what everybody feels for everybody else."
  • "Toleration," she said once, when she was visiting her friend Mrs. Laurence Hutton, "is the greatest gift of the mind; it requires the same effort of the brain that it takes to balance oneself on a bicycle."
  • Not all the attention that has been paid her since she was a child has made her take herself too seriously.
  • She means everything so thoroughly that her very quotations, her echoes from what she has read, are in truth original.
  • In the diary that she kept at the Wright-Humason School in New York she wrote on October 18, 1894, "I find that I have four things to learn in my school life here, and indeed, in life--to think clearly without hurry or confusion, to love everybody sincerely, to act in everything with the highest motives, and to trust in dear God unhesitatingly."
  • It is now sixty-five years since Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe knew that he had made his way through Laura Bridgman's fingers to her intelligence.
  • For Dr. Howe is the great pioneer on whose work that of Miss Sullivan and other teachers of the deaf-blind immediately depends.
  • His success convinced him that language can be conveyed through type to the mind of the blind-deaf child, who, before education, is in the state of the baby who has not learned to prattle; indeed, is in a much worse state, for the brain has grown in years without natural nourishment.
  • She taught it to Laura, and from that time on the manual alphabet was the means of communicating with her.
  • From a scientific standpoint it is unfortunate that it was impossible to keep such a complete record of Helen Keller's development.
  • Helen Keller became so rapidly a distinctive personality that she kept her teacher in a breathless race to meet the needs of her pupil, with no time or strength to make a scientific study.
  • Miss Sullivan knew at the beginning that Helen Keller would be more interesting and successful than Laura Bridgman, and she expresses in one of her letters the need of keeping notes.
  • How perfectly absurd to say that Helen is 'already talking fluently!'
  • Why, one might just as well say that a two-year-old child converses fluently when he says 'apple give,' or 'baby walk go.'
  • Indeed, I am heartily glad that I don't know all that is being said and written about Helen and myself.
  • Teachers of the deaf proved a priori that what Miss Sullivan had done could not be, and some discredit was reflected on her statements, because they were surrounded by the vague eloquence of Mr. Anagnos.
  • Although Miss Sullivan is still rather amused than distressed when some one, even one of her friends, makes mistakes in published articles about her and Miss Keller, still she sees that Miss Keller's book should include all the information that the teacher could at present furnish.
  • Many people have thought that any attempt to find the principles in her method would be nothing but a later theory superimposed on Miss Sullivan's work.
  • But it is evident that in these letters she was making a clear analysis of what she was doing.
  • It must be remembered that Miss Sullivan had to solve her problems unaided by previous experience or the assistance of any other teacher.
  • The impression that Miss Sullivan educated Helen Keller "under the direction of Mr. Anagnos" is erroneous.
  • I do not doubt that she derived from them much pleasure and not a little profit.
  • That remains for her to do at another time.
  • At present we have here the fullest record that has been published.
  • I tried with all my might to control the eagerness that made me tremble so that I could hardly walk.
  • Finding that there was, she turned to me, making the sign of turning a key and pointing to the bag.
  • Her mother interfered at this point and showed Helen by signs that she must not touch the bag.
  • I made her understand, by pointing to a trunk in the hall and to myself and nodding my head, that I had a trunk, and then made the sign that she had used for eating, and nodded again.
  • She understood in a flash and ran downstairs to tell her mother, by means of emphatic signs, that there was some candy in a trunk for her.
  • She has none of those nervous habits that are so noticeable and so distressing in blind children.
  • You see at a glance that she is blind.
  • One thing that impresses everybody is Helen's tireless activity.
  • Then it occurred to me that it was useless to continue the struggle--I must do something to turn the current of her thoughts.
  • She made the letters rapidly, and I gave her the cake, which she ate in a great hurry, thinking, I suppose, that I might take it from her.
  • I made the first row of vertical lines and let her feel it and notice that there were several rows of little holes.
  • She made the "c-a," then stopped and thought, and making the sign for eating and pointing downward she pushed me toward the door, meaning that I must go downstairs for some cake.
  • The two letters "c-a," you see, had reminded her of Fridays "lesson"--not that she had any idea that cake was the name of the thing, but it was simply a matter of association, I suppose.
  • She follows with her hands every motion you make, and she knew that I was looking for the doll.
  • She pointed down, meaning that the doll was downstairs.
  • I made the signs that she had used when she wished me to go for the cake, and pushed her toward the door.
  • She had not finished the cake she was eating, and I took it away, indicating that if she brought the doll I would give her back the cake.
  • I took them off and showed her that the two wooden ones must go on first, then the glass bead.
  • I let her see that I was eating, but did not let her put her hand in the plate.
  • Don't worry; I'll do my best and leave the rest to whatever power manages that which we cannot.
  • I very soon made up my mind that I could do nothing with Helen in the midst of the family, who have always allowed her to do exactly as she pleased.
  • I saw clearly that it was useless to try to teach her language or anything else until she learned to obey me.
  • I had an idea that I could win the love and confidence of my little pupil by the same means that I should use if she could see and hear.
  • But I soon found that I was cut off from all the usual approaches to the child's heart.
  • I told her that in my opinion the child ought to be separated from the family for a few weeks at least--that she must learn to depend on and obey me before I could make any headway.
  • After a long time Mrs. Keller said that she would think the matter over and see what Captain Keller thought of sending Helen away with me.
  • There is a piazza in front, covered with vines that grow so luxuriantly that you have to part them to see the garden beyond.
  • She devoted herself to her dolls the first evening, and when it was bedtime she undressed very quietly, but when she felt me get into bed with her, she jumped out on the other side, and nothing that I could do would induce her to get in again.
  • But I was afraid she would take cold, and I insisted that she must go to bed.
  • Helen knows several words now, but has no idea how to use them, or that everything has a name.
  • You will be glad to hear that my experiment is working out finely.
  • I have just heard something that surprised me very much.
  • It seems that Mr. Anagnos had heard of Helen before he received Captain Keller's letter last summer.
  • Doesn't it seem strange that Mr. Anagnos never referred to this interview?
  • It now remains my pleasant task to direct and mould the beautiful intelligence that is beginning to stir in the child-soul.
  • When I came, her movements were so insistent that one always felt there was something unnatural and almost weird about her.
  • I have noticed also that she eats much less, a fact which troubles her father so much that he is anxious to get her home.
  • When she spells "milk," she points to the mug, and when she spells "mug," she makes the sign for pouring or drinking, which shows that she has confused the words.
  • She has no idea yet that everything has a name.
  • When he succeeded in forming it to suit her, she patted him on his woolly head so vigorously that I thought some of his slips were intentional.
  • It was evident that she recognized the dog; for she put her arms round her neck and squeezed her.
  • And I don't intend that the lesson she has learned at the cost of so much pain and trouble shall be unlearned.
  • I have told Captain and Mrs. Keller that they must not interfere with me in any way.
  • I realize that it hurts to see their afflicted little child punished and made to do things against her will.
  • Only a few hours after my talk with Captain and Mrs. Keller (and they had agreed to everything), Helen took a notion that she wouldn't use her napkin at table.
  • Her father objected and said that no child of his should be deprived of his food on any account.
  • I took this for a promise that if I gave her some cake she would be a good girl.
  • This morning she planted her doll and showed me that she expected her to grow as tall as I. You must see that she is very bright, but you have no idea how cunning she is.
  • On March 31st I found that Helen knew eighteen nouns and three verbs.
  • She has learned that EVERYTHING HAS A NAME, AND THAT THE MANUAL ALPHABET IS THE KEY TO EVERYTHING SHE WANTS TO KNOW.
  • She has learned that EVERYTHING HAS A NAME, AND THAT THE MANUAL ALPHABET IS THE KEY TO EVERYTHING SHE WANTS TO KNOW.
  • In a previous letter I think I wrote you that "mug" and "milk" had given Helen more trouble than all the rest.
  • Then it occurred to me that with the help of this new word I might succeed in straightening out the "mug-milk" difficulty.
  • All the way back to the house she was highly excited, and learned the name of every object she touched, so that in a few hours she had adDED THIRTY NEW WORDS TO HER VOCABULARY.
  • And we notice that her face grows more expressive each day.
  • I shall assume that she has the normal child's capacity of assimilation and imitation.
  • Helen knows the meaning of more than a hundred words now, and learns new ones daily without the slightest suspicion that she is performing a most difficult feat.
  • But don't imagine that she "talks fluently."
  • They seem to me to be built up on the supposition that every child is a kind of idiot who must be taught to think.
  • Let him go and come freely, let him touch real things and combine his impressions for himself, instead of sitting indoors at a little round table, while a sweet-voiced teacher suggests that he build a stone wall with his wooden blocks, or make a rainbow out of strips of coloured paper, or plant straw trees in bead flower-pots.
  • Helen noticed that the puppies' eyes were closed, and she said, "Eyes--shut. Sleep--no," meaning, "The eyes are shut, but the puppies are not asleep."
  • After she had played with them a little while, the thought occurred to her that the puppies must have special names, like people, and she asked for the name of each pup.
  • She noticed that one of the puppies was much smaller than the others, and she spelled "small," making the sign at the same time, and I said "very small."
  • She evidently understood that VERY was the name of the new thing that had come into her head; for all the way back to the house she used the word VERY correctly.
  • Since I have abandoned the idea of regular lessons, I find that Helen learns much faster.
  • I know that the education of this child will be the distinguishing event of my life, if I have the brains and perseverance to accomplish it.
  • One of Helen's old habits, that is strongest and hardest to correct, is a tendency to break things.
  • The other day a friend brought her a new doll from Memphis, and I thought I would see if I could make Helen understand that she must not break it.
  • I gave her my braille slate to play with, thinking that the mechanical pricking of holes in the paper would amuse her and rest her mind.
  • She knew, too, that I sometimes write "letters to blind girls" on the slate; but I didn't suppose that she had any clear idea what a letter was.
  • I told her that the book wasn't afraid, and must sleep in its case, and that "girl" mustn't read in bed.
  • If, indeed, they apply to me even remotely, I do not see that I deserve any laudation on that account.
  • I know that she has remarkable powers, and I believe that I shall be able to develop and mould them.
  • She is much interested in some little chickens that are pecking their way into the world this morning.
  • They tell us that Helen is "overdoing," that her mind is too active (these very people thought she had no mind at all a few months ago!) and suggest many absurd and impossible remedies.
  • If she could see and hear, I suppose she would get rid of her superfluous energy in ways which would not, perhaps, tax her brain so much, although I suspect that the ordinary child takes his play pretty seriously.
  • I happened to tell her the other day that the vine on the fence was a "creeper."
  • Her every waking moment is spent in the endeavour to satisfy her innate desire for knowledge, and her mind works so incessantly that we have feared for her health.
  • The next day I found that she remembered all but spread.
  • She enjoys punching holes in paper with the stiletto, and I supposed it was because she could examine the result of her work; but we watched her one day, and I was much surprised to find that she imagined she was writing a letter.
  • Unlike Laura Bridgman, she is fond of gentlemen, and we notice that she makes friends with a gentleman sooner than with a lady.
  • It seems Viney had attempted to take a glass, which Helen was filling with stones, fearing that she would break it.
  • Helen resisted, and Viney tried to force it out of her hand, and I suspect that she slapped the child, or did something which caused this unusual outburst of temper.
  • She stood very still for a moment, and it was evident from her face, which was flushed and troubled, that a struggle was going on in her mind.
  • I told her that she had better not talk about it any more, but think.
  • She knew that I was much troubled, and would have liked to stay near me; but I thought it best for her to sit by herself.
  • At the dinner-table she was greatly disturbed because I didn't eat, and suggested that "Cook make tea for teacher."
  • But I told her that my heart was sad, and I didn't feel like eating.
  • I remember how unbearable I used to find the inquisitiveness of my friends' children; but I know now that these questions indicate the child's growing interest in the cause of things.
  • Of course she asks many questions that are not as intelligent as these.
  • I read the letter at the supper-table, and Mrs. Keller exclaimed: "My, Miss Annie, Helen writes almost as well as that now!"
  • The next morning we were astonished to find that she remembered all of them, and recognized every one she had met the night before.
  • She remembers all that I told her about it, and in telling her mother REPEATED THE VERY WORDS AND PHRASES I HAD USED IN DESCRIBING IT TO HER.
  • But it hardly seems possible that any mere words should convey to one who has never seen a mountain the faintest idea of its grandeur; and I don't see how any one is ever to know what impression she did receive, or the cause of her pleasure in what was told her about it.
  • All that we do know certainly is that she has a good memory and imagination and the faculty of association.
  • These questions were sometimes asked under circumstances which rendered them embarrassing, and I made up my mind that something must be done.
  • I decided that there was no reason, except my deplorable ignorance of the great facts that underlie our physical existence.
  • It was no doubt because of this ignorance that I rushed in where more experienced angels fear to tread.
  • I reminded her of the corn, beans and watermelon-seed she had planted in the spring, and told her that the tall corn in the garden, and the beans and watermelon vines had grown from those seeds.
  • I made her understand that all life comes from an egg.
  • I told her that she could call the egg the cradle of life.
  • I had no difficulty in making it clear to her that if plants and animals didn't produce offspring after their kind, they would cease to exist, and everything in the world would soon die.
  • I did, however, try to give her the idea that love is the great continuer of life.
  • But she was surprised that hot water should come out of the ground.
  • I do not wonder you were surprised to hear that I was going to write something for the report.
  • He agreed with Mr. Anagnos that it was my duty to give others the benefit of my experience.
  • I kept a record of everything she said last week, and I found that she knows six hundred words.
  • I told her that her hair was brown, and she asked, "Is brown very pretty?"
  • Helen talks a great deal about things that she cannot know of through the sense of touch.
  • I told her that when we are happy our thoughts are bright, and when we are naughty they are sad.
  • You see, she had an idea that the colour of our thoughts matched that of our skin.
  • I couldn't help laughing, for at that very moment Viney was shouting at the top of her voice:
  • You will see from her letter that she uses many pronouns correctly.
  • She is also beginning to realize that she is not like other children.
  • I told her that I could see things with my eyes, and that she could see them with her fingers.
  • Taking the bullet she made her habitual sign for SMALL--that is, by pinching a little bit of the skin of one hand.
  • A slip on which was printed, in raised letters, the word BOX was placed on the object, and the same experiment was tried with a great many articles, but she did not immediately comprehend that the label-name represented the thing.
  • Her mother and I cut up several sheets of printed words so that she could arrange them into sentences.
  • She learned it gladly when she discovered that she could herself read what she had written; and this still affords her constant pleasure.
  • On being told that she was white and that one of the servants was black, she concluded that all who occupied a similar menial position were of the same hue; and whenever I asked her the colour of a servant she would say "black."
  • One of the leopards licked her hands, and the man in charge of the giraffes lifted her up in his arms so that she could feel their ears and see how tall they were.
  • I find it hard to realize that Christmas is almost here, in spite of the fact that Helen talks about nothing else.
  • She has made me repeat the story of little Red Riding Hood so often that I believe I could say it backward.
  • She likes stories that make her cry--I think we all do, it's so nice to feel sad when you've nothing particular to be sad about.
  • I think, too, that they quicken all the child's faculties, because they stimulate the imagination.
  • TOO MUCH EXPLANATION DIRECTS THE CHILD'S ATTENTION TO WORDS AND SENTENCES, SO THAT HE FAILS TO GET THE THOUGHT AS A WHOLE.
  • I do not think anyone can read, or talk for that matter, until he forgets words and sentences in the technical sense.
  • It was not difficult, however, to make her understand that there was a present for each child, and to her great delight she was permitted to hand the gifts to the children.
  • I HAVE TRIED FROM THE BEGINNING TO TALK NATURALLY TO HELEN AND TO TEACH HER TO TELL ME ONLY THINGS THAT INTEREST HER AND ASK QUESTIONS ONLY FOR THE SAKE OF FINDING OUT WHAT SHE WANTS TO KNOW.
  • When I see that she is eager to tell me something, but is hampered because she does not know the words, I supply them and the necessary idioms, and we get along finely.
  • The child's eagerness and interest carry her over many obstacles that would be our undoing if we stopped to define and explain everything.
  • When I told her that Santa Claus would not come until she was asleep, she shut her eyes and said, "He will think girl is asleep."
  • She knows that her father shoots partridges and deer and other game.
  • After talking about the various things that carpenters make, she asked me, "Did carpenter make me?" and before I could answer, she spelled quickly, "No, no, photographer made me in Sheffield."
  • Why, for instance, does he take the trouble to ascribe motives to me that I never dreamed of?
  • How ridiculous it is to say I had drunk so copiously of the noble spirit of Dr. Howe that I was fired with the desire to rescue from darkness and obscurity the little Alabamian!
  • I explained that Uncle Frank was old, and couldn't learn braille easily.
  • When I told her that Mildred's eyes were blue, she asked, "Are they like wee skies?"
  • I can't believe that the colour-impressions she received during the year and a half she could see and hear are entirely lost.
  • It was nothing but excitement from first to last--drives, luncheons, receptions, and all that they involve when you have an eager, tireless child like Helen on your hands.
  • The stores in Memphis are very good, and I managed to spend all the money that I had with me.
  • Dr. Bell writes that Helen's progress is without a parallel in the education of the deaf, or something like that and he says many nice things about her teacher.
  • Captain Keller said at breakfast this morning that he wished I would take Helen to church.
  • She seemed to think at first that the children all belonged to the visiting ministers; but soon she recognized some little friends among them, and I told her the ministers didn't bring their children with them.
  • When it was time for the church service to begin, she was in such a state of excitement that I thought it best to take her away; but Captain Keller said, "No, she will be all right."
  • He gave her his watch to play with; but that didn't keep her still.
  • When the communion service began, she smelt the wine, and sniffed so loud that every one in the church could hear.
  • I never was so glad to get out of a place as I was to leave that church!
  • Then she threw herself on the floor and began to swim so energetically that some of us thought we should be kicked out of our chairs!
  • Do you realize that this is the last letter I shall write to you for a long, long time?
  • The next word that you receive from me will be in a yellow envelope, and it will tell you when we shall reach Boston.
  • There is something about her that attracts people.
  • Another said, "Damn me! but I'd give everything I own in the world to have that little girl always near me."
  • Dr. Keller distributed the extracts from the report that Mr. Anagnos sent me, and he could have disposed of a thousand if he had had them.
  • He had never heard of "talking-gloves"; but I explained that she had seen a glove on which the alphabet was printed, and evidently thought they could be bought.
  • I told him he could buy some gloves if he wished, and that I would have the alphabet stamped on them.
  • It seems strange that people should marvel at what is really so simple.
  • If you had called these sensations respectively BLACK and WHITE, he would have adopted them as readily; but he would mean by BLACK and WHITE the same things that he means by SWEET and SOUR.
  • It is not the word, but the capacity to experience the sensation that counts in his education.
  • I was incredulous when he first told me the secret.
  • "No," she replied, "I think not; but children learn better if they write about things that concern them personally."
  • It frequently happens that the perfume of a flower or the flavour of a fruit recalls to her mind some happy event in home life, or a delightful birthday party.
  • Indeed, her whole body is so finely organized that she seems to use it as a medium for bringing herself into closer relations with her fellow creatures.
  • She responds quickly to the gentle pressure of affection, the pat of approval, the jerk of impatience, the firm motion of command, and to the many other variations of the almost infinite language of the feelings; and she has become so expert in interpreting this unconscious language of the emotions that she is often able to divine our very thoughts.
  • In my account of Helen last year, I mentioned several instances where she seemed to have called into use an inexplicable mental faculty; but it now seems to me, after carefully considering the matter, that this power may be explained by her perfect familiarity with the muscular variations of those with whom she comes into contact, caused by their emotions.
  • Helen remained motionless through them all, not once showing the least sign that she realized what was going on.
  • The wounded leg soon became so much worse that the horse was suspended from a beam.
  • At last it became necessary to kill him, and, when Helen next asked to go and see him, I told her that he was DEAD.
  • This was the first time that she had heard the word.
  • She does not realize that one can be anything but kind-hearted and tender.
  • One morning she was greatly distressed by finding that one of the dogs had a block fastened to her collar.
  • We explained that it was done to keep Pearl from running away.
  • Her father wrote to her last summer that the birds and bees were eating all his grapes.
  • I got the milk to show her that she had used the correct word; but I did not let her drink it until she had, with my assistance, made a complete sentence, as "Give Helen some milk to drink."
  • The warm winds blow The waters flow And robin dear, Is come to show That Spring is here.
  • I tried to describe to her the appearance of a camel; but, as we were not allowed to touch the animal, I feared that she did not get a correct idea of its shape.
  • It was the first two years that counted.
  • The horse was an old, worn-out chestnut, with an ill-kept coat, and bones that showed plainly through it; the knees knuckled over, and the forelegs were very unsteady.
  • There was a hopeless look in the dull eye that I could not help noticing, and then, as I was thinking where I had seen that horse before, she looked full at me and said, 'Black Beauty, is that you?'
  • I never knew before that there could be such a change in anything.
  • She has one advantage over ordinary children, that nothing from without distracts her attention from her studies.
  • I have never known her to be willing to leave a lesson when she felt that there was anything in it which she did not understand.
  • She was quiet for a moment, and then asked, with spirit: How do you know that I cannot understand?
  • You must remember, dear teacher, that Greek parents were very particular with their children, and they used to let them listen to wise words, and I think they understood some of them.
  • I have found it best not to tell her that she cannot understand, because she is almost certain to become excited.
  • After a time I became discouraged, and told her I was afraid she could not make it stand, but that I would build it for her; but she did not approve of this plan.
  • Her mind works so rapidly, that it often happens, that when I give her an example she will give me the correct answer before I have time to write out the question.
  • Once, when a question puzzled her very much, I suggested that we take a walk and then perhaps she would understand it.
  • I have always talked to Helen exactly as I would talk to a seeing and hearing child, and I have insisted that other people should do the same.
  • Whenever any one asks me if she will understand this or that word I always reply: Never mind whether she understands each separate word of a sentence or not.
  • Of course, in the beginning it was necessary that the things described should be familiar and interesting, and the English pure and simple.
  • When she had read the words of the second sentence, I showed her that there really was a mouse in the box.
  • The expression of the little girl's countenance showed that she was perplexed.
  • When she read, "Do not let the cat get the mouse!" she recognized the negation in the sentence, and seemed to know that the cat must not get the mouse.
  • By signs she made me understand that she wished another story, and I gave her a book containing very short stories, written in the most elementary style.
  • She ran her fingers along the lines, finding the words she knew and guessing at the meaning of others, in a way that would convince the most conservative of educators that a little deaf child, if given the opportunity, will learn to read as easily and naturally as ordinary children.
  • I am convinced that Helen's use of English is due largely to her familiarity with books.
  • One day as we left the library I noticed that she appeared more serious than usual, and I asked the cause.
  • I asked what she thought that meant.
  • It was hoped that one so peculiarly endowed by nature as Helen, would, if left entirely to her own resources, throw some light upon such psychological questions as were not exhaustively investigated by Dr. Howe; but their hopes were not to be realized.
  • In the case of Helen, as in that of Laura Bridgman, disappointment was inevitable.
  • It is impossible to isolate a child in the midst of society, so that he shall not be influenced by the beliefs of those with whom he associates.
  • After a moment she went on: A. says God is everywhere, and that He is all love; but I do not think a person can be made out of love.
  • I think my mother got me from heaven, but I do not know where that place is.
  • After May, 1890, it was evident to me that she had reached a point where it was impossible to keep from her the religious beliefs held by those with whom she was in daily contact.
  • Tell me something that Father Nature does.
  • Can any one doubt after reading these questions that the child who was capable of asking them was also capable of understanding at least their elementary answers?
  • Throughout Helen's education I have invariably assumed that she can understand whatever it is desirable for her to know.
  • Without that degree of mental development and activity which perceives the necessity of superhuman creative power, no explanation of natural phenomena is possible.
  • But after a great deal of thought and study, I told her, men came to believe that all forces were manifestations of one power, and to that power they gave the name GOD.
  • I told her that God was everywhere, and that she must not think of Him as a person, but as the life, the mind, the soul of everything.
  • It is often necessary to remind her that there are infinitely many things that the wisest people in the world cannot explain.
  • When she referred to our conversation again, it was to ask, "Why did not Jesus go away, so that His enemies could not find Him?"
  • When told that Jesus walked on the sea to meet His disciples, she said, decidedly, "It does not mean WALKED, it means SWAM."
  • That is why I cannot see God.
  • "No one knows what the soul is like," I replied; "but we know that it is not the body, and it is that part of us which thinks and loves and hopes."
  • I explained to her that the soul, too, is invisible, or in other words, that it is without apparent form.
  • I was obliged to confess that I did not know, but suggested that it might be on one of the stars.
  • I said, "No; because, if there were no death, our world would soon be so crowded with living creatures that it would be impossible for any of them to live comfortably."
  • When told recently that Hungarians were born musicians, she asked in surprise, "Do they sing when they are born?"
  • When her friend added that some of the pupils he had seen in Budapest had more than one hundred tunes in their heads, she said, laughing, "I think their heads must be very noisy."
  • The fact that sin exists, and that great misery results from it, dawned gradually upon her mind as she understood more and more clearly the lives and experiences of those around her.
  • I always tried to find out what interested her most, and made that the starting-point for the new lesson, whether it had any bearing on the lesson I had planned to teach or not.
  • It may be true, as some maintain, that language cannot express to us much beyond what we have lived and experienced; but I have always observed that children manifest the greatest delight in the lofty, poetic language which we are too ready to think beyond their comprehension.
  • It is not necessary that a child should understand every word in a book before he can read with pleasure and profit.
  • The attitude of the child toward his books should be that of unconscious receptivity.
  • It is true, the more sensitive and imaginative the mind is that receives the thought-pictures and images of literature, the more nicely the finest lines are reproduced.
  • Her mind is so filled with the beautiful thoughts and ideals of the great poets that nothing seems commonplace to her; for her imagination colours all life with its own rich hues.
  • Miss Keller's education, however, is so fundamentally a question of language teaching that it rather includes the problems of the deaf than limits itself to the deaf alone.
  • All day long in their play-time and work-time Miss Sullivan kept spelling into her pupil's hand, and by that Helen Keller absorbed words, just as the child in the cradle absorbs words by hearing thousands of them before he uses one and by associating the words with the occasion of their utterance.
  • Thus he learns that words name things and actions and feelings.
  • It is the proposition, something predicated about something, that conveys an idea.
  • True, single words do suggest and express ideas; the child may say simply "mamma" when he means "Where is mamma?" but he learns the expression of the ideas that relate to mamma--he learns language--by hearing complete sentences.
  • It is true rather that she has a special aptitude for thinking, and her leaning toward language is due to the fact that language to her meant life.
  • It is true that a teacher with ten times Miss Sullivan's genius could not have made a pupil so remarkable as Helen Keller out of a child born dull and mentally deficient.
  • And the fact remains that she was taught by a method of teaching language to the deaf the essential principles of which are clearly expressed in Miss Sullivan's letters, written while she was discovering the method and putting it successfully into practice.
  • And this does not mean that Miss Keller is unduly dependent on her teacher.
  • There is, then, a good deal that Miss Sullivan has done for Miss Keller which no other teacher can do in just the same way for any one else.
  • I know that this idea will be vigorously combated by those who conduct schools for the deaf.
  • But it is evident that precisely what the deaf child needs to be taught is what other children learn before they go to school at all.
  • That is just what the teacher of the deaf child must be, a child ready to play and romp, and interested in all childish things.
  • Let me sum up a few of the elements that made Helen Keller what she is.
  • Mrs. Keller writes me that before her illness Helen made signs for everything, and her mother thought this habit the cause of her slowness in learning to speak.
  • How far she could receive communications is hard to determine, but she knew much that was going on around her.
  • She recognized that others used their lips; she "saw" her father reading a paper and when he laid it down she sat in his chair and held the paper before her face.
  • It was, then, to a good subject that Miss Sullivan brought her devotion and intelligence, and fearless willingness to experiment.
  • Miss Sullivan's methods were so good that even without the practical result, any one would recognize the truth of the teacher's ideas.
  • And finally all the conditions were good for that first nature school, in which the teacher and pupil played together, exploring together and educating themselves, pupil and teacher inseparable.
  • This is like the effect of the slow dwelling on long words, not quite well managed, that one notices in a child who is telling a solemn story.
  • The principal thing that is lacking is sentence accent and variety in the inflection of phrases.
  • Her friend, Mr. John Hitz, whose native tongue is German, says that her pronunciation is excellent.
  • Her friends grow accustomed to her speech and forget that it is different from that of any one else.
  • Children seldom have any difficulty in understanding her; which suggests that her deliberate measured speech is like theirs, before they come to the adult trick of running all the words of a phrase into one movement of the breath.
  • I am told that Miss Keller speaks better than most other deaf people.
  • I explained to her that some deaf children were taught to speak, but that they could see their teachers' mouths, and that that was a very great assistance to them.
  • She at once resolved to learn to speak, and from that day to this she has never wavered in that resolution.
  • I am hardly prepared to decide that question, or even give an opinion regarding it.
  • I believe that I have hardly begun yet to know what is possible.
  • Teachers of the deaf often express surprise that Helen's speech is so good when she has not received any regular instruction in speech since the first few lessons given her by Miss Fuller.
  • I knew that Laura Bridgman had shown the same intuitive desire to produce sounds, and had even learned to pronounce a few simple words, which she took great delight in using, and I did not doubt that Helen could accomplish as much as this.
  • I thought, however, that the advantage she would derive would not repay her for the time and labour that such an experiment would cost.
  • It seems, however, that, while she was still suffering from severe pain, she noticed the movements of her mother's lips.
  • It will be seen that they contain three vowel and six consonant elements, and these formed the foundation for her first real lesson in speaking.
  • It must be remembered that speech contributed in no way to her fundamental education, though without the ability to speak she could hardly have gone to higher schools and to college.
  • It seems very strange to me that there should be this difference of opinion; I cannot understand how any one interested in our education can fail to appreciate the satisfaction we feel in being able to express our thoughts in living words.
  • Do not think of to-days failures, but of the success that may come to-morrow.
  • Remember, no effort that we make to attain something beautiful is ever lost.
  • Sometime, somewhere, somehow we shall find that which we seek.
  • No one can have read Miss Keller's autobiography without feeling that she writes unusually fine English.
  • Any teacher of composition knows that he can bring his pupils to the point of writing without errors in syntax or in the choice of words.
  • The reason why she read to her pupil so many good books is due, in some measure, to the fact that she had so recently recovered her eyesight.
  • For it was Dr. Bell who first saw the principles that underlie Miss Sullivan's method, and explained the process by which Helen Keller absorbed language from books.
  • I inquired of her where she had read this; she did not remember having read it, did not seem to know that she had learned it.
  • The teachers at the Institution expressed the opinion that the description did not appear in any book in raised print in that library; but one lady, Miss Marrett, took upon herself the task of examining books of poems in ordinary type, and was rewarded by finding the following lines in one of Longfellow's minor poems, entitled 'Snowflakes':
  • It would seem that Helen had learned and treasured the memory of this expression of the poet, and this morning in the snow-storm had found its application.
  • I knew that in that sunny land spring had come in all its splendour.
  • About the same time, in a letter to a friend, in which she makes mention of her Southern home, she gives so close a reproduction from a poem by one of her favourite authors that I will give extracts from Helen's letter and from the poem itself:
  • The original story was read to her from a copy of "Andersen's Stories," published by Leavitt & Allen Bros., and may be found on p. 97 of Part I. in that volume.
  • In one of his letters, speaking of how God in every way tells us of His love, he says, "I think he writes it even upon the walls of the great house of nature which we live in, that he is our Father."
  • Helen's mind is so gifted by nature that she seems able to understand with only the faintest touch of explanation every possible variety of external relations.
  • This became a difficult task, as her publishers in Philadelphia had retired from business many years ago; however, it was eventually discovered that her residence is at Wilmington, Delaware, and copies of the second edition of the book, 1889, were obtained from her.
  • What a wonderfully active and retentive mind that gifted child must have!
  • No one shall be allowed to think it was anything wrong; and some day she will write a great, beautiful story or poem that will make many people happy.
  • She thinks it is wonderful that two people should write stories so much alike; but she still considers her own as original.
  • I give below a portion of Miss Canby's story, "The Rose Fairies," and also Helen's letter to Mr. Anagnos containing her "dream," so that the likenesses and differences may be studied by those interested in the subject:
  • As he came in sight of the rose-bushes that grew near the side of the house, he suddenly clapped his hands, and with a little shout of joy stopped to look at them; they were all covered with lovely rosebuds.
  • After awhile he went nearer, and looking closely at the buds, found that they were folded up, leaf over leaf, as eyelids are folded over sleeping eyes, so that Birdie thought they must be asleep.
  • Here the similarity in the language of the story to that in the letter ceases.
  • I clapped my chubby hands for joy when I saw that the rose-bushes were covered with lovely buds.
  • Please give my love to your good Greek friends, and tell them that I shall come to Athens some day.
  • Well, one day King Frost was trying to think of some good that he could do with his treasure; and suddenly he concluded to send some of it to his kind neighbour, Santa Claus, to buy presents of food and clothing for the poor, that they might not suffer so much when King Winter went near their homes.
  • Still, for awhile, the frost fairies did not notice this strange occurrence, for they were down on the grass, so far below the tree-tops that the wonderful shower of treasure was a long time in reaching them; but at last one of them said, Hark!
  • Then looking more closely at the trees around, they saw that the treasure was all melting away, and that much of it was already spread over the leaves of the oak trees and maples, which were shining with their gorgeous dress of gold and bronze, crimson and emerald.
  • And when he came to the nut trees, and saw the shells left by the idle fairies and all the traces of their frolic, he knew exactly how they had acted, and that they had disobeyed him by playing and loitering on their way through the woods.
  • You must know that King Frost, like all other kings, has great treasures of gold and precious stones; but as he is a generous old monarch, he endeavours to make a right use of his riches.
  • Then looking around more closely, they saw that much of the treasure was already melted, for the oaks and maples were arrayed in gorgeous dresses of gold and crimson and emerald.
  • They were afraid that King Frost would come and punish them.
  • I never thought that people could make such mistakes.
  • I do not feel that I can add anything more that will be of interest.
  • Soon after its appearance in print I was pained to learn, through the Goodson Gazette, that a portion of the story (eight or nine passages) is either a reproduction or adaptation of Miss Margaret Canby's "Frost Fairies."
  • I hasten to assure you that Helen could not have received any idea of the story from any of her relations or friends here, none of whom can communicate with her readily enough to impress her with the details of a story of that character.
  • Helen told me that for a long time she had thought of Jack Frost as a king, because of the many treasures which he possessed.
  • She could not remember that any one had ever read to her any stories about King Frost, but said she had talked with her teacher about Jack Frost and the wonderful things he did.
  • The only person that we supposed might possibly have read the story to Helen was her friend, Mrs. Hopkins, whom she was visiting at the time in Brewster.
  • I have scarcely any doubt that Miss Canby's little book was read to Helen, by Mrs. Hopkins, in the summer of 1888.
  • This may explain the reason why Helen claims persistently that "The Frost King" is her own story.
  • The episode had a deadening effect on Helen Keller and on Miss Sullivan, who feared that she had allowed the habit of imitation, which has in truth made Miss Keller a writer, to go too far.
  • It shows how the child-mind gathers into itself words it has heard, and how they lurk there ready to come out when the key that releases the spring is touched.
  • The reason that we do not observe this process in ordinary children is, because we seldom observe them at all, and because they are fed from so many sources that the memories are confused and mutually destructive.
  • It is original in the same way that a poet's version of an old story is original.
  • All use of language is imitative, and one's style is made up of all other styles that one has met.
  • Thus it is that any child may be taught to use correct English by not being allowed to read or hear any other kind.
  • Writing of the moment when she learned that everything has a name, she says: We met the nurse carrying my little cousin; and teacher spelled 'baby.'
  • It was a word that created these thoughts in her mind.
  • Let him get language and he gets the very stuff that language is made of, the thought and the experience of his race.
  • I discovered the true way to walk when I was a year old, and during the radiant summer days that followed I was never still a minute....
  • I still have confused memories of that illness.
  • They did not know for some time after my recovery that the cruel fever had taken my sight and hearing; taken all the light and music and gladness out of my little life.
  • When I awoke and found that all was dark and still, I suppose I thought it was night, and I must have wondered why day was so long coming.
  • When I was a little older I felt the need of some means of communication with those around me, and I began to make simple signs which my parents and friends readily understood; but it often happened that I was unable to express my thoughts intelligibly, and at such times I would give way to my angry feelings utterly....
  • That word startled my soul, and it awoke, full of the spirit of the morning, full of joyous, exultant song.
  • I learned a great many words that day.
  • I do not remember what they all were; but I do know that MOTHER, FATHER, SISTER and TEACHER were among them.
  • I was never angry after that because I understood what my friends said to me, and I was very busy learning many wonderful things.
  • Her vocabulary has all the phrases that other people use, and the explanation of it, and the reasonableness of it ought to be evident by this time.
  • It is true, on the other hand, that in her descriptions, she is best from the point of view of art when she is faithful to her own sensations; and this is precisely true of all artists.
  • Miss Keller's autobiography contains almost everything that she ever intended to publish.
  • To be sure, I take the keenest interest in everything that concerns those who surround me; it is this very interest which makes it so difficult for me to carry on a conversation with some people who will not talk or say what they think, but I should not be sorry to find more friends ready to talk with me now and then about the wonderful things I read.
  • For the first time since my entrance into Radcliffe I had the opportunity to make friends with all my classmates...
  • It surprises me to find that such an idea has crossed the mind of any one, especially of a highly gifted critic.
  • The very fact that the nineteenth century has not produced many authors whom the world may count among the greatest of all time does not in my opinion justify the remark, "There may come a time when people cease to write."
  • Now I understand that the darkness everywhere may hold possibilities better even than my hopes.
  • You forget that death comes to the rich and the poor alike, and comes once for all; but remember, Acheron could not be bribed by gold to ferry the crafty Prometheus back to the sunlit world.
  • Ah, the pranks that the nixies of Dreamland play on us while we sleep!
  • I rarely have dreams that are not in keeping with what I really think and feel, but one night my very nature seemed to change, and I stood in the eye of the world a mighty man and a terrible.
  • Naturally I love peace and hate war and all that pertains to war; I see nothing admirable in the ruthless career of Napoleon, save its finish.
  • I rode a fiery hunter--I can feel the impatient toss of his head now and the quiver that ran through him at the first roar of the cannon.
  • I was very fond of bananas, and one night I dreamed that I found a long string of them in the dining-room, near the cupboard, all peeled and deliciously ripe, and all I had to do was to stand under the string and eat as long as I could eat.
  • Perhaps they are the ghosts of thoughts that once inhabited the mind of an ancestor.
  • In most books, the I, or first person, is omitted; in this it will be retained; that, in respect to egotism, is the main difference.
  • We commonly do not remember that it is, after all, always the first person that is speaking.
  • Self-emancipation even in the West Indian provinces of the fancy and imagination--what Wilberforce is there to bring that about?
  • But alert and healthy natures remember that the sun rose clear.
  • What old people say you cannot do, you try and find that you can.
  • Here is life, an experiment to a great extent untried by me; but it does not avail me that they have tried it.
  • Hippocrates has even left directions how we should cut our nails; that is, even with the ends of the fingers, neither shorter nor longer.
  • What demon possessed me that I behaved so well?
  • I think that we may safely trust a good deal more than we do.
  • Confucius said, "To know that we know what we know, and that we do not know what we do not know, that is true knowledge."
  • When one man has reduced a fact of the imagination to be a fact to his understanding, I foresee that all men at length establish their lives on that basis.
  • Let us consider for a moment what most of the trouble and anxiety which I have referred to is about, and how much it is necessary that we be troubled, or at least careful.
  • It is remarkable that we know so much of them as we do.
  • Are we sure that there is none of it in our own lives?
  • I would gladly tell all that I know about it, and never paint "No Admittance" on my gate.
  • I have thought that Walden Pond would be a good place for business, not solely on account of the railroad and the ice trade; it offers advantages which it may not be good policy to divulge; it is a good port and a good foundation.
  • It is said that a flood-tide, with a westerly wind, and ice in the Neva, would sweep St. Petersburg from the face of the earth.
  • As this business was to be entered into without the usual capital, it may not be easy to conjecture where those means, that will still be indispensable to every such undertaking, were to be obtained.
  • Let him who has work to do recollect that the object of clothing is, first, to retain the vital heat, and secondly, in this state of society, to cover nakedness, and he may judge how much of any necessary or important work may be accomplished without adding to his wardrobe.
  • Kings and queens who wear a suit but once, though made by some tailor or dressmaker to their majesties, cannot know the comfort of wearing a suit that fits.
  • Most behave as if they believed that their prospects for life would be ruined if they should do it.
  • I have heard of a dog that barked at every stranger who approached his master's premises with clothes on, but was easily quieted by a naked thief.
  • A man who has at length found something to do will not need to get a new suit to do it in; for him the old will do, that has lain dusty in the garret for an indeterminate period.
  • I say, beware of all enterprises that require new clothes, and not rather a new wearer of clothes.
  • Our moulting season, like that of the fowls, must be a crisis in our lives.
  • Nevertheless, we will not forget that some Egyptian wheat was handed down to us by a mummy.
  • On the whole, I think that it cannot be maintained that dressing has in this or any country risen to the dignity of an art.
  • We are amused at beholding the costume of Henry VIII, or Queen Elizabeth, as much as if it was that of the King and Queen of the Cannibal Islands.
  • Let Harlequin be taken with a fit of the colic and his trappings will have to serve that mood too.
  • The manufacturers have learned that this taste is merely whimsical.
  • Of two patterns which differ only by a few threads more or less of a particular color, the one will be sold readily, the other lie on the shelf, though it frequently happens that after the lapse of a season the latter becomes the most fashionable.
  • I cannot believe that our factory system is the best mode by which men may get clothing.
  • The condition of the operatives is becoming every day more like that of the English; and it cannot be wondered at, since, as far as I have heard or observed, the principal object is, not that mankind may be well and honestly clad, but, unquestionably, that corporations may be enriched.
  • It was the natural yearning of that portion, any portion of our most primitive ancestor which still survived in us.
  • I have seen Penobscot Indians, in this town, living in tents of thin cotton cloth, while the snow was nearly a foot deep around them, and I thought that they would be glad to have it deeper to keep out the wind.
  • A comfortable house for a rude and hardy race, that lived mostly out of doors, was once made here almost entirely of such materials as Nature furnished ready to their hands.
  • He adds that they were commonly carpeted and lined within with well-wrought embroidered mats, and were furnished with various utensils.
  • In the savage state every family owns a shelter as good as the best, and sufficient for its coarser and simpler wants; but I think that I speak within bounds when I say that, though the birds of the air have their nests, and the foxes their holes, and the savages their wigwams, in modern civilized society not more than one half the families own a shelter.
  • But how happens it that he who is said to enjoy these things is so commonly a poor civilized man, while the savage, who has them not, is rich as a savage?
  • What mean ye by saying that the poor ye have always with you, or that the fathers have eaten sour grapes, and the children's teeth are set on edge?
  • Behold all souls are mine; as the soul of the father, so also the soul of the son is mine: the soul that sinneth, it shall die.
  • The man who has actually paid for his farm with labor on it is so rare that every neighbor can point to him.
  • But this puts an infinitely worse face on the matter, and suggests, beside, that probably not even the other three succeed in saving their souls, but are perchance bankrupt in a worse sense than they who fail honestly.
  • And when the farmer has got his house, he may not be the richer but the poorer for it, and it be the house that has got him.
  • Granted that the majority are able at last either to own or hire the modern house with all its improvements.
  • It certainly is fair to look at that class by whose labor the works which distinguish this generation are accomplished.
  • Yet I have no doubt that that people's rulers are as wise as the average of civilized rulers.
  • Or what if I were to allow--would it not be a singular allowance?--that our furniture should be more complex than the Arab's, in proportion as we are morally and intellectually his superiors!
  • The best works of art are the expression of man's struggle to free himself from this condition, but the effect of our art is merely to make this low state comfortable and that higher state to be forgotten.
  • Without factitious support, man is sure to come to earth again beyond that distance.
  • The owner of the axe, as he released his hold on it, said that it was the apple of his eye; but I returned it sharper than I received it.
  • They were pleasant spring days, in which the winter of man's discontent was thawing as well as the earth, and the life that had lain torpid began to stretch itself.
  • She lighted a lamp to show me the inside of the roof and the walls, and also that the board floor extended under the bed, warning me not to step into the cellar, a sort of dust hole two feet deep.
  • In her own words, they were "good boards overhead, good boards all around, and a good window"--of two whole squares originally, only the cat had passed out that way lately.
  • When it stormed before my bread was baked, I fixed a few boards over the fire, and sat under them to watch my loaf, and passed some pleasant hours in that way.
  • There is some of the same fitness in a man's building his own house that there is in a bird's building its own nest.
  • What reasonable man ever supposed that ornaments were something outward and in the skin merely--that the tortoise got his spotted shell, or the shell-fish its mother-o'-pearl tints, by such a contract as the inhabitants of Broadway their Trinity Church?
  • But a man has no more to do with the style of architecture of his house than a tortoise with that of its shell: nor need the soldier be so idle as to try to paint the precise color of his virtue on his standard.
  • One man says, in his despair or indifference to life, take up a handful of the earth at your feet, and paint your house that color.
  • If I seem to boast more than is becoming, my excuse is that I brag for humanity rather than for myself; and my shortcomings and inconsistencies do not affect the truth of my statement.
  • I think that it would be better than this, for the students, or those who desire to be benefited by it, even to lay the foundation themselves.
  • "But," says one, "you do not mean that the students should go to work with their hands instead of their heads?"
  • I do not mean that exactly, but I mean something which he might think a good deal like that; I mean that they should not play life, or study it merely, while the community supports them at this expensive game, but earnestly live it from beginning to end.
  • To my astonishment I was informed on leaving college that I had studied navigation!--why, if I had taken one turn down the harbor I should have known more about it.
  • I have learned that the swiftest traveller is he that goes afoot.
  • That is almost a day's wages.
  • And so, if the railroad reached round the world, I think that I should keep ahead of you; and as for seeing the country and getting experience of that kind, I should have to cut your acquaintance altogether.
  • This spending of the best part of one's life earning money in order to enjoy a questionable liberty during the least valuable part of it reminds me of the Englishman who went to India to make a fortune first, in order that he might return to England and live the life of a poet.
  • One farmer said that it was "good for nothing but to raise cheeping squirrels on."
  • However, I should never have broken a horse or bull and taken him to board for any work he might do for me, for fear I should become a horseman or a herdsman merely; and if society seems to be the gainer by so doing, are we certain that what is one man's gain is not another's loss, and that the stable-boy has equal cause with his master to be satisfied?
  • It should not be by their architecture, but why not even by their power of abstract thought, that nations should seek to commemorate themselves?
  • It appears from the above estimate, that my food alone cost me in money about twenty-seven cents a week.
  • It was fit that I should live on rice, mainly, who love so well the philosophy of India.
  • To meet the objections of some inveterate cavillers, I may as well state, that if I dined out occasionally, as I always had done, and I trust shall have opportunities to do again, it was frequently to the detriment of my domestic arrangements.
  • They were a real cereal fruit which I ripened, and they had to my senses a fragrance like that of other noble fruits, which I kept in as long as possible by wrapping them in cloths.
  • It would seem that I made it according to the recipe which Marcus Porcius Cato gave about two centuries before Christ.
  • When you have kneaded it well, mould it, and bake it under a cover, that is, in a baking kettle.
  • Finally, as for salt, that grossest of groceries, to obtain this might be a fit occasion for a visit to the seashore, or, if I did without it altogether, I should probably drink the less water.
  • I do not learn that the Indians ever troubled themselves to go after it.
  • But as it was, I considered that I enhanced the value of the land by squatting on it.
  • If they cannot understand that, they cannot understand much that I have to say.
  • None is so poor that he need sit on a pumpkin.
  • That is Spaulding's furniture.
  • He was a lucky fox that left his tail in the trap.
  • I think that the man is at a dead set who has got through a knot-hole or gateway where his sledge load of furniture cannot follow him.
  • The Mexicans also practised a similar purification at the end of every fifty-two years, in the belief that it was time for the world to come to an end.
  • For more than five years I maintained myself thus solely by the labor of my hands, and I found that, by working about six weeks in a year, I could meet all the expenses of living.
  • I have tried trade but I found that it would take ten years to get under way in that, and that then I should probably be on my way to the devil.
  • I was actually afraid that I might by that time be doing what is called a good business.
  • I also dreamed that I might gather the wild herbs, or carry evergreens to such villagers as loved to be reminded of the woods, even to the city, by hay-cart loads.
  • But I have since learned that trade curses everything it handles; and though you trade in messages from heaven, the whole curse of trade attaches to the business.
  • It is not necessary that a man should earn his living by the sweat of his brow, unless he sweats easier than I do.
  • One young man of my acquaintance, who has inherited some acres, told me that he thought he should live as I did, if he had the means.
  • The youth may build or plant or sail, only let him not be hindered from doing that which he tells me he would like to do.
  • It is by a mathematical point only that we are wise, as the sailor or the fugitive slave keeps the polestar in his eye; but that is sufficient guidance for all our life.
  • I heard it proposed lately that two young men should travel together over the world, the one without money, earning his means as he went, before the mast and behind the plow, the other carrying a bill of exchange in his pocket.
  • It was easy to see that they could not long be companions or co-operate, since one would not operate at all.
  • I confess that I have hitherto indulged very little in philanthropic enterprises.
  • While my townsmen and women are devoted in so many ways to the good of their fellows, I trust that one at least may be spared to other and less humane pursuits.
  • As for Doing-good, that is one of the professions which are full.
  • Probably I should not consciously and deliberately forsake my particular calling to do the good which society demands of me, to save the universe from annihilation; and I believe that a like but infinitely greater steadfastness elsewhere is all that now preserves it.
  • There is no odor so bad as that which arises from goodness tainted.
  • I can find you a Newfoundland dog that will do as much.
  • Being superior to physical suffering, it sometimes chanced that they were superior to any consolation which the missionaries could offer; and the law to do as you would be done by fell with less persuasiveness on the ears of those who, for their part, did not care how they were done by, who loved their enemies after a new fashion, and came very near freely forgiving them all they did.
  • Be sure that you give the poor the aid they most need, though it be your example which leaves them far behind.
  • I want the flower and fruit of a man; that some fragrance be wafted over from him to me, and some ripeness flavor our intercourse.
  • This is a charity that hides a multitude of sins.
  • We should impart our courage, and not our despair, our health and ease, and not our disease, and take care that this does not spread by contagion.
  • Who is that intemperate and brutal man whom we would redeem?
  • If anything ail a man, so that he does not perform his functions, if he have a pain in his bowels even--for that is the seat of sympathy--he forthwith sets about reforming--the world.
  • I believe that what so saddens the reformer is not his sympathy with his fellows in distress, but, though he be the holiest son of God, is his private ail.
  • My imagination carried me so far that I even had the refusal of several farms--the refusal was all I wanted--but I never got my fingers burned by actual possession.
  • The nearest that I came to actual possession was when I bought the Hollowell place, and had begun to sort my seeds, and collected materials with which to make a wheelbarrow to carry it on or off with; but before the owner gave me a deed of it, his wife--every man has such a wife--changed her mind and wished to keep it, and he offered me ten dollars to release him.
  • Now, to speak the truth, I had but ten cents in the world, and it surpassed my arithmetic to tell, if I was that man who had ten cents, or who had a farm, or ten dollars, or all together.
  • I have frequently seen a poet withdraw, having enjoyed the most valuable part of a farm, while the crusty farmer supposed that he had got a few wild apples only.
  • All that I could say, then, with respect to farming on a large scale--I have always cultivated a garden--was, that I had had my seeds ready.
  • Many think that seeds improve with age.
  • I have no doubt that time discriminates between the good and the bad; and when at last I shall plant, I shall be less likely to be disappointed.
  • I think I shall not buy greedily, but go round and round it as long as I live, and be buried in it first, that it may please me the more at last.
  • The upright white hewn studs and freshly planed door and window casings gave it a clean and airy look, especially in the morning, when its timbers were saturated with dew, so that I fancied that by noon some sweet gum would exude from them.
  • The morning wind forever blows, the poem of creation is uninterrupted; but few are the ears that hear it.
  • That way I looked between and over the near green hills to some distant and higher ones in the horizon, tinged with blue.
  • One value even of the smallest well is, that when you look into it you see that earth is not continent but insular.
  • This is as important as that it keeps butter cool.
  • I discovered that my house actually had its site in such a withdrawn, but forever new and unprofaned, part of the universe.
  • I got up early and bathed in the pond; that was a religious exercise, and one of the best things which I did.
  • They say that characters were engraven on the bathing tub of King Tchingthang to this effect: "Renew thyself completely each day; do it again, and again, and forever again."
  • I was as much affected by the faint hum of a mosquito making its invisible and unimaginable tour through my apartment at earliest dawn, when I was sitting with door and windows open, as I could be by any trumpet that ever sang of fame.
  • I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.
  • Still we live meanly, like ants; though the fable tells us that we were long ago changed into men; like pygmies we fight with cranes; it is error upon error, and clout upon clout, and our best virtue has for its occasion a superfluous and evitable wretchedness.
  • Our life is like a German Confederacy, made up of petty states, with its boundary forever fluctuating, so that even a German cannot tell you how it is bounded at any moment.
  • Did you ever think what those sleepers are that underlie the railroad?
  • And every few years a new lot is laid down and run over; so that, if some have the pleasure of riding on a rail, others have the misfortune to be ridden upon.
  • And when they run over a man that is walking in his sleep, a supernumerary sleeper in the wrong position, and wake him up, they suddenly stop the cars, and make a hue and cry about it, as if this were an exception.
  • Men say that a stitch in time saves nine, and so they take a thousand stitches today to save nine tomorrow.
  • "Pray tell me anything new that has happened to a man anywhere on this globe"--and he reads it over his coffee and rolls, that a man has had his eyes gouged out this morning on the Wachito River; never dreaming the while that he lives in the dark unfathomed mammoth cave of this world, and has but the rudiment of an eye himself.
  • I think that there are very few important communications made through it.
  • To speak critically, I never received more than one or two letters in my life--I wrote this some years ago--that were worth the postage.
  • The penny-post is, commonly, an institution through which you seriously offer a man that penny for his thoughts which is so often safely offered in jest.
  • And I am sure that I never read any memorable news in a newspaper.
  • What news! how much more important to know what that is which was never old!
  • Children, who play life, discern its true law and relations more clearly than men, who fail to live it worthily, but who think that they are wiser by experience, that is, by failure.
  • We think that that is which appears to be.
  • Let us spend one day as deliberately as Nature, and not be thrown off the track by every nutshell and mosquito's wing that falls on the rails.
  • Let us not be upset and overwhelmed in that terrible rapid and whirlpool called a dinner, situated in the meridian shallows.
  • My instinct tells me that my head is an organ for burrowing, as some creatures use their snout and fore paws, and with it I would mine and burrow my way through these hills.
  • I think that the richest vein is somewhere hereabouts; so by the divining-rod and thin rising vapors I judge; and here I will begin to mine.
  • The oldest Egyptian or Hindoo philosopher raised a corner of the veil from the statue of the divinity; and still the trembling robe remains raised, and I gaze upon as fresh a glory as he did, since it was I in him that was then so bold, and it is he in me that now reviews the vision.
  • No dust has settled on that robe; no time has elapsed since that divinity was revealed.
  • That time which we really improve, or which is improvable, is neither past, present, nor future.
  • I read one or two shallow books of travel in the intervals of my work, till that employment made me ashamed of myself, and I asked where it was then that I lived.
  • The student may read Homer or Æschylus in the Greek without danger of dissipation or luxuriousness, for it implies that he in some measure emulate their heroes, and consecrate morning hours to their pages.
  • It is not in vain that the farmer remembers and repeats the few Latin words which he has heard.
  • To read well, that is, to read true books in a true spirit, is a noble exercise, and one that will task the reader more than any exercise which the customs of the day esteem.
  • It is not enough even to be able to speak the language of that nation by which they are written, for there is a memorable interval between the spoken and the written language, the language heard and the language read.
  • The crowds of men who merely spoke the Greek and Latin tongues in the Middle Ages were not entitled by the accident of birth to read the works of genius written in those languages; for these were not written in that Greek or Latin which they knew, but in the select language of literature.
  • But when the several nations of Europe had acquired distinct though rude written languages of their own, sufficient for the purposes of their rising literatures, then first learning revived, and scholars were enabled to discern from that remoteness the treasures of antiquity.
  • There is a work in several volumes in our Circulating Library entitled "Little Reading," which I thought referred to a town of that name which I had not been to.
  • I know a woodchopper, of middle age, who takes a French paper, not for news as he says, for he is above that, but to "keep himself in practice," he being a Canadian by birth; and when I ask him what he considers the best thing he can do in this world, he says, beside this, to keep up and add to his English.
  • Most men do not know that any nation but the Hebrews have had a scripture.
  • It is not all books that are as dull as their readers.
  • I do not wish to flatter my townsmen, nor to be flattered by them, for that will not advance either of us.
  • It is time that we had uncommon schools, that we did not leave off our education when we begin to be men and women.
  • That is the uncommon school we want.
  • My days were not days of the week, bearing the stamp of any heathen deity, nor were they minced into hours and fretted by the ticking of a clock; for I lived like the Puri Indians, of whom it is said that "for yesterday, today, and tomorrow they have only one word, and they express the variety of meaning by pointing backward for yesterday forward for tomorrow, and overhead for the passing day."
  • I had this advantage, at least, in my mode of life, over those who were obliged to look abroad for amusement, to society and the theatre, that my life itself was become my amusement and never ceased to be novel.
  • The whistle of the locomotive penetrates my woods summer and winter, sounding like the scream of a hawk sailing over some farmer's yard, informing me that many restless city merchants are arriving within the circle of the town, or adventurous country traders from the other side.
  • Nor is there any man so independent on his farm that he can say them nay.
  • And here's your pay for them! screams the countryman's whistle; timber like long battering-rams going twenty miles an hour against the city's walls, and chairs enough to seat all the weary and heavy-laden that dwell within them.
  • Up comes the cotton, down goes the woven cloth; up comes the silk, down goes the woollen; up come the books, but down goes the wit that writes them.
  • I watch the passage of the morning cars with the same feeling that I do the rising of the sun, which is hardly more regular.
  • Or perchance, at evening, I hear him in his stable blowing off the superfluous energy of the day, that he may calm his nerves and cool his liver and brain for a few hours of iron slumber.
  • We have constructed a fate, an Atropos, that never turns aside.
  • (Let that be the name of your engine.)
  • Next Spanish hides, with the tails still preserving their twist and the angle of elevation they had when the oxen that wore them were careering over the pampas of the Spanish Main--a type of all obstinacy, and evincing how almost hopeless and incurable are all constitutional vices.
  • I confess, that practically speaking, when I have learned a man's real disposition, I have no hopes of changing it for the better or worse in this state of existence.
  • Here is a hogshead of molasses or of brandy directed to John Smith, Cuttingsville, Vermont, some trader among the Green Mountains, who imports for the farmers near his clearing, and now perchance stands over his bulkhead and thinks of the last arrivals on the coast, how they may affect the price for him, telling his customers this moment, as he has told them twenty times before this morning, that he expects some by the next train of prime quality.
  • They give me a new sense of the variety and capacity of that nature which is our common dwelling.
  • No wonder that man added this bird to his tame stock--to say nothing of the eggs and drumsticks.
  • I have never felt lonesome, or in the least oppressed by a sense of solitude, but once, and that was a few weeks after I came to the woods, when, for an hour, I doubted if the near neighborhood of man was not essential to a serene and healthy life.
  • What sort of space is that which separates a man from his fellows and makes him solitary?
  • I have found that no exertion of the legs can bring two minds much nearer to one another.
  • I answered that I was very sure I liked it passably well; I was not joking.
  • The place where that may occur is always the same, and indescribably pleasant to all our senses.
  • Nearest to all things is that power which fashions their being.
  • We meet at meals three times a day, and give each other a new taste of that old musty cheese that we are.
  • We have had to agree on a certain set of rules, called etiquette and politeness, to make this frequent meeting tolerable and that we need not come to open war.
  • The value of a man is not in his skin, that we should touch him.
  • So also, owing to bodily and mental health and strength, we may be continually cheered by a like but more normal and natural society, and come to know that we are never alone.
  • Let me suggest a few comparisons, that some one may convey an idea of my situation.
  • I am no more lonely than the loon in the pond that laughs so loud, or than Walden Pond itself.
  • What company has that lonely lake, I pray?
  • She was probably the only thoroughly sound-conditioned, healthy, and robust young lady that ever walked the globe, and wherever she came it was spring.
  • In my house we were so near that we could not begin to hear--we could not speak low enough to be heard; as when you throw two stones into calm water so near that they break each other's undulations.
  • At one o'clock the next day Massasoit "brought two fishes that he had shot," about thrice as big as a bream.
  • Fearing that they would be light-headed for want of food and also sleep, owing to "the savages' barbarous singing, (for they use to sing themselves asleep,)" and that they might get home while they had strength to travel, they departed.
  • They had nothing to eat themselves, and they were wiser than to think that apologies could supply the place of food to their guests; so they drew their belts tighter and said nothing about it.
  • I had more visitors while I lived in the woods than at any other period in my life; I mean that I had some.
  • I had withdrawn so far within the great ocean of solitude, into which the rivers of society empty, that for the most part, so far as my needs were concerned, only the finest sediment was deposited around me.
  • He cut his trees level and close to the ground, that the sprouts which came up afterward might be more vigorous and a sled might slide over the stumps; and instead of leaving a whole tree to support his corded wood, he would pare it away to a slender stake or splinter which you could break off with your hand at last.
  • Such an exuberance of animal spirits had he that he sometimes tumbled down and rolled on the ground with laughter at anything which made him think and tickled him.
  • In the winter he had a fire by which at noon he warmed his coffee in a kettle; and as he sat on a log to eat his dinner the chickadees would sometimes come round and alight on his arm and peck at the potato in his fingers; and he said that he "liked to have the little fellers about him."
  • He was so genuine and unsophisticated that no introduction would serve to introduce him, more than if you introduced a woodchuck to your neighbor.
  • He was so simply and naturally humble--if he can be called humble who never aspires--that humility was no distinct quality in him, nor could he conceive of it.
  • If you told him that such a one was coming, he did as if he thought that anything so grand would expect nothing of himself, but take all the responsibility on itself, and let him be forgotten still.
  • I sometimes found the name of his native parish handsomely written in the snow by the highway, with the proper French accent, and knew that he had passed.
  • A townsman told me that when he met him sauntering through the village in his small close-fitting cap, and whistling to himself, he reminded him of a prince in disguise.
  • He had worn the home-made Vermont gray, he said, and that was good.
  • He had soaked hemlock leaves in water and drank it, and thought that was better than water in warm weather.
  • If an ox were his property, and he wished to get needles and thread at the store, he thought it would be inconvenient and impossible soon to go on mortgaging some portion of the creature each time to that amount.
  • "Good Lord"--said he, "a man that has to work as I do, if he does not forget the ideas he has had, he will do well.
  • If I suggested any improvement in his mode of life, he merely answered, without expressing any regret, that it was too late.
  • I told them that I drank at the pond, and pointed thither, offering to lend them a dipper.
  • Indeed, I found some of them to be wiser than the so-called overseers of the poor and selectmen of the town, and thought it was time that the tables were turned.
  • With respect to wit, I learned that there was not much difference between the half and the whole.
  • I have rarely met a fellowman on such promising ground--it was so simple and sincere and so true all that he said.
  • It seemed that from such a basis of truth and frankness as the poor weak-headed pauper had laid, our intercourse might go forward to something better than the intercourse of sages.
  • I require of a visitor that he be not actually starving, though he may have the very best appetite in the world, however he got it.
  • I have too good a memory to make that necessary.
  • Men of business, even farmers, thought only of solitude and employment, and of the great distance at which I dwelt from something or other; and though they said that they loved a ramble in the woods occasionally, it was obvious that they did not.
  • Children come a-berrying, railroad men taking a Sunday morning walk in clean shirts, fishermen and hunters, poets and philosophers; in short, all honest pilgrims, who came out to the woods for freedom's sake, and really left the village behind, I was ready to greet with--"Welcome, Englishmen! welcome, Englishmen!" for I had had communication with that race.
  • And now to-night my flute has waked the echoes over that very water.
  • Fellow-travellers as they rattled by compared it aloud with the fields which they had passed, so that I came to know how I stood in the agricultural world.
  • They were beans cheerfully returning to their wild and primitive state that I cultivated, and my hoe played the Ranz des Vaches for them.
  • Near at hand, upon the topmost spray of a birch, sings the brown thrasher--or red mavis, as some love to call him--all the morning, glad of your society, that would find out another farmer's field if yours were not here.
  • When my hoe tinkled against the stones, that music echoed to the woods and the sky, and was an accompaniment to my labor which yielded an instant and immeasurable crop.
  • And when the sound died quite away, and the hum had ceased, and the most favorable breezes told no tale, I knew that they had got the last drone of them all safely into the Middlesex hive, and that now their minds were bent on the honey with which it was smeared.
  • I felt proud to know that the liberties of Massachusetts and of our fatherland were in such safe keeping; and as I turned to my hoeing again I was filled with an inexpressible confidence, and pursued my labor cheerfully with a calm trust in the future.
  • But sometimes it was a really noble and inspiring strain that reached these woods, and the trumpet that sings of fame, and I felt as if I could spit a Mexican with a good relish--for why should we always stand for trifles?--and looked round for a woodchuck or a skunk to exercise my chivalry upon.
  • This was one of the great days; though the sky had from my clearing only the same everlastingly great look that it wears daily, and I saw no difference in it.
  • It was a singular experience that long acquaintance which I cultivated with beans, what with planting, and hoeing, and harvesting, and threshing, and picking over and selling them--the last was the hardest of all--I might add eating, for I did taste.
  • Many a lusty crest--waving Hector, that towered a whole foot above his crowding comrades, fell before my weapon and rolled in the dust.
  • We should really be fed and cheered if when we met a man we were sure to see that some of the qualities which I have named, which we all prize more than those other productions, but which are for the most part broadcast and floating in the air, had taken root and grown in him.
  • We are wont to forget that the sun looks on our cultivated fields and on the prairies and forests without distinction.
  • What though I value the seed of these beans, and harvest that in the fall of the year?
  • I hardly ever failed, when I rambled through the village, to see a row of such worthies, either sitting on a ladder sunning themselves, with their bodies inclined forward and their eyes glancing along the line this way and that, from time to time, with a voluptuous expression, or else leaning against a barn with their hands in their pockets, like caryatides, as if to prop it up.
  • I observed that the vitals of the village were the grocery, the bar-room, the post-office, and the bank; and, as a necessary part of the machinery, they kept a bell, a big gun, and a fire-engine, at convenient places; and the houses were so arranged as to make the most of mankind, in lanes and fronting one another, so that every traveller had to run the gauntlet, and every man, woman, and child might get a lick at him.
  • I have heard of many going astray even in the village streets, when the darkness was so thick that you could cut it with a knife, as the saying is.
  • I am convinced, that if all men were to live as simply as I then did, thieving and robbery would be unknown.
  • It is a vulgar error to suppose that you have tasted huckleberries who never plucked them.
  • This is that portion, also, where in the spring, the ice being warmed by the heat of the sun reflected from the bottom, and also transmitted through the earth, melts first and forms a narrow canal about the still frozen middle.
  • It is well known that a large plate of glass will have a green tint, owing, as the makers say, to its "body," but a small piece of the same will be colorless.
  • The water is so transparent that the bottom can easily be discerned at the depth of twenty-five or thirty feet.
  • The shore is composed of a belt of smooth rounded white stones like paving-stones, excepting one or two short sand beaches, and is so steep that in many places a single leap will carry you into water over your head; and were it not for its remarkable transparency, that would be the last to be seen of its bottom till it rose on the opposite side.
  • Perhaps on that spring morning when Adam and Eve were driven out of Eden Walden Pond was already in existence, and even then breaking up in a gentle spring rain accompanied with mist and a southerly wind, and covered with myriads of ducks and geese, which had not heard of the fall, when still such pure lakes sufficed them.
  • If the name was not derived from that of some English locality--Saffron Walden, for instance--one might suppose that it was called originally Walled-in Pond.
  • For four months in the year its water is as cold as it is pure at all times; and I think that it is then as good as any, if not the best, in the town.
  • The temperature of the Boiling Spring the same day was 45º, or the warmest of any water tried, though it is the coldest that I know of in summer, when, beside, shallow and stagnant surface water is not mingled with it.
  • The trees have ample room to expand on the water side, and each sends forth its most vigorous branch in that direction.
  • It is a mirror which no stone can crack, whose quicksilver will never wear off, whose gilding Nature continually repairs; no storms, no dust, can dim its surface ever fresh;--a mirror in which all impurity presented to it sinks, swept and dusted by the sun's hazy brush--this the light dust-cloth--which retains no breath that is breathed on it, but sends its own to float as clouds high above its surface, and be reflected in its bosom still.
  • A field of water betrays the spirit that is in the air.
  • It is remarkable that we can look down on its surface.
  • The hills which form its shores are so steep, and the woods on them were then so high, that, as you looked down from the west end, it had the appearance of an amphitheatre for some land of sylvan spectacle.
  • That devilish Iron Horse, whose ear-rending neigh is heard throughout the town, has muddied the Boiling Spring with his foot, and he it is that has browsed off all the woods on Walden shore, that Trojan horse, with a thousand men in his belly, introduced by mercenary Greeks!
  • That devilish Iron Horse, whose ear-rending neigh is heard throughout the town, has muddied the Boiling Spring with his foot, and he it is that has browsed off all the woods on Walden shore, that Trojan horse, with a thousand men in his belly, introduced by mercenary Greeks!
  • Many men have been likened to it, but few deserve that honor.
  • Though the woodchoppers have laid bare first this shore and then that, and the Irish have built their sties by it, and the railroad has infringed on its border, and the ice-men have skimmed it once, it is itself unchanged, the same water which my youthful eyes fell on; all the change is in me.
  • I see by its face that it is visited by the same reflection; and I can almost say, Walden, is it you?
  • The engineer does not forget at night, or his nature does not, that he has beheld this vision of serenity and purity once at least during the day.
  • One proposes that it be called "God's Drop."
  • I have said that Walden has no visible inlet nor outlet, but it is on the one hand distantly and indirectly related to Flint's Pond, which is more elevated, by a chain of small ponds coming from that quarter, and on the other directly and manifestly to Concord River, which is lower, by a similar chain of ponds through which in some other geological period it may have flowed, and by a little digging, which God forbid, it can be made to flow thither again.
  • Give me the poverty that enjoys true wealth.
  • They are so much alike that you would say they must be connected under ground.
  • It was even supposed by some that the pond had sunk, and this was one of the primitive forest that formerly stood there.
  • In the spring of '49 I talked with the man who lives nearest the pond in Sudbury, who told me that it was he who got out this tree ten or fifteen years before.
  • He sawed a channel in the ice toward the shore, and hauled it over and along and out on to the ice with oxen; but, before he had gone far in his work, he was surprised to find that it was wrong end upward, with the stumps of the branches pointing down, and the small end firmly fastened in the sandy bottom.
  • Once it chanced that I stood in the very abutment of a rainbow's arch, which filled the lower stratum of the atmosphere, tinging the grass and leaves around, and dazzling me as if I looked through colored crystal.
  • Beside, he tells us that he showed it to very few.
  • There we sat together under that part of the roof which leaked the least, while it showered and thundered without.
  • I had sat there many times of old before the ship was built that floated his family to America.
  • But the only true America is that country where you are at liberty to pursue such a mode of life as may enable you to do without these, and where the state does not endeavor to compel you to sustain the slavery and war and other superfluous expenses which directly or indirectly result from the use of such things.
  • I should be glad if all the meadows on the earth were left in a wild state, if that were the consequence of men's beginning to redeem themselves.
  • The wildness and adventure that are in fishing still recommended it to me.
  • They early introduce us to and detain us in scenery with which otherwise, at that age, we should have little acquaintance.
  • We are most interested when science reports what those men already know practically or instinctively, for that alone is a true humanity, or account of human experience.
  • No wonder, then, that he did not oftener stay to play on the common.
  • I have actually fished from the same kind of necessity that the first fishers did.
  • Not that I am less humane than others, but I did not perceive that my feelings were much affected.
  • I warn you, mothers, that my sympathies do not always make the usual phil-anthropic distinctions.
  • Commonly they did not think that they were lucky, or well paid for their time, unless they got a long string of fish, though they had the opportunity of seeing the pond all the while.
  • I have found repeatedly, of late years, that I cannot fish without falling a little in self-respect.
  • I think that I do not mistake.
  • But I see that if I were to live in a wilderness I should again be tempted to become a fisher and hunter in earnest.
  • I am satisfied that it is not.
  • Is it not a reproach that man is a carnivorous animal?
  • If the day and the night are such that you greet them with joy, and life emits a fragrance like flowers and sweet-scented herbs, is more elastic, more starry, more immortal--that is your success.
  • I believe that water is the only drink for a wise man; wine is not so noble a liquor; and think of dashing the hopes of a morning with a cup of warm coffee, or of an evening with a dish of tea!
  • Not that food which entereth into the mouth defileth a man, but the appetite with which it is eaten.
  • Goodness is the only investment that never fails.
  • The harp is the travelling patterer for the Universe's Insurance Company, recommending its laws, and our little goodness is all the assessment that we pay.
  • I fear that it may enjoy a certain health of its own; that we may be well, yet not pure.
  • "That in which men differ from brute beasts," says Mencius, "is a thing very inconsiderable; the common herd lose it very soon; superior men preserve it carefully."
  • He is blessed who is assured that the animal is dying out in him day by day, and the divine being established.
  • What avails it that you are Christian, if you are not purer than the heathen, if you deny yourself no more, if you are not more religious?
  • We are so degraded that we cannot speak simply of the necessary functions of human nature.
  • He had not attended to the train of his thoughts long when he heard some one playing on a flute, and that sound harmonized with his mood.
  • But the notes of the flute came home to his ears out of a different sphere from that he worked in, and suggested work for certain faculties which slumbered in him.
  • Was that a farmer's noon horn which sounded from beyond the woods just now?
  • He that does not eat need not work.
  • I thought, as I have my living to get, and have not eaten to-day, that I might go a-fishing.
  • I think that I am near the end of it.
  • But that we may not be delayed, you shall be digging the bait meanwhile.
  • I think that I may warrant you one worm to every three sods you turn up, if you look well in among the roots of the grass, as if you were weeding.
  • What was it that I was thinking of?
  • I will just try these three sentences of Confut-see; they may fetch that state about again.
  • The parent will sometimes roll and spin round before you in such a dishabille, that you cannot, for a few moments, detect what kind of creature it is.
  • So perfect is this instinct, that once, when I had laid them on the leaves again, and one accidentally fell on its side, it was found with the rest in exactly the same position ten minutes afterward.
  • It is said that when hatched by a hen they will directly disperse on some alarm, and so are lost, for they never hear the mother's call which gathers them again.
  • You only need sit still long enough in some attractive spot in the woods that all its inhabitants may exhibit themselves to you by turns.
  • Looking farther, I was surprised to find that the chips were covered with such combatants, that it was not a duellum, but a bellum, a war between two races of ants, the red always pitted against the black, and frequently two red ones to one black.
  • I watched a couple that were fast locked in each other's embraces, in a little sunny valley amid the chips, now at noonday prepared to fight till the sun went down, or life went out.
  • It was evident that their battle-cry was "Conquer or die."
  • I raised the glass, and he went off over the window-sill in that crippled state.
  • Some station themselves on this side of the pond, some on that, for the poor bird cannot be omnipresent; if he dive here he must come up there.
  • But now the kind October wind rises, rustling the leaves and rippling the surface of the water, so that no loon can be heard or seen, though his foes sweep the pond with spy-glasses, and make the woods resound with their discharges.
  • If I endeavored to overtake him in a boat, in order to see how he would manoeuvre, he would dive and be completely lost, so that I did not discover him again, sometimes, till the latter part of the day.
  • He manoeuvred so cunningly that I could not get within half a dozen rods of him.
  • I found that it was as well for me to rest on my oars and wait his reappearing as to endeavor to calculate where he would rise; for again and again, when I was straining my eyes over the surface one way, I would suddenly be startled by his unearthly laugh behind me.
  • But why, after displaying so much cunning, did he invariably betray himself the moment he came up by that loud laugh?
  • I concluded that he laughed in derision of my efforts, confident of his own resources.
  • Though the sky was by this time overcast, the pond was so smooth that I could see where he broke the surface when I did not hear him.
  • It was very exciting at that season to roam the then boundless chestnut woods of Lincoln--they now sleep their long sleep under the railroad--with a bag on my shoulder, and a stick to open burs with in my hand, for I did not always wait for the frost, amid the rustling of leaves and the loud reproofs of the red squirrels and the jays, whose half-consumed nuts I sometimes stole, for the burs which they had selected were sure to contain sound ones.
  • It has a sweetish taste, much like that of a frost-bitten potato, and I found it better boiled than roasted.
  • My bricks, being second-hand ones, required to be cleaned with a trowel, so that I learned more than usual of the qualities of bricks and trowels.
  • However that may be, I was struck by the peculiar toughness of the steel which bore so many violent blows without being worn out.
  • My house never pleased my eye so much after it was plastered, though I was obliged to confess that it was more comfortable.
  • Cato says, the master of a family (patremfamilias) must have in his rustic villa "cellam oleariam, vinariam, dolia multa, uti lubeat caritatem expectare, et rei, et virtuti, et gloriae erit," that is, "an oil and wine cellar, many casks, so that it may be pleasant to expect hard times; it will be for his advantage, and virtue, and glory."
  • I had the previous winter made a small quantity of lime by burning the shells of the Unio fluviatilis, which our river affords, for the sake of the experiment; so that I knew where my materials came from.
  • One day when I came to the same place forty-eight hours afterward, I found that those large bubbles were still perfect, though an inch more of ice had formed, as I could see distinctly by the seam in the edge of a cake.
  • The new ice had formed around and under the bubble, so that it was included between the two ices.
  • Though completely waterlogged and almost as heavy as lead, they not only burned long, but made a very hot fire; nay, I thought that they burned better for the soaking, as if the pitch, being confined by the water, burned longer, as in a lamp.
  • Michaux, more than thirty years ago, says that the price of wood for fuel in New York and Philadelphia "nearly equals, and sometimes exceeds, that of the best wood in Paris, though this immense capital annually requires more than three hundred thousand cords, and is surrounded to the distance of three hundred miles by cultivated plains."
  • It is now many years that men have resorted to the forest for fuel and the materials of the arts: the New Englander and the New Hollander, the Parisian and the Celt, the farmer and Robin Hood, Goody Blake and Harry Gill; in most parts of the world the prince and the peasant, the scholar and the savage, equally require still a few sticks from the forest to warm them and cook their food.
  • As my driver prophesied when I was plowing, they warmed me twice--once while I was splitting them, and again when they were on the fire, so that no fuel could give out more heat.
  • Hard green wood just cut, though I used but little of that, answered my purpose better than any other.
  • It was I and Fire that lived there; and commonly my housekeeper proved trustworthy.
  • But my house occupied so sunny and sheltered a position, and its roof was so low, that I could afford to let the fire go out in the middle of almost any winter day.
  • It will soon be forgotten, in these days of stoves, that we used to roast potatoes in the ashes, after the Indian fashion.
  • One old frequenter of these woods remembers, that as he passed her house one noon he heard her muttering to herself over her gurgling pot--"Ye are all bones, bones!"
  • I had just sunk my head on this when the bells rung fire, and in hot haste the engines rolled that way, led by a straggling troop of men and boys, and I among the foremost, for I had leaped the brook.
  • It chanced that I walked that way across the fields the following night, about the same hour, and hearing a low moaning at this spot, I drew near in the dark, and discovered the only survivor of the family that I know, the heir of both its virtues and its vices, who alone was interested in this burning, lying on his stomach and looking over the cellar wall at the still smouldering cinders beneath, muttering to himself, as is his wont.
  • I had read of the potter's clay and wheel in Scripture, but it had never occurred to me that the pots we use were not such as had come down unbroken from those days, or grown on trees like gourds somewhere, and I was pleased to hear that so fictile an art was ever practiced in my neighborhood.
  • His trade here was that of a ditcher.
  • He died in the road at the foot of Brister's Hill shortly after I came to the woods, so that I have not remembered him as a neighbor.
  • What a sorrowful act must that be--the covering up of wells! coincident with the opening of wells of tears.
  • But all I can learn of their conclusions amounts to just this, that "Cato and Brister pulled wool"; which is about as edifying as the history of more famous schools of philosophy.
  • The vivacious lilac still grows, unfolding its sweet-scented flowers each spring.
  • Little did the dusky children think that the puny slip with its two eyes only, which they stuck in the ground in the shadow of the house and daily watered, would root itself so, and outlive them, and house itself in the rear that shaded it, and grown man's garden and orchard, and tell their story faintly to the lone wanderer a half-century after they had grown up and died--blossoming as fair, and smelling as sweet, as in that first spring.
  • I am not aware that any man has ever built on the spot which I occupy.
  • The soil is blanched and accursed there, and before that becomes necessary the earth itself will be destroyed.
  • I think that he must be the man of the most faith of any alive.
  • How blind that cannot see serenity!
  • Whichever way we turned, it seemed that the heavens and the earth had met together, since he enhanced the beauty of the landscape.
  • We waded so gently and reverently, or we pulled together so smoothly, that the fishes of thought were not scared from the stream, nor feared any angler on the bank, but came and went grandly, like the clouds which float through the western sky, and the mother-o'-pearl flocks which sometimes form and dissolve there.
  • When I crossed Flint's Pond, after it was covered with snow, though I had often paddled about and skated over it, it was so unexpectedly wide and so strange that I could think of nothing but Baffin's Bay.
  • I also heard the whooping of the ice in the pond, my great bed-fellow in that part of Concord, as if it were restless in its bed and would fain turn over, were troubled with flatulency and had dreams; or I was waked by the cracking of the ground by the frost, as if some one had driven a team against my door, and in the morning would find a crack in the earth a quarter of a mile long and a third of an inch wide.
  • They were so familiar that at length one alighted on an armful of wood which I was carrying in, and pecked at the sticks without fear.
  • The squirrels also grew at last to be quite familiar, and occasionally stepped upon my shoe, when that was the nearest way.
  • I am glad that the partridge gets fed, at any rate.
  • In dark winter mornings, or in short winter afternoons, I sometimes heard a pack of hounds threading all the woods with hounding cry and yelp, unable to resist the instinct of the chase, and the note of the hunting-horn at intervals, proving that man was in the rear.
  • They tell me that if the fox would remain in the bosom of the frozen earth he would be safe, or if he would run in a straight line away no foxhound could overtake him; but, having left his pursuers far behind, he stops to rest and listen till they come up, and when he runs he circles round to his old haunts, where the hunters await him.
  • Sometimes, however, he will run upon a wall many rods, and then leap off far to one side, and he appears to know that water will not retain his scent.
  • A hunter told me that he once saw a fox pursued by hounds burst out on to Walden when the ice was covered with shallow puddles, run part way across, and then return to the same shore.
  • But I fear that he was not the wiser for all I told him, for every time I attempted to answer his questions he interrupted me by asking, "What do you do here?"
  • The hunter who told me this could remember one Sam Nutting, who used to hunt bears on Fair Haven Ledges, and exchange their skins for rum in Concord village; who told him, even, that he had seen a moose there.
  • One man still preserves the horns of the last deer that was killed in this vicinity, and another has told me the particulars of the hunt in which his uncle was engaged.
  • That must be a poor country indeed that does not support a hare.
  • That must be a poor country indeed that does not support a hare.
  • First I take an axe and pail and go in search of water, if that be not a dream.
  • It is surprising that they are caught here--that in this deep and capacious spring, far beneath the rattling teams and chaises and tinkling sleighs that travel the Walden road, this great gold and emerald fish swims.
  • Many have believed that Walden reached quite through to the other side of the globe.
  • But I can assure my readers that Walden has a reasonably tight bottom at a not unreasonable, though at an unusual, depth.
  • I am thankful that this pond was made deep and pure for a symbol.
  • A factory-owner, hearing what depth I had found, thought that it could not be true, for, judging from his acquaintance with dams, sand would not lie at so steep an angle.
  • William Gilpin, who is so admirable in all that relates to landscapes, and usually so correct, standing at the head of Loch Fyne, in Scotland, which he describes as "a bay of salt water, sixty or seventy fathoms deep, four miles in breadth," and about fifty miles long, surrounded by mountains, observes, "If we could have seen it immediately after the diluvian crash, or whatever convulsion of nature occasioned it, before the waters gushed in, what a horrid chasm must it have appeared!
  • We know that a hill is not highest at its narrowest part.
  • In proportion as the mouth of the cove was wider compared with its length, the water over the bar was deeper compared with that in the basin.
  • But a low and smooth shore proves him shallow on that side.
  • At the advent of each individual into this life, may we not suppose that such a bar has risen to the surface somewhere?
  • It is true, we are such poor navigators that our thoughts, for the most part, stand off and on upon a harborless coast, are conversant only with the bights of the bays of poesy, or steer for the public ports of entry, and go into the dry docks of science, where they merely refit for this world, and no natural currents concur to individualize them.
  • It was a small cavity under ten feet of water; but I think that I can warrant the pond not to need soldering till they find a worse leak than that.
  • One has suggested, that if such a "leach-hole" should be found, its connection with the meadow, if any existed, might be proved by conveying some colored powder or sawdust to the mouth of the hole, and then putting a strainer over the spring in the meadow, which would catch some of the particles carried through by the current.
  • It is well known that a level cannot be used on ice.
  • It may be that he lays up no treasures in this world which will cool his summer drink in the next.
  • They said that a gentleman farmer, who was behind the scenes, wanted to double his money, which, as I understood, amounted to half a million already; but in order to cover each one of his dollars with another, he took off the only coat, ay, the skin itself, of Walden Pond in the midst of a hard winter.
  • They told me that in a good day they could get out a thousand tons, which was the yield of about one acre.
  • This heap, made in the winter of '46-7 and estimated to contain ten thousand tons, was finally covered with hay and boards; and though it was unroofed the following July, and a part of it carried off, the rest remaining exposed to the sun, it stood over that summer and the next winter, and was not quite melted till September, 1848.
  • I have noticed that a portion of Walden which in the state of water was green will often, when frozen, appear from the same point of view blue.
  • They told me that they had some in the ice-houses at Fresh Pond five years old which was as good as ever.
  • Why is it that a bucket of water soon becomes putrid, but frozen remains sweet forever?
  • It is commonly said that this is the difference between the affections and the intellect.
  • In the morning I bathe my intellect in the stupendous and cosmogonal philosophy of the Bhagvat-Geeta, since whose composition years of the gods have elapsed, and in comparison with which our modern world and its literature seem puny and trivial; and I doubt if that philosophy is not to be referred to a previous state of existence, so remote is its sublimity from our conceptions.
  • But such was not the effect on Walden that year, for she had soon got a thick new garment to take the place of the old.
  • I never knew it to open in the course of a winter, not excepting that of '52-3, which gave the ponds so severe a trial.
  • This difference of three and a half degrees between the temperature of the deep water and the shallow in the latter pond, and the fact that a great proportion of it is comparatively shallow, show why it should break up so much sooner than Walden.
  • Ice has its grain as well as wood, and when a cake begins to rot or "comb," that is, assume the appearance of honeycomb, whatever may be its position, the air cells are at right angles with what was the water surface.
  • One pleasant morning after a cold night, February 24th, 1850, having gone to Flint's Pond to spend the day, I noticed with surprise, that when I struck the ice with the head of my axe, it resounded like a gong for many rods around, or as if I had struck on a tight drum-head.
  • The fishermen say that the "thundering of the pond" scares the fishes and prevents their biting.
  • Innumerable little streams overlap and interlace one with another, exhibiting a sort of hybrid product, which obeys half way the law of currents, and half way that of vegetation.
  • No wonder that the earth expresses itself outwardly in leaves, it so labors with the idea inwardly.
  • Thus it seemed that this one hillside illustrated the principle of all the operations of Nature.
  • What Champollion will decipher this hieroglyphic for us, that we may turn over a new leaf at last?
  • It convinces me that Earth is still in her swaddling-clothes, and stretches forth baby fingers on every side.
  • These foliaceous heaps lie along the bank like the slag of a furnace, showing that Nature is "in full blast" within.
  • They were wholly deaf to my arguments, or failed to perceive their force, and fell into a strain of invective that was irresistible.
  • The marsh hawk, sailing low over the meadow, is already seeking the first slimy life that awakes.
  • It is almost identical with that, for in the growing days of June, when the rills are dry, the grass-blades are their channels, and from year to year the herds drink at this perennial green stream, and the mower draws from it betimes their winter supply.
  • I knew that it would not rain any more.
  • As soon as the breath of evening does not suffice longer to preserve them, then the nature of man does not differ much from that of the brute.
  • Men seeing the nature of this man like that of the brute, think that he has never possessed the innate faculty of reason.
  • This sight reminded me of falconry and what nobleness and poetry are associated with that sport.
  • At the same time that we are earnest to explore and learn all things, we require that all things be mysterious and unexplorable, that land and sea be infinitely wild, unsurveyed and unfathomed by us because unfathomable.
  • The sulphur-like pollen of the pitch pine soon covered the pond and the stones and rotten wood along the shore, so that you could have collected a barrelful.
  • One hastens to southern Africa to chase the giraffe; but surely that is not the game he would be after.
  • Is it the source of the Nile, or the Niger, or the Mississippi, or a Northwest Passage around this continent, that we would find?
  • Is Franklin the only man who is lost, that his wife should be so earnest to find him?
  • Only the defeated and deserters go to the wars, cowards that run away and enlist.
  • He declared that "a soldier who fights in the ranks does not require half so much courage as a footpad"--"that honor and religion have never stood in the way of a well-considered and a firm resolve."
  • Perhaps it seemed to me that I had several more lives to live, and could not spare any more time for that one.
  • It is true, I fear, that others may have fallen into it, and so helped to keep it open.
  • I learned this, at least, by my experiment: that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
  • If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be.
  • It is a ridiculous demand which England and America make, that you shall speak so that they can understand you.
  • As if that were important, and there were not enough to understand you without them.
  • Who that has heard a strain of music feared then lest he should speak extravagantly any more forever?
  • Why level downward to our dullest perception always, and praise that as common sense?
  • "They pretend," as I hear, "that the verses of Kabir have four different senses; illusion, spirit, intellect, and the exoteric doctrine of the Vedas"; but in this part of the world it is considered a ground for complaint if a man's writings admit of more than one interpretation.
  • I do not suppose that I have attained to obscurity, but I should be proud if no more fatal fault were found with my pages on this score than was found with the Walden ice.
  • Some are dinning in our ears that we Americans, and moderns generally, are intellectual dwarfs compared with the ancients, or even the Elizabethan men.
  • But what is that to the purpose?
  • Shall a man go and hang himself because he belongs to the race of pygmies, and not be the biggest pygmy that he can?
  • It is not important that he should mature as soon as an apple tree or an oak.
  • He proceeded instantly to the forest for wood, being resolved that it should not be made of unsuitable material; and as he searched for and rejected stick after stick, his friends gradually deserted him, for they grew old in their works and died, but he grew not older by a moment.
  • In sane moments we regard only the facts, the case that is.
  • God will see that you do not want society.
  • We are often reminded that if there were bestowed on us the wealth of Croesus, our aims must still be the same, and our means essentially the same.
  • We read that the traveller asked the boy if the swamp before him had a hard bottom.
  • The boy replied that it had.
  • But presently the traveller's horse sank in up to the girths, and he observed to the boy, "I thought you said that this bog had a hard bottom."
  • So it is with the bogs and quicksands of society; but he is an old boy that knows it.
  • Drive a nail home and clinch it so faithfully that you can wake up in the night and think of your work with satisfaction--a work at which you would not be ashamed to invoke the Muse.
  • I thought that there was no need of ice to freeze them.
  • "Yes, we have done great deeds, and sung divine songs, which shall never die"--that is, as long as we can remember them.
  • We think that we can change our clothes only.
  • The government of the world I live in was not framed, like that of Britain, in after-dinner conversations over the wine.
  • Only that day dawns to which we are awake.
  • I heartily accept the motto,--"That government is best which governs least"; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically.
  • Carried out, it finally amounts to this, which also I believe,--"That government is best which governs not at all"; and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have.
  • Carried out, it finally amounts to this, which also I believe,--"That government is best which governs not at all"; and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have.
  • But it is not the less necessary for this; for the people must have some complicated machinery or other, and hear its din, to satisfy that idea of government which they have.
  • Let every man make known what kind of government would command his respect, and that will be one step toward obtaining it.
  • I think that we should be men first, and subjects afterward.
  • It is truly enough said that a corporation has no conscience; but a corporation of conscientious men is a corporation with a conscience.
  • They have no doubt that it is a damnable business in which they are concerned; they are all peaceably inclined.
  • I answer, that he cannot without disgrace be associated with it.
  • I cannot for an instant recognize that political organization as my government which is the slave's government also.
  • But almost all say that such is not the case now.
  • What makes this duty the more urgent is the fact that the country so overrun is not our own, but ours is the invading army.
  • But he that would save his life, in such a case, shall lose it.
  • We are accustomed to say, that the mass of men are unprepared; but improvement is slow, because the few are not materially wiser or better than the many.
  • It is not so important that many should be as good as you, as that there be some absolute goodness somewhere; for that will leaven the whole lump.
  • They will wait, well disposed, for others to remedy the evil, that they may no longer have it to regret.
  • I cast my vote, perchance, as I think right; but I am not vitally concerned that that right should prevail.
  • It is only expressing to men feebly your desire that it should prevail.
  • But no: I find that the respectable man, so called, has immediately drifted from his position, and despairs of his country, when his country has more reason to despair of him.
  • If I devote myself to other pursuits and contemplations, I must first see, at least, that I do not pursue them sitting upon another man's shoulders.
  • I must get off him first, that he may pursue his contemplations too.
  • After the first blush of sin comes its indifference; and from immoral it becomes, as it were, unmoral, and not quite unnecessary to that life which we have made.
  • Do not they stand in the same relation to the State, that the State does to the Union?
  • Men generally, under such a government as this, think that they ought to wait until they have persuaded the majority to alter them.
  • They think that, if they should resist, the remedy would be worse than the evil.
  • But it is the fault of the government itself that the remedy is worse than the evil.
  • A man has not everything to do, but something; and because he cannot do everything, it is not necessary that he should do something wrong.
  • I do not hesitate to say, that those who call themselves Abolitionists should at once effectually withdraw their support, both in person and property, from the government of Massachusetts, and not wait till they constitute a majority of one, before they suffer the right to prevail through them.
  • I think that it is enough if they have God on their side, without waiting for that other one.
  • But we love better to talk about it: that we say is our mission.
  • If a thousand men were not to pay their tax-bills this year, that would not be a violent and bloody measure, as it would be to pay them, and enable the State to commit violence and shed innocent blood.
  • For my own part, I should not like to think that I ever rely on the protection of the State.
  • You must hire or squat somewhere, and raise but a small crop, and eat that soon.
  • I should feel as if I were worth less in that case.
  • I saw that the State was half-witted, that it was timid as a lone woman with her silver spoons, and that it did not know its friends from its foes, and I lost all my remaining respect for it, and pitied it.
  • I do not hear of men being forced to have this way or that by masses of men.
  • What sort of life were that to live?
  • It seemed to me that I never had heard the town-clock strike before, nor the evening sounds of the village; for we slept with the windows open, which were inside the grating.
  • When they called for the vessels again, I was green enough to return what bread I had left; but my comrade seized it, and said that I should lay that up for lunch or dinner.
  • Soon after he was let out to work at haying in a neighboring field, whither he went every day, and would not be back till noon; so he bade me good-day, saying that he doubted if he should see me again.
  • It is for no particular item in the tax-bill that I refuse to pay it.
  • Let him see that he does only what belongs to himself and to the hour.
  • It is not many moments that I live under a government, even in this world.
  • If a man is thought-free, fancy-free, imagination-free, that which is not never for a long time appearing to be to him, unwise rulers or reformers cannot fatally interrupt him.
  • They are wont to forget that the world is not governed by policy and expediency.
  • Truth is always in harmony with herself, and is not concerned chiefly to reveal the justice that may consist with wrong-doing.
  • But I warn you, if you don't tell me that this means war, if you still try to defend the infamies and horrors perpetrated by that Antichrist--I really believe he is Antichrist--I will have nothing more to do with you and you are no longer my friend, no longer my 'faithful slave,' as you call yourself!
  • All her invitations without exception, written in French, and delivered by a scarlet-liveried footman that morning, ran as follows:
  • They have decided that Buonaparte has burnt his boats, and I believe that we are ready to burn ours.
  • That is the one thing I have faith in!
  • And I don't believe a word that Hardenburg says, or Haugwitz either.
  • Do you know that profound thinker?
  • She added that Her Majesty had deigned to show Baron Funke beaucoup d'estime, and again her face clouded over with sadness.
  • That is the only difference between them.
  • That is how I explain it to myself.
  • It shall be on your family's behalf that I'll start my apprenticeship as old maid.
  • One of the next arrivals was a stout, heavily built young man with close-cropped hair, spectacles, the light-colored breeches fashionable at that time, a very high ruffle, and a brown dress coat.
  • He knew that all the intellectual lights of Petersburg were gathered there and, like a child in a toyshop, did not know which way to look, afraid of missing any clever conversation that was to be heard.
  • Helene was so lovely that not only did she not show any trace of coquetry, but on the contrary she even appeared shy of her unquestionable and all too victorious beauty.
  • "Charming!" whispered the little princess, sticking the needle into her work as if to testify that the interest and fascination of the story prevented her from going on with it.
  • But how are you to get that balance?
  • At that moment Anna Pavlovna came up and, looking severely at Pierre, asked the Italian how he stood Russian climate.
  • It was evident that he not only knew everyone in the drawing room, but had found them to be so tiresome that it wearied him to look at or listen to them.
  • He turned away from her with a grimace that distorted his handsome face, kissed Anna Pavlovna's hand, and screwing up his eyes scanned the whole company.
  • He wished to say something more, but at that moment Prince Vasili and his daughter got up to go and the two young men rose to let them pass.
  • That would be the best way.
  • It was, in fact, solely to meet Prince Vasili that she had obtained an invitation to Anna Pavlovna's reception and had sat listening to the vicomte's story.
  • Prince Vasili knew this, and having once realized that if he asked on behalf of all who begged of him, he would soon be unable to ask for himself, he became chary of using his influence.
  • He told me himself that all the Moscow ladies have conspired to give him all their sons as adjutants.
  • "I hope this will prove the last drop that will make the glass run over," Anna Pavlovna continued.
  • "That is doubtful," said Prince Andrew.
  • Monsieur le Vicomte quite rightly supposes that matters have already gone too far.
  • "It is the Buonapartists who say that," replied the vicomte without looking at Pierre.
  • It was evident that he did not like the vicomte and was aiming his remarks at him, though without looking at him.
  • "The execution of the Duc d'Enghien," declared Monsieur Pierre, "was a political necessity, and it seems to me that Napoleon showed greatness of soul by not fearing to take on himself the whole responsibility of that deed."
  • Do you consider that assassination shows greatness of soul? said the little princess, smiling and drawing her work nearer to her.
  • The people only gave him power that he might rid them of the Bourbons and because they saw that he was a great man.
  • But when she saw that Pierre's sacrilegious words had not exasperated the vicomte, and had convinced herself that it was impossible to stop him, she rallied her forces and joined the vicomte in a vigorous attack on the orator.
  • "I should like," said the vicomte, "to ask how monsieur explains the 18th Brumaire; was not that an imposture?
  • That was horrible! said the little princess, shrugging her shoulders.
  • The vicomte who was meeting him for the first time saw clearly that this young Jacobin was not so terrible as his words suggested.
  • Prince Andrew, who had evidently wished to tone down the awkwardness of Pierre's remarks, rose and made a sign to his wife that it was time to go.
  • That was her taste.
  • Stout, about the average height, broad, with huge red hands; he did not know, as the saying is, how to enter a drawing room and still less how to leave one; that is, how to say something particularly agreeable before going away.
  • I pity the poor husband, that little officer who gives himself the airs of a monarch.
  • Hippolyte spluttered again, and amid his laughter said, And you were saying that the Russian ladies are not equal to the French?
  • Pierre reaching the house first went into Prince Andrew's study like one quite at home, and from habit immediately lay down on the sofa, took from the shelf the first book that came to his hand (it was Caesar's Commentaries), and resting on his elbow, began reading it in the middle.
  • It was evident that Prince Andrew was not interested in such abstract conversation.
  • It was about this choice that Prince Andrew was speaking.
  • That is all nonsense.
  • "And that would be splendid," said Pierre.
  • "Ah, that is just what I tell him!" said she.
  • How is it that we women don't want anything of the kind, don't need it?
  • The other day at the Apraksins' I heard a lady asking, 'Is that the famous Prince Andrew?'
  • Pierre looked at his friend and, noticing that he did not like the conversation, gave no reply.
  • But that one word expressed an entreaty, a threat, and above all conviction that she would herself regret her words.
  • Did you behave like that six months ago?
  • "Lise!" said Prince Andrew dryly, raising his voice to the pitch which indicates that patience is exhausted.
  • Everything from the table napkins to the silver, china, and glass bore that imprint of newness found in the households of the newly married.
  • Marry when you are old and good for nothing--or all that is good and noble in you will be lost.
  • It was evident that the more lifeless he seemed at ordinary times, the more impassioned he became in these moments of almost morbid irritation.
  • And that stupid set without whom my wife cannot exist, and those women...
  • "It seems funny to me," said Pierre, "that you, you should consider yourself incapable and your life a spoiled life.
  • "How can he talk like that?" thought Pierre.
  • Even in the best, most friendly and simplest relations of life, praise and commendation are essential, just as grease is necessary to wheels that they may run smoothly.
  • He suddenly blushed crimson, and it was plain that he had made a great effort to say this.
  • But look here: give up visiting those Kuragins and leading that sort of life.
  • Anatole kept on refilling Pierre's glass while explaining that Dolokhov was betting with Stevens, an English naval officer, that he would drink a bottle of rum sitting on the outer ledge of the third floor window with his legs hanging out.
  • Like all infantry officers he wore no mustache, so that his mouth, the most striking feature of his face, was clearly seen.
  • The lines of that mouth were remarkably finely curved.
  • Both Kuragin and Dolokhov were at that time notorious among the rakes and scapegraces of Petersburg.
  • Fifty imperials... that I will drink a whole bottle of rum without taking it from my mouth, sitting outside the window on this spot" (he stooped and pointed to the sloping ledge outside the window) "and without holding on to anything.
  • Anatole did not release him, and though he kept nodding to show that he understood, Anatole went on translating Dolokhov's words into English.
  • One of the footmen who had stooped to pick up some broken glass remained in that position without taking his eyes from the window and from Dolokhov's back.
  • It seemed to him that more than half an hour had elapsed.
  • They seized him by his arms; but he was so strong that everyone who touched him was sent flying.
  • "No, you'll never manage him that way," said Anatole.
  • "What is that?" asked the countess as if she did not know what the visitor alluded to, though she had already heard about the cause of Count Bezukhov's distress some fifteen times.
  • This is all that his foreign education has done for him!
  • I hope that here in Moscow no one will receive him, in spite of his money.
  • "Yes, but between ourselves," said the princess, "that is a pretext.
  • "But do you know, my dear, that was a capital joke," said the count; and seeing that the elder visitor was not listening, he turned to the young ladies.
  • I can just imagine what a funny figure that policeman cut!
  • The countess looked at her callers, smiling affably, but not concealing the fact that she would not be distressed if they now rose and took their leave.
  • It was evident that she had not intended her flight to bring her so far.
  • She leaned against her mother and burst into such a loud, ringing fit of laughter that even the prim visitor could not help joining in.
  • Boris on the contrary at once found his footing, and related quietly and humorously how he had known that doll Mimi when she was still quite a young lady, before her nose was broken; how she had aged during the five years he had known her, and how her head had cracked right across the skull.
  • Isn't that friendship? remarked the count in an inquiring tone.
  • "But they say that war has been declared," replied the visitor.
  • It can't be helped! said the count, shrugging his shoulders and speaking playfully of a matter that evidently distressed him.
  • "I have already told you, Papa," said his son, "that if you don't wish to let me go, I'll stay.
  • "Yes, they are splendid, splendid youngsters," chimed in the count, who always solved questions that seemed to him perplexing by deciding that everything was splendid.
  • I have heard that it harms the voice to train it at that age.
  • Perhaps I spoil her, but really that seems the best plan.
  • How can you torture me and yourself like that, for a mere fancy? said Nicholas taking her hand.
  • Suddenly she jumped up onto a tub to be higher than he, embraced him so that both her slender bare arms clasped him above his neck, and, tossing back her hair, kissed him full on the lips.
  • "Natasha," he said, "you know that I love you, but..."
  • After receiving her visitors, the countess was so tired that she gave orders to admit no more, but the porter was told to be sure to invite to dinner all who came "to congratulate."
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, with her tear-worn but pleasant face, drew her chair nearer to that of the countess.
  • You came rushing into the drawing room so that everyone felt ashamed of you.
  • Though what she said was quite just, perhaps for that very reason no one replied, and the four simply looked at one another.
  • She seemed that day to be more than ever kind and affectionate to everyone.
  • Don't I know that at the rate we are living our means won't last long?
  • That lawsuit taught me much.
  • And my affairs are in such a bad way that my position is now a terrible one, continued Anna Mikhaylovna, sadly, dropping her voice.
  • "I often think, though, perhaps it's a sin," said the princess, "that here lives Count Cyril Vladimirovich Bezukhov so rich, all alone... that tremendous fortune... and what is his life worth?
  • Remember that, my dear, and be nice to him, as you so well know how to be.
  • "If only I knew that anything besides humiliation would come of it..." answered her son coldly.
  • "My dear!" exclaimed his mother imploringly, again laying her hand on his arm as if that touch might soothe or rouse him.
  • The hall porter sullenly pulled a bell that rang upstairs, and turned away.
  • The son noticed that an expression of profound sorrow suddenly clouded his mother's face, and he smiled slightly.
  • "That is, with Ilya Rostov who married Nataly Shinshina," said Anna Mikhaylovna.
  • I never could understand how Nataly made up her mind to marry that unlicked bear!
  • He is his godson, she added, her tone suggesting that this fact ought to give Prince Vasili much satisfaction.
  • Evidently the prince understood her, and also understood, as he had done at Anna Pavlovna's, that it would be difficult to get rid of Anna Mikhaylovna.
  • Consider that the welfare of his soul is at stake.
  • "On the contrary," replied the prince, who had plainly become depressed, "I shall be only too glad if you relieve me of that young man....
  • The two younger ones were embroidering: both were rosy and pretty and they differed only in that one had a little mole on her lip which made her much prettier.
  • Olga, go and see whether Uncle's beef tea is ready--it is almost time, she added, giving Pierre to understand that they were busy, and busy making his father comfortable, while evidently he, Pierre, was only busy causing him annoyance.
  • He sent for Pierre and said to him: My dear fellow, if you are going to behave here as you did in Petersburg, you will end very badly; that is all I have to say to you.
  • But before Pierre--who at that moment imagined himself to be Napoleon in person and to have just effected the dangerous crossing of the Straits of Dover and captured London--could pronounce Pitt's sentence, he saw a well-built and handsome young officer entering his room.
  • Pierre smiled in his good-natured way as if afraid for his companion's sake that the latter might say something he would afterwards regret.
  • Pierre was still afraid that this officer might inadvertently say something disconcerting to himself.
  • "And it must seem to you," said Boris flushing slightly, but not changing his tone or attitude, "it must seem to you that everyone is trying to get something out of the rich man?"
  • But I just wish to say, to avoid misunderstandings, that you are quite mistaken if you reckon me or my mother among such people.
  • You might think that I...
  • It's queer," he added after a pause, "that you should have suspected me!"
  • Pierre saw that Boris wished to change the subject, and being of the same mind he began explaining the advantages and disadvantages of the Boulogne expedition.
  • After he had gone Pierre continued pacing up and down the room for a long time, no longer piercing an imaginary foe with his imaginary sword, but smiling at the remembrance of that pleasant, intelligent, and resolute young man.
  • As often happens in early youth, especially to one who leads a lonely life, he felt an unaccountable tenderness for this young man and made up his mind that they would be friends.
  • The will will show that, my dear; our fate also depends on it.
  • But why do you expect that he will leave us anything?
  • What's that mess? she said, pointing to his waistcoat.
  • Hey, who's there? he called out in a tone only used by persons who are certain that those they call will rush to obey the summons.
  • But, don't be uneasy, he added, noticing that the count was beginning to breathe heavily and quickly which was always a sign of approaching anger.
  • When Anna Mikhaylovna returned from Count Bezukhov's the money, all in clean notes, was lying ready under a handkerchief on the countess' little table, and Anna Mikhaylovna noticed that something was agitating her.
  • "Annette, for heaven's sake don't refuse me," the countess began, with a blush that looked very strange on her thin, dignified, elderly face, and she took the money from under the handkerchief.
  • His favorite occupation when not playing boston, a card game he was very fond of, was that of listener, especially when he succeeded in setting two loquacious talkers at one another.
  • No, Peter Nikolaevich; I only want to show that in the cavalry the advantages are far less than in the infantry.
  • His conversation always related entirely to himself; he would remain calm and silent when the talk related to any topic that had no direct bearing on himself.
  • * So that squares matters.
  • The other guests seeing that Shinshin was talking came up to listen.
  • Berg evidently enjoyed narrating all this, and did not seem to suspect that others, too, might have their own interests.
  • But all he said was so prettily sedate, and the naivete of his youthful egotism was so obvious, that he disarmed his hearers.
  • "Well, my boy, you'll get along wherever you go--foot or horse--that I'll warrant," said Shinshin, patting him on the shoulder and taking his feet off the sofa.
  • It was just the moment before a big dinner when the assembled guests, expecting the summons to zakuska, * avoid engaging in any long conversation but think it necessary to move about and talk, in order to show that they are not at all impatient for their food.
  • The latter understood that she was being asked to entertain this young man, and sitting down beside him she began to speak about his father; but he answered her, as he had the countess, only in monosyllables.
  • At the ladies' end an even chatter of voices was heard all the time, at the men's end the voices sounded louder and louder, especially that of the colonel of hussars who, growing more and more flushed, ate and drank so much that the count held him up as a pattern to the other guests.
  • Of the four crystal glasses engraved with the count's monogram that stood before his plate, Pierre held out one at random and drank with enjoyment, gazing with ever- increasing amiability at the other guests.
  • Sometimes that same look fell on Pierre, and that funny lively little girl's look made him inclined to laugh without knowing why.
  • Then with the unerring official memory that characterized him he repeated from the opening words of the manifesto:
  • *(2) That suits us down to the ground.
  • Natasha only desisted when she had been told that there would be pineapple ice.
  • She looked round and seeing that her friend was not in the room ran to look for her.
  • Yes, these verses Nicholas wrote himself and I copied some others, and she found them on my table and said she'd show them to Mamma, and that I was ungrateful, and that Mamma would never allow him to marry me, but that he'll marry Julie.
  • I don't quite remember how, but don't you remember that it could all be arranged and how nice it all was?
  • "Really, truly!" answered Natasha, pushing in a crisp lock that had strayed from under her friend's plaits.
  • "Do you know, that fat Pierre who sat opposite me is so funny!" said Natasha, stopping suddenly.
  • At nighttime in the moon's fair glow How sweet, as fancies wander free, To feel that in this world there's one Who still is thinking but of thee!
  • She had a fan in her hand that one of the ladies had given her to hold.
  • "Look at Papa!" shouted Natasha to the whole company, and quite forgetting that she was dancing with a grown-up partner she bent her curly head to her knees and made the whole room ring with her laughter.
  • "That was a Daniel Cooper!" exclaimed Marya Dmitrievna, tucking up her sleeves and puffing heavily.
  • I knew someone who received that sacrament seven times.
  • She rose and smoothed her hair, which was as usual so extremely smooth that it seemed to be made of one piece with her head and covered with varnish.
  • It was plain that this "well?" referred to much that they both understood without naming.
  • You know, Catiche, that we--you three sisters, Mamontov, and my wife-- are the count's only direct heirs.
  • The count," pointing to his portrait, "definitely demanded that he should be called."
  • "Yes, yes, of course," interrupted Prince Vasili impatiently, rubbing his bald head and angrily pulling back toward him the little table that he had pushed away.
  • But... in short, the fact is... you know yourself that last winter the count made a will by which he left all his property, not to us his direct heirs, but to Pierre.
  • Do you understand that in consideration of the count's services, his request would be granted?...
  • "I can tell you more," continued Prince Vasili, seizing her hand, "that letter was written, though it was not sent, and the Emperor knew of it.
  • * And all that follows therefrom.
  • "That would be a fine thing!" said she.
  • "Do you or do you not know where that will is?" insisted Prince Vasili, his cheeks twitching more than ever.
  • You must remember, Catiche, that it was all done casually in a moment of anger, of illness, and was afterwards forgotten.
  • Our duty, my dear, is to rectify his mistake, to ease his last moments by not letting him commit this injustice, and not to let him die feeling that he is rendering unhappy those who...
  • You understand that my sole desire is conscientiously to carry out his wishes; that is my only reason for being here.
  • It's that protege of yours, that sweet Princess Drubetskaya, that Anna Mikhaylovna whom I would not take for a housemaid... the infamous, vile woman!
  • Last winter she wheedled herself in here and told the count such vile, disgraceful things about us, especially about Sophie--I can't repeat them--that it made the count quite ill and he would not see us for a whole fortnight.
  • Yes; if I have a sin, a great sin, it is hatred of that vile woman! almost shrieked the princess, now quite changed.
  • As the wheels rolled softly over the straw beneath the windows, Anna Mikhaylovna, having turned with words of comfort to her companion, realized that he was asleep in his corner and woke him up.
  • He noticed that they had not come to the front entrance but to the back door.
  • "Ah, my friend!" she said, touching his arm as she had done her son's when speaking to him that afternoon, "believe me I suffer no less than you do, but be a man!"
  • Think that he is your father... perhaps in the agony of death.
  • Pierre did not understand a word, but the conviction that all this had to be grew stronger, and he meekly followed Anna Mikhaylovna who was already opening a door.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna evinced no surprise, she only smiled faintly and sighed, as if to say that this was no more than she had expected.
  • Pierre could not make out what it was all about, and still less what "watching over his interests" meant, but he decided that all these things had to be.
  • With the air of a practical Petersburg lady she now, keeping Pierre close beside her, entered the room even more boldly than that afternoon.
  • She felt that as she brought with her the person the dying man wished to see, her own admission was assured.
  • As soon as Anna Mikhaylovna had disappeared he noticed that the eyes of all in the room turned to him with something more than curiosity and sympathy.
  • He noticed that they whispered to one another, casting significant looks at him with a kind of awe and even servility.
  • That is well! and he turned to go.
  • Pierre's mind was in such a confused state that the word "stroke" suggested to him a blow from something.
  • He looked at Prince Vasili in perplexity, and only later grasped that a stroke was an attack of illness.
  • All were silently crossing themselves, and the reading of the church service, the subdued chanting of deep bass voices, and in the intervals sighs and the shuffling of feet were the only sounds that could be heard.
  • He lit it and, distracted by observing those around him, began crossing himself with the hand that held the taper.
  • The French doctor held no taper; he was leaning against one of the columns in a respectful attitude implying that he, a foreigner, in spite of all differences of faith, understood the full importance of the rite now being performed and even approved of it.
  • Pierre paid no more attention to this occurrence than to the rest of what went on, having made up his mind once for all that what he saw happening around him that evening was in some way essential.
  • The sick man was so surrounded by doctors, princesses, and servants that Pierre could no longer see the reddish-yellow face with its gray mane-- which, though he saw other faces as well, he had not lost sight of for a single moment during the whole service.
  • Either this look meant nothing but that as long as one has eyes they must look somewhere, or it meant too much.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna with her eyes indicated a chair that stood beside the bed.
  • "He is dozing," said Anna Mikhaylovna, observing that one of the princesses was coming to take her turn at watching.
  • I can't bear the sight of that woman.
  • Around the table all who were at Count Bezukhov's house that night had gathered to fortify themselves.
  • He looked inquiringly at his monitress and saw that she was again going on tiptoe to the reception room where they had left Prince Vasili and the eldest princess.
  • Pierre concluded that this also was essential, and after a short interval followed her.
  • His cheeks, which were so flabby that they looked heavier below, were twitching violently; but he wore the air of a man little concerned in what the two ladies were saying.
  • All I know is that his real will is in his writing table, and this is a paper he has forgotten....
  • "I know, my dear, kind princess," said Anna Mikhaylovna, seizing the portfolio so firmly that it was plain she would not let go easily.
  • Their efforts in the struggle for the portfolio were the only sounds audible, but it was evident that if the princess did speak, her words would not be flattering to Anna Mikhaylovna.
  • "Why don't you speak, cousin?" suddenly shrieked the princess so loud that those in the drawing room heard her and were startled.
  • I myself will go and ask him, I!... does that satisfy you?
  • "Remember that you will answer for the consequences," said Prince Vasili severely.
  • At this moment that terrible door burst noisily open and banged against the wall.
  • Pierre noticed that he was pale and that his jaw quivered and shook as if in an ague.
  • I know you well enough to be sure that this will not turn your head, but it imposes duties on you, and you must be a man.
  • She said the count had died as she would herself wish to die, that his end was not only touching but edifying.
  • Though in the new reign he was free to return to the capitals, he still continued to live in the country, remarking that anyone who wanted to see him could come the hundred miles from Moscow to Bald Hills, while he himself needed no one and nothing.
  • He used to say that there are only two sources of human vice--idleness and superstition, and only two virtues--activity and intelligence.
  • He was himself always occupied: writing his memoirs, solving problems in higher mathematics, turning snuffboxes on a lathe, working in the garden, or superintending the building that was always going on at his estate.
  • With those about him, from his daughter to his serfs, the prince was sharp and invariably exacting, so that without being a hardhearted man he inspired such fear and respect as few hardhearted men would have aroused.
  • On the morning of the day that the young couple were to arrive, Princess Mary entered the antechamber as usual at the time appointed for the morning greeting.
  • Every morning she came in like that, and every morning prayed that the daily interview might pass off well.
  • "Well, madam," he began, stooping over the book close to his daughter and placing an arm on the back of the chair on which she sat, so that she felt herself surrounded on all sides by the acrid scent of old age and tobacco, which she had known so long.
  • Now, madam, these triangles are equal; please note that the angle ABC...
  • Here is some sort of Key to the Mysteries that your Heloise has sent you.
  • Princess Mary went back to her room with the sad, scared expression that rarely left her and which made her plain, sickly face yet plainer.
  • God grant that the Corsican monster who is destroying the peace of Europe may be overthrown by the angel whom it has pleased the Almighty, in His goodness, to give us as sovereign!
  • I will confess to you, dear Mary, that in spite of his extreme youth his departure for the army was a great grief to me.
  • This young man, of whom I spoke to you last summer, is so noble-minded and full of that real youthfulness which one seldom finds nowadays among our old men of twenty and, particularly, he is so frank and has so much heart.
  • Someday I will tell you about our parting and all that was said then.
  • That is still too fresh.
  • But you will understand that I have no desire for the post.
  • A propos of marriages: do you know that a while ago that universal auntie Anna Mikhaylovna told me, under the seal of strict secrecy, of a plan of marriage for you.
  • That is all I have been able to find out about him.
  • The princess pondered awhile with a thoughtful smile and her luminous eyes lit up so that her face was entirely transformed.
  • Why do you suppose that I should look severely on your affection for that young man?
  • He says the count was the last representative but one of the great century, and that it is his own turn now, but that he will do all he can to let his turn come as late as possible.
  • He always seemed to me to have an excellent heart, and that is the quality I value most in people.
  • I never could understand the fondness some people have for confusing their minds by dwelling on mystical books that merely awaken their doubts and excite their imagination, giving them a bent for exaggeration quite contrary to Christian simplicity.
  • Let us not seek to penetrate what mysteries they contain; for how can we, miserable sinners that we are, know the terrible and holy secrets of Providence while we remain in this flesh which forms an impenetrable veil between us and the Eternal?
  • My father has not spoken to me of a suitor, but has only told me that he has received a letter and is expecting a visit from Prince Vasili.
  • In regard to this project of marriage for me, I will tell you, dear sweet friend, that I look on marriage as a divine institution to which we must conform.
  • The princess glanced at her watch and, seeing that she was five minutes late in starting her practice on the clavichord, went into the sitting room with a look of alarm.
  • Tikhon knew that neither the son's arrival nor any other unusual event must be allowed to disturb the appointed order of the day.
  • Prince Andrew apparently knew this as well as Tikhon; he looked at his watch as if to ascertain whether his father's habits had changed since he was at home last, and, having assured himself that they had not, he turned to his wife.
  • Is that Mary practicing?
  • Princess Mary had turned toward her brother, and through her tears the loving, warm, gentle look of her large luminous eyes, very beautiful at that moment, rested on Prince Andrew's face.
  • It was plain that she was following a train of thought independent of her sister-in-law's words.
  • Prince Andrew, seeing that his father insisted, began--at first reluctantly, but gradually with more and more animation, and from habit changing unconsciously from Russian to French as he went on--to explain the plan of operation for the coming campaign.
  • He explained how an army, ninety thousand strong, was to threaten Prussia so as to bring her out of her neutrality and draw her into the war; how part of that army was to join some Swedish forces at Stralsund; how two hundred and twenty thousand Austrians, with a hundred thousand Russians, were to operate in Italy and on the Rhine; how fifty thousand Russians and as many English were to land at Naples, and how a total force of five hundred thousand men was to attack the French from different sides.
  • This meant that Tikhon was not handing him the waistcoat he wanted.
  • At the appointed hour the prince, powdered and shaven, entered the dining room.
  • The prince, who generally kept very strictly to social distinctions and rarely admitted even important government officials to his table, had unexpectedly selected Michael Ivanovich (who always went into a corner to blow his nose on his checked handkerchief) to illustrate the theory that all men are equals, and had more than once impressed on his daughter that Michael Ivanovich was "not a whit worse than you or I."
  • Prince Andrew, looking again at that genealogical tree, shook his head, laughing as a man laughs who looks at a portrait so characteristic of the original as to be amusing.
  • "How thoroughly like him that is!" he said to Princess Mary, who had come up to him.
  • At that moment the great clock struck two and another with a shrill tone joined in from the drawing room.
  • Michael Ivanovich did not at all know when "you and I" had said such things about Bonaparte, but understanding that he was wanted as a peg on which to hang the prince's favorite topic, he looked inquiringly at the young prince, wondering what would follow.
  • No, my dear boy," he continued, "you and your generals won't get on against Buonaparte; you'll have to call in the French, so that birds of a feather may fight together.
  • His son made no rejoinder, but it was evident that whatever arguments were presented he was as little able as his father to change his opinion.
  • "That would take too long to tell," answered the son.
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne, here's another admirer of that powder-monkey emperor of yours, he exclaimed in excellent French.
  • It was the heavy tread of Princess Mary that he heard.
  • She was so tired that she has fallen asleep on the sofa in my room.
  • Prince Andrew was silent, but the princess noticed the ironical and contemptuous look that showed itself on his face.
  • Don't forget that she has grown up and been educated in society, and so her position now is not a rosy one.
  • The only thing that is hard for me...
  • That is the only thing that makes me unhappy.
  • That is the only thing that makes me unhappy.
  • No--promise that you will not refuse!
  • And I am sorry for that, he went on.
  • Know this, Masha: I can't reproach, have not reproached, and never shall reproach my wife with anything, and I cannot reproach myself with anything in regard to her; and that always will be so in whatever circumstances I may be placed.
  • He said nothing to her but looked at her forehead and hair, without looking at her eyes, with such contempt that the Frenchwoman blushed and went away without a word.
  • It was an autumn night, so dark that the coachman could not see the carriage pole.
  • And he went on writing, so that his quill spluttered and squeaked.
  • "I know that no one can help if nature does not do her work," said Prince Andrew, evidently confused.
  • I know that out of a million cases only one goes wrong, but it is her fancy and mine.
  • They're all like that; one can't unmarry.
  • Andrew did not speak; he was both pleased and displeased that his father understood him.
  • Give this letter to Michael Ilarionovich. * I have written that he should make use of you in proper places and not keep you long as an adjutant: a bad position!
  • He spoke so rapidly that he did not finish half his words, but his son was accustomed to understand him.
  • Andrew did not tell his father that he would no doubt live a long time yet.
  • He felt that he must not say it.
  • "Remember this, Prince Andrew, if they kill you it will hurt me, your old father..." he paused unexpectedly, and then in a querulous voice suddenly shrieked: "but if I hear that you have not behaved like a son of Nicholas Bolkonski, I shall be ashamed!"
  • "You need not have said that to me, Father," said the son with a smile.
  • On October 11, 1805, one of the infantry regiments that had just reached Braunau had halted half a mile from the town, waiting to be inspected by the commander-in-chief.
  • Though the words of the order were not clear to the regimental commander, and the question arose whether the troops were to be in marching order or not, it was decided at a consultation between the battalion commanders to present the regiment in parade order, on the principle that it is always better to "bow too low than not bow low enough."
  • "He's coming!" shouted the signaler at that moment.
  • Beside Kutuzov sat an Austrian general, in a white uniform that looked strange among the Russian black ones.
  • Thanks to the strictness and assiduity of its commander the regiment, in comparison with others that had reached Braunau at the same time, was in splendid condition.
  • Looking at their boots he several times shook his head sadly, pointing them out to the Austrian general with an expression which seemed to say that he was not blaming anyone, but could not help noticing what a bad state of things it was.
  • Behind Kutuzov, at a distance that allowed every softly spoken word to be heard, followed some twenty men of his suite.
  • The hussar at that moment noticed the face of the red-nosed captain and his drawn-in stomach, and mimicked his expression and pose with such exactitude that Nesvitski could not help laughing.
  • (The regimental commander's face now that the inspection was happily over beamed with irrepressible delight.)
  • And tell Mr. Dolokhov that I won't forget him--he may be quite easy.
  • "I will, your excellency," said Timokhin, showing by his smile that he understood his commander's wish.
  • "A cup of vodka for the men from me," he added so that the soldiers could hear.
  • God be praised! and he rode past that company and overtook the next one.
  • And that other one with him, the Austrian, looked as if he were smeared with chalk--as white as flour!
  • Everybody said that Buonaparte himself was at Braunau.
  • The commander-in-chief made a sign that the men should continue to march at ease, and he and all his suite showed pleasure at the sound of the singing and the sight of the dancing soldier and the gay and smartly marching men.
  • It was Dolokhov marching with particular grace and boldness in time to the song and looking at those driving past as if he pitied all who were not at that moment marching with the company.
  • But now that Kutuzov had spoken to the gentleman ranker, he addressed him with the cordiality of an old friend.
  • On returning from the review, Kutuzov took the Austrian general into his private room and, calling his adjutant, asked for some papers relating to the condition of the troops on their arrival, and the letters that had come from the Archduke Ferdinand, who was in command of the advanced army.
  • "All I can say, General," said he with a pleasant elegance of expression and intonation that obliged one to listen to each deliberately spoken word.
  • It was evident that Kutuzov himself listened with pleasure to his own voice.
  • And believe me on my honour that to me personally it would be a pleasure to hand over the supreme command of the army into the hands of a better informed and more skillful general--of whom Austria has so many--and to lay down all this heavy responsibility.
  • And Kutuzov smiled in a way that seemed to say, You are quite at liberty not to believe me and I don't even care whether you do or not, but you have no grounds for telling me so.
  • And that is the whole point.
  • But Kutuzov went on blandly smiling with the same expression, which seemed to say that he had a right to suppose so.
  • "Give me that letter," said Kutuzov turning to Prince Andrew.
  • Also, as we are masters of Ulm, we cannot be deprived of the advantage of commanding both sides of the Danube, so that should the enemy not cross the Lech, we can cross the Danube, throw ourselves on his line of communications, recross the river lower down, and frustrate his intention should he try to direct his whole force against our faithful ally.
  • Though not much time had passed since Prince Andrew had left Russia, he had changed greatly during that period.
  • But among these people Prince Andrew knew how to take his stand so that they respected and even feared him.
  • But at that instant a tall Austrian general in a greatcoat, with the order of Maria Theresa on his neck and a black bandage round his head, who had evidently just arrived, entered quickly, slamming the door.
  • The unknown general looked disdainfully down at Kozlovski, who was rather short, as if surprised that anyone should not know him.
  • When he saw Mack and heard the details of his disaster he understood that half the campaign was lost, understood all the difficulties of the Russian army's position, and vividly imagined what awaited it and the part he would have to play.
  • Involuntarily he felt a joyful agitation at the thought of the humiliation of arrogant Austria and that in a week's time he might, perhaps, see and take part in the first Russian encounter with the French since Suvorov met them.
  • He feared that Bonaparte's genius might outweigh all the courage of the Russian troops, and at the same time could not admit the idea of his hero being disgraced.
  • He screwed up his eyes showing that he was listening.
  • Nesvitski and Zherkov were so surprised by this outburst that they gazed at Bolkonski silently with wide-open eyes.
  • Don't you understand that either we are officers serving our Tsar and our country, rejoicing in the successes and grieving at the misfortunes of our common cause, or we are merely lackeys who care nothing for their master's business.
  • *(2) Only a hobbledehoy could amuse himself in this way, he added in Russian--but pronouncing the word with a French accent--having noticed that Zherkov could still hear him.
  • * "Forty thousand men massacred and the army of our allies destroyed, and you find that a cause for jesting!"
  • * (2) "It is all very well for that good-for-nothing fellow of whom you have made a friend, but not for you, not for you."
  • "Walk him up and down, my dear fellow," he continued, with that gay brotherly cordiality which goodhearted young people show to everyone when they are happy.
  • It was evident that the cadet was liberal with his tips and that it paid to serve him.
  • And what devil made me go to that wat?
  • He took the lighted pipe that was offered to him, gripped it in his fist, and tapped it on the floor, making the sparks fly, while he continued to shout.
  • "Oh, he's all right, a good horse," answered Rostov, though the horse for which he had paid seven hundred rubbles was not worth half that sum.
  • I don't like that fellow, he said, regardless of the quartermaster's presence.
  • No, I remember thinking that you kept it under your head like a treasure, said Rostov.
  • You're always like that; you thwow a thing down anywhere and forget it.
  • "I must have that purse, I tell you," shouted Denisov, shaking his orderly by the shoulders and knocking him against the wall.
  • So that if it is not so, then...
  • "That money is Denisov's; you took it..." he whispered just above Telyanin's ear.
  • That same evening there was an animated discussion among the squadron's officers in Denisov's quarters.
  • "And I tell you, Rostov, that you must apologize to the colonel!" said a tall, grizzly-haired staff captain, with enormous mustaches and many wrinkles on his large features, to Rostov who was crimson with excitement.
  • You tell the colonel in the presence of other officers that an officer has stolen...
  • I'm not to blame that the conversation began in the presence of other officers.
  • Is that how you look at it?
  • You're wrong to think that of me...
  • Ah well, I'll show that in action, and for me the honor of the flag...
  • "And what has become of that scoundrel?" he asked Denisov.
  • The wide expanse that opened out before the heights on which the Russian batteries stood guarding the bridge was at times veiled by a diaphanous curtain of slanting rain, and then, suddenly spread out in the sunlight, far-distant objects could be clearly seen glittering as though freshly varnished.
  • Yes, the Austrian prince who built that castle was no fool.
  • They'll ransack that castle, he remarked with evident approval.
  • That would be fine, gentlemen!
  • Sometimes through the monotonous waves of men, like a fleck of white foam on the waves of the Enns, an officer, in a cloak and with a type of face different from that of the men, squeezed his way along; sometimes like a chip of wood whirling in the river, an hussar on foot, an orderly, or a townsman was carried through the waves of infantry; and sometimes like a log floating down the river, an officers' or company's baggage wagon, piled high, leather covered, and hemmed in on all sides, moved across the bridge.
  • That soldier passed on, and after him came another sitting on a cart.
  • I did, 'pon my word, I got that frightened! said he, as if bragging of having been frightened.
  • That one also passed.
  • Then followed a cart unlike any that had gone before.
  • The German closed his eyes, signifying that he did not understand.
  • Looking down at the waters of the Enns under the bridge, Nesvitski suddenly heard a sound new to him, of something swiftly approaching... something big, that splashed into the water.
  • Nesvitski realized that it was a cannon ball.
  • The imposing figure of Nesvitski followed by his Cossack, and the determination of Denisov who flourished his sword and shouted frantically, had such an effect that they managed to squeeze through to the farther side of the bridge and stopped the infantry.
  • Carelessly holding in his stallion that was neighing and pawing the ground, eager to rejoin its fellows, he watched his squadron draw nearer.
  • An empty space of some seven hundred yards was all that separated them.
  • The enemy ceased firing, and that stern, threatening, inaccessible, and intangible line which separates two hostile armies was all the more clearly felt.
  • Who is there?--there beyond that field, that tree, that roof lit up by the sun?
  • Every face, from Denisov's to that of the bugler, showed one common expression of conflict, irritation, and excitement, around chin and mouth.
  • But despite himself, on his face too that same indication of something new and stern showed round the mouth.
  • Who's that curtseying there?
  • It seemed to Rostov that Bogdanich was only pretending not to notice him, and that his whole aim now was to test the cadet's courage, so he drew himself up and looked around him merrily; then it seemed to him that Bogdanich rode so near in order to show him his courage.
  • Next he thought that his enemy would send the squadron on a desperate attack just to punish him--Rostov.
  • "I don't myself know 'to who,'" replied the cornet in a serious tone, "but the prince told me to 'go and tell the colonel that the hussars must return quickly and fire the bridge.'"
  • After him the stout Nesvitski came galloping up on a Cossack horse that could scarcely carry his weight.
  • "I will the bridge fire," he said in a solemn tone as if to announce that in spite of all the unpleasantness he had to endure he would still do the right thing.
  • Again on all the bright faces of the squadron the serious expression appeared that they had worn when under fire.
  • He was afraid of falling behind the hussars, so much afraid that his heart stood still.
  • Rostov wiping his muddy hands on his breeches looked at his enemy and was about to run on, thinking that the farther he went to the front the better.
  • Who's that running on the middle of the bridge?
  • Another instant and I shall never again see the sun, this water, that gorge!...
  • At that instant the sun began to hide behind the clouds, and other stretchers came into view before Rostov.
  • Thou who art in that heaven, save, forgive, and protect me!
  • "Was that grapeshot?" he asked Denisov.
  • And Denisov rode up to a group that had stopped near Rostov, composed of the colonel, Nesvitski, Zherkov, and the officer from the suite.
  • "Well, it seems that no one has noticed," thought Rostov.
  • "Inform the prince that I the bridge fired!" said the colonel triumphantly and gaily.
  • Austrian troops that had escaped capture at Ulm and had joined Kutuzov at Braunau now separated from the Russian army, and Kutuzov was left with only his own weak and exhausted forces.
  • The night was dark but starry, the road showed black in the snow that had fallen the previous day--the day of the battle.
  • Then he began to imagine that the Russians were running away and that he himself was killed, but he quickly roused himself with a feeling of joy, as if learning afresh that this was not so but that on the contrary the French had run away.
  • It was already quite dark when Prince Andrew rattled over the paved streets of Brunn and found himself surrounded by high buildings, the lights of shops, houses, and street lamps, fine carriages, and all that atmosphere of a large and active town which is always so attractive to a soldier after camp life.
  • He vividly imagined the casual questions that might be put to him and the answers he would give.
  • At the chief entrance to the palace, however, an official came running out to meet him, and learning that he was a special messenger led him to another entrance.
  • "But that is a matter of perfect indifference to me," he thought.
  • It was not the question "What for?" but the question "How?" that interested him.
  • In society he always awaited an opportunity to say something striking and took part in a conversation only when that was possible.
  • These sayings were prepared in the inner laboratory of his mind in a portable form as if intentionally, so that insignificant society people might carry them from drawing room to drawing room.
  • * "But my dear fellow, with all my respect for the Orthodox Russian army, I must say that your victory was not particularly victorious."
  • That is true, but still why didn't you capture him?
  • All that is beautiful, but what do we, I mean the Austrian court, care for your victories?
  • Bring us nice news of a victory by the Archduke Karl or Ferdinand (one archduke's as good as another, as you know) and even if it is only over a fire brigade of Bonaparte's, that will be another story and we'll fire off some cannon!
  • After the fatigues and impressions of the journey, his reception, and especially after having dined, Bolkonski felt that he could not take in the full significance of the words he heard.
  • You see that your victory is not a matter for great rejoicing and that you can't be received as a savior.
  • "Really I don't care about that, I don't care at all," said Prince Andrew, beginning to understand that his news of the battle before Krems was really of small importance in view of such events as the fall of Austria's capital.
  • We heard reports that Prince Auersperg was defending Vienna? he said.
  • "But still this does not mean that the campaign is over," said Prince Andrew.
  • "Buonaparte?" said Bilibin inquiringly, puckering up his forehead to indicate that he was about to say something witty.
  • That would be too base.
  • "If we live we shall see," replied Bilibin, his face again becoming smooth as a sign that the conversation was at an end.
  • When Prince Andrew reached the room prepared for him and lay down in a clean shirt on the feather bed with its warmed and fragrant pillows, he felt that the battle of which he had brought tidings was far, far away from him.
  • "Yes, that all happened!" he said, and, smiling happily to himself like a child, he fell into a deep, youthful slumber.
  • Recalling his recent impressions, the first thought that came into his mind was that today he had to be presented to the Emperor Francis; he remembered the Minister of War, the polite Austrian adjutant, Bilibin, and last night's conversation.
  • "Tell me about that!" he said.
  • "Wait, I have not finished..." he said to Prince Andrew, seizing him by the arm, "I believe that intervention will be stronger than nonintervention.
  • That is how it will end.
  • And he released Bolkonski's arm to indicate that he had now quite finished.
  • He was evidently distressed, and breathed painfully, but could not restrain the wild laughter that convulsed his usually impassive features.
  • "When speaking to the Emperor, try as far as you can to praise the way that provisions are supplied and the routes indicated," said Bilibin, accompanying him to the hall.
  • But after it was over, the adjutant he had seen the previous day ceremoniously informed Bolkonski that the Emperor desired to give him an audience.
  • Before the conversation began Prince Andrew was struck by the fact that the Emperor seemed confused and blushed as if not knowing what to say.
  • "I cannot inform Your Majesty at what o'clock the battle began at the front, but at Durrenstein, where I was, our attack began after five in the afternoon," replied Bolkonski growing more animated and expecting that he would have a chance to give a reliable account, which he had ready in his mind, of all he knew and had seen.
  • Confess that this is delightful, said he.
  • And you didn't see that everybody is packing up?
  • Why, the French have crossed the bridge that Auersperg was defending, and the bridge was not blown up: so Murat is now rushing along the road to Brunn and will be here in a day or two.
  • That is what I ask you.
  • But if the bridge is crossed it means that the army too is lost?
  • Listening to Bilibin he was already imagining how on reaching the army he would give an opinion at the war council which would be the only one that could save the army, and how he alone would be entrusted with the executing of the plan.
  • He lets them enter the tête-de-pont. * They spin him a thousand gasconades, saying that the war is over, that the Emperor Francis is arranging a meeting with Bonaparte, that they desire to see Prince Auersperg, and so on.
  • But what is best of all," he went on, his excitement subsiding under the delightful interest of his own story, "is that the sergeant in charge of the cannon which was to give the signal to fire the mines and blow up the bridge, this sergeant, seeing that the French troops were running onto the bridge, was about to fire, but Lannes stayed his hand.
  • Murat, seeing that all is lost if the sergeant is allowed to speak, turns to Auersperg with feigned astonishment (he is a true Gascon) and says: 'I don't recognize the world-famous Austrian discipline, if you allow a subordinate to address you like that!'
  • Come, you must own that this affair of the Thabor Bridge is delightful!
  • "It may be treachery," said Prince Andrew, vividly imagining the gray overcoats, wounds, the smoke of gunpowder, the sounds of firing, and the glory that awaited him.
  • That puts the court in too bad a light, replied Bilibin.
  • We are Macked), he concluded, feeling that he had produced a good epigram, a fresh one that would be repeated.
  • I know you think it your duty to gallop back to the army now that it is in danger.
  • But as you are a philosopher, be a consistent one, look at the other side of the question and you will see that your duty, on the contrary, is to take care of yourself.
  • That same night, having taken leave of the Minister of War, Bolkonski set off to rejoin the army, not knowing where he would find it and fearing to be captured by the French on the way to Krems.
  • The road was so obstructed with carts that it was impossible to get by in a carriage.
  • Prince Andrew saw that the officer was in that state of senseless, tipsy rage when a man does not know what he is saying.
  • He saw that his championship of the doctor's wife in her queer trap might expose him to what he dreaded more than anything in the world--to ridicule; but his instinct urged him on.
  • "It's all the fault of these fellows on the staff that there's this disorder," he muttered.
  • On reaching the village he dismounted and went to the nearest house, intending to rest if but for a moment, eat something, and try to sort out the stinging and tormenting thoughts that confused his mind.
  • "Here, in that house," answered the adjutant.
  • I know nothing except that it was all I could do to get here.
  • You must be ill to shiver like that, he added, noticing that Prince Andrew winced as at an electric shock.
  • "Get in," said Kutuzov, and noticing that Bolkonski still delayed, he added: "I need good officers myself, need them myself!"
  • "That is why I beg to be sent to that detachment," he said.
  • "That is why I beg to be sent to that detachment," he said.
  • On November 1 Kutuzov had received, through a spy, news that the army he commanded was in an almost hopeless position.
  • The spy reported that the French, after crossing the bridge at Vienna, were advancing in immense force upon Kutuzov's line of communication with the troops that were arriving from Russia.
  • If Kutuzov decided to retreat along the road from Krems to Olmutz, to unite with the troops arriving from Russia, he risked being forestalled on that road by the French who had crossed the Vienna bridge, and encumbered by his baggage and transport, having to accept battle on the march against an enemy three times as strong, who would hem him in from two sides.
  • Marching thirty miles that stormy night across roadless hills, with his hungry, ill-shod soldiers, and losing a third of his men as stragglers by the way, Bagration came out on the Vienna-Znaim road at Hollabrunn a few hours ahead of the French who were approaching Hollabrunn from Vienna.
  • The success of the trick that had placed the Vienna bridge in the hands of the French without a fight led Murat to try to deceive Kutuzov in a similar way.
  • To be able to crush it absolutely he awaited the arrival of the rest of the troops who were on their way from Vienna, and with this object offered a three days' truce on condition that both armies should remain in position without moving.
  • Bagration replied that he was not authorized either to accept or refuse a truce and sent his adjutant to Kutuzov to report the offer he had received.
  • Inform him that the general who signed that capitulation had no right to do so, and that no one but the Emperor of Russia has that right.
  • The prince gave orders that no one should leave his post.
  • One would think that as an artillery officer you would set a good example, yet here you are without your boots!
  • But before he had finished he felt that his jest was unacceptable and had not come off.
  • Our front line and that of the enemy were far apart on the right and left flanks, but in the center where the men with a flag of truce had passed that morning, the lines were so near together that the men could see one another's faces and speak to one another.
  • "It's ancient history," said another, guessing that it referred to a former war.
  • Ouh! ouh! came peals of such healthy and good-humored laughter from the soldiers that it infected the French involuntarily, so much so that the only thing left to do seemed to be to unload the muskets, explode the ammunition, and all return home as quickly as possible.
  • It was true that a view over nearly the whole Russian position and the greater part of the enemy's opened out from this battery.
  • To the left from that village, amid the smoke, was something resembling a battery, but it was impossible to see it clearly with the naked eye.
  • The French line was wider than ours, and it was plain that they could easily outflank us on both sides.
  • In that case the dragoons could successfully make a flank counterattack.
  • Suddenly, however, he was struck by a voice coming from the shed, and its tone was so sincere that he could not but listen.
  • "No, friend," said a pleasant and, as it seemed to Prince Andrew, a familiar voice, "what I say is that if it were possible to know what is beyond death, none of us would be afraid of it.
  • Mounting his horse again Prince Andrew lingered with the battery, looking at the puff from the gun that had sent the ball.
  • His eyes ran rapidly over the wide space, but he only saw that the hitherto motionless masses of the French now swayed and that there really was a battery to their left.
  • Lemarrois had just arrived at a gallop with Bonaparte's stern letter, and Murat, humiliated and anxious to expiate his fault, had at once moved his forces to attack the center and outflank both the Russian wings, hoping before evening and before the arrival of the Emperor to crush the contemptible detachment that stood before him.
  • Before he had reached the embankments that were being thrown up, he saw, in the light of the dull autumn evening, mounted men coming toward him.
  • Prince Andrew gazed with anxious curiosity at that impassive face and wished he could tell what, if anything, this man was thinking and feeling at that moment.
  • Is there anything at all behind that impassive face?
  • "What's that that has fallen?" asked the accountant with a naive smile.
  • Prince Andrew remembered the story of Suvorov giving his saber to Bagration in Italy, and the recollection was particularly pleasant at that moment.
  • As he approached, a ringing shot issued from it deafening him and his suite, and in the smoke that suddenly surrounded the gun they could see the gunners who had seized it straining to roll it quickly back to its former position.
  • No one had given Tushin orders where and at what to fire, but after consulting his sergeant major, Zakharchenko, for whom he had great respect, he had decided that it would be a good thing to set fire to the village.
  • The officer of the suite ventured to remark to the prince that if these battalions went away, the guns would remain without support.
  • It seemed to Prince Andrew that the officer's remark was just and that really no answer could be made to it.
  • Prince Andrew listened attentively to Bagration's colloquies with the commanding officers and the orders he gave them and, to his surprise, found that no orders were really given, but that Prince Bagration tried to make it appear that everything done by necessity, by accident, or by the will of subordinate commanders was done, if not by his direct command, at least in accord with his intentions.
  • Prince Andrew noticed, however, that though what happened was due to chance and was independent of the commander's will, owing to the tact Bagration showed, his presence was very valuable.
  • All he knew was that at the commencement of the action balls and shells began flying all over his regiment and hitting men and that afterwards someone had shouted "Cavalry!" and our men had begun firing.
  • Prince Bagration bowed his head as a sign that this was exactly what he had desired and expected.
  • While he was speaking, the curtain of smoke that had concealed the hollow, driven by a rising wind, began to move from right to left as if drawn by an invisible hand, and the hill opposite, with the French moving about on it, opened out before them.
  • At that moment he was clearly thinking of nothing but how dashing a fellow he would appear as he passed the commander.
  • It was as if all the powers of his soul were concentrated on passing the commander in the best possible manner, and feeling that he was doing it well he was happy.
  • A morose soldier marching on the left turned his eyes on Bagration as he shouted, with an expression that seemed to say: "We know that ourselves!"
  • Bagration rode round the ranks that had marched past him and dismounted.
  • Prince Andrew felt that an invisible power was leading him forward, and experienced great happiness.
  • Bagration had sent Zherkov to the general commanding that left flank with orders to retreat immediately.
  • The troops of the left flank, infantry and hussars alike, felt that the commander did not himself know what to do, and this irresolution communicated itself to the men.
  • "If only they would be quick!" thought Rostov, feeling that at last the time had come to experience the joy of an attack of which he had so often heard from his fellow hussars.
  • "Let anyone come my way now," thought Rostov driving his spurs into Rook and letting him go at a full gallop so that he outstripped the others.
  • "Where, on which side, was now the line that had so sharply divided the two armies?" he asked himself and could not answer.
  • "Can something bad have happened to me?" he wondered as he got up: and at that moment he felt that something superfluous was hanging on his benumbed left arm.
  • Can it be that they will take me too?
  • The foremost Frenchman, the one with the hooked nose, was already so close that the expression of his face could be seen.
  • And the excited, alien face of that man, his bayonet hanging down, holding his breath, and running so lightly, frightened Rostov.
  • One sentiment, fear for his life, possessed his whole being.
  • One soldier, in his fear, uttered the senseless cry, "Cut off!" that is so terrible in battle, and that word infected the whole crowd with a feeling of panic.
  • That moment of moral hesitation which decides the fate of battles had arrived.
  • Despite his desperate shouts that used to seem so terrible to the soldiers, despite his furious purple countenance distorted out of all likeness to his former self, and the flourishing of his saber, the soldiers all continued to run, talking, firing into the air, and disobeying orders.
  • But at that moment the French who were attacking, suddenly and without any apparent reason, ran back and disappeared from the outskirts, and Russian sharpshooters showed themselves in the copse.
  • Timokhin, armed only with a sword, had rushed at the enemy with such a desperate cry and such mad, drunken determination that, taken by surprise, the French had thrown down their muskets and run.
  • On the contrary, the energetic action of that battery led the French to suppose that here--in the center--the main Russian forces were concentrated.
  • The French columns that had advanced beyond the village went back; but as though in revenge for this failure, the enemy placed ten guns to the right of the village and began firing them at Tushin's battery.
  • Little Tushin, moving feebly and awkwardly, kept telling his orderly to "refill my pipe for that one!" and then, scattering sparks from it, ran forward shading his eyes with his small hand to look at the French.
  • Owing to the terrible uproar and the necessity for concentration and activity, Tushin did not experience the slightest unpleasant sense of fear, and the thought that he might be killed or badly wounded never occurred to him.
  • It seemed to him that it was a very long time ago, almost a day, since he had first seen the enemy and fired the first shot, and that the corner of the field he stood on was well-known and familiar ground.
  • In that world, the handsome drunkard Number One of the second gun's crew was "uncle"; Tushin looked at him more often than at anyone else and took delight in his every movement.
  • The first thing he saw on riding up to the space where Tushin's guns were stationed was an unharnessed horse with a broken leg, that lay screaming piteously beside the harnessed horses.
  • When having limbered up the only two cannon that remained uninjured out of the four, they began moving down the hill (one shattered gun and one unicorn were left behind), Prince Andrew rode up to Tushin.
  • It was all that they could do to get the guns up the rise aided by the infantry, and having reached the village of Gruntersdorf they halted.
  • It had grown so dark that one could not distinguish the uniforms ten paces off, and the firing had begun to subside.
  • The gloom that enveloped the army was filled with their groans, which seemed to melt into one with the darkness of the night.
  • The whole moving mass began pressing closer together and a report spread that they were ordered to halt: evidently those in front had halted.
  • Tushin's large, kind, intelligent eyes were fixed with sympathy and commiseration on Rostov, who saw that Tushin with his whole heart wished to help him but could not.
  • When I saw, your excellency, that their first battalion was disorganized, I stopped in the road and thought: 'I'll let them come on and will meet them with the fire of the whole battalion'--and that's what I did.
  • The general had so wished to do this and was so sorry he had not managed to do it that it seemed to him as if it had really happened.
  • Could one possibly make out amid all that confusion what did or did not happen?
  • He had not seen the hussars all that day, but had heard about them from an infantry officer.
  • Several of those present smiled at Zherkov's words, expecting one of his usual jokes, but noticing that what he was saying redounded to the glory of our arms and of the day's work, they assumed a serious expression, though many of them knew that what he was saying was a lie devoid of any foundation.
  • How was it that two guns were abandoned in the center? he inquired, searching with his eyes for someone.
  • It is true that it was hot there, he added, modestly.
  • Tushin did not say that there were no covering troops, though that was perfectly true.
  • "And, if your excellency will allow me to express my opinion," he continued, "we owe today's success chiefly to the action of that battery and the heroic endurance of Captain Tushin and his company," and without awaiting a reply, Prince Andrew rose and left the table.
  • For a moment he dozed, but in that short interval innumerable things appeared to him in a dream: his mother and her large white hand, Sonya's thin little shoulders, Natasha's eyes and laughter, Denisov with his voice and mustache, and Telyanin and all that affair with Telyanin and Bogdanich.
  • That affair was the same thing as this soldier with the harsh voice, and it was that affair and this soldier that were so agonizingly, incessantly pulling and pressing his arm and always dragging it in one direction.
  • That affair was the same thing as this soldier with the harsh voice, and it was that affair and this soldier that were so agonizingly, incessantly pulling and pressing his arm and always dragging it in one direction.
  • Flakes of falling snow were fluttering in that light.
  • But when he came across a man of position his instinct immediately told him that this man could be useful, and without any premeditation Prince Vasili took the first opportunity to gain his confidence, flatter him, become intimate with him, and finally make his request.
  • He had Pierre at hand in Moscow and procured for him an appointment as Gentleman of the Bedchamber, which at that time conferred the status of Councilor of State, and insisted on the young man accompanying him to Petersburg and staying at his house.
  • Pierre, on unexpectedly becoming Count Bezukhov and a rich man, felt himself after his recent loneliness and freedom from cares so beset and preoccupied that only in bed was he able to be by himself.
  • He was always hearing such words as: "With your remarkable kindness," or, "With your excellent heart," "You are yourself so honorable Count," or, "Were he as clever as you," and so on, till he began sincerely to believe in his own exceptional kindness and extraordinary intelligence, the more so as in the depth of his heart it had always seemed to him that he really was very kind and intelligent.
  • Touched that this statuesque princess could so change, Pierre took her hand and begged her forgiveness, without knowing what for.
  • From that day the eldest princess quite changed toward Pierre and began knitting a striped scarf for him.
  • Prince Vasili had come to the conclusion that it was necessary to throw this bone--a bill for thirty thousand rubles--to the poor princess that it might not occur to her to speak of his share in the affair of the inlaid portfolio.
  • Pierre signed the deed and after that the princess grew still kinder.
  • It seemed so natural to Pierre that everyone should like him, and it would have seemed so unnatural had anyone disliked him, that he could not but believe in the sincerity of those around him.
  • Like the others, Anna Pavlovna Scherer showed Pierre the change of attitude toward him that had taken place in society.
  • Formerly in Anna Pavlovna's presence, Pierre had always felt that what he was saying was out of place, tactless and unsuitable, that remarks which seemed to him clever while they formed in his mind became foolish as soon as he uttered them, while on the contrary Hippolyte's stupidest remarks came out clever and apt.
  • Even if Anna Pavlovna did not say so, he could see that she wished to and only refrained out of regard for his modesty.
  • When he read that sentence, Pierre felt for the first time that some link which other people recognized had grown up between himself and Helene, and that thought both alarmed him, as if some obligation were being imposed on him which he could not fulfill, and pleased him as an entertaining supposition.
  • Helene smiled, with a look implying that she did not admit the possibility of anyone seeing her without being enchanted.
  • The aunt coughed, swallowed, and said in French that she was very pleased to see Helene, then she turned to Pierre with the same words of welcome and the same look.
  • In the middle of a dull and halting conversation, Helene turned to Pierre with the beautiful bright smile that she gave to everyone.
  • Pierre was so used to that smile, and it had so little meaning for him, that he paid no attention to it.
  • The aunt was just speaking of a collection of snuffboxes that had belonged to Pierre's father, Count Bezukhov, and showed them her own box.
  • "That is probably the work of Vinesse," said Pierre, mentioning a celebrated miniaturist, and he leaned over the table to take the snuffbox while trying to hear what was being said at the other table.
  • You had not noticed that I am a woman?
  • And at that moment Pierre felt that Helene not only could, but must, be his wife, and that it could not be otherwise.
  • How and when this would be he did not know, he did not even know if it would be a good thing (he even felt, he knew not why, that it would be a bad thing), but he knew it would happen.
  • It seemed to him that everyone knew what had happened to him as he knew it himself.
  • The architect had told him that it was necessary, and Pierre, without knowing why, was having his enormous Petersburg house done up.
  • He had merely understood that the woman he had known as a child, of whom when her beauty was mentioned he had said absent-mindedly: "Yes, she's good looking," he had understood that this woman might belong to him.
  • Why did this thought never occur to me before? and again he told himself that it was impossible, that there would be something unnatural, and as it seemed to him dishonorable, in this marriage.
  • He had arranged this for himself so as to visit his neglected estates at the same time and pick up his son Anatole where his regiment was stationed, and take him to visit Prince Nicholas Bolkonski in order to arrange a match for him with the daughter of that rich old man.
  • "This is all very fine, but things must be settled," said Prince Vasili to himself, with a sorrowful sigh, one morning, feeling that Pierre who was under such obligations to him ("But never mind that") was not behaving very well in this matter.
  • Pierre knew that everyone was waiting for him to say a word and cross a certain line, and he knew that sooner or later he would step across it, but an incomprehensible terror seized him at the thought of that dreadful step.
  • Can it be that I have none?
  • He wished to take a decision, but felt with dismay that in this matter he lacked that strength of will which he had known in himself and really possessed.
  • Pierre was one of those who are only strong when they feel themselves quite innocent, and since that day when he was overpowered by a feeling of desire while stooping over the snuffbox at Anna Pavlovna's, an unacknowledged sense of the guilt of that desire paralyzed his will.
  • At one end of the table, the old chamberlain was heard assuring an old baroness that he loved her passionately, at which she laughed; at the other could be heard the story of the misfortunes of some Mary Viktorovna or other.
  • But much as all the rest laughed, talked, and joked, much as they enjoyed their Rhine wine, saute, and ices, and however they avoided looking at the young couple, and heedless and unobservant as they seemed of them, one could feel by the occasional glances they gave that the story about Sergey Kuzmich, the laughter, and the food were all a pretense, and that the whole attention of that company was directed to-- Pierre and Helene.
  • The old princess sighed sadly as she offered some wine to the old lady next to her and glanced angrily at her daughter, and her sigh seemed to say: "Yes, there's nothing left for you and me but to sip sweet wine, my dear, now that the time has come for these young ones to be thus boldly, provocatively happy."
  • "And what nonsense all this is that I am saying!" thought a diplomatist, glancing at the happy faces of the lovers.
  • Into the insignificant, trifling, and artificial interests uniting that society had entered the simple feeling of the attraction of a healthy and handsome young man and woman for one another.
  • Pierre felt that he was the center of it all, and this both pleased and embarrassed him.
  • Now I know that not because of her alone, nor of myself alone, but because of everyone, it must inevitably come about.
  • They are all expecting it, they are so sure that it will happen that I cannot, I cannot, disappoint them.
  • Then it would suddenly seem to him that it was not she but he was so unusually beautiful, and that that was why they all looked so at him, and flattered by this general admiration he would expand his chest, raise his head, and rejoice at his good fortune.
  • But Pierre was so absorbed that he did not understand what was said.
  • Prince Vasili smiled, and Pierre noticed that everyone was smiling at him and Helene.
  • That Princess Helene will be beautiful still when she's fifty.
  • Now he felt that it was inevitable, but he could not make up his mind to take the final step.
  • He felt ashamed; he felt that he was occupying someone else's place here beside Helene.
  • Prince Vasili gave him a look of stern inquiry, as though what Pierre had just said was so strange that one could not take it in.
  • It seemed to Pierre that even the prince was disconcerted.
  • The sight of the discomposure of that old man of the world touched Pierre: he looked at Helene and she too seemed disconcerted, and her look seemed to say: "Well, it is your own fault."
  • Helene answered with a smile that she too had missed it.
  • His face was so unusually triumphant that Pierre rose in alarm on seeing it.
  • "Something special is always said in such cases," he thought, but could not remember what it was that people say.
  • Old Prince Nicholas Bolkonski received a letter from Prince Vasili in November, 1805, announcing that he and his son would be paying him a visit.
  • "It seems that there will be no need to bring Mary out, suitors are coming to us of their own accord," incautiously remarked the little princess on hearing the news.
  • Stepping flat on his heels--we know what that means....
  • I heard, your honor, that a minister is coming to visit your honor.
  • What she found hardest to bear was to know that on such occasions she ought to behave like Mademoiselle Bourienne, but could not.
  • She thought: "If I seem not to notice he will think that I do not sympathize with him; if I seem sad and out of spirits myself, he will say (as he has done before) that I'm in the dumps."
  • The little princess was not unwell, but had such an overpowering fear of the prince that, hearing he was in a bad humor, she had decided not to appear.
  • Afraid of the 'minister' as that idiot Alpatych called him this morning?
  • Prince Vasili arrived that evening.
  • That never does any harm, thought Anatole.
  • They'll be announcing that the gentlemen are in the drawing room and we shall have to go down, and you have not smartened yourself up at all!
  • Princess Mary's self-esteem was wounded by the fact that the arrival of a suitor agitated her, and still more so by both her companions' not having the least conception that it could be otherwise.
  • To tell them that she felt ashamed for herself and for them would be to betray her agitation, while to decline their offers to dress her would prolong their banter and insistence.
  • It was not the dress, but the face and whole figure of Princess Mary that was not pretty, but neither Mademoiselle Bourienne nor the little princess felt this; they still thought that if a blue ribbon were placed in the hair, the hair combed up, and the blue scarf arranged lower on the best maroon dress, and so on, all would be well.
  • They forgot that the frightened face and the figure could not be altered, and that however they might change the setting and adornment of that face, it would still remain piteous and plain.
  • Her voice sounded so serious and so sad that the chirping of the birds was silenced at once.
  • They looked at the beautiful, large, thoughtful eyes full of tears and of thoughts, gazing shiningly and imploringly at them, and understood that it was useless and even cruel to insist.
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne and the little princess had to own to themselves that Princess Mary in this guise looked very plain, worse than usual, but it was too late.
  • This expression in Princess Mary did not frighten them (she never inspired fear in anyone), but they knew that when it appeared on her face, she became mute and was not to be shaken in her determination.
  • And scarcely had she put that question than God gave her the answer in her own heart.
  • What could all that matter in comparison with the will of God, without Whose care not a hair of man's head can fall?
  • Prince Vasili approached first, and she kissed the bold forehead that bent over her hand and answered his question by saying that, on the contrary, she remembered him quite well.
  • It was evident that he could be silent in this way for a very long time.
  • Perhaps he did not really think this when he met women--even probably he did not, for in general he thought very little--but his looks and manner gave that impression.
  • The princess felt this, and as if wishing to show him that she did not even dare expect to interest him, she turned to his father.
  • The conversation was general and animated, thanks to Princess Lise's voice and little downy lip that lifted over her white teeth.
  • Prince Vasili readily adopted her tone and the little princess also drew Anatole, whom she hardly knew, into these amusing recollections of things that had never occurred.
  • She took the liberty of inquiring whether it was long since Anatole had left Paris and how he had liked that city.
  • When he saw the pretty little Bourienne, Anatole came to the conclusion that he would not find Bald Hills dull either.
  • "Not at all bad!" he thought, examining her, "not at all bad, that little companion!
  • What are Prince Vasili and that son of his to me?
  • What angered him was that the coming of these visitors revived in his mind an unsettled question he always tried to stifle, one about which he always deceived himself.
  • And that is what we shall see.
  • That is what we shall see!
  • That is what we shall see! he added aloud.
  • "Is it for visitors you've got yourself up like that, eh?" said he.
  • You have done up your hair in this new way for the visitors, and before the visitors I tell you that in future you are never to dare to change your way of dress without my consent.
  • "On the contrary, that coiffure suits the princess very well," said Prince Vasili.
  • "Well, do you think I shall prevent her, that I can't part from her?" said the old prince angrily.
  • I try to be reserved because in the depth of my soul I feel too near to him already, but then he cannot know what I think of him and may imagine that I do not like him.
  • The little princess, like an old war horse that hears the trumpet, unconsciously and quite forgetting her condition, prepared for the familiar gallop of coquetry, without any ulterior motive or any struggle, but with naive and lighthearted gaiety.
  • Her favorite sonata bore her into a most intimately poetic world and the look she felt upon her made that world still more poetic.
  • "Is it possible that Amelie" (Mademoiselle Bourienne) "thinks I could be jealous of her, and not value her pure affection and devotion to me?"
  • When your father writes to tell me that you are behaving well I will give you my hand to kiss.
  • They all separated, but, except Anatole who fell asleep as soon as he got into bed, all kept awake a long time that night.
  • "Is he really to be my husband, this stranger who is so kind--yes, kind, that is the chief thing," thought Princess Mary; and fear, which she had seldom experienced, came upon her.
  • She feared to look round, it seemed to her that someone was there standing behind the screen in the dark corner.
  • The little princess grumbled to her maid that her bed was badly made.
  • "I should be glad enough to fall asleep, so it's not my fault!" and her voice quivered like that of a child about to cry.
  • He kept telling himself that he would consider the whole matter and decide what was right and how he should act, but instead of that he only excited himself more and more.
  • The first man that turns up--she forgets her father and everything else, runs upstairs and does up her hair and wags her tail and is unlike herself!
  • And don't I see that that idiot had eyes only for Bourienne--I shall have to get rid of her.
  • She must be shown that the blockhead thinks nothing of her and looks only at Bourienne.
  • The old prince knew that if he told his daughter she was making a mistake and that Anatole meant to flirt with Mademoiselle Bourienne, Princess Mary's self-esteem would be wounded and his point (not to be parted from her) would be gained, so pacifying himself with this thought, he called Tikhon and began to undress.
  • He guessed that the question referred to Prince Vasili and his son.
  • The old prince was very affectionate and careful in his treatment of his daughter that morning.
  • "I expect you have guessed that Prince Vasili has not come and brought his pupil with him" (for some reason Prince Bolkonski referred to Anatole as a "pupil") "for the sake of my beautiful eyes.
  • Remember this, Princess, I hold to the principle that a maiden has a full right to choose.
  • Only remember that your life's happiness depends on your decision.
  • An hour later, Tikhon came to call Princess Mary to the old prince; he added that Prince Vasili was also there.
  • My dear, I must tell you that this is a moment I shall never, never forget.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, who always knew everything that passed in the house, on hearing of the arrival of the letter went softly into the room and found the count with it in his hand, sobbing and laughing at the same time.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna sat down beside him, with her own handkerchief wiped the tears from his eyes and from the letter, then having dried her own eyes she comforted the count, and decided that at dinner and till teatime she would prepare the countess, and after tea, with God's help, would inform her.
  • Each time that these hints began to make the countess anxious and she glanced uneasily at the count and at Anna Mikhaylovna, the latter very adroitly turned the conversation to insignificant matters.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, in a few words, told her the contents of the letter, on condition that she should tell no one.
  • It's true that all you women are crybabies, remarked Petya, pacing the room with large, resolute strides.
  • Now I'm very glad, very glad indeed, that my brother has distinguished himself so.
  • No, but she said that it was all over and that he's now an officer.
  • "No, Sonya, but do you remember so that you remember him perfectly, remember everything?" said Natasha, with an expressive gesture, evidently wishing to give her words a very definite meaning.
  • It's not that I don't remember--I know what he is like, but not as I remember Nikolenka.
  • She felt that Sonya was speaking the truth, that there was such love as Sonya was speaking of.
  • Now that he was already an officer and a wounded hero, would it be right to remind him of herself and, as it might seem, of the obligations to her he had taken on himself?
  • "It's because she was in love with that fat one in spectacles" (that was how Petya described his namesake, the new Count Bezukhov) "and now she's in love with that singer" (he meant Natasha's Italian singing master), "that's why she's ashamed!"
  • After a brief description of the campaign and the two battles in which he had taken part, and his promotion, Nicholas said that he kissed his father's and mother's hands asking for their blessing, and that he kissed Vera, Natasha, and Petya.
  • When she heard this Sonya blushed so that tears came into her eyes and, unable to bear the looks turned upon her, ran away into the dancing hall, whirled round it at full speed with her dress puffed out like a balloon, and, flushed and smiling, plumped down on the floor.
  • How strange, how extraordinary, how joyful it seemed, that her son, the scarcely perceptible motion of whose tiny limbs she had felt twenty years ago within her, that son about whom she used to have quarrels with the too indulgent count, that son who had first learned to say "pear" and then "granny," that this son should now be away in a foreign land amid strange surroundings, a manly warrior doing some kind of man's work of his own, without help or guidance.
  • The universal experience of ages, showing that children do grow imperceptibly from the cradle to manhood, did not exist for the countess.
  • As twenty years before, it seemed impossible that the little creature who lived somewhere under her heart would ever cry, suck her breast, and begin to speak, so now she could not believe that that little creature could be this strong, brave man, this model son and officer that, judging by this letter, he now was.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, practical woman that she was, had even managed by favor with army authorities to secure advantageous means of communication for herself and her son.
  • That day Nicholas Rostov received a letter from Boris, telling him that the Ismaylov regiment was quartered for the night ten miles from Olmutz and that he wanted to see him as he had a letter and money for him.
  • That day Nicholas Rostov received a letter from Boris, telling him that the Ismaylov regiment was quartered for the night ten miles from Olmutz and that he wanted to see him as he had a letter and money for him.
  • Rostov was particularly in need of money now that the troops, after their active service, were stationed near Olmutz and the camp swarmed with well-provisioned sutlers and Austrian Jews offering all sorts of tempting wares.
  • "Well, how are you going to get out of that?" he remarked.
  • At that moment the door opened.
  • Boris rose to meet Rostov, but in doing so did not omit to steady and replace some chessmen that were falling.
  • Both had changed greatly since they last met and both were in a hurry to show the changes that had taken place in them.
  • You know, of course, that His Imperial Highness rode with our regiment all the time, so that we had every comfort and every advantage.
  • "Well, they've sent you a tidy sum," said Berg, eying the heavy purse that sank into the sofa.
  • "Why have you thrown that away?" asked Boris.
  • Without boasting, you know, I may say that I know the Army Orders by heart and know the Regulations as well as I do the Lord's Prayer.
  • I knew I was in the right so I kept silent; was not that best, Count?...
  • "Yes, that was fine," said Rostov, smiling.
  • But Boris noticed that he was preparing to make fun of Berg, and skillfully changed the subject.
  • He could not tell them simply that everyone went at a trot and that he fell off his horse and sprained his arm and then ran as hard as he could from a Frenchman into the wood.
  • Glancing, however, at Boris, he saw that he too seemed ashamed of the hussar of the line.
  • Should he go to headquarters next day and challenge that affected adjutant, or really let the matter drop, was the question that worried him all the way.
  • The whole army was extended in three lines: the cavalry in front, behind it the artillery, and behind that again the infantry.
  • And at that moment, though the day was still, a light gust of wind blowing over the army slightly stirred the streamers on the lances and the unfolded standards fluttered against their staffs.
  • It looked as if by that slight motion the army itself was expressing its joy at the approach of the Emperors.
  • He gave the words of greeting, and the first regiment roared "Hurrah!" so deafeningly, continuously, and joyfully that the men themselves were awed by their multitude and the immensity of the power they constituted.
  • Upon them the undivided, tensely passionate attention of that whole mass of men was concentrated.
  • Seeing that smile, Rostov involuntarily smiled himself and felt a still stronger flow of love for his sovereign.
  • He longed to show that love in some way and knowing that this was impossible was ready to cry.
  • Rostov too, bending over his saddle, shouted "Hurrah!" with all his might, feeling that he would like to injure himself by that shout, if only to express his rapture fully.
  • That hesitation lasted only an instant.
  • Farther and farther he rode away, stopping at other regiments, till at last only his white plumes were visible to Rostov from amid the suites that surrounded the Emperors.
  • When the Emperor had passed nearly all the regiments, the troops began a ceremonial march past him, and Rostov on Bedouin, recently purchased from Denisov, rode past too, at the rear of his squadron--that is, alone and in full view of the Emperor.
  • The day after the review, Boris, in his best uniform and with his comrade Berg's best wishes for success, rode to Olmutz to see Bolkonski, wishing to profit by his friendliness and obtain for himself the best post he could--preferably that of adjutant to some important personage, a position in the army which seemed to him most attractive.
  • He did not find Prince Andrew in Olmutz that day, but the appearance of the town where the headquarters and the diplomatic corps were stationed and the two Emperors were living with their suites, households, and courts only strengthened his desire to belong to that higher world.
  • The one who was writing and whom Boris addressed turned round crossly and told him Bolkonski was on duty and that he should go through the door on the left into the reception room if he wished to see him.
  • When he entered, Prince Andrew, his eyes drooping contemptuously (with that peculiar expression of polite weariness which plainly says, "If it were not my duty I would not talk to you for a moment"), was listening to an old Russian general with decorations, who stood very erect, almost on tiptoe, with a soldier's obsequious expression on his purple face, reporting something.
  • He would say a lot of pleasant things, ask you to dinner" ("That would not be bad as regards the unwritten code," thought Boris), "but nothing more would come of it.
  • But this is what we'll do: I have a good friend, an adjutant general and an excellent fellow, Prince Dolgorukov; and though you may not know it, the fact is that now Kutuzov with his staff and all of us count for nothing.
  • Prince Andrew introduced his protege, but Prince Dolgorukov politely and firmly pressing his hand said nothing to Boris and, evidently unable to suppress the thoughts which were uppermost in his mind at that moment, addressed Prince Andrew in French.
  • God grant that the one that will result from it will be as victorious!
  • And do you know, my dear fellow, it seems to me that Bonaparte has decidedly lost bearings, you know that a letter was received from him today for the Emperor.
  • But what was most amusing," he continued, with a sudden, good-natured laugh, "was that we could not think how to address the reply!
  • "Only that?" said Bolkonski.
  • Boris was excited by the thought of being so close to the higher powers as he felt himself to be at that moment.
  • "Who was that?" asked Boris.
  • Their squadron remained in reserve and Nicholas Rostov spent that day in a dull and wretched mood.
  • The day was bright and sunny after a sharp night frost, and the cheerful glitter of that autumn day was in keeping with the news of victory which was conveyed, not only by the tales of those who had taken part in it, but also by the joyful expression on the faces of soldiers, officers, generals, and adjutants, as they passed Rostov going or coming.
  • Sell us that horse!
  • It was plain that he did not quite grasp where he was.
  • The Cossacks sold the horse for two gold pieces, and Rostov, being the richest of the officers now that he had received his money, bought it.
  • He felt that this nearness by itself made up to him for the day he had lost.
  • "The reserves, sire!" replied a voice, a very human one compared to that which had said: "The Pavlograd hussars?"
  • The Emperor, surrounded by his suite of officers and courtiers, was riding a bobtailed chestnut mare, a different one from that which he had ridden at the review, and bending to one side he gracefully held a gold lorgnette to his eyes and looked at a soldier who lay prone, with blood on his uncovered head.
  • The wounded soldier was so dirty, coarse, and revolting that his proximity to the Emperor shocked Rostov.
  • "Not 'our Sovereign, the Emperor,' as they say at official dinners," said he, "but the health of our Sovereign, that good, enchanting, and great man!
  • Late that night, when all had separated, Denisov with his short hand patted his favorite, Rostov, on the shoulder.
  • And Rostov got up and went wandering among the campfires, dreaming of what happiness it would be to die--not in saving the Emperor's life (he did not even dare to dream of that), but simply to die before his eyes.
  • And he was not the only man to experience that feeling during those memorable days preceding the battle of Austerlitz: nine tenths of the men in the Russian army were then in love, though less ecstatically, with their Tsar and the glory of the Russian arms.
  • At headquarters and among the troops near by the news spread that the Emperor was unwell.
  • He ate nothing and had slept badly that night, those around him reported.
  • But on the afternoon of that day, this activity reached Kutuzov's headquarters and the staffs of the commanders of columns.
  • The concentrated activity which had begun at the Emperor's headquarters in the morning and had started the whole movement that followed was like the first movement of the main wheel of a large tower clock.
  • Wheels creak on their axles as the cogs engage one another and the revolving pulleys whirr with the rapidity of their movement, but a neighboring wheel is as quiet and motionless as though it were prepared to remain so for a hundred years; but the moment comes when the lever catches it and obeying the impulse that wheel begins to creak and joins in the common motion the result and aim of which are beyond its ken.
  • Just as in a clock, the result of the complicated motion of innumerable wheels and pulleys is merely a slow and regular movement of the hands which show the time, so the result of all the complicated human activities of 160,000 Russians and French--all their passions, desires, remorse, humiliations, sufferings, outbursts of pride, fear, and enthusiasm--was only the loss of the battle of Austerlitz, the so-called battle of the three Emperors--that is to say, a slow movement of the hand on the dial of human history.
  • Prince Andrew was on duty that day and in constant attendance on the commander-in-chief.
  • If he weren't afraid of a battle why did he ask for that interview?
  • He is a man in a gray overcoat, very anxious that I should call him 'Your Majesty,' but who, to his chagrin, got no title from me!
  • "Despite my great respect for old Kutuzov," he continued, "we should be a nice set of fellows if we were to wait about and so give him a chance to escape, or to trick us, now that we certainly have him in our hands!
  • "Oh, that is all the same," Dolgorukov said quickly, and getting up he spread a map on the table.
  • That was the answer I got!
  • Shortly after nine o'clock that evening, Weyrother drove with his plans to Kutuzov's quarters where the council of war was to be held.
  • Weyrother evidently felt himself to be at the head of a movement that had already become unrestrainable.
  • He was evidently so busy that he even forgot to be polite to the commander in chief.
  • At last Bagration's orderly came with the news that the prince could not attend.
  • Kutuzov, with his uniform unbuttoned so that his fat neck bulged over his collar as if escaping, was sitting almost asleep in a low chair, with his podgy old hands resting symmetrically on its arms.
  • If at first the members of the council thought that Kutuzov was pretending to sleep, the sounds his nose emitted during the reading that followed proved that the commander-in-chief at that moment was absorbed by a far more serious matter than a desire to show his contempt for the dispositions or anything else--he was engaged in satisfying the irresistible human need for sleep.
  • Weyrother, with the gesture of a man too busy to lose a moment, glanced at Kutuzov and, having convinced himself that he was asleep, took up a paper and in a loud, monotonous voice began to read out the dispositions for the impending battle, under a heading which he also read out:
  • Langeron's objections were valid but it was obvious that their chief aim was to show General Weyrother--who had read his dispositions with as much self-confidence as if he were addressing school children--that he had to do, not with fools, but with men who could teach him something in military matters.
  • He listened to what Langeron said, as if remarking, "So you are still at that silly business!" quickly closed his eye again, and let his head sink still lower.
  • Langeron, trying as virulently as possible to sting Weyrother's vanity as author of the military plan, argued that Bonaparte might easily attack instead of being attacked, and so render the whole of this plan perfectly worthless.
  • But Miloradovich was at that moment evidently thinking of anything rather than of what the generals were disputing about.
  • "Ma foi!" said he, "tomorrow we shall see all that on the battlefield."
  • Is it possible that on account of court and personal considerations tens of thousands of lives, and my life, my life," he thought, "must be risked?"
  • "Yes, it is very likely that I shall be killed tomorrow," he thought.
  • Tomorrow perhaps, even certainly, I have a presentiment that for the first time I shall have to show all I can do.
  • And then that happy moment, that Toulon for which he had so long waited, presents itself to him at last.
  • All are struck by the justness of his views, but no one undertakes to carry them out, so he takes a regiment, a division-stipulates that no one is to interfere with his arrangements--leads his division to the decisive point, and gains the victory alone.
  • Prince Andrew, however, did not answer that voice and went on dreaming of his triumphs.
  • If before that you are not ten times wounded, killed, or betrayed, well... what then?...
  • "Well then," Prince Andrew answered himself, "I don't know what will happen and don't want to know, and can't, but if I want this--want glory, want to be known to men, want to be loved by them, it is not my fault that I want it and want nothing but that and live only for that.
  • Yes, for that alone!
  • All the same, I love and value nothing but triumph over them all, I value this mystic power and glory that is floating here above me in this mist!
  • That same night, Rostov was with a platoon on skirmishing duty in front of Bagration's detachment.
  • His hussars were placed along the line in couples and he himself rode along the line trying to master the sleepiness that kept coming over him.
  • What a nuisance that our squadron will be in reserve tomorrow, he thought.
  • It seemed to him that it was getting lighter.
  • To the left he saw a sloping descent lit up, and facing it a black knoll that seemed as steep as a wall.
  • On this knoll there was a white patch that Rostov could not at all make out: was it a glade in the wood lit up by the moon, or some unmelted snow, or some white houses?
  • He even thought something moved on that white spot.
  • "I expect it's snow... that spot... a spot--une tache," he thought.
  • The chief thing is that the Emperor is here.
  • All at once it seemed to him that he was being fired at.
  • That must be the enemy's camp!
  • The shouting grew still louder and merged into a general roar that only an army of several thousand men could produce.
  • I saw them this evening on that knoll; if they had retreated they would have withdrawn from that too....
  • Dolgorukov was still insisting that the French had retreated and had only lit fires to deceive us.
  • "What does that prove?" he was saying as Rostov rode up.
  • "It's plain that they have not all gone yet, Prince," said Bagration.
  • The fires and shouting in the enemy's army were occasioned by the fact that while Napoleon's proclamation was being read to the troops the Emperor himself rode round his bivouacs.
  • Let every man be fully imbued with the thought that we must defeat these hirelings of England, inspired by such hatred of our nation!
  • The officers were hurriedly drinking tea and breakfasting, the soldiers, munching biscuit and beating a tattoo with their feet to warm themselves, gathering round the fires throwing into the flames the remains of sheds, chairs, tables, wheels, tubs, and everything that they did not want or could not carry away with them.
  • The column moved forward without knowing where and unable, from the masses around them, the smoke and the increasing fog, to see either the place they were leaving or that to which they were going.
  • The fog had grown so dense that though it was growing light they could not see ten paces ahead.
  • Every soldier felt glad to know that to the unknown place where he was going, many more of our men were going too.
  • The cause of the confusion was that while the Austrian cavalry was moving toward our left flank, the higher command found that our center was too far separated from our right flank and the cavalry were all ordered to turn back to the right.
  • The general shouted a demand that the cavalry should be halted, the Austrian argued that not he, but the higher command, was to blame.
  • The fog that was dispersing on the hill lay still more densely below, where they were descending.
  • Whether all the enemy forces were, as we supposed, six miles away, or whether they were near by in that sea of mist, no one knew till after eight o'clock.
  • Above him was a clear blue sky, and the sun's vast orb quivered like a huge hollow, crimson float on the surface of that milky sea of mist.
  • The whole French army, and even Napoleon himself with his staff, were not on the far side of the streams and hollows of Sokolnitz and Schlappanitz beyond which we intended to take up our position and begin the action, but were on this side, so close to our own forces that Napoleon with the naked eye could distinguish a mounted man from one on foot.
  • He saw over the mist that in a hollow between two hills near the village of Pratzen, the Russian columns, their bayonets glittering, were moving continuously in one direction toward the valley and disappearing one after another into the mist.
  • From information he had received the evening before, from the sound of wheels and footsteps heard by the outposts during the night, by the disorderly movement of the Russian columns, and from all indications, he saw clearly that the allies believed him to be far away in front of them, and that the columns moving near Pratzen constituted the center of the Russian army, and that that center was already sufficiently weakened to be successfully attacked.
  • At eight o'clock Kutuzov rode to Pratzen at the head of the fourth column, Miloradovich's, the one that was to take the place of Przebyszewski's and Langeron's columns which had already gone down into the valley.
  • He greeted the men of the foremost regiment and gave them the order to march, thereby indicating that he intended to lead that column himself.
  • He was firmly convinced that this was the day of his Toulon, or his bridge of Arcola.
  • Seeing them he kept thinking, "That may be the very standard with which I shall lead the army."
  • In the morning all that was left of the night mist on the heights was a hoar frost now turning to dew, but in the valleys it still lay like a milk-white sea.
  • In front, far off on the farther shore of that sea of mist, some wooded hills were discernible, and it was there the enemy probably was, for something could be descried.
  • That morning Kutuzov seemed worn and irritable.
  • Seeing him, Kutuzov's malevolent and caustic expression softened, as if admitting that what was being done was not his adjutant's fault, and still not answering the Austrian adjutant, he addressed Bolkonski.
  • Overtaking the battalions that continued to advance, he stopped the third division and convinced himself that there really were no sharpshooters in front of our columns.
  • He had felt perfectly sure that there were other troops in front of him and that the enemy must be at least six miles away.
  • In the Emperor's suite all exchanged rapid looks that expressed dissatisfaction and reproach.
  • "Old though he may be, he should not, he certainly should not, speak like that," their glances seemed to say.
  • But how is that? said different voices.
  • But at that very instant a cloud of smoke spread all round, firing was heard quite close at hand, and a voice of naive terror barely two steps from Prince Andrew shouted, Brothers!
  • Nesvitski with an angry face, red and unlike himself, was shouting to Kutuzov that if he did not ride away at once he would certainly be taken prisoner.
  • "Stop them!" he shouted, and at the same moment, probably realizing that it was impossible to stop them, spurred his horse and rode to the right.
  • The troops were running in such a dense mass that once surrounded by them it was difficult to get out again.
  • Having by a great effort got away to the left from that flood of men, Kutuzov, with his suite diminished by more than half, rode toward a sound of artillery fire near by.
  • Having forced his way out of the crowd of fugitives, Prince Andrew, trying to keep near Kutuzov, saw on the slope of the hill amid the smoke a Russian battery that was still firing and Frenchmen running toward it.
  • "Stop those wretches!" gasped Kutuzov to the regimental commander, pointing to the flying soldiers; but at that instant, as if to punish him for those words, bullets flew hissing across the regiment and across Kutuzov's suite like a flock of little birds.
  • "Hurrah!" shouted Prince Andrew, and, scarcely able to hold up the heavy standard, he ran forward with full confidence that the whole battalion would follow him.
  • A sergeant of the battalion ran up and took the flag that was swaying from its weight in Prince Andrew's hands, but he was immediately killed.
  • "How quiet, peaceful, and solemn; not at all as I ran," thought Prince Andrew--"not as we ran, shouting and fighting, not at all as the gunner and the Frenchman with frightened and angry faces struggled for the mop: how differently do those clouds glide across that lofty infinite sky!
  • How was it I did not see that lofty sky before?
  • All is vanity, all falsehood, except that infinite sky.
  • Bagration knew that as the distance between the two flanks was more than six miles, even if the messenger were not killed (which he very likely would be), and found the commander-in-chief (which would be very difficult), he would not be able to get back before evening.
  • On being relieved from picket duty Rostov had managed to get a few hours' sleep before morning and felt cheerful, bold, and resolute, with elasticity of movement, faith in his good fortune, and generally in that state of mind which makes everything seem possible, pleasant, and easy.
  • He could see puffs of musketry smoke that seemed to chase one another down the hillsides, and clouds of cannon smoke rolling, spreading, and mingling with one another.
  • After passing some Austrian troops he noticed that the next part of the line (the Guards) was already in action.
  • Rostov got out of their way, involuntarily noticed that one of them was bleeding, and galloped on.
  • "That is no business of mine," he thought.
  • He had not ridden many hundred yards after that before he saw to his left, across the whole width of the field, an enormous mass of cavalry in brilliant white uniforms, mounted on black horses, trotting straight toward him and across his path.
  • They were our Horse Guards, advancing to attack the French cavalry that was coming to meet them.
  • Hardly had the Horse Guards passed Rostov before he heard them shout, "Hurrah!" and looking back saw that their foremost ranks were mixed up with some foreign cavalry with red epaulets, probably French.
  • At that moment, as the Horse Guards, having passed him, disappeared in the smoke, Rostov hesitated whether to gallop after them or to go where he was sent.
  • This was the brilliant charge of the Horse Guards that amazed the French themselves.
  • Rostov was horrified to hear later that of all that mass of huge and handsome men, of all those brilliant, rich youths, officers and cadets, who had galloped past him on their thousand-ruble horses, only eighteen were left after the charge.
  • "Can you imagine it?" and he began describing how the Guards, having taken up their position and seeing troops before them, thought they were Austrians, and all at once discovered from the cannon balls discharged by those troops that they were themselves in the front line and had unexpectedly to go into action.
  • "But be that what it may," he reflected, "there is no riding round it now.
  • The foreboding of evil that had suddenly come over Rostov was more and more confirmed the farther he rode into the region behind the village of Pratzen, which was full of troops of all kinds.
  • Having left that soldier who was evidently drunk, Rostov stopped the horse of a batman or groom of some important personage and began to question him.
  • Go that way, to that village, all the commanders are there, said the officer, pointing to the village of Hosjeradek, and he walked on.
  • "Take this road, your honor, that way you will be killed at once!" a soldier shouted to him.
  • That way is nearer.
  • The French had not yet occupied that region, and the Russians--the uninjured and slightly wounded--had left it long ago.
  • Here everyone clearly saw and said that the battle was lost.
  • Some said the report that the Emperor was wounded was correct, others that it was not, and explained the false rumor that had spread by the fact that the Emperor's carriage had really galloped from the field of battle with the pale and terrified Ober-Hofmarschal Count Tolstoy, who had ridden out to the battlefield with others in the Emperor's suite.
  • One officer told Rostov that he had seen someone from headquarters behind the village to the left, and thither Rostov rode, not hoping to find anyone but merely to ease his conscience.
  • Turning the horse sharply, he again jumped the ditch, and deferentially addressed the horseman with the white plumes, evidently suggesting that he should do the same.
  • The rider, whose figure seemed familiar to Rostov and involuntarily riveted his attention, made a gesture of refusal with his head and hand and by that gesture Rostov instantly recognized his lamented and adored monarch.
  • At that moment Alexander turned his head and Rostov saw the beloved features that were so deeply engraved on his memory.
  • Rostov was happy in the assurance that the rumors about the Emperor being wounded were false.
  • He knew that he might and even ought to go straight to him and give the message Dolgorukov had ordered him to deliver.
  • Not one of the innumerable speeches addressed to the Emperor that he had composed in his imagination could he now recall.
  • His despair was all the greater from feeling that his own weakness was the cause of his grief.
  • From one of the drivers he learned that Kutuzov's staff were not far off, in the village the vehicles were going to.
  • Then came a cart, and behind that walked an old, bandy- legged domestic serf in a peaked cap and sheepskin coat.
  • After five o'clock it was only at the Augesd Dam that a hot cannonade (delivered by the French alone) was still to be heard from numerous batteries ranged on the slopes of the Pratzen Heights, directed at our retreating forces.
  • Dolokhov--now an officer--wounded in the arm, and on foot, with the regimental commander on horseback and some ten men of his company, represented all that was left of that whole regiment.
  • Dolokhov who was in the midst of the crowd forced his way to the edge of the dam, throwing two soldiers off their feet, and ran onto the slippery ice that covered the millpool.
  • The ice bore him but it swayed and creaked, and it was plain that it would give way not only under a cannon or a crowd, but very soon even under his weight alone.
  • Suddenly a cannon ball hissed so low above the crowd that everyone ducked.
  • One of the hindmost guns that was going onto the dam turned off onto the ice.
  • The ice, that had held under those on foot, collapsed in a great mass, and some forty men who were on it dashed, some forward and some back, drowning one another.
  • Still the cannon balls continued regularly to whistle and flop onto the ice and into the water and oftenest of all among the crowd that covered the dam, the pond, and the bank.
  • Suddenly he again felt that he was alive and suffering from a burning, lacerating pain in his head.
  • "Where is it, that lofty sky that I did not know till now, but saw today?" was his first thought.
  • Above him again was the same lofty sky with clouds that had risen and were floating still higher, and between them gleamed blue infinity.
  • "The ammunition for the guns in position is exhausted, Your Majesty," said an adjutant who had come from the batteries that were firing at Augesd.
  • Prince Andrew understood that this was said of him and that it was Napoleon who said it.
  • He knew it was Napoleon--his hero--but at that moment Napoleon seemed to him such a small, insignificant creature compared with what was passing now between himself and that lofty infinite sky with the clouds flying over it.
  • "There are so many prisoners today, nearly the whole Russian army, that he is probably tired of them," said another officer.
  • And who is that young man beside you?
  • Napoleon apparently remembered seeing him on the battlefield and, addressing him, again used the epithet "young man" that was connected in his memory with Prince Andrew.
  • He was already enjoying that happiness when that little Napoleon had suddenly appeared with his unsympathizing look of shortsighted delight at the misery of others, and doubts and torments had followed, and only the heavens promised peace.
  • Why, that one, right at the end, the big one.
  • Prokofy, the footman, who was so strong that he could lift the back of the carriage from behind, sat plaiting slippers out of cloth selvedges.
  • But now steps were heard at the door, steps so rapid that they could hardly be his mother's.
  • Rostov, rubbing his eyes that seemed glued together, raised his disheveled head from the hot pillow.
  • Such a friend that I burned my arm for her sake.
  • She pulled up her muslin sleeve and showed him a red scar on her long, slender, delicate arm, high above the elbow on that part that is covered even by a ball dress.
  • Sitting on the sofa with the little cushions on its arms, in what used to be his old schoolroom, and looking into Natasha's wildly bright eyes, Rostov re-entered that world of home and childhood which had no meaning for anyone else, but gave him some of the best joys of his life; and the burning of an arm with a ruler as a proof of love did not seem to him senseless, he understood and was not surprised at it.
  • "Well, and is that all?" he asked.
  • All that ruler business was just nonsense, but we are friends forever.
  • She, if she loves anyone, does it for life, but I don't understand that, I forget quickly.
  • Isn't that lovely and noble!
  • Isn't it? asked Natasha, so seriously and excitedly that it was evident that what she was now saying she had talked of before, with tears.
  • Besides, Sonya is so charming that only a fool would renounce such happiness.
  • It makes it as if you were marrying her because you must, and that wouldn't do at all.
  • Rostov saw that it had been well considered by them.
  • His looks thanked her for offering him his freedom and told her that one way or another he would never cease to love her, for that would be impossible.
  • "How strange it is," said Vera, selecting a moment when all were silent, "that Sonya and Nicholas now say you to one another and meet like strangers."
  • He felt that he had grown up and matured very much.
  • The races, the English Club, sprees with Denisov, and visits to a certain house--that was another matter and quite the thing for a dashing young hussar!
  • Say that everything out of the hothouses must be brought here well wrapped up in felt.
  • You military men like that sort of thing.
  • At that time, the Russians were so used to victories that on receiving news of the defeat some would simply not believe it, while others sought some extraordinary explanation of so strange an event.
  • The Moscovites felt that something was wrong and that to discuss the bad news was difficult, and so it was best to be silent.
  • What also conduced to Bagration's being selected as Moscow's hero was the fact that he had no connections in the city and was a stranger there.
  • All Moscow repeated Prince Dolgorukov's saying: "If you go on modeling and modeling you must get smeared with clay," suggesting consolation for our defeat by the memory of former victories; and the words of Rostopchin, that French soldiers have to be incited to battle by highfalutin words, and Germans by logical arguments to show them that it is more dangerous to run away than to advance, but that Russian soldiers only need to be restrained and held back!
  • On that third of March, all the rooms in the English Club were filled with a hum of conversation, like the hum of bees swarming in springtime.
  • He walked shyly and awkwardly over the parquet floor of the reception room, not knowing what to do with his hands; he was more accustomed to walk over a plowed field under fire, as he had done at the head of the Kursk regiment at Schon Grabern--and he would have found that easier.
  • But all eyes demanded that he should submit.
  • But before he had finished reading, a stentorian major-domo announced that dinner was ready!
  • Everyone rose, feeling that dinner was more important than verses, and Bagration, again preceding all the rest, went in to dinner.
  • At that toast, the count took out his handkerchief and, covering his face, wept outright.
  • But those who knew him intimately noticed that some great change had come over him that day.
  • Involuntarily recalling his wife's past and her relations with Dolokhov, Pierre saw clearly that what was said in the letter might be true, or might at least seem to be true had it not referred to his wife.
  • Pierre recalled how Helene had smilingly expressed disapproval of Dolokhov's living at their house, and how cynically Dolokhov had praised his wife's beauty to him and from that time till they came to Moscow had not left them for a day.
  • I know and understand what a spice that would add to the pleasure of deceiving me, if it really were true.
  • That expression was often on Dolokhov's face when looking at him.
  • It must seem to him that everyone is afraid of him, and that must please him.
  • Hearing that cry and seeing to whom it was addressed, Nesvitski and the neighbor on his right quickly turned in alarm to Bezukhov.
  • Despite Denisov's request that he would take no part in the matter, Rostov agreed to be Dolokhov's second, and after dinner he discussed the arrangements for the duel with Nesvitski, Bezukhov's second.
  • He had evidently not slept that night.
  • It's even certain that I should have done the same, then why this duel, this murder?
  • "Oh yes, like that, I know, I only forgot," said he.
  • It was evident that the affair so lightly begun could no longer be averted but was taking its course independently of men's will.
  • But it's not that, my friend- said Dolokhov with a gasping voice.
  • When he had become a little quieter, he explained to Rostov that he was living with his mother, who, if she saw him dying, would not survive it.
  • Rostov went on ahead to do what was asked, and to his great surprise learned that Dolokhov the brawler, Dolokhov the bully, lived in Moscow with an old mother and a hunchback sister, and was the most affectionate of sons and brothers.
  • The night after the duel he did not go to his bedroom but, as he often did, remained in his father's room, that huge room in which Count Bezukhov had died.
  • He lay down on the sofa meaning to fall asleep and forget all that had happened to him, but could not do so.
  • Such a storm of feelings, thoughts, and memories suddenly arose within him that he could not fall asleep, nor even remain in one place, but had to jump up and pace the room with rapid steps.
  • Yes, that was it!
  • And he vividly recalled that moment after supper at Prince Vasili's, when he spoke those words he had found so difficult to utter: "I love you."
  • I felt then that it was not so, that I had no right to do it.
  • I then thought that I did not understand her.
  • Now I have spoken that terrible word to myself all has become clear.
  • She laughed contemptuously and said she was not a fool to want to have children, and that she was not going to have any children by me.
  • "Why did I tell her that 'Je vous aime'?" he kept repeating to himself.
  • * "But what the devil was he doing in that galley?"
  • Helene laughed, "that Dolokhov was my lover," she said in French with her coarse plainness of speech, uttering the word amant as casually as any other word, "and you believed it!
  • That you're a fool, que vous etes un sot, but everybody knew that.
  • That I shall be the laughingstock of all Moscow, that everyone will say that you, drunk and not knowing what you were about, challenged a man you are jealous of without cause.
  • That I shall be the laughingstock of all Moscow, that everyone will say that you, drunk and not knowing what you were about, challenged a man you are jealous of without cause.
  • He was suffering physically at that moment, there was a weight on his chest and he could not breathe.
  • He knew that he must do something to put an end to this suffering, but what he wanted to do was too terrible.
  • He flung down the slab, broke it, and swooping down on her with outstretched hands shouted, "Get out!" in such a terrible voice that the whole house heard it with horror.
  • God knows what he would have done at that moment had Helene not fled from the room.
  • The gazettes from which the old prince first heard of the defeat at Austerlitz stated, as usual very briefly and vaguely, that after brilliant engagements the Russians had had to retreat and had made their withdrawal in perfect order.
  • Kutuzov writes... and he screamed as piercingly as if he wished to drive the princess away by that scream...
  • It was evident that her eyes did not see Princess Mary but were looking within... into herself... at something joyful and mysterious taking place within her.
  • She looked at Princess Mary, then sat thinking for a while with that expression of attention to something within her that is only seen in pregnant women, and suddenly began to cry.
  • To her surprise and distress she found that her prayers did not calm her excitement.
  • Suddenly her door opened softly and her old nurse, Praskovya Savishna, who hardly ever came to that room as the old prince had forbidden it, appeared on the threshold with a shawl round her head.
  • Everyone in the house was dominated by the same feeling that Princess Mary experienced as she sat in her room.
  • The old prince, stepping on his heels, paced up and down his study and sent Tikhon to ask Mary Bogdanovna what news.--"Say only that 'the prince told me to ask,' and come and tell me her answer."
  • "Inform the prince that labor has begun," said Mary Bogdanovna, giving the messenger a significant look.
  • Still lower, beyond the turn of the staircase, one could hear the footstep of someone in thick felt boots, and a voice that seemed familiar to Princess Mary was saying something.
  • "No it can't be, that would be too extraordinary," and at the very moment she thought this, the face and figure of Prince Andrew, in a fur cloak the deep collar of which covered with snow, appeared on the landing where the footman stood with the candle.
  • She was not surprised at his having come; she did not realize that he had come.
  • Then suddenly a terrible shriek--it could not be hers, she could not scream like that--came from the bedroom.
  • "Ah, what have you done to me?" it still seemed to say, and Prince Andrew felt that something gave way in his soul and that he was guilty of a sin he could neither remedy nor forget.
  • The old man too came up and kissed the waxen little hands that lay quietly crossed one on the other on her breast, and to him, too, her face seemed to say: "Ah, what have you done to me, and why?"
  • He looked up joyfully at the baby when the nurse brought it to him and nodded approval when she told him that the wax with the baby's hair had not sunk in the font but had floated.
  • I know you understand Fedya, my dear count; that, believe me, is why I am so fond of you.
  • I don't care a straw about anyone but those I love; but those I love, I love so that I would give my life for them, and the others I'd throttle if they stood in my way.
  • I have not yet met that divine purity and devotion I look for in women.
  • At that time in the Rostovs' house there prevailed an amorous atmosphere characteristic of homes where there are very young and very charming girls.
  • There now, I like your Denisov though he is a rake and all that, still I like him; so you see I do understand.
  • Well, I don't know about that, but I am uncomfortable with him.
  • He was pointedly attentive to Sonya and looked at her in such a way that not only could she not bear his glances without coloring, but even the old countess and Natasha blushed when they saw his looks.
  • It was evident that this strange, strong man was under the irresistible influence of the dark, graceful girl who loved another.
  • For the Rostov family the whole interest of these preparations for war lay in the fact that Nicholas would not hear of remaining in Moscow, and only awaited the termination of Denisov's furlough after Christmas to return with him to their regiment.
  • That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly.
  • Nicholas understood that something must have happened between Sonya and Dolokhov before dinner, and with the kindly sensitiveness natural to him was very gentle and wary with them both at dinner.
  • I know, heaven knows how, but I know for certain that you won't marry her.
  • "Now you don't know that at all!" said Nicholas.
  • This was the first time since his return that they had talked alone and about their love.
  • "Nicholas, don't tell me that!" she said.
  • "That is enough for me," said Sonya, blushing.
  • Don't say that to me!
  • That year two marriages had come of these balls.
  • There was the fact that only those came who wished to dance and amuse themselves as girls of thirteen and fourteen do who are wearing long dresses for the first time.
  • That evening, proud of Dolokhov's proposal, her refusal, and her explanation with Nicholas, Sonya twirled about before she left home so that the maid could hardly get her hair plaited, and she was transparently radiant with impulsive joy.
  • That evening, proud of Dolokhov's proposal, her refusal, and her explanation with Nicholas, Sonya twirled about before she left home so that the maid could hardly get her hair plaited, and she was transparently radiant with impulsive joy.
  • Whatever person she happened to look at she was in love with for that moment.
  • Denisov did not take his eyes off her and beat time with his saber in a way that clearly indicated that if he was not dancing it was because he would not and not because he could not.
  • Knowing that Denisov had a reputation even in Poland for the masterly way in which he danced the mazurka, Nicholas ran up to Natasha:
  • She saw that everybody was looking at her and waiting.
  • Nicholas saw that Denisov was refusing though he smiled delightedly.
  • First he spun her round, holding her now with his left, now with his right hand, then falling on one knee he twirled her round him, and again jumping up, dashed so impetuously forward that it seemed as if he would rush through the whole suite of rooms without drawing breath, and then he suddenly stopped and performed some new and unexpected steps.
  • For two days after that Rostov did not see Dolokhov at his own or at Dolokhov's home: on the third day he received a note from him:
  • He was at once shown to the best room, which Dolokhov had taken for that evening.
  • Rostov recalled at that moment a strange conversation he had once had with Dolokhov.
  • But before he had thought of anything, Dolokhov, looking straight in his face, said slowly and deliberately so that everyone could hear:
  • And strange to say Nicholas felt that he could not help taking up a card, putting a small stake on it, and beginning to play.
  • Dolokhov "killed," that is, beat, ten cards of Rostov's running.
  • He well remembered that seven afterwards.
  • He laid down the seven of hearts, on which with a broken bit of chalk he had written "800 rubles" in clear upright figures; he emptied the glass of warm champagne that was handed him, smiled at Dolokhov's words, and with a sinking heart, waiting for a seven to turn up, gazed at Dolokhov's hands which held the pack.
  • Much depended on Rostov's winning or losing on that seven of hearts.
  • On the previous Sunday the old count had given his son two thousand rubles, and though he always disliked speaking of money difficulties had told Nicholas that this was all he could let him have till May, and asked him to be more economical this time.
  • Nicholas had replied that it would be more than enough for him and that he gave his word of honor not to take anything more till the spring.
  • Now only twelve hundred rubles was left of that money, so that this seven of hearts meant for him not only the loss of sixteen hundred rubles, but the necessity of going back on his word.
  • At that moment his home life, jokes with Petya, talks with Sonya, duets with Natasha, piquet with his father, and even his comfortable bed in the house on the Povarskaya rose before him with such vividness, clearness, and charm that it seemed as if it were all a lost and unappreciated bliss, long past.
  • Those broad, reddish hands, with hairy wrists visible from under the shirt cuffs, laid down the pack and took up a glass and a pipe that were handed him.
  • Instead of sixteen hundred rubles he had a long column of figures scored against him, which he had reckoned up to ten thousand, but that now, as he vaguely supposed, must have risen to fifteen thousand.
  • He had decided to play until that score reached forty-three thousand.
  • He had fixed on that number because forty-three was the sum of his and Sonya's joint ages.
  • One tormenting impression did not leave him: that those broad- boned reddish hands with hairy wrists visible from under the shirt sleeves, those hands which he loved and hated, held him in their power.
  • Such a little while ago I came to this table with the thought of winning a hundred rubles to buy that casket for Mamma's name day and then going home.
  • When did that end and when did this new, terrible state of things begin?
  • Oh, how Rostov detested at that moment those hands with their short reddish fingers and hairy wrists, which held him in their power....
  • Dolokhov cut him short, as if to remind him that it was not for him to jest.
  • He knew what a shock he would inflict on his father and mother by the news of this loss, he knew what a relief it would be to escape it all, and felt that Dolokhov knew that he could save him from all this shame and sorrow, but wanted now to play with him as a cat does with a mouse.
  • What spark has set my inmost soul on fire, What is this bliss that makes my fingers thrill?
  • She noticed at once that something had happened to him.
  • But, though she noticed it, she was herself in such high spirits at that moment, so far from sorrow, sadness, or self-reproach, that she purposely deceived herself as young people often do.
  • At that moment she was oblivious of her surroundings, and from her smiling lips flowed sounds which anyone may produce at the same intervals and hold for the same time, but which leave you cold a thousand times and the thousand and first time thrill you and make you weep.
  • Natasha, that winter, had for the first time begun to sing seriously, mainly because Denisov so delighted in her singing.
  • How will she take that si?
  • And without noticing that he was singing, to strengthen the si he sung a second, a third below the high note.
  • Oh, how that chord vibrated, and how moved was something that was finest in Rostov's soul!
  • It was long since Rostov had felt such enjoyment from music as he did that day.
  • If it is true that Monsieur Denisov has made you a proposal, tell him he is a fool, that's all!
  • I shall speak to him myself, said the countess, indignant that they should have dared to treat this little Natasha as grown up.
  • No, but you are so nice... but it won't do...not that... but as a friend, I shall always love you.
  • "Vasili Dmitrich, I thank you for the honor," she said, with an embarrassed voice, though it sounded severe to Denisov--"but my daughter is so young, and I thought that, as my son's friend, you would have addressed yourself first to me.
  • In that case you would not have obliged me to give this refusal.
  • "Countess, I have done w'ong," Denisov went on in an unsteady voice, "but believe me, I so adore your daughter and all your family that I would give my life twice over..."
  • It was as if she wanted to show him that his losses were an achievement that made her love him all the more, but Nicholas now considered himself unworthy of her.
  • He had begun to think of the last station and was still pondering on the same question--one so important that he took no notice of what went on around him.
  • Without changing his careless attitude, Pierre looked at them over his spectacles unable to understand what they wanted or how they could go on living without having solved the problems that so absorbed him.
  • It was as if the thread of the chief screw which held his life together were stripped, so that the screw could not get in or out, but went on turning uselessly in the same place.
  • It was plain that he was lying and only wanted to get more money from the traveler.
  • There was no answer to any of these questions, except one, and that not a logical answer and not at all a reply to them.
  • As if that money could add a hair's breadth to happiness or peace of mind.
  • God could not have put into her heart an impulse that was against His will.
  • All we can know is that we know nothing.
  • The stern, shrewd, and penetrating expression of that look struck Pierre.
  • Pierre felt confused and wished to avoid that look, but the bright old eyes attracted him irresistibly.
  • "I should never dare to say that I know the truth," said the Mason, whose words struck Pierre more and more by their precision and firmness.
  • Only by laying stone on stone with the cooperation of all, by the millions of generations from our forefather Adam to our own times, is that temple reared which is to be a worthy dwelling place of the Great God, he added, and closed his eyes.
  • "I ought to tell you that I do not believe... do not believe in God," said Pierre, regretfully and with an effort, feeling it essential to speak the whole truth.
  • You do not know Him and that is why you are unhappy.
  • Thou dreamest that thou art wise because thou couldst utter those blasphemous words, he went on, with a somber and scornful smile.
  • And thou art more foolish and unreasonable than a little child, who, playing with the parts of a skillfully made watch, dares to say that, as he does not understand its use, he does not believe in the master who made it.
  • "I don't understand," he said, "how it is that the mind of man cannot attain the knowledge of which you speak."
  • Can I receive that pure liquid into an impure vessel and judge of its purity?
  • "Yes, yes, that is so," said Pierre joyfully.
  • And to attain this end, we have the light called conscience that God has implanted in our souls.
  • That is what you have done.
  • There is nothing strange in that, my dear sir!
  • Pierre looked at that aged, stern, motionless, almost lifeless face and moved his lips without uttering a sound.
  • He firmly believed in the possibility of the brotherhood of men united in the aim of supporting one another in the path of virtue, and that is how Freemasonry presented itself to him.
  • One thing he continually realized as he read that book: the joy, hitherto unknown to him, of believing in the possibility of attaining perfection, and in the possibility of active brotherly love among men, which Joseph Alexeevich had revealed to him.
  • I consider it a sacred duty to fulfill that person's wishes.
  • "In that case..." began Willarski, but Pierre interrupted him.
  • "In that case we can go," said Willarski.
  • To Pierre's inquiries as to what he must do and how he should answer, Willarski only replied that brothers more worthy than he would test him and that Pierre had only to tell the truth.
  • His arms felt numb, his legs almost gave way, it seemed to him that he was tired out.
  • Pierre went nearer and saw that the lamp stood on a black table on which lay an open book.
  • A skull, a coffin, the Gospel--it seemed to him that he had expected all this and even more.
  • Drawing nearer, he recognized in the Rhetor a man he knew, Smolyaninov, and it mortified him to think that the newcomer was an acquaintance--he wished him simply a brother and a virtuous instructor.
  • For a long time he could not utter a word, so that the Rhetor had to repeat his question.
  • "No, I considered it erroneous and did not follow it," said Pierre, so softly that the Rhetor did not hear him and asked him what he was saying.
  • Is that not so? said the Rhetor, after a moment's pause.
  • But since this mystery is of such a nature that nobody can know or use it unless he be prepared by long and diligent self-purification, not everyone can hope to attain it quickly.
  • Of the three objects mentioned by the Rhetor, this last, that of improving mankind, especially appealed to Pierre.
  • The important mystery mentioned by the Rhetor, though it aroused his curiosity, did not seem to him essential, and the second aim, that of purifying and regenerating himself, did not much interest him because at that moment he felt with delight that he was already perfectly cured of his former faults and was ready for all that was good.
  • "In the seventh place, try, by the frequent thought of death," the Rhetor said, "to bring yourself to regard it not as a dreaded foe, but as a friend that frees the soul grown weary in the labors of virtue from this distressful life, and leads it to its place of recompense and peace."
  • "Yes, that must be so," thought Pierre, when after these words the Rhetor went away, leaving him to solitary meditation.
  • It must be so, but I am still so weak that I love my life, the meaning of which is only now gradually opening before me.
  • "I must also inform you," said the Rhetor, "that our Order delivers its teaching not in words only but also by other means, which may perhaps have a stronger effect on the sincere seeker after wisdom and virtue than mere words.
  • Our Order imitates the ancient societies that explained their teaching by hieroglyphics.
  • He listened to the Rhetor in silence, feeling from all he said that his ordeal was about to begin.
  • "But I have nothing here," replied Pierre, supposing that he was asked to give up all he possessed.
  • Pierre hurriedly began taking off his right boot also and was going to tuck up the other trouser leg to save this stranger the trouble, but the Mason told him that was not necessary and gave him a slipper for his left foot.
  • "That passion which more than all others caused you to waver on the path of virtue," said the Mason.
  • He was conducted from that room along passages that turned backwards and forwards and was at last brought to the doors of the Lodge.
  • During these wanderings, Pierre noticed that he was spoken of now as the "Seeker," now as the "Sufferer," and now as the "Postulant," to the accompaniment of various knockings with mallets and swords.
  • He heard those around him disputing in whispers and one of them insisting that he should be led along a certain carpet.
  • After that they took his right hand, placed it on something, and told him to hold a pair of compasses to his left breast with the other hand and to repeat after someone who read aloud an oath of fidelity to the laws of the Order.
  • The candles were then extinguished and some spirit lighted, as Pierre knew by the smell, and he was told that he would now see the lesser light.
  • Then the candles were relit and he was told that he would see the full light; the bandage was again removed and more than ten voices said together: "Sic transit gloria mundi."
  • Two of the brothers led Pierre up to the altar, placed his feet at right angles, and bade him lie down, saying that he must prostrate himself at the Gates of the Temple.
  • Pierre glanced at the serious faces of those around, remembered all he had already gone through, and realized that he could not stop halfway.
  • As to the first pair of gloves, a man's, he said that Pierre could not know their meaning but must keep them.
  • And after a pause, he added: "But beware, dear brother, that these gloves do not deck hands that are unclean."
  • While the Grand Master said these last words it seemed to Pierre that he grew embarrassed.
  • Share thy happiness with thy neighbor, and may envy never dim the purity of that bliss.
  • He finished and, getting up, embraced and kissed Pierre, who, with tears of joy in his eyes, looked round him, not knowing how to answer the congratulations and greetings from acquaintances that met him on all sides.
  • Pierre would have liked to subscribe all he had, but fearing that it might look like pride subscribed the same amount as the others.
  • On the previous evening at the Lodge, he had heard that a rumor of his duel had reached the Emperor and that it would be wiser for him to leave Petersburg.
  • I know all about it, and I can tell you positively that Helene is as innocent before you as Christ was before the Jews.
  • But before Prince Vasili had finished his playful speech, Pierre, without looking at him, and with a kind of fury that made him like his father, muttered in a whisper:
  • "Go!" he repeated, amazed at himself and glad to see the look of confusion and fear that showed itself on Prince Vasili's face.
  • The duel between Pierre and Dolokhov was hushed up and, in spite of the Emperor's severity regarding duels at that time, neither the principals nor their seconds suffered for it.
  • This expression suggested that she had resolved to endure her troubles uncomplainingly and that her husband was a cross laid upon her by God.
  • I was against this marriage even then and foretold all that has happened.
  • The novelty Anna Pavlovna was setting before her guests that evening was Boris Drubetskoy, who had just arrived as a special messenger from the Prussian army and was aide-de-camp to a very important personage.
  • We shall not cease to express our sincere views on that subject, and can only say to the King of Prussia and others: 'So much the worse for you.
  • He himself carefully scanned each face, appraising the possibilities of establishing intimacy with each of those present, and the advantages that might accrue.
  • Vienna considers the bases of the proposed treaty so unattainable that not even a continuity of most brilliant successes would secure them, and she doubts the means we have of gaining them.
  • That is the actual phrase used by the Vienna cabinet, said the Danish charge d'affaires.
  • The Emperor of Austria can never have thought of such a thing, it is only the cabinet that says it.
  • After that Anna Pavlovna led up to the courage and firmness of the King of Prussia, in order to draw Boris into the conversation.
  • For some time he engrossed the general attention, and Anna Pavlovna felt that the novelty she had served up was received with pleasure by all her visitors.
  • "You absolutely must come and see me," she said in a tone that implied that, for certain considerations he could not know of, this was absolutely necessary.
  • Boris smiled circumspectly, so that it might be taken as ironical or appreciative according to the way the joke was received.
  • Oh, that wicked Prince Hippolyte! she said.
  • It seemed as if from some words Boris had spoken that evening about the Prussian army, Helene had suddenly found it necessary to see him.
  • She seemed to promise to explain that necessity to him when he came on Tuesday.
  • During that stay in Petersburg, Boris became an intimate in the countess' house.
  • But what was still stranger, though of this Prince Andrew said nothing to his sister, was that in the expression the sculptor had happened to give the angel's face, Prince Andrew read the same mild reproach he had read on the face of his dead wife: "Ah, why have you done this to me?"
  • He was told that the prince had gone to the nursery.
  • I think so... but as you please, said Princess Mary, evidently intimidated and confused that her opinion had prevailed.
  • It was the second night that neither of them had slept, watching the boy who was in a high fever.
  • Karl Ivanich always says that sleep is more important than anything, whispered Princess Mary with a sigh.
  • I shall await your most gracious permission here in hospital, that I may not have to play the part of a secretary rather than commander in the army.
  • Those that follow are naturally increasingly interesting and entertaining.
  • After the field marshal's departure it appears that we are within sight of the enemy and must give battle.
  • Those who retreat after a battle have lost it is what we say; and according to that it is we who lost the battle of Pultusk.
  • So energetically do we pursue this aim that after crossing an unfordable river we burn the bridges to separate ourselves from our enemy, who at the moment is not Bonaparte but Buxhowden.
  • General Buxhowden was all but attacked and captured by a superior enemy force as a result of one of these maneuvers that enabled us to escape him.
  • But as it turns out, just at that moment a third enemy rises before us--namely the Orthodox Russian soldiers, loudly demanding bread, meat, biscuits, fodder, and whatnot!
  • It was not what he had read that vexed him, but the fact that the life out there in which he had now no part could perturb him.
  • Just as he went in he saw that the nurse was hiding something from him with a scared look and that Princess Mary was no longer by the cot.
  • As often happens after long sleeplessness and long anxiety, he was seized by an unreasoning panic--it occurred to him that the child was dead.
  • Prince Andrew was as glad to find the boy like that, as if he had already lost him.
  • In the dim shadow of the curtain her luminous eyes shone more brightly than usual from the tears of joy that were in them.
  • Each made the other a warning gesture and stood still in the dim light beneath the curtain as if not wishing to leave that seclusion where they three were shut off from all the world.
  • But he felt that this did not forward matters at all.
  • He felt that these consultations were detached from real affairs and did not link up with them or make them move.
  • Temptations to Pierre's greatest weakness-- the one to which he had confessed when admitted to the Lodge--were so strong that he could not resist them.
  • He consoled himself with the thought that he fulfilled another of the precepts--that of reforming the human race--and had other virtues--love of his neighbor, and especially generosity.
  • What Pierre did not know was that the place where they presented him with bread and salt and wished to build a chantry in honor of Peter and Paul was a market village where a fair was held on St. Peter's day, and that the richest peasants (who formed the deputation) had begun the chantry long before, but that nine tenths of the peasants in that villages were in a state of the greatest poverty.
  • He did not know that since the nursing mothers were no longer sent to work on his land, they did still harder work on their own land.
  • He did not know that the priest who met him with the cross oppressed the peasants by his exactions, and that the pupils' parents wept at having to let him take their children and secured their release by heavy payments.
  • He did not know that the brick buildings, built to plan, were being built by serfs whose manorial labor was thus increased, though lessened on paper.
  • It was at the end of a village that stretched along the highroad in the midst of a young copse in which were a few fir trees.
  • The latter began to feel that it was in bad taste to speak of his enthusiasms, dreams, and hopes of happiness or goodness, in Prince Andrew's presence.
  • And so you had to go through that too!
  • "One thing I thank God for is that I did not kill that man," said Pierre.
  • "What does harm to another is wrong," said Pierre, feeling with pleasure that for the first time since his arrival Prince Andrew was roused, had begun to talk, and wanted to express what had brought him to his present state.
  • I lived like that, I lived for myself and ruined my life.
  • And the main thing is," he continued, "that I know, and know for certain, that the enjoyment of doing this good is the only sure happiness in life."
  • "Yes, if you put it like that it's quite a different matter," said Prince Andrew.
  • "Come, let's argue then," said Prince Andrew, "You talk of schools," he went on, crooking a finger, "education and so forth; that is, you want to raise him" (pointing to a peasant who passed by them taking off his cap) "from his animal condition and awaken in him spiritual needs, while it seems to me that animal happiness is the only happiness possible, and that is just what you want to deprive him of.
  • And besides, what a notion that medicine ever cured anyone!
  • Prince Andrew expressed his ideas so clearly and distinctly that it was evident he had reflected on this subject more than once, and he spoke readily and rapidly like a man who has not talked for a long time.
  • "Oh, that is dreadful, dreadful!" said Pierre.
  • I had such moments myself not long ago, in Moscow and when traveling, but at such times I collapsed so that I don't live at all--everything seems hateful to me... myself most of all.
  • That is not cleanly," said Prince Andrew; "on the contrary one must try to make one's life as pleasant as possible.
  • I'm alive, that is not my fault, so I must live out my life as best I can without hurting others.
  • They could not understand that I have not the necessary qualifications for it--the kind of good-natured, fussy shallowness necessary for the position.
  • His eyes glittered feverishly while he tried to prove to Pierre that in his actions there was no desire to do good to his neighbor.
  • Prince Andrew, glancing at Pierre, broke the silence now and then with remarks which showed that he was in a good temper.
  • But as soon as he thought of what he should say, he felt that Prince Andrew with one word, one argument, would upset all his teaching, and he shrank from beginning, afraid of exposing to possible ridicule what to him was precious and sacred.
  • I myself thought like that, and do you know what saved me?
  • They reached a river that had overflowed its banks and which they had to cross by ferry.
  • If I see, clearly see, that ladder leading from plant to man, why should I suppose it breaks off at me and does not go farther and farther?
  • I feel that I cannot vanish, since nothing vanishes in this world, but that I shall always exist and always have existed.
  • I feel that beyond me and above me there are spirits, and that in this world there is truth.
  • It cannot be that there is no answer.
  • That's what convinces, that is what has convinced me, said Prince Andrew.
  • "Yes, yes, of course," said Pierre, "isn't that what I'm saying?"
  • You know that there is a there and there is a Someone?
  • We must live, we must love, and we must believe that we live not only today on this scrap of earth, but have lived and shall live forever, there, in the Whole, said Pierre, and he pointed to the sky.
  • It vanished as soon as he returned to the customary conditions of his life, but he knew that this feeling which he did not know how to develop existed within him.
  • * "You must know that this is a woman."
  • It was evident that Prince Andrew's ironical tone toward the pilgrims and Princess Mary's helpless attempts to protect them were their customary long-established relations on the matter.
  • "Really?" said Pierre, gazing over his spectacles with curiosity and seriousness (for which Princess Mary was specially grateful to him) into Ivanushka's face, who, seeing that she was being spoken about, looked round at them all with crafty eyes.
  • "But, dear me, that must be a fraud!" said Pierre, naively, who had listened attentively to the pilgrim.
  • And he dreamed that the Holy Virgin Mother of the Kiev catacombs came to him and said, 'Believe in me and I will make you whole.'
  • Pelageya stopped doubtfully, but in Pierre's face there was such a look of sincere penitence, and Prince Andrew glanced so meekly now at her and now at Pierre, that she was gradually reassured.
  • I'd sleep a bit and then again go and kiss the relics, and there was such peace all around, such blessedness, that one don't want to come out, even into the light of heaven again.
  • Today he is cheerful and in good spirits, but that is the effect of your visit--he is not often like that.
  • "Who's that?" asked the old prince, noticing Pierre as he got out of the carriage.
  • Pierre was maintaining that a time would come when there would be no more wars.
  • That charm was not expressed so much in his relations with him as with all his family and with the household.
  • When returning from his leave, Rostov felt, for the first time, how close was the bond that united him to Denisov and the whole regiment.
  • In the hospitals, death was so certain that soldiers suffering from fever, or the swelling that came from bad food, preferred to remain on duty, and hardly able to drag their legs went to the front rather than to the hospitals.
  • When spring came on, the soldiers found a plant just showing out of the ground that looked like asparagus, which, for some reason, they called "Mashka's sweet root."
  • That spring a new disease broke out among the soldiers, a swelling of the arms, legs, and face, which the doctors attributed to eating this root.
  • Rostov took the joke as an insult, flared up, and said such unpleasant things to the officer that it was all Denisov could do to prevent a duel.
  • She is like a sister to me, and I can't tell you how it offended me... because... well, for that reason....
  • In April the troops were enlivened by news of the Emperor's arrival, but Rostov had no chance of being present at the review he held at Bartenstein, as the Pavlograds were at the outposts far beyond that place.
  • The roof was so constructed that one could stand up in the middle of the trench and could even sit up on the beds if one drew close to the table.
  • I ordered you not to let them eat that Mashka woot stuff!
  • He could hear that Lavrushka--that sly, bold orderly of Denisov's--was talking, as well as the quartermaster.
  • In answer to Rostov's inquiry where he was going, he answered vaguely and crossly that he had some business.
  • Alarmed at Denisov's condition, Rostov suggested that he should undress, drink some water, and send for the doctor.
  • Who is it that's starving us? shouted Denisov, hitting the table with the fist of his newly bled arm so violently that the table nearly broke down and the tumblers on it jumped about.
  • The case, as represented by the offended parties, was that, after seizing the transports, Major Denisov, being drunk, went to the chief quartermaster and without any provocation called him a thief, threatened to strike him, and on being led out had rushed into the office and given two officials a thrashing, and dislocated the arm of one of them.
  • In answer to Rostov's renewed questions, Denisov said, laughing, that he thought he remembered that some other fellow had got mixed up in it, but that it was all nonsense and rubbish, and he did not in the least fear any kind of trial, and that if those scoundrels dared attack him he would give them an answer that they would not easily forget.
  • In June the battle of Friedland was fought, in which the Pavlograds did not take part, and after that an armistice was proclaimed.
  • Rostov explained that he wanted to see Major Denisov of the hussars, who was wounded.
  • It's well that the charitable Prussian ladies send us two pounds of coffee and some lint each month or we should be lost! he laughed.
  • "There was one like that," said the doctor, as if pleased.
  • That one is dead, I fancy.
  • The smell was so strong there that Rostov held his nose and had to pause and collect his strength before he could go on.
  • Glancing in at the door, Rostov saw that the sick and wounded were lying on the floor on straw and overcoats.
  • It was a little different, more pungent, and one felt that this was where it originated.
  • The man's neighbor on one side whispered something to him, pointing at Rostov, who noticed that the old man wanted to speak to him.
  • How are you, how are you? he called out, still in the same voice as in the regiment, but Rostov noticed sadly that under this habitual ease and animation some new, sinister, hidden feeling showed itself in the expression of Denisov's face and the intonations of his voice.
  • His face had the same swollen pallor as the faces of the other hospital patients, but it was not this that struck Rostov.
  • What struck him was that Denisov did not seem glad to see him, and smiled at him unnaturally.
  • Rostov even noticed that Denisov did not like to be reminded of the regiment, or in general of that other free life which was going on outside the hospital.
  • He seemed to try to forget that old life and was only interested in the affair with the commissariat officers.
  • Rostov noticed by their faces that all those gentlemen had already heard that story more than once and were tired of it.
  • Boris looked at his general inquiringly and immediately saw that he was being tested.
  • Since he had begun to move in the highest circles Boris had made it his habit to watch attentively all that went on around him and to note it down.
  • He noted this down that same evening, among other facts he felt to be of historic importance.
  • That same day, Rostov, profiting by the darkness to avoid being recognized in civilian dress, came to Tilsit and went to the lodging occupied by Boris and Zhilinski.
  • Rostov, in common with the whole army from which he came, was far from having experienced the change of feeling toward Napoleon and the French- -who from being foes had suddenly become friends--that had taken place at headquarters and in Boris.
  • Only recently, talking with one of Platov's Cossack officers, Rostov had argued that if Napoleon were taken prisoner he would be treated not as a sovereign, but as a criminal.
  • As soon as he noticed a French officer, who thrust his head out of the door, that warlike feeling of hostility which he always experienced at the sight of the enemy suddenly seized him.
  • As if you could come at a wrong time! said Boris, and he led him into the room where the supper table was laid and introduced him to his guests, explaining that he was not a civilian, but an hussar officer, and an old friend of his.
  • When he and Boris were alone, Rostov felt for the first time that he could not look Boris in the face without a sense of awkwardness.
  • I have heard of such cases and know that His Majesty is very severe in such affairs.
  • At that moment Zhilinski's voice was heard calling Boris.
  • The Emperors were to be present at that banquet.
  • Rostov felt so ill at ease and uncomfortable with Boris that, when the latter looked in after supper, he pretended to be asleep, and early next morning went away, avoiding Boris.
  • On hearing this indifferent voice, Rostov grew frightened at what he was doing; the thought of meeting the Emperor at any moment was so fascinating and consequently so alarming that he was ready to run away, but the official who had questioned him opened the door, and Rostov entered.
  • Rostov went back into the hall and noticed that in the porch there were many officers and generals in full parade uniform, whom he had to pass.
  • I'm sorry, sorry for that fine fellow.
  • Forgetting the danger of being recognized, Rostov went close to the porch, together with some inquisitive civilians, and again, after two years, saw those features he adored: that same face and same look and step, and the same union of majesty and mildness....
  • In the uniform of the Preobrazhensk regiment--white chamois-leather breeches and high boots-- and wearing a star Rostov did not know (it was that of the Legion d'honneur), the monarch came out into the porch, putting on his gloves and carrying his hat under his arm.
  • On approaching Alexander he raised his hat, and as he did so, Rostov, with his cavalryman's eye, could not help noticing that Napoleon did not sit well or firmly in the saddle.
  • It struck him as a surprise that Alexander treated Bonaparte as an equal and that the latter was quite at ease with the Tsar, as if such relations with an Emperor were an everyday matter to him.
  • The crowd unexpectedly found itself so close to the Emperors that Rostov, standing in the front row, was afraid he might be recognized.
  • Napoleon merely laid the cross on Lazarev's breast and, dropping his hand, turned toward Alexander as though sure that the cross would adhere there.
  • But receiving no orders, he remained for some time in that rigid position.
  • Rostov stood at that corner for a long time, watching the feast from a distance.
  • So vividly did he recall that hospital stench of dead flesh that he looked round to see where the smell came from.
  • He caught himself harboring such strange thoughts that he was frightened.
  • He went to a hotel he had noticed that morning.
  • There he found so many people, among them officers who, like himself, had come in civilian clothes, that he had difficulty in getting a dinner.
  • If we're punished, it means that we have deserved it, it's not for us to judge.
  • If the Emperor pleases to recognize Bonaparte as Emperor and to conclude an alliance with him, it means that that is the right thing to do.
  • That way we shall be saying there is no God--nothing! shouted Nicholas, banging the table--very little to the point as it seemed to his listeners, but quite relevantly to the course of his own thoughts.
  • But besides considerations of foreign policy, the attention of Russian society was at that time keenly directed on the internal changes that were being undertaken in all the departments of government.
  • Probably ten times the age of the birches that formed the forest, it was ten times as thick and twice as tall as they.
  • Are you not weary of that stupid, meaningless, constantly repeated fraud?
  • As he passed through the forest Prince Andrew turned several times to look at that oak, as if expecting something from it.
  • Let others--the young--yield afresh to that fraud, but we know life, our life is finished!
  • During this journey he, as it were, considered his life afresh and arrived at his old conclusion, restful in its hopelessness: that it was not for him to begin anything anew--but that he must live out his life, content to do no harm, and not disturbing himself or desiring anything.
  • It was dusty and so hot that on passing near water one longed to bathe.
  • The girl was shouting something but, seeing that he was a stranger, ran back laughing without looking at him.
  • In 1809 Count Ilya Rostov was living at Otradnoe just as he had done in former years, that is, entertaining almost the whole province with hunts, theatricals, dinners, and music.
  • That night, alone in new surroundings, he was long unable to sleep.
  • Prince Andrew leaned his elbows on the window ledge and his eyes rested on that sky.
  • In his soul there suddenly arose such an unexpected turmoil of youthful thoughts and hopes, contrary to the whole tenor of his life, that unable to explain his condition to himself he lay down and fell asleep at once.
  • "Yes, here in this forest was that oak with which I agreed," thought Prince Andrew.
  • On reaching home Prince Andrew decided to go to Petersburg that autumn and found all sorts of reasons for this decision.
  • It now seemed clear to him that all his experience of life must be senselessly wasted unless he applied it to some kind of work and again played an active part in life.
  • He did not even remember how formerly, on the strength of similar wretched logical arguments, it had seemed obvious that he would be degrading himself if he now, after the lessons he had had in life, allowed himself to believe in the possibility of being useful and in the possibility of happiness or love.
  • After that journey to Ryazan he found the country dull; his former pursuits no longer interested him, and often when sitting alone in his study he got up, went to the mirror, and gazed a long time at his own face.
  • "If it were hot," Prince Andrew would reply at such times very dryly to his sister, "he could go out in his smock, but as it is cold he must wear warm clothes, which were designed for that purpose.
  • That same August the Emperor was thrown from his caleche, injured his leg, and remained three weeks at Peterhof, receiving Speranski every day and no one else.
  • A few days later Prince Andrew received notice that he was to go to see the Minister of War, Count Arakcheev.
  • But the moment the door opened one feeling alone appeared on all faces-- that of fear.
  • Prince Andrew for the second time asked the adjutant on duty to take in his name, but received an ironical look and was told that his turn would come in due course.
  • And this movement of reconstruction of which Prince Andrew had a vague idea, and Speranski its chief promoter, began to interest him so keenly that the question of the army regulations quickly receded to a secondary place in his consciousness.
  • "It was a small estate that brought in no profit," replied Prince Andrew, trying to extenuate his action so as not to irritate the old man uselessly.
  • Speranski's whole figure was of a peculiar type that made him easily recognizable.
  • He spoke slowly, with assurance that he would be listened to, and he looked only at the person with whom he was conversing.
  • He did not say that the Emperor had kept him, and Prince Andrew noticed this affectation of modesty.
  • I hope you will find him sympathetic and ready to co- operate in promoting all that is reasonable.
  • It was clear that he thought it necessary to interest himself in Bolkonski.
  • "I think, however, that these condemnations have some ground," returned Prince Andrew, trying to resist Speranski's influence, of which he began to be conscious.
  • Certain rights and privileges for the aristocracy appear to me a means of maintaining that sentiment.
  • * "If you regard the question from that point of view."
  • Speranski went on to say that honor, l'honneur, cannot be upheld by privileges harmful to the service; that honor, l'honneur, is either a negative concept of not doing what is blameworthy or it is a source of emulation in pursuit of commendation and rewards, which recognize it.
  • "I do not dispute that, but it cannot be denied that court privileges have attained the same end," returned Prince Andrew.
  • During the first weeks of his stay in Petersburg Prince Andrew felt the whole trend of thought he had formed during his life of seclusion quite overshadowed by the trifling cares that engrossed him in that city.
  • He sometimes noticed with dissatisfaction that he repeated the same remark on the same day in different circles.
  • But he was so busy for whole days together that he had no time to notice that he was thinking of nothing.
  • To Bolkonski so many people appeared contemptible and insignificant creatures, and he so longed to find in someone the living ideal of that perfection toward which he strove, that he readily believed that in Speranski he had found this ideal of a perfectly rational and virtuous man.
  • Everything seemed so simple and clear in Speranski's exposition that Prince Andrew involuntarily agreed with him about everything.
  • He was unpleasantly struck, too, by the excessive contempt for others that he observed in Speranski, and by the diversity of lines of argument he used to support his opinions.
  • It was evident that the thought could never occur to him which to Prince Andrew seemed so natural, namely, that it is after all impossible to express all one thinks; and that he had never felt the doubt, "Is not all I think and believe nonsense?"
  • And it was just this peculiarity of Speranski's mind that particularly attracted Prince Andrew.
  • During the first period of their acquaintance Bolkonski felt a passionate admiration for him similar to that which he had once felt for Bonaparte.
  • "And that is all the state has for the millions it has spent," said he.
  • That is why it is a sin for men like you, Prince, not to serve in these times!
  • Prince Andrew said that for that work an education in jurisprudence was needed which he did not possess.
  • Amid the turmoil of his activities and distractions, however, Pierre at the end of a year began to feel that the more firmly he tried to rest upon it, the more masonic ground on which he stood gave way under him.
  • He did not think of doubting Freemasonry itself, but suspected that Russian Masonry had taken a wrong path and deviated from its original principles.
  • The Petersburg Freemasons all came to see him, tried to ingratiate themselves with him, and it seemed to them all that he was preparing something for them and concealing it.
  • This aim was that of Christianity itself.
  • At that time, when everything was plunged in darkness, preaching alone was of course sufficient.
  • It is impossible to eradicate the passions; but we must strive to direct them to a noble aim, and it is therefore necessary that everyone should be able to satisfy his passions within the limits of virtue.
  • Our order should provide means to that end.
  • The majority of the Brothers, seeing in it dangerous designs of Illuminism, * met it with a coldness that surprised Pierre.
  • At that meeting he was struck for the first time by the endless variety of men's minds, which prevents a truth from ever presenting itself identically to two persons.
  • He was told that it would not, and without waiting for the usual formalities he left the lodge and went home.
  • It was just then that he received a letter from his wife, who implored him to see her, telling him how grieved she was about him and how she wished to devote her whole life to him.
  • At the end of the letter she informed him that in a few days she would return to Petersburg from abroad.
  • Pierre saw that there was a conspiracy against him and that they wanted to reunite him with his wife, and in the mood he then was, this was not even unpleasant to him.
  • Nothing in life seemed to him of much importance, and under the influence of the depression that possessed him he valued neither his liberty nor his resolution to punish his wife.
  • My benefactor then explained to me fully the meaning of the Great Square of creation and pointed out to me that the numbers three and seven are the basis of everything.
  • My mother-in-law came to me in tears and said that Helene was here and that she implored me to hear her; that she was innocent and unhappy at my desertion, and much more.
  • I knew that if I once let myself see her I should not have strength to go on refusing what she wanted.
  • That is what I decided, and what I wrote to Joseph Alexeevich.
  • I told my wife that I begged her to forget the past, to forgive me whatever wrong I may have done her, and that I had nothing to forgive.
  • At that time, as always happens, the highest society that met at court and at the grand balls was divided into several circles, each with its own particular tone.
  • She was visited by the members of the French embassy and by many belonging to that circle and noted for their intellect and polished manners.
  • Young men read books before attending Helene's evenings, to have something to say in her salon, and secretaries of the embassy, and even ambassadors, confided diplomatic secrets to her, so that in a way Helene was a power.
  • He was that absent-minded crank, a grand seigneur husband who was in no one's way, and far from spoiling the high tone and general impression of the drawing room, he served, by the contrast he presented to her, as an advantageous background to his elegant and tactful wife.
  • Her smile for him was the same as for everybody, but sometimes that smile made Pierre uncomfortable.
  • "No, now that she has become a bluestocking she has finally renounced her former infatuations," he told himself.
  • Pierre went on with his diary, and this is what he wrote in it during that time:
  • That is why I should really like to save him from evil and lead him into the path of truth, but evil thoughts of him did not leave me.
  • It seemed to me that his object in entering the Brotherhood was merely to be intimate and in favor with members of our lodge.
  • Now I recalled every detail of that meeting and in my mind gave him the most malevolent and bitter replies.
  • I recollected myself and drove away that thought only when I found myself glowing with anger, but I did not sufficiently repent.
  • I flared up and said much that was unpleasant and even rude to him.
  • I dreamed that I was walking in the dark and was suddenly surrounded by dogs, but I went on undismayed.
  • After much effort I dragged myself up, so that my leg hung down on one side and my body on the other.
  • I dreamed that Joseph Alexeevich was sitting in my house, and that I was very glad and wished to entertain him.
  • It seemed as if I chattered incessantly with other people and suddenly remembered that this could not please him, and I wished to come close to him and embrace him.
  • But as soon as I drew near I saw that his face had changed and grown young, and he was quietly telling me something about the teaching of our order, but so softly that I could not hear it.
  • Then it seemed that we all left the room and something strange happened.
  • Abashed by this question, I replied that sloth was my chief temptation.
  • To this he replied that one should not deprive a wife of one's embraces and gave me to understand that that was my duty.
  • But I replied that I should be ashamed to do it, and suddenly everything vanished.
  • That day I received a letter from my benefactor in which he wrote about "conjugal duties."
  • I saw that I was in Moscow in my house, in the big sitting room, and Joseph Alexeevich came in from the drawing room.
  • I seemed to know at once that the process of regeneration had already taken place in him, and I rushed to meet him.
  • I embraced him and kissed his hands, and he said, "Hast thou noticed that my face is different?"
  • I looked at him, still holding him in my arms, and saw that his face was young, but that he had no hair on his head and his features were quite changed.
  • And suddenly I saw him lying like a dead body; then he gradually recovered and went with me into my study carrying a large book of sheets of drawing paper; I said, "I drew that," and he answered by bowing his head.
  • And in my dream I knew that these drawings represented the love adventures of the soul with its beloved.
  • And I seemed to know that this maiden was nothing else than a representation of the Song of Songs.
  • And looking at those drawings I dreamed I felt that I was doing wrong, but could not tear myself away from them.
  • He narrated that episode so persistently and with so important an air that everyone believed in the merit and usefulness of his deed, and he had obtained two decorations for Austerlitz.
  • He had picked up the scrap of a grenade that had killed an aide-de-camp standing near the commander-in-chief and had taken it to his commander.
  • Though some skeptics smiled when told of Berg's merits, it could not be denied that he was a painstaking and brave officer, on excellent terms with his superiors, and a moral young man with a brilliant career before him and an assured position in society.
  • Now in Petersburg, having considered the Rostovs' position and his own, he decided that the time had come to propose.
  • Berg's proposal was at first received with a perplexity that was not flattering to him.
  • "You see," said Berg to his comrade, whom he called "friend" only because he knew that everyone has friends, "you see, I have considered it all, and should not marry if I had not thought it all out or if it were in any way unsuitable.
  • But on the contrary, my papa and mamma are now provided for--I have arranged that rent for them in the Baltic Provinces--and I can live in Petersburg on my pay, and with her fortune and my good management we can get along nicely.
  • In our times that is worth something, isn't it?
  • The count was so disconcerted by this long-foreseen inquiry that without consideration he gave the first reply that came into his head.
  • But Berg, smiling pleasantly, explained that if he did not know for certain how much Vera would have and did not receive at least part of the dowry in advance, he would have to break matters off.
  • Berg smiled meekly, kissed the count on the shoulder, and said that he was very grateful, but that it was impossible for him to arrange his new life without receiving thirty thousand in ready money.
  • Before Sonya and her mother, if Boris happened to be mentioned, she spoke quite freely of that episode as of some childish, long-forgotten matter that was not worth mentioning.
  • But he went with the firm intention of letting her and her parents feel that the childish relations between himself and Natasha could not be binding either on her or on him.
  • Boris kissed Natasha's hand and said that he was astonished at the change in her.
  • He felt the weight of that resolute and affectionate scrutiny and glanced at her occasionally.
  • Boris made up his mind to avoid meeting Natasha, but despite that resolution he called again a few days later and began calling often and spending whole days at the Rostovs'.
  • It seemed to him that he ought to have an explanation with Natasha and tell her that the old times must be forgotten, that in spite of everything... she could not be his wife, that he had no means, and they would never let her marry him.
  • It seemed to her mother and Sonya that Natasha was in love with Boris as of old.
  • She was finishing her last prayer: "Can it be that this couch will be my grave?"
  • Seeing that her mother was still praying she ran on tiptoe to the bed and, rapidly slipping one little foot against the other, pushed off her slippers and jumped onto the bed the countess had feared might become her grave.
  • The countess finished her prayers and came to the bed with a stern face, but seeing, that Natasha's head was covered, she smiled in her kind, weak way.
  • In her behavior to her mother Natasha seemed rough, but she was so sensitive and tactful that however she clasped her mother she always managed to do it without hurting her or making her feel uncomfortable or displeased.
  • Natasha was lying looking steadily straight before her at one of the mahogany sphinxes carved on the corners of the bedstead, so that the countess only saw her daughter's face in profile.
  • That face struck her by its peculiarly serious and concentrated expression.
  • Speak! said she, turning to her mother, who was tenderly gazing at her daughter and in that contemplation seemed to have forgotten all she had wished to say.
  • She kept thinking that no one could understand all that she understood and all there was in her.
  • "Sonya?" she thought, glancing at that curled-up, sleeping little kitten with her enormous plait of hair.
  • She had got up at eight that morning and had been in a fever of excitement and activity all day.
  • Sonya stood ready dressed in the middle of the room and, pressing the head of a pin till it hurt her dainty finger, was fixing on a last ribbon that squeaked as the pin went through it.
  • I can't do it like that, said the maid who was holding Natasha's hair.
  • Turning her mother's head this way and that, she fastened on the cap and, hurriedly kissing her gray hair, ran back to the maids who were turning up the hem of her skirt.
  • At that moment, with soft steps, the countess came in shyly, in her cap and velvet gown.
  • "I'll arrange it," and she rushed forward so that the maids who were tacking up her skirt could not move fast enough and a piece of gauze was torn off.
  • The prospect was so splendid that she hardly believed it would come true, so out of keeping was it with the chill darkness and closeness of the carriage.
  • She understood all that awaited her only when, after stepping over the red baize at the entrance, she entered the hall, took off her fur cloak, and, beside Sonya and in front of her mother, mounted the brightly illuminated stairs between the flowers.
  • And this was the very attitude that became her best.
  • The countess took up a position in one of the front rows of that crowd.
  • Natasha heard and felt that several people were asking about her and looking at her.
  • She realized that those noticing her liked her, and this observation helped to calm her.
  • That is the Dutch ambassador, do you see?
  • That gray-haired man, she said, indicating an old man with a profusion of silver-gray curly hair, who was surrounded by ladies laughing at something he said.
  • "That is Bezukhova's brother, Anatole Kuragin," she said, indicating a handsome officer of the Horse Guards who passed by them with head erect, looking at something over the heads of the ladies.
  • I hear they will marry him to that rich girl.
  • And that stout one in spectacles is the universal Freemason, she went on, indicating Pierre.
  • Suddenly everybody stirred, began talking, and pressed forward and then back, and between the two rows, which separated, the Emperor entered to the sounds of music that had immediately struck up.
  • She was not concerned about the Emperor or any of those great people whom Peronskaya was pointing out--she had but one thought: Is it possible no one will ask me, that I shall not be among the first to dance?
  • Is it possible that not one of all these men will notice me?
  • She and the countess and Sonya were standing by themselves as in the depths of a forest amid that crowd of strangers, with no one interested in them and not wanted by anyone.
  • Natasha gazed at them and was ready to cry because it was not she who was dancing that first turn of the waltz.
  • Prince Andrew, as one closely connected with Speranski and participating in the work of the legislative commission, could give reliable information about that sitting, concerning which various rumors were current.
  • He recognized her, guessed her feelings, saw that it was her debut, remembered her conversation at the window, and with an expression of pleasure on his face approached Countess Rostova.
  • That tremulous expression on Natasha's face, prepared either for despair or rapture, suddenly brightened into a happy, grateful, childlike smile.
  • Such as she are rare here, he thought, as Natasha, readjusting a rose that was slipping on her bodice, settled herself beside him.
  • She was at that height of bliss when one becomes completely kind and good and does not believe in the possibility of evil, unhappiness, or sorrow.
  • At that ball Pierre for the first time felt humiliated by the position his wife occupied in court circles.
  • Yes, that little Rostova is very charming.
  • There's something fresh, original, un- Petersburg-like about her that distinguishes her.
  • That was all he thought about yesterday's ball, and after his morning tea he set to work.
  • The visitor was Bitski, who served on various committees, frequented all the societies in Petersburg, and a passionate devotee of the new ideas and of Speranski, and a diligent Petersburg newsmonger--one of those men who choose their opinions like their clothes according to the fashion, but who for that very reason appear to be the warmest partisans.
  • He had just heard particulars of that morning's sitting of the Council of State opened by the Emperor, and he spoke of it enthusiastically.
  • The Emperor said that the fiscal system must be reorganized and the accounts published, recounted Bitski, emphasizing certain words and opening his eyes significantly.
  • Can all that make me any happier or better?
  • He was going to dine that evening at Speranski's, "with only a few friends," as the host had said when inviting him.
  • It seemed to him that this was not Speranski but someone else.
  • Everything that had formerly appeared mysterious and fascinating in Speranski suddenly became plain and unattractive.
  • It seemed that in this company the insignificance of those people was so definitely accepted that the only possible attitude toward them was one of good humored ridicule.
  • Speranski related how at the Council that morning a deaf dignitary, when asked his opinion, replied that he thought so too.
  • Stolypin, stuttering, broke into the conversation and began excitedly talking of the abuses that existed under the former order of things--threatening to give a serious turn to the conversation.
  • Prince Andrew did not laugh and feared that he would be a damper on the spirits of the company, but no one took any notice of his being out of harmony with the general mood.
  • And that gesture, too, seemed unnatural to Prince Andrew.
  • In the midst of a conversation that was started about Napoleon's Spanish affairs, which they all agreed in approving, Prince Andrew began to express a contrary opinion.
  • That precise, mirthless laughter rang in Prince Andrew's ears long after he had left the house.
  • He remembered how carefully and at what length everything relating to form and procedure was discussed at those meetings, and how sedulously and promptly all that related to the gist of the business was evaded.
  • Then he vividly pictured to himself Bogucharovo, his occupations in the country, his journey to Ryazan; he remembered the peasants and Dron the village elder, and mentally applying to them the Personal Rights he had divided into paragraphs, he felt astonished that he could have spent so much time on such useless work.
  • The old count's hospitality and good nature, which struck one especially in Petersburg as a pleasant surprise, were such that Prince Andrew could not refuse to stay to dinner.
  • She asked this and then became confused, feeling that she ought not to have asked it.
  • He went to bed from habit, but soon realized that he could not sleep.
  • He decided that he must attend to his son's education by finding a tutor and putting the boy in his charge, then he ought to retire from the service and go abroad, and see England, Switzerland and Italy.
  • Berg explained so clearly why he wanted to collect at his house a small but select company, and why this would give him pleasure, and why though he grudged spending money on cards or anything harmful, he was prepared to run into some expense for the sake of good society--that Pierre could not refuse, and promised to come.
  • Contrary to his habit of being late, Pierre on that day arrived at the Bergs' house, not at ten but at fifteen minutes to eight.
  • Berg, closely buttoned up in his new uniform, sat beside his wife explaining to her that one always could and should be acquainted with people above one, because only then does one get satisfaction from acquaintances.
  • It goes without saying that one must be conscientious and methodical.
  • Vera, having decided in her own mind that Pierre ought to be entertained with conversation about the French embassy, at once began accordingly.
  • At the card table he happened to be directly facing Natasha, and was struck by a curious change that had come over her since the ball.
  • After six rubbers the general got up, saying that it was no use playing like that, and Pierre was released.
  • With so intellectual a guest as she considered Prince Andrew to be, she felt that she had to employ her diplomatic tact.
  • That is what I consider true love.
  • Yes, that is true, Prince.
  • And it must be confessed that Natalie is very susceptible.
  • (alluding to a map of love much in vogue at that time).
  • You know that pair of women's gloves?
  • But at that moment Berg came to Pierre and began insisting that he should take part in an argument between the general and the colonel on the affairs in Spain.
  • Everything was similar: the ladies' subtle talk, the cards, the general raising his voice at the card table, and the samovar and the tea cakes; only one thing was lacking that he had always seen at the evening parties he wished to imitate.
  • She felt that he wanted to say something to her but could not bring himself to do so.
  • One can't talk about that, said Natasha.
  • But all the same that night Natasha, now agitated and now frightened, lay a long time in her mother's bed gazing straight before her.
  • Does it mean that it's the real thing?
  • It seemed to Natasha that even at the time she first saw Prince Andrew at Otradnoe she had fallen in love with him.
  • And it had to happen that he should come specially to Petersburg while we are here.
  • And it had to happen that we should meet at that ball.
  • Clearly it is fate that everything led up to this!
  • At that very time Prince Andrew was sitting with Pierre and telling him of his love for Natasha and his firm resolve to make her his wife.
  • That day Countess Helene had a reception at her house.
  • He tried equally to avoid thinking about his wife, and about Natasha and Prince Andrew; and again everything seemed to him insignificant in comparison with eternity; again the question: for what? presented itself; and he forced himself to work day and night at masonic labors, hoping to drive away the evil spirit that threatened him.
  • He pointed to his manuscript book with that air of escaping from the ills of life with which unhappy people look at their work.
  • Pierre was the only person to whom he made up his mind to speak openly; and to him he told all that was in his soul.
  • "I should not have believed anyone who told me that I was capable of such love," said Prince Andrew.
  • It is not at all the same feeling that I knew in the past.
  • Mind, the last... concluded the prince, in a tone which showed that nothing would make him alter his decision.
  • Pierre did not come either and Natasha, not knowing that Prince Andrew had gone to see his father, could not explain his absence to herself.
  • It seemed to her that everybody knew about her disappointment and was laughing at her and pitying her.
  • When she had finished her first exercise she stood still in the middle of the room and sang a musical phrase that particularly pleased her.
  • "How charming that Natasha is!" she said again, speaking as some third, collective, male person.
  • Again he glanced at her, and that glance convinced her that she was not mistaken.
  • Yes, at once, that very instant, her fate would be decided.
  • She wished to love him as a son, but felt that to her he was a stranger and a terrifying man.
  • My father, to whom I have told my plans, has made it an express condition of his consent that the wedding is not to take place for a year.
  • And I wished to tell you of that, said Prince Andrew.
  • It is true that Natasha is still young, but--so long as that?...
  • Sonya said that Natasha was in her bedroom.
  • "Is it possible that this stranger has now become everything to me?" she asked herself, and immediately answered, "Yes, everything!
  • "Did your mother tell you that it cannot be for a year?" asked Prince Andrew, still looking into her eyes.
  • "You know that from the very day you first came to Otradnoe I have loved you," she cried, quite convinced that she spoke the truth.
  • Natasha repeated suddenly, only now realizing that the marriage was to be postponed for a year.
  • Prince Andrew did not reply, but his face expressed the impossibility of altering that decision.
  • From that day Prince Andrew began to frequent the Rostovs' as Natasha's affianced lover.
  • If after six months she felt that she did not love him she would have full right to reject him.
  • At first the family felt some constraint in intercourse with Prince Andrew; he seemed a man from another world, and for a long time Natasha trained the family to get used to him, proudly assuring them all that he only appeared to be different, but was really just like all of them, and that she was not afraid of him and no one else ought to be.
  • In the house that poetic dullness and quiet reigned which always accompanies the presence of a betrothed couple.
  • Prince Andrew blushed, as he often did now--Natasha particularly liked it in him--and said that his son would not live with them.
  • When Prince Andrew spoke (he could tell a story very well), Natasha listened to him with pride; when she spoke she noticed with fear and joy that he gazed attentively and scrutinizingly at her.
  • Flushed and agitated she went about the house all that day, dry-eyed, occupied with most trivial matters as if not understanding what awaited her.
  • During that year after his son's departure, Prince Nicholas Bolkonski's health and temper became much worse.
  • The princess never thought of that proud word "justice."
  • She had to endure and love, and that she did.
  • She felt that something had happened to him, but he said nothing to her about his love.
  • Before he left he had a long talk with his father about something, and Princess Mary noticed that before his departure they were dissatisfied with one another.
  • Soon after Prince Andrew had gone, Princess Mary wrote to her friend Julie Karagina in Petersburg, whom she had dreamed (as all girls dream) of marrying to her brother, and who was at that time in mourning for her own brother, killed in Turkey.
  • Your loss is so terrible that I can only explain it to myself as a special providence of God who, loving you, wishes to try you and your excellent mother.
  • The first death I saw, and one I shall never forget--that of my dear sister-in-law--left that impression on me.
  • Five years have passed since then, and already I, with my petty understanding, begin to see clearly why she had to die, and in what way that death was but an expression of the infinite goodness of the Creator, whose every action, though generally incomprehensible to us, is but a manifestation of His infinite love for His creatures.
  • But not to speak of her alone, that early and terrible death has had the most beneficent influence on me and on my brother in spite of all our grief.
  • You will be surprised to hear that the reason for this is Buonaparte!
  • He cannot endure the notion that Buonaparte is negotiating on equal terms with all the sovereigns of Europe and particularly with our own, the grandson of the Great Catherine!
  • He has again become as I used to know him when a child: kind, affectionate, with that heart of gold to which I know no equal.
  • He has realized, it seems to me, that life is not over for him.
  • You write that in Petersburg he is spoken of as one of the most active, cultivated, and capable of the young men.
  • I do not think my brother will ever marry again, and certainly not her; and this is why: first, I know that though he rarely speaks about the wife he has lost, the grief of that loss has gone too deep in his heart for him ever to decide to give her a successor and our little angel a stepmother.
  • Secondly because, as far as I know, that girl is not the kind of girl who could please Prince Andrew.
  • He wrote that he had never loved as he did now and that only now did he understand and know what life was.
  • My father then insisted on a delay of a year and now already six months, half of that period, have passed, and my resolution is firmer than ever.
  • Write and tell him that he may marry tomorrow if he likes.
  • And latterly, to her surprise and bewilderment, Princess Mary noticed that her father was really associating more and more with the Frenchwoman.
  • Prince Andrew had loved his wife, she died, but that was not enough: he wanted to bind his happiness to another woman.
  • "How is it that no one realizes this?" thought Princess Mary.
  • Once, when in a room with a lamp dimly lit before the icon Theodosia was talking of her life, the thought that Theodosia alone had found the true path of life suddenly came to Princess Mary with such force that she resolved to become a pilgrim herself.
  • When Theodosia had gone to sleep Princess Mary thought about this for a long time, and at last made up her mind that, strange as it might seem, she must go on a pilgrimage.
  • Often, listening to the pilgrims' tales, she was so stimulated by their simple speech, mechanical to them but to her so full of deep meaning, that several times she was on the point of abandoning everything and running away from home.
  • She wept quietly, and felt that she was a sinner who loved her father and little nephew more than God.
  • The Bible legend tells us that the absence of labor--idleness--was a condition of the first man's blessedness before the Fall.
  • Fallen man has retained a love of idleness, but the curse weighs on the race not only because we have to seek our bread in the sweat of our brows, but because our moral nature is such that we cannot be both idle and at ease.
  • He felt that sooner or later he would have to re-enter that whirlpool of life, with its embarrassments and affairs to be straightened out, its accounts with stewards, quarrels, and intrigues, its ties, society, and with Sonya's love and his promise to her.
  • In 1810 he received letters from his parents, in which they told him of Natasha's engagement to Bolkonski, and that the wedding would be in a year's time because the old prince made difficulties.
  • But in the spring of that year, he received a letter from his mother, written without his father's knowledge, and that letter persuaded him to return.
  • She wrote that if he did not come and take matters in hand, their whole property would be sold by auction and they would all have to go begging.
  • The count was so weak, and trusted Mitenka so much, and was so good-natured, that everybody took advantage of him and things were going from bad to worse.
  • He had that common sense of a matter-of- fact man which showed him what he ought to do.
  • Sonya was nearly twenty; she had stopped growing prettier and promised nothing more than she was already, but that was enough.
  • Petya was a big handsome boy of thirteen, merry, witty, and mischievous, with a voice that was already breaking.
  • I know that no better man than he exists, and I am calm and contented now.
  • It always seemed to him that there was something not quite right about this intended marriage.
  • Once, when he had touched on this topic with his mother, he discovered, to his surprise and somewhat to his satisfaction, that in the depth of her soul she too had doubts about this marriage.
  • "You see he writes," said she, showing her son a letter of Prince Andrew's, with that latent grudge a mother always has in regard to a daughter's future married happiness, "he writes that he won't come before December.
  • However, God grant that everything turns out well!
  • The countess, who heard at once from the maids what had happened at the lodge, was calmed by the thought that now their affairs would certainly improve, but on the other hand felt anxious as to the effect this excitement might have on her son.
  • "I knew," thought Nicholas, "that I should never understand anything in this crazy world."
  • You were angry that he had not entered those 700 rubles.
  • But once the countess called her son and informed him that she had a promissory note from Anna Mikhaylovna for two thousand rubles, and asked him what he thought of doing with it.
  • All that day the hounds remained at home.
  • The only motion in the air was that of the dripping, microscopic particles of drizzling mist.
  • (This meant that the she-wolf, about whom they both knew, had moved with her cubs to the Otradnoe copse, a small place a mile and a half from the house.)
  • Daniel himself felt this, and as usual stood just inside the door, trying to speak softly and not move, for fear of breaking something in the master's apartment, and he hastened to say all that was necessary so as to get from under that ceiling, out into the open under the sky once more.
  • Having finished his inquiries and extorted from Daniel an opinion that the hounds were fit (Daniel himself wished to go hunting), Nicholas ordered the horses to be saddled.
  • Sonya said you wouldn't go, but I knew that today is the sort of day when you couldn't help going.
  • Nicholas, with a stern and serious air which showed that now was no time for attending to trifles, went past Natasha and Petya who were trying to tell him something.
  • Besides the family, there were eight borzoi kennelmen and more than forty borzois, so that, with the borzois on the leash belonging to members of the family, there were about a hundred and thirty dogs and twenty horsemen.
  • "In the first place, Trunila is not a 'dog,' but a harrier," thought Nicholas, and looked sternly at his sister, trying to make her feel the distance that ought to separate them at that moment.
  • A third person rode up circumspectly through the wood (it was plain that he had had a lesson) and stopped behind the count.
  • He understands the matter so well that Daniel and I are often quite astounded, said Simon, well knowing what would please his master.
  • After the cry of the hounds came the deep tones of the wolf call from Daniel's hunting horn; the pack joined the first three hounds and they could be heard in full cry, with that peculiar lift in the note that indicates that they are after a wolf.
  • After listening a few moments in silence, the count and his attendant convinced themselves that the hounds had separated into two packs: the sound of the larger pack, eagerly giving tongue, began to die away in the distance, the other pack rushed by the wood past the count, and it was with this that Daniel's voice was heard calling ulyulyu.
  • "Back!" cried Simon to a borzoi that was pushing forward out of the wood.
  • "Look out!" he shouted, in a voice plainly showing that he had long fretted to utter that word, and letting the borzois slip he galloped toward the count.
  • He knew that young and old wolves were there, that the hounds had separated into two packs, that somewhere a wolf was being chased, and that something had gone wrong.
  • Several times he addressed a prayer to God that the wolf should come his way.
  • He prayed with that passionate and shamefaced feeling with which men pray at moments of great excitement arising from trivial causes.
  • A thousand times during that half-hour Rostov cast eager and restless glances over the edge of the wood, with the two scraggy oaks rising above the aspen undergrowth and the gully with its water-worn side and "Uncle's" cap just visible above the bush on his right.
  • "Only once in my life to get an old wolf, I want only that!" thought he, straining eyes and ears and looking to the left and then to the right and listening to the slightest variation of note in the cries of the dogs.
  • The height of happiness was reached--and so simply, without warning, or noise, or display, that Rostov could not believe his eyes and remained in doubt for over a second.
  • The wolf ran forward and jumped heavily over a gully that lay in her path.
  • She ran without hurry, evidently feeling sure that no one saw her.
  • Nicholas did not hear his own cry nor feel that he was galloping, nor see the borzois, nor the ground over which he went: he saw only the wolf, who, increasing her speed, bounded on in the same direction along the hollow.
  • But the quickness of the wolf's lope and the borzoi's slower pace made it plain that Karay had miscalculated.
  • But here Nicholas only saw that something happened to Karay--the borzoi was suddenly on the wolf, and they rolled together down into a gully just in front of them.
  • That instant, when Nicholas saw the wolf struggling in the gully with the dogs, while from under them could be seen her gray hair and outstretched hind leg and her frightened choking head, with her ears laid back (Karay was pinning her by the throat), was the happiest moment of his life.
  • With his hand on his saddlebow, he was ready to dismount and stab the wolf, when she suddenly thrust her head up from among that mass of dogs, and then her forepaws were on the edge of the gully.
  • Nicholas and his attendant, with "Uncle" and his huntsman, were all riding round the wolf, crying "ulyulyu!" shouting and preparing to dismount each moment that the wolf crouched back, and starting forward again every time she shook herself and moved toward the wood where she would be safe.
  • But when he saw that the horsemen did not dismount and that the wolf shook herself and ran for safety, Daniel set his chestnut galloping, not at the wolf but straight toward the wood, just as Karay had run to cut the animal off.
  • It was evident to the dogs, the hunters, and to the wolf herself that all was now over.
  • Where's that huntsman from?
  • Then from that spot came the sound of a horn, with the signal agreed on in case of a fight.
  • And it was my gray bitch that caught it!
  • Natasha, afraid that her brother would do something dreadful, had followed him in some excitement.
  • "A fine little bitch, that!" said he in a careless tone.
  • "That black-spotted one of yours is fine--well shaped!" said he.
  • (This call and the uplifted whip meant that he saw a sitting hare.)
  • The huntsman stood halfway up the knoll holding up his whip and the gentlefolk rode up to him at a footpace; the hounds that were far off on the horizon turned away from the hare, and the whips, but not the gentlefolk, also moved away.
  • The pack on leash rushed downhill in full cry after the hare, and from all sides the borzois that were not on leash darted after the hounds and the hare.
  • When he jumped up he did not run at once, but pricked his ears listening to the shouting and trampling that resounded from all sides at once.
  • "But what is there in running across it like that?" said Ilagin's groom.
  • At the same moment Natasha, without drawing breath, screamed joyously, ecstatically, and so piercingly that it set everyone's ear tingling.
  • "Uncle" himself twisted up the hare, threw it neatly and smartly across his horse's back as if by that gesture he meant to rebuke everybody, and, with an air of not wishing to speak to anyone, mounted his bay and rode off.
  • When, much later, "Uncle" rode up to Nicholas and began talking to him, he felt flattered that, after what had happened, "Uncle" deigned to speak to him.
  • Toward evening Ilagin took leave of Nicholas, who found that they were so far from home that he accepted "Uncle's" offer that the hunting party should spend the night in his little village of Mikhaylovna.
  • And if you put up at my house that will be better still.
  • "Uncle" dismounted at the porch of his little wooden house which stood in the midst of an overgrown garden and, after a glance at his retainers, shouted authoritatively that the superfluous ones should take themselves off and that all necessary preparations should be made to receive the guests and the visitors.
  • The house, with its bare, unplastered log walls, was not overclean--it did not seem that those living in it aimed at keeping it spotless--but neither was it noticeably neglected.
  • They looked at one another (now that the hunt was over and they were in the house, Nicholas no longer considered it necessary to show his manly superiority over his sister), Natasha gave him a wink, and neither refrained long from bursting into a peal of ringing laughter even before they had a pretext ready to account for it.
  • And Natasha felt that this costume, the very one she had regarded with surprise and amusement at Otradnoe, was just the right thing and not at all worse than a swallow-tail or frock coat.
  • "Uncle" too was in high spirits and far from being offended by the brother's and sister's laughter (it could never enter his head that they might be laughing at his way of life) he himself joined in the merriment.
  • Natasha felt so lighthearted and happy in these novel surroundings that she only feared the trap would come for her too soon.
  • After a casual pause, such as often occurs when receiving friends for the first time in one's own house, "Uncle," answering a thought that was in his visitors' minds, said:
  • Really very good! said Nicholas with some unintentional superciliousness, as if ashamed to confess that the sounds pleased him very much.
  • Just as "Uncle's" pickled mushrooms, honey, and cherry brandy had seemed to her the best in the world, so also that song, at that moment, seemed to her the acme of musical delight.
  • "He doesn't play that part right!" said "Uncle" suddenly, with an energetic gesture.
  • "Now then, niece!" he exclaimed, waving to Natasha the hand that had just struck a chord.
  • Where, how, and when had this young countess, educated by an emigree French governess, imbibed from the Russian air she breathed that spirit and obtained that manner which the pas de chale * would, one would have supposed, long ago have effaced?
  • But the spirit and the movements were those inimitable and unteachable Russian ones that "Uncle" had expected of her.
  • He accompanied them on foot as far as the bridge that could not be crossed, so that they had to go round by the ford, and he sent huntsmen to ride in front with lanterns.
  • "Good-bye, dear niece," his voice called out of the darkness--not the voice Natasha had known previously, but the one that had sung As 'twas growing dark last night.
  • They were fond of asking one another that question.
  • Well, you see, first I thought that Rugay, the red hound, was like Uncle, and that if he were a man he would always keep Uncle near him, if not for his riding, then for his manner.
  • Yes, first I thought that we are driving along and imagining that we are going home, but that heaven knows where we are really going in the darkness, and that we shall arrive and suddenly find that we are not in Otradnoe, but in Fairyland.
  • "Ah, there are still lights in the drawing-room!" she said, pointing to the windows of the house that gleamed invitingly in the moist velvety darkness of the night.
  • There was still the hunting establishment which Nicholas had enlarged.
  • The count moved in his affairs as in a huge net, trying not to believe that he was entangled but becoming more and more so at every step, and feeling too feeble to break the meshes or to set to work carefully and patiently to disentangle them.
  • She felt this to be their last hope and that if Nicholas refused the match she had found for him, she would have to abandon the hope of ever getting matters right.
  • Karagina had replied that for her part she was agreeable, and everything depend on her daughter's inclination.
  • Several times the countess, with tears in her eyes, told her son that now both her daughters were settled, her only wish was to see him married.
  • She said she could lie down in her grave peacefully if that were accomplished.
  • Then she told him that she knew of a splendid girl and tried to discover what he thought about marriage.
  • She told him that her only hope of getting their affairs disentangled now lay in his marrying Julie Karagina.
  • It is your happiness I wish for, she added, feeling that she was telling an untruth and was becoming entangled.
  • If I love Sonya, that feeling is for me stronger and higher than all else.
  • Natasha was still as much in love with her betrothed, found the same comfort in that love, and was still as ready to throw herself into all the pleasures of life as before; but at the end of the fourth month of their separation she began to have fits of depression which she could not master.
  • She felt sorry for herself: sorry that she was being wasted all this time and of no use to anyone-- while she felt herself so capable of loving and being loved.
  • Her brother Petya was upstairs too; with the man in attendance on him he was preparing fireworks to let off that night.
  • Natasha glanced at her and at the crack in the pantry door, and it seemed to her that she remembered the light falling through that crack once before and Sonya passing with a glass in her hand.
  • I have felt like that when everything was all right and everyone was cheerful.
  • The thought has come into my mind that I was already tired of it all, and that we must all die.
  • When I was quite little that used to be so with me.
  • And I was innocent--that was the chief thing, said Natasha.
  • I remember that I came to you afterwards and wanted to comfort you, but do you know, I felt ashamed to.
  • Was that real or not?
  • In the middle of their talk in the sitting room, Dimmler came in and went up to the harp that stood there in a corner.
  • "Do you know," said Natasha in a whisper, moving closer to Nicholas and Sonya, "that when one goes on and on recalling memories, one at last begins to remember what happened before one was in the world..."
  • "That is metempsychosis," said Sonya, who had always learned well, and remembered everything.
  • The Egyptians believed that our souls have lived in animals, and will go back into animals again.
  • No, that can't be!
  • None of them, not even the middle-aged Dimmler, wanted to break off their conversation and quit that corner in the sitting room, but Natasha got up and Nicholas sat down at the clavichord.
  • She had said she did not want to sing, but it was long since she had sung, and long before she again sang, as she did that evening.
  • Her maternal instinct told her that Natasha had too much of something, and that because of this she would not be happy.
  • Before Natasha had finished singing, fourteen-year-old Petya rushed in delightedly, to say that some mummers had arrived.
  • "Idiot!" she screamed at her brother and, running to a chair, threw herself on it, sobbing so violently that she could not stop for a long time.
  • It was decided that the count must not go, but that if Louisa Ivanovna (Madame Schoss) would go with them, the young ladies might go to the Melyukovs', Sonya, generally so timid and shy, more urgently than anyone begging Louisa Ivanovna not to refuse.
  • It was so light that he could see the moonlight reflected from the metal harness disks and from the eyes of the horses, who looked round in alarm at the noisy party under the shadow of the porch roof.
  • "That used to be Sonya," thought he, and looked at her closer and smiled.
  • From that sleigh one could hear the shouts, laughter, and voices of the mummers.
  • It was only by the keener wind that met them and the jerks given by the side horses who pulled harder--ever increasing their gallop--that one noticed how fast the troyka was flying.
  • With screams squeals, and waving of whips that caused even the shaft horses to gallop--the other sleighs followed.
  • "Zakhar is shouting that I should turn to the left, but why to the left?" thought Nicholas.
  • "I think this used to be Natasha," thought Nicholas, "and that was Madame Schoss, but perhaps it's not, and this Circassian with the mustache I don't know, but I love her."
  • And if this is really Melyukovka, it is still stranger that we drove heaven knows where and have come to Melyukovka, thought Nicholas.
  • Sometimes, as she looked at the strange but amusing capers cut by the dancers, who--having decided once for all that being disguised, no one would recognize them--were not at all shy, Pelageya Danilovna hid her face in her handkerchief, and her whole stout body shook with irrepressible, kindly, elderly laughter.
  • It depends on what you hear; hammering and knocking--that's bad; but a sound of shifting grain is good and one sometimes hears that, too.
  • It seemed to him that it was only today, thanks to that burnt-cork mustache, that he had fully learned to know her.
  • And really, that evening, Sonya was brighter, more animated, and prettier than Nicholas had ever seen her before.
  • "What a darling that girl is!" thought he.
  • The light was so strong and the snow sparkled with so many stars that one did not wish to look up at the sky and the real stars were unnoticed.
  • He knew Sonya would pass that way.
  • The log walls of the barn and its snow-covered roof, that looked as if hewn out of some precious stone, sparkled in the moonlight.
  • He slipped his arms under the cloak that covered her head, embraced her, pressed her to him, and kissed her on the lips that wore a mustache and had a smell of burnt cork.
  • When they all drove back from Pelageya Danilovna's, Natasha, who always saw and noticed everything, arranged that she and Madame Schoss should go back in the sleigh with Dimmler, and Sonya with Nicholas and the maids.
  • On the way back Nicholas drove at a steady pace instead of racing and kept peering by that fantastic all-transforming light into Sonya's face and searching beneath the eyebrows and mustache for his former and his present Sonya from whom he had resolved never to be parted again.
  • Oh, how strange you are with that mustache and those eyebrows!...
  • Only when will all that be?
  • She sat a long time looking at the receding line of candles reflected in the glasses and expecting (from tales she had heard) to see a coffin, or him, Prince Andrew, in that last dim, indistinctly outlined square.
  • After that, I could not make out what there was; something blue and red...
  • Nicholas, for the first time, felt that his mother was displeased with him and that, despite her love for him, she would not give way.
  • Nicholas replied that he could not go back on his word, and his father, sighing and evidently disconcerted, very soon became silent and went in to the countess.
  • She could not help loving the countess and the whole Rostov family, but neither could she help loving Nicholas and knowing that his happiness depended on that love.
  • He first implored her to forgive him and Sonya and consent to their marriage, then he threatened that if she molested Sonya he would at once marry her secretly.
  • The countess, with a coldness her son had never seen in her before, replied that he was of age, that Prince Andrew was marrying without his father's consent, and he could do the same, but that she would never receive that intriguer as her daughter.
  • Exploding at the word intriguer, Nicholas, raising his voice, told his mother he had never expected her to try to force him to sell his feelings, but if that were so, he would say for the last time....
  • Natasha set to work to effect a reconciliation, and so far succeeded that Nicholas received a promise from his mother that Sonya should not be troubled, while he on his side promised not to undertake anything without his parents' knowledge.
  • The thought that her best days, which she would have employed in loving him, were being vainly wasted, with no advantage to anyone, tormented her incessantly.
  • It hurt her to think that while she lived only in the thought of him, he was living a real life, seeing new places and new people that interested him.
  • He ceased keeping a diary, avoided the company of the Brothers, began going to the club again, drank a great deal, and came once more in touch with the bachelor sets, leading such a life that the Countess Helene thought it necessary to speak severely to him about it.
  • Pierre felt that she was right, and to avoid compromising her went away to Moscow.
  • But instead of all that--here he was, the wealthy husband of an unfaithful wife, a retired gentleman-in-waiting, fond of eating and drinking and, as he unbuttoned his waistcoat, of abusing the government a bit, a member of the Moscow English Club, and a universal favorite in Moscow society.
  • For a long time he could not reconcile himself to the idea that he was one of those same retired Moscow gentlemen-in-waiting he had so despised seven years before.
  • Sometimes he consoled himself with the thought that he was only living this life temporarily; but then he was shocked by the thought of how many, like himself, had entered that life and that club temporarily, with all their teeth and hair, and had only left it when not a single tooth or hair remained.
  • Pierre no longer suffered moments of despair, hypochondria, and disgust with life, but the malady that had formerly found expression in such acute attacks was driven inwards and never left him for a moment.
  • The Spaniards, through the Catholic clergy, offer praise to God for their victory over the French on the fourteenth of June, and the French, also through the Catholic clergy, offer praise because on that same fourteenth of June they defeated the Spaniards.
  • We all profess the Christian law of forgiveness of injuries and love of our neighbors, the law in honor of which we have built in Moscow forty times forty churches--but yesterday a deserter was knouted to death and a minister of that same law of love and forgiveness, a priest, gave the soldier a cross to kiss before his execution.
  • I have tried, and have always found that they too in the depths of their souls understand it as I do, and only try not to see it.
  • So it appears that it must be so!
  • He read, and read everything that came to hand.
  • Though the doctors warned him that with his corpulence wine was dangerous for him, he drank a great deal.
  • Only after emptying a bottle or two did he feel dimly that the terribly tangled skein of life which previously had terrified him was not as dreadful as he had thought.
  • Sometimes he remembered how he had heard that soldiers in war when entrenched under the enemy's fire, if they have nothing to do, try hard to find some occupation the more easily to bear the danger.
  • Only not to see it, that dreadful it!
  • The prince had aged very much that year.
  • Latterly that private life had become very trying for Princess Mary.
  • She did not go out into society; everyone knew that her father would not let her go anywhere without him, and his failing health prevented his going out himself, so that she was not invited to dinners and evening parties.
  • Next day the prince did not say a word to his daughter, but she noticed that at dinner he gave orders that Mademoiselle Bourienne should be served first.
  • It happened that on that morning of his name day the prince was in one of his worst moods.
  • After admitting the doctor, Princess Mary sat down with a book in the drawing room near the door through which she could hear all that passed in the study.
  • Then why was that scoundrel admitted?
  • Understand that, understand it!
  • Boris had realized this the week before when the commander-in-chief in his presence invited Rostopchin to dinner on St. Nicholas' Day, and Rostopchin had replied that he could not come:
  • On that day I always go to pay my devotions to the relics of Prince Nicholas Bolkonski.
  • The small group that assembled before dinner in the lofty old-fashioned drawing room with its old furniture resembled the solemn gathering of a court of justice.
  • The guests were reluctant to address her, feeling that she was in no mood for their conversation.
  • Prince Bolkonski listened as a presiding judge receives a report, only now and then, silently or by a brief word, showing that he took heed of what was being reported to him.
  • The tone of the conversation was such as indicated that no one approved of what was being done in the political world.
  • Incidents were related evidently confirming the opinion that everything was going from bad to worse, but whether telling a story or giving an opinion the speaker always stopped, or was stopped, at the point beyond which his criticism might touch the sovereign himself.
  • Count Rostopchin paused, feeling that he had reached the limit beyond which censure was impossible.
  • "His Majesty drew attention to the Grenadier division and to the march past," continued the general, "and it seems the ambassador took no notice and allowed himself to reply that: 'We in France pay no attention to such trifles!'
  • He was here; they admitted him in spite of my request that they should let no one in, he went on, glancing angrily at his daughter.
  • And he narrated his whole conversation with the French doctor and the reasons that convinced him that Metivier was a spy.
  • The whole expression of his face told her that he had not forgotten the morning's talk, that his decision remained in force, and only the presence of visitors hindered his speaking of it to her now.
  • "Have you known that young man long, Princess?" he asked.
  • Why do you ask me that? said Princess Mary, still thinking of that morning's conversation with her father.
  • Because I have noticed that when a young man comes on leave from Petersburg to Moscow it is usually with the object of marrying an heiress.
  • "You have observed that?" said Princess Mary.
  • "Ah, how bitter it is to love someone near to you and to feel that..." she went on in a trembling voice, "that you can do nothing for him but grieve him, and to know that you cannot alter this.
  • That is all one can say about her.
  • Oh no, she is simply enchanting, and that is all.
  • That winter the Karagins' house was the most agreeable and hospitable in Moscow.
  • Though nothing of the kind had happened to her she was regarded in that light, and had even herself come to believe that she had suffered much in life.
  • Boris read 'Poor Liza' aloud to her, and more than once interrupted the reading because of the emotions that choked him.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna regarded the refined sadness that united her son to the wealthy Julie with emotion, and resignation to the Divine will.
  • He spent every day and whole days at the Karagins', and every day on thinking the matter over told himself that he would propose tomorrow.
  • "My dear," said Anna Mikhaylovna to her son, "I know from a reliable source that Prince Vasili has sent his son to Moscow to get him married to Julie.
  • I am so fond of Julie that I should be sorry for her.
  • Julie was offended and replied that it was true that a woman needs variety, and the same thing over and over again would weary anyone.
  • Boris began, wishing to sting her; but at that instant the galling thought occurred to him that he might have to leave Moscow without having accomplished his aim, and have vainly wasted his efforts--which was a thing he never allowed to happen.
  • He glanced at her to make sure that he might go on.
  • There was no need to say more: Julie's face shone with triumph and self- satisfaction; but she forced Boris to say all that is said on such occasions--that he loved her and had never loved any other woman more than her.
  • She knew that for the Penza estates and Nizhegorod forests she could demand this, and she received what she demanded.
  • But we'll speak of that later on, she added, glancing at Sonya with a look that showed she did not want to speak of it in her presence.
  • Next morning Marya Dmitrievna took the young ladies to the Iberian shrine of the Mother of God and to Madame Suppert-Roguet, who was so afraid of Marya Dmitrievna that she always let her have costumes at a loss merely to get rid of her.
  • You know that old Prince Nicholas much dislikes his son's marrying.
  • Natasha remained silent, from shyness Marya Dmitrievna supposed, but really because she disliked anyone interfering in what touched her love of Prince Andrew, which seemed to her so apart from all human affairs that no one could understand it.
  • Won't that be best?
  • At last an old, cross looking footman came and announced to the Rostovs that the prince was not receiving, but that the princess begged them to walk up.
  • The princess told the count that she would be delighted, and only begged him to stay longer at Anna Semenovna's, and he departed.
  • God is my witness, I didn't know-" he repeated, stressing the word "God" so unnaturally and so unpleasantly that Princess Mary stood with downcast eyes not daring to look either at her father or at Natasha.
  • When the count returned, Natasha was impolitely pleased and hastened to get away: at that moment she hated the stiff, elderly princess, who could place her in such an embarrassing position and had spent half an hour with her without once mentioning Prince Andrew.
  • "I couldn't begin talking about him in the presence of that Frenchwoman," thought Natasha.
  • She paused, feeling that she was not telling the truth.
  • "I think, Princess, it is not convenient to speak of that now," she said with external dignity and coldness, though she felt the tears choking her.
  • They waited a long time for Natasha to come to dinner that day.
  • That evening the Rostovs went to the Opera, for which Marya Dmitrievna had taken a box.
  • Natasha's looks, as everyone told her, had improved in the country, and that evening thanks to her agitation she was particularly pretty.
  • One can see at once that they're engaged....
  • Their box was pervaded by that atmosphere of an affianced couple which Natasha knew so well and liked so much.
  • It's 'Dolokhov the Persian' that does it!
  • Natasha involuntarily gazed at that neck, those shoulders, and pearls and coiffure, and admired the beauty of the shoulders and the pearls.
  • She could not follow the opera nor even listen to the music; she saw only the painted cardboard and the queerly dressed men and women who moved, spoke, and sang so strangely in that brilliant light.
  • She knew what it was all meant to represent, but it was so pretentiously false and unnatural that she first felt ashamed for the actors and then amused at them.
  • And feeling the bright light that flooded the whole place and the warm air heated by the crowd, Natasha little by little began to pass into a state of intoxication she had not experienced for a long while.
  • Then he took his place in the first row of the stalls and sat down beside Dolokhov, nudging with his elbow in a friendly and offhand way that Dolokhov whom others treated so fawningly.
  • During the whole of that entr'acte Kuragin stood with Dolokhov in front of the orchestra partition, looking at the Rostovs' box.
  • She even turned so that he should see her profile in what she thought was its most becoming aspect.
  • Almost smiling, he gazed straight into her eyes with such an enraptured caressing look that it seemed strange to be so near him, to look at him like that, to be so sure he admired her, and not to be acquainted with him.
  • She was so pleased by praise from this brilliant beauty that she blushed with pleasure.
  • To get better acquainted she asked that one of the young ladies should come into her box for the rest of the performance, and Natasha moved over to it.
  • Natasha knew for certain that he was enraptured by her.
  • When she was not looking at him she felt that he was looking at her shoulders, and she involuntarily caught his eye so that he should look into hers rather than this.
  • But looking into his eyes she was frightened, realizing that there was not that barrier of modesty she had always felt between herself and other men.
  • She did not know how it was that within five minutes she had come to feel herself terribly near to this man.
  • She felt all the time that by talking to him she was doing something improper.
  • Natasha did not understand what he was saying any more than he did himself, but she felt that his incomprehensible words had an improper intention.
  • But as soon as she had turned away she felt that he was there, behind, so close behind her.
  • And again she felt with horror that no barrier lay between him and her.
  • All that was going on before her now seemed quite natural, but on the other hand all her previous thoughts of her betrothed, of Princess Mary, or of life in the country did not once recur to her mind and were as if belonging to a remote past.
  • That was the only part of the fourth act that Natasha saw.
  • That was the only part of the fourth act that Natasha saw.
  • What was that terror I felt of him?
  • So it is plain that nothing has happened and there is nothing to repent of, and Andrew can love me still.
  • His father announced to him that he would now pay half his debts for the last time, but only on condition that he went to Moscow as adjutant to the commander-in-chief--a post his father had procured for him--and would at last try to make a good match there.
  • As Shinshin had remarked, from the time of his arrival Anatole had turned the heads of the Moscow ladies, especially by the fact that he slighted them and plainly preferred the gypsy girls and French actresses--with the chief of whom, Mademoiselle George, he was said to be on intimate relations.
  • At that time while with his regiment in Poland, a Polish landowner of small means had forced him to marry his daughter.
  • He was instinctively and thoroughly convinced that it was impossible for him to live otherwise than as he did and that he had never in his life done anything base.
  • He was convinced that, as a duck is so made that it must live in water, so God had made him such that he must spend thirty thousand rubles a year and always occupy a prominent position in society.
  • He believed this so firmly that others, looking at him, were persuaded of it too and did not refuse him either a leading place in society or money, which he borrowed from anyone and everyone and evidently would not repay.
  • Dolokhov, who had reappeared that year in Moscow after his exile and his Persian adventures, and was leading a life of luxury, gambling, and dissipation, associated with his old Petersburg comrade Kuragin and made use of him for his own ends.
  • Well, that can't happen twice!
  • She was expecting Prince Andrew any moment and twice that day sent a manservant to the Vozdvizhenka to ascertain whether he had come.
  • She continually fancied that either he would never come or that something would happen to her before he came.
  • But in nothing in the house was the holiday so noticeable as in Marya Dmitrievna's broad, stern face, which on that day wore an invariable look of solemn festivity.
  • Anatole had asked her to bring him and Natasha together, and she was calling on the Rostovs for that purpose.
  • If you love somebody, my charmer, that is not a reason to shut yourself up.
  • So she knows I am engaged, and she and her husband Pierre--that good Pierre--have talked and laughed about this.
  • In answer to the count's inquiries she replied that things were all right and that she would tell about it next day.
  • On hearing of Countess Bezukhova's visit and the invitation for that evening, Marya Dmitrievna remarked:
  • Count Rostov was displeased to see that the company consisted almost entirely of men and women known for the freedom of their conduct.
  • Anatole asked Natasha for a valse and as they danced he pressed her waist and hand and told her she was bewitching and that he loved her.
  • Is it my fault that you are enchanting?...
  • She understood hardly anything that went on that evening.
  • Later on she recalled how she had asked her father to let her go to the dressing room to rearrange her dress, that Helene had followed her and spoken laughingly of her brother's love, and that she again met Anatole in the little sitting room.
  • I cannot come to visit you but is it possible that I shall never see you?
  • His large, glittering, masculine eyes were so close to hers that she saw nothing but them.
  • She so wanted a word from him that would explain to her what had happened and to which she could find no answer.
  • But she also loved Anatole, of that there was no doubt.
  • It means that he is kind, noble, and splendid, and I could not help loving him.
  • That is perfectly true.
  • She's afraid you might think that she does not like you.
  • "Don't answer like that, my good girl!" she said.
  • Princess Mary wrote that she was in despair at the misunderstanding that had occurred between them.
  • Whatever her father's feelings might be, she begged Natasha to believe that she could not help loving her as the one chosen by her brother, for whose happiness she was ready to sacrifice everything.
  • "Do not think, however," she wrote, "that my father is ill-disposed toward you.
  • What more could she write after all that had happened the evening before?
  • All that has happened, and now all is changed, she thought as she sat with the letter she had begun before her.
  • "Can it be that it is all over?" she thought.
  • Can it be that all this has happened so quickly and has destroyed all that went before?
  • She recalled her love for Prince Andrew in all its former strength, and at the same time felt that she loved Kuragin.
  • "Why could that not be as well?" she sometimes asked herself in complete bewilderment.
  • But with that one nothing is spoiled.
  • Yes, she loved him, or else how could that have happened which had happened?
  • With trembling hands Natasha held that passionate love letter which Dolokhov had composed for Anatole, and as she read it she found in it an echo of all that she herself imagined she was feeling.
  • Then he went on to say that he knew her parents would not give her to him--for this there were secret reasons he could reveal only to her--but that if she loved him she need only say the word yes, and no human power could hinder their bliss.
  • That evening Marya Dmitrievna was going to the Akharovs' and proposed to take the girls with her.
  • But it can't be that she loves him!
  • And with the decision and tenderness that often come at the moment of awakening, she embraced her friend, but noticing Sonya's look of embarrassment, her own face expressed confusion and suspicion.
  • "Sonya, you've read that letter?" she demanded.
  • But, Natasha, can that be all over?
  • It seems to me that I have never loved anyone before.
  • I had heard that it happens like this, and you must have heard it too, but it's only now that I feel such love.
  • As soon as I saw him I felt he was my master and I his slave, and that I could not help loving him.
  • "I told you that I have no will," Natasha replied.
  • Don't you know that I love him? screamed Natasha.
  • At that moment this all seemed quite easy, simple, and clear to Natasha.
  • At that party Natasha again met Anatole, and Sonya noticed that she spoke to him, trying not to be overheard, and that all through dinner she was more agitated than ever.
  • The day before the count was to return, Sonya noticed that Natasha sat by the drawing-room window all the morning as if expecting something and that she made a sign to an officer who drove past, whom Sonya took to be Anatole.
  • Sonya began watching her friend still more attentively and noticed that at dinner and all that evening Natasha was in a strange and unnatural state.
  • Then suddenly it became clear to Sonya that Natasha had some dreadful plan for that evening.
  • "Well, anyway," thought Sonya as she stood in the dark passage, "now or never I must prove that I remember the family's goodness to me and that I love Nicholas.
  • Natasha had promised to come out to Kuragin at the back porch at ten that evening.
  • It will come out that you're already married.
  • But he liked them; liked that mad driving at twelve miles an hour, liked upsetting a driver or running down a pedestrian, and flying at full gallop through the Moscow streets.
  • Only a couple of times a year--when he knew from their valets that they had money in hand--he would turn up of a morning quite sober and with a deep bow would ask them to help him.
  • "That depends on our luck in starting, else why shouldn't we be there in time?" replied Balaga.
  • I think you remember that, your excellency?
  • "That time I'd harnessed two young side horses with the bay in the shafts," he went on, turning to Dolokhov.
  • I couldn't hold them in, my hands grew numb in the sharp frost so that I threw down the reins--'Catch hold yourself, your excellency!' says I, and I just tumbled on the bottom of the sleigh and sprawled there.
  • Hey, Matrena, the sable! he shouted so that his voice rang far through the rooms.
  • When Gabriel came to inform her that the men who had come had run away again, she rose frowning, and clasping her hands behind her paced through the rooms a long time considering what she should do.
  • "It's lucky for him that he escaped me; but I'll find him!" she said in her rough voice.
  • Lie still, stay like that then, I won't touch you.
  • You know that yourself.
  • He, your father, I know him... if he challenges him to a duel will that be all right?
  • Marya Dmitrievna went on admonishing her for some time, enjoining on her that it must all be kept from her father and assuring her that nobody would know anything about it if only Natasha herself would undertake to forget it all and not let anyone see that something had happened.
  • All that night she did not sleep or weep and did not speak to Sonya who got up and went to her several times.
  • Natasha had not left her room that morning.
  • She was evidently expecting news of him and that he would come or would write to her.
  • In reply to the count's anxious inquiries as to why she was so dejected and whether anything had happened to her betrothed, she assured him that nothing had happened and asked him not to worry.
  • Marya Dmitrievna confirmed Natasha's assurances that nothing had happened.
  • From the pretense of illness, from his daughter's distress, and by the embarrassed faces of Sonya and Marya Dmitrievna, the count saw clearly that something had gone wrong during his absence, but it was so terrible for him to think that anything disgraceful had happened to his beloved daughter, and he so prized his own cheerful tranquillity, that he avoided inquiries and tried to assure himself that nothing particularly had happened; and he was only dissatisfied that her indisposition delayed their return to the country.
  • In a sleigh drawn by two gray trotting-horses that were bespattering the dashboard with snow, Anatole and his constant companion Makarin dashed past.
  • In Marya Dmitrievna's anteroom the footman who helped him off with his fur coat said that the mistress asked him to come to her bedroom.
  • That Prince Andrew's deeply loved affianced wife--the same Natasha Rostova who used to be so charming--should give up Bolkonski for that fool Anatole who was already secretly married (as Pierre knew), and should be so in love with him as to agree to run away with him, was something Pierre could not conceive and could not imagine.
  • That Prince Andrew's deeply loved affianced wife--the same Natasha Rostova who used to be so charming--should give up Bolkonski for that fool Anatole who was already secretly married (as Pierre knew), and should be so in love with him as to agree to run away with him, was something Pierre could not conceive and could not imagine.
  • "They are all alike!" he said to himself, reflecting that he was not the only man unfortunate enough to be tied to a bad woman.
  • But still he pitied Prince Andrew to the point of tears and sympathized with his wounded pride, and the more he pitied his friend the more did he think with contempt and even with disgust of that Natasha who had just passed him in the ballroom with such a look of cold dignity.
  • He did not know that Natasha's soul was overflowing with despair, shame, and humiliation, and that it was not her fault that her face happened to assume an expression of calm dignity and severity.
  • That morning Natasha had told him that she had rejected Bolkonski.
  • That morning Natasha had told him that she had rejected Bolkonski.
  • Pierre saw that the count was much upset and tried to change the subject, but the count returned to his troubles.
  • Then it is not true that he's married!
  • She was evidently unable to speak and made a sign with her hands that they should leave her alone.
  • One man told him he had not come yet, and another that he was coming to dinner.
  • Anatole, for whom Pierre was looking, dined that day with Dolokhov, consulting him as to how to remedy this unfortunate affair.
  • When Pierre returned home after vainly hunting all over Moscow, his valet informed him that Prince Anatole was with the countess.
  • Pierre without greeting his wife whom he had not seen since his return-- at that moment she was more repulsive to him than ever--entered the drawing room and seeing Anatole went up to him.
  • You promised Countess Rostova to marry her and were about to elope with her, is that so?
  • "When I tell you that I must talk to you!..." repeated Pierre.
  • Pierre took the letter Anatole handed him and, pushing aside a table that stood in his way, threw himself on the sofa.
  • After all, you must understand that besides your pleasure there is such a thing as other people's happiness and peace, and that you are ruining a whole life for the sake of amusing yourself!
  • Don't you understand that it is as mean as beating an old man or a child?...
  • "I don't know about that, eh?" said Anatole, growing more confident as Pierre mastered his wrath.
  • "I don't know that and don't want to," he said, not looking at Pierre and with a slight tremor of his lower jaw, "but you have used such words to me--'mean' and so on--which as a man of honor I can't allow anyone to use."
  • The expression of that base and cringing smile, which Pierre knew so well in his wife, revolted him.
  • Pierre drove to Marya Dmitrievna's to tell her of the fulfillment of her wish that Kuragin should be banished from Moscow.
  • Pierre dined at the club that day and heard on all sides gossip about the attempted abduction of Rostova.
  • It seemed to Pierre that it was his duty to conceal the whole affair and re-establish Natasha's reputation.
  • She sighed, looking toward the door of the room where Prince Andrew was, evidently intending to express her sympathy with his sorrow, but Pierre saw by her face that she was glad both at what had happened and at the way her brother had taken the news of Natasha's faithlessness.
  • "But is it possible that all is really ended?" asked Pierre.
  • Pierre now recognized in his friend a need with which he was only too familiar, to get excited and to have arguments about extraneous matters in order to stifle thoughts that were too oppressive and too intimate.
  • Pierre saw that Prince Andrew was going to speak of Natasha, and his broad face expressed pity and sympathy.
  • I have received a refusal from Countess Rostova and have heard reports of your brother-in-law having sought her hand, or something of that kind.
  • Tell Countess Rostova that she was and is perfectly free and that I wish her all that is good.
  • I said that a fallen woman should be forgiven, but I didn't say I could forgive her.
  • If you wish to be my friend never speak to me of that... of all that!
  • That same evening Pierre went to the Rostovs' to fulfill the commission entrusted to him.
  • Till then he had reproached her in his heart and tried to despise her, but he now felt so sorry for her that there was no room in his soul for reproach.
  • No, that can never be.
  • Tell him only that I beg him to forgive, forgive, forgive me for everything....
  • Pierre did not know how to refer to Anatole and flushed at the thought of him--"did you love that bad man?"
  • Pierre too when she had gone almost ran into the anteroom, restraining tears of tenderness and joy that choked him, and without finding the sleeves of his fur cloak threw it on and got into his sleigh.
  • All men seemed so pitiful, so poor, in comparison with this feeling of tenderness and love he experienced: in comparison with that softened, grateful, last look she had given him through her tears.
  • In Pierre, however, that comet with its long luminous tail aroused no feeling of fear.
  • It seemed to Pierre that this comet fully responded to what was passing in his own softened and uplifted soul, now blossoming into a new life.
  • On the twelfth of June, 1812, the forces of Western Europe crossed the Russian frontier and war began, that is, an event took place opposed to human reason and to human nature.
  • We can understand that the matter seemed like that to contemporaries.
  • It naturally seemed to Napoleon that the war was caused by England's intrigues (as in fact he said on the island of St. Helena).
  • We are forced to fall back on fatalism as an explanation of irrational events (that is to say, events the reasonableness of which we do not understand).
  • History, that is, the unconscious, general, hive life of mankind, uses every moment of the life of kings as a tool for its own purposes.
  • And the botanist who finds that the apple falls because the cellular tissue decays and so forth is equally right with the child who stands under the tree and says the apple fell because he wanted to eat it and prayed for it.
  • On the twenty-ninth of May Napoleon left Dresden, where he had spent three weeks surrounded by a court that included princes, dukes, kings, and even an emperor.
  • Before leaving, Napoleon showed favor to the emperor, kings, and princes who had deserved it, reprimanded the kings and princes with whom he was dissatisfied, presented pearls and diamonds of his own--that is, which he had taken from other kings--to the Empress of Austria, and having, as his historian tells us, tenderly embraced the Empress Marie Louise--who regarded him as her husband, though he had left another wife in Paris--left her grieved by the parting which she seemed hardly able to bear.
  • Early in the morning of the twelfth of June he came out of his tent, which was pitched that day on the steep left bank of the Niemen, and looked through a spyglass at the streams of his troops pouring out of the Vilkavisski forest and flowing over the three bridges thrown across the river.
  • He mounted it and rode at a gallop to one of the bridges over the Niemen, deafened continually by incessant and rapturous acclamations which he evidently endured only because it was impossible to forbid the soldiers to express their love of him by such shouting, but the shouting which accompanied him everywhere disturbed him and distracted him from the military cares that had occupied him from the time he joined the army.
  • Napoleon looked up and down the river, dismounted, and sat down on a log that lay on the bank.
  • The aide-de-camp replied that probably the Emperor would not be displeased at this excess of zeal.
  • They tried to make their way forward to the opposite bank and, though there was a ford one third of a mile away, were proud that they were swimming and drowning in this river under the eyes of the man who sat on the log and was not even looking at what they were doing.
  • For him it was no new conviction that his presence in any part of the world, from Africa to the steppes of Muscovy alike, was enough to dumfound people and impel them to insane self-oblivion.
  • Nothing was ready for the war that everyone expected and to prepare for which the Emperor had come from Petersburg.
  • Each of the three armies had its own commander-in-chief, but there was no supreme commander of all the forces, and the Emperor did not assume that responsibility himself.
  • All the efforts of those who surrounded the sovereign seemed directed merely to making him spend his time pleasantly and forget that war was impending.
  • The very day that Napoleon issued the order to cross the Niemen, and his vanguard, driving off the Cossacks, crossed the Russian frontier, Alexander spent the evening at the entertainment given by his aides-de- camp at Bennigsen's country house.
  • As the mazurka began, Boris saw that Adjutant General Balashev, one of those in closest attendance on the Emperor, went up to him and contrary to court etiquette stood near him while he was talking to a Polish lady.
  • Having finished speaking to her, the Emperor looked inquiringly at Balashev and, evidently understanding that he only acted thus because there were important reasons for so doing, nodded slightly to the lady and turned to him.
  • In the figure in which he had to choose two ladies, he whispered to Helene that he meant to choose Countess Potocka who, he thought, had gone out onto the veranda, and glided over the parquet to the door opening into the garden, where, seeing Balashev and the Emperor returning to the veranda, he stood still.
  • It seemed to Boris that it gave the Emperor pleasure to utter these words.
  • He was satisfied with the form in which he had expressed his thoughts, but displeased that Boris had overheard it.
  • Boris understood that this was meant for him and, closing his eyes, slightly bowed his head.
  • Boris was thus the first to learn the news that the French army had crossed the Niemen and, thanks to this, was able to show certain important personages that much that was concealed from others was usually known to him, and by this means he rose higher in their estimation.
  • On first receiving the news, under the influence of indignation and resentment the Emperor had found a phrase that pleased him, fully expressed his feelings, and has since become famous.
  • Yesterday I learned that, despite the loyalty with which I have kept my engagements with Your Majesty, your troops have crossed the Russian frontier, and I have this moment received from Petersburg a note, in which Count Lauriston informs me, as a reason for this aggression, that Your Majesty has considered yourself to be in a state of war with me from the time Prince Kuragin asked for his passports.
  • The reasons on which the Duc de Bassano based his refusal to deliver them to him would never have led me to suppose that that could serve as a pretext for aggression.
  • In fact, the ambassador, as he himself has declared, was never authorized to make that demand, and as soon as I was informed of it I let him know how much I disapproved of it and ordered him to remain at his post.
  • In the contrary case, Your Majesty, I shall see myself forced to repel an attack that nothing on my part has provoked.
  • The colonel said that the commander of the division was a mile and a quarter away and would receive Balashev and conduct him to his destination.
  • In front of the group, on a black horse with trappings that glittered in the sun, rode a tall man with plumes in his hat and black hair curling down to his shoulders.
  • He referred to the fact that the Emperor Napoleon had resented the demand that he should withdraw his troops from Prussia, especially when that demand became generally known and the dignity of France was thereby offended.
  • Balashev replied that there was "nothing offensive in the demand, because..." but Murat interrupted him.
  • Balashev rode on, supposing from Murat's words that he would very soon be brought before Napoleon himself.
  • But instead of that, at the next village the sentinels of Davout's infantry corps detained him as the pickets of the vanguard had done, and an adjutant of the corps commander, who was fetched, conducted him into the village to Marshal Davout.
  • Davout allowed himself that pleasure when Balashev was brought in.
  • "You are perfectly at liberty to treat me with respect or not," protested Balashev, "but permit me to observe that I have the honor to be adjutant general to His Majesty...."
  • That day he dined with the marshal, at the same board on the barrels.
  • Duroc said that Napoleon would receive the Russian general before going for his ride.
  • He had just finished dressing for his ride, and wore a blue uniform, opening in front over a white waistcoat so long that it covered his rotund stomach, white leather breeches tightly fitting the fat thighs of his short legs, and Hessian boots.
  • His whole short corpulent figure with broad thick shoulders, and chest and stomach involuntarily protruding, had that imposing and stately appearance one sees in men of forty who live in comfort.
  • It was evident, too, that he was in the best of spirits that day.
  • It was plain that Balashev's personality did not interest him at all.
  • Judging by the calmly moderate and amicable tone in which the French Emperor spoke, Balashev was firmly persuaded that he wished for peace and intended to enter into negotiations.
  • He grew confused and said: "On condition that the French army retires beyond the Niemen."
  • During the speech that followed, Balashev, who more than once lowered his eyes, involuntarily noticed the quivering of Napoleon's left leg which increased the more Napoleon raised his voice.
  • Balashev noticed that his left leg was quivering faster than before and his face seemed petrified in its stern expression.
  • All that, he would have owed to my friendship.
  • And what role is your young monarch playing in that monstrous crowd?
  • They compromise him and throw on him the responsibility for all that happens.
  • You have not two hundred thousand men, and I have three times that number.
  • I give you my word of honor," said Napoleon, forgetting that his word of honor could carry no weight--"I give you my word of honor that I have five hundred and thirty thousand men this side of the Vistula.
  • To the alleged insanity of the Swedes, Balashev wished to reply that when Russia is on her side Sweden is practically an island: but Napoleon gave an angry exclamation to drown his voice.
  • Napoleon was in that state of irritability in which a man has to talk, talk, and talk, merely to convince himself that he is in the right.
  • Balashev began to feel uncomfortable: as envoy he feared to demean his dignity and felt the necessity of replying; but, as a man, he shrank before the transport of groundless wrath that had evidently seized Napoleon.
  • He knew that none of the words now uttered by Napoleon had any significance, and that Napoleon himself would be ashamed of them when he came to his senses.
  • "Know that if you stir up Prussia against me, I'll wipe it off the map of Europe!" he declared, his face pale and distorted by anger, and he struck one of his small hands energetically with the other.
  • Yes, I will throw you back beyond the Dvina and beyond the Dnieper, and will re- erect against you that barrier which it was criminal and blind of Europe to allow to be destroyed.
  • Yes, that is what will happen to you.
  • That is what you have gained by alienating me!
  • Balashev, feeling it incumbent on him to reply, said that from the Russian side things did not appear in so gloomy a light.
  • Balashev said that in Russia the best results were expected from the war.
  • Napoleon nodded condescendingly, as if to say, I know it's your duty to say that, but you don't believe it yourself.
  • But, to his surprise, Balashev received, through Duroc, an invitation to dine with the Emperor that day.
  • Bessieres, Caulaincourt, and Berthier were present at that dinner.
  • He not only showed no sign of constraint or self-reproach on account of his outburst that morning, but, on the contrary, tried to reassure Balashev.
  • In the course of conversation he mentioned Moscow and questioned Balashev about the Russian capital, not merely as an interested traveler asks about a new city he intends to visit, but as if convinced that Balashev, as a Russian, must be flattered by his curiosity.
  • Is it true that Moscow is called 'Holy Moscow'?
  • And receiving the reply that there were more than two hundred churches, he remarked:
  • "But n