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  • Perhaps I don't understand things, but Austria never has wished, and does not wish, for war.
  • "I'm not going to drop a pin," said Zeb.
  • Jonathan wants a little brother, not a little sister.
  • I am not saying we live in a utopia.
  • Two other baby birds were there, that had not fallen out.
  • For a moment the boy did not know what he meant by this question.
  • In the strict sense of the word I am not a Wizard, but only a humbug.
  • If you have nothing better to do, Count (or Prince), and if the prospect of spending an evening with a poor invalid is not too terrible, I shall be very charmed to see you tonight between 7 and 10--Annette Scherer.
  • "Heavens! what a virulent attack!" replied the prince, not in the least disconcerted by this reception.
  • Not now implied later, but that didn't feel comfortable either.
  • But I did not find out the secret for several years.
  • The speech was not hard to learn, and Edward soon knew every word of it.
  • But this was not true.
  • After reading my arguments, you may or may not believe the future I describe is inevitable, as I say it is.
  • By the midpoint of the twentieth century, America's dreamers were preoccupied with the future—and not just any old future, but the great and glorious future that seemed inevitable.
  • But nowhere in it was there even a hint that it might not be possible.
  • "Henry Longfellow," said the teacher, "why have you not written?"
  • Henry's composition was not in verse.
  • And while it may not be perfect, life will be profoundly better for everyone on the planet.
  • She smiled to herself - and not always because he rubbed her the wrong way.
  • He did not act as if it was bothering him.
  • The shed at Hugson's Siding was bare save for an old wooden bench, and did not look very inviting.
  • She could count his ribs easily where they showed through the skin of his body, and his head was long and seemed altogether too big for him, as if it did not fit.
  • Why, it's a great deal for Uncle Hugson, but not for me.
  • It had a bright blue cover, which he was careful not to soil.
  • So you must be careful not to spend these foolishly.
  • The great cathedral Notre Dame de Paris, which was begun before your birth, would not be finished by your death.
  • Of course I did not know what it was all about, but I enjoyed the pleasant odours that filled the house and the tidbits that were given to Martha Washington and me to keep us quiet.
  • We were sadly in the way, but that did not interfere with our pleasure in the least.
  • I did not then know why Belle acted in this way; but I knew she was not doing as I wished.
  • The apron did not dry quickly enough to suit me, so I drew nearer and threw it right over the hot ashes.
  • I could not be induced to tell where the key was.
  • Some have asked what I got to eat; if I did not feel lonesome; if I was not afraid; and the like.
  • I should not talk so much about myself if there were anybody else whom I knew as well.
  • Think, also, of the ladies of the land weaving toilet cushions against the last day, not to betray too green an interest in their fates!
  • He pushed forward, feeling stirred, but not yet sure what stirred him or what he would say.
  • In the first place, I tell you we have no right to question the Emperor about that, and secondly, if the Russian nobility had that right, the Emperor could not answer such a question.
  • "Yes, and this is not a time for discussing," he continued, "but for acting: there is war in Russia!
  • We are Russians and will not grudge our blood in defense of our faith, the throne, and the Fatherland!
  • Pierre wished to reply, but could not get in a word.
  • Not only was Pierre's attempt to speak unsuccessful, but he was rudely interrupted, pushed aside, and people turned away from him as from a common enemy.
  • Millions will pour forth from there"--he pointed to the merchants' hall--"but our business is to supply men and not spare ourselves...
  • Pierre stood rather far off and could not hear all that the Emperor said.
  • The assembled nobles all took off their uniforms and settled down again in their homes and clubs, and not without some groans gave orders to their stewards about the enrollment, feeling amazed themselves at what they had done.
  • This was a decision she had already made once - but not really.
  • In fact, he had given her strict orders not to lift anything.
  • But you're still not comfortable with the decision, are you?
  • "Not for them." he said, and turned to the bathroom.
  • This does not bother you?
  • "I did not think of his wound," Felipa admitted.
  • I'm not asking you to punish the men.
  • "I'm not like him," Alex stated firmly.
  • "Not now," she whispered.
  • We can't - not right now.
  • "Our children will have everything they need, but not everything they want," Alex interrupted.
  • This is not enough for Alex to support?
  • It is not for me to say how he spends his money.
  • Why don't we adopt another orphan baby?
  • It is not so good as a baby with your blood?
  • He does not like the way father treats us - financially.
  • As she peered through the soft gray light not a house of any sort was visible near the station, nor was any person in sight; but after a while the child discovered a horse and buggy standing near a group of trees a short distance away.
  • The horse did not stir.
  • The sudden rush into space confused them so that they could not think.
  • When Dorothy recovered her senses they were still falling, but not so fast.
  • There was not an ugly person in all the throng.
  • They did not smile nor did they frown, or show either fear or surprise or curiosity or friendliness.
  • That I am not prepared to say.
  • "By the way," said the man with the star, looking steadily at the Sorcerer, "you told us yesterday that there would not be a second Rain of Stones.
  • Is not a Wizard something like a Sorcerer?
  • "That does not sound especially pleasant," said the little man, looking at the one with the star uneasily.
  • No one did, because the Mangaboos did not wear hats, and Zeb had lost his, somehow, in his flight through the air.
  • "He will not be a wonderful Wizard long," remarked Gwig.
  • "Why not?" enquired the Wizard.
  • Are you not vegetable, also?
  • "I'm not cruel," replied the kitten, yawning.
  • There is no reason, that I can see, why they may not exist in the waters of this strange country.
  • "I'm glad we are not fishes!" said another.
  • But even that did not satisfy the Princess.
  • The Mangaboos were much impressed because they had never before seen any light that did not come directly from their suns.
  • If they advised you well, and were in the right, they will not be injured in any way.
  • The advisors of the Princess did not like this test; but she commanded them to step into the flame and one by one they did so, and were scorched so badly that the air was soon filled with an odor like that of baked potatoes.
  • "If the Wizard was here," said one of the piglets, sobbing bitterly, "he would not see us suffer so."
  • The cavern did not come to an end, as they had expected it would, but slanted upward through the great glass mountain, running in a direction that promised to lead them to the side opposite the Mangaboo country.
  • From their elevated position they could overlook the entire valley, but not a single moving object could they see.
  • They heard the sudden twittering of a bird, but could not find the creature anywhere.
  • Several squeals and grunts were instantly heard at his feet, but the Wizard could not discover a single piglet.
  • But not a single person appeared to be in the room.
  • "But we do not wish to intrude, I assure you," the Wizard hastened to say.
  • "Why do you not eat the damas?" asked the woman's voice.
  • "And we do not have to be so particular about our dress," remarked the man.
  • "And mama can't tell whether my face is dirty or not!" added the other childish voice, gleefully.
  • I do not know, young sir.
  • Just now, my dear, there is not a single warrior in your company.
  • But they were in great numbers, and the Champion could not shout much because he had to save his breath for fighting.
  • You are strangers in the Valley of Voe, and do not seem to know our ways; so I will try to save you.
  • It is a secret the bears do not know, and we people of Voe usually walk upon the water when we travel, and so escape our enemies.
  • "No place at all," answered the man with the braids; "that is, not recently.
  • "I do not want money," returned the braided man, "for I could not spend it in this deserted place if I had it.
  • I could not help it.
  • The birds did not sing, nor did the cows moo; yet there was more than ordinary activity everywhere.
  • But the Wizard was not so confident.
  • But the Gargoyles were clever enough not to attack the horse the next time.
  • Before this crowned Gargoyle had recovered himself Zeb had wound a strap several times around its body, confining its wings and arms so that it could not move.
  • As they had no wings the strangers could not fly away, and if they jumped down from such a height they would surely be killed.
  • If the Gargoyles can unhook the wings then the power to fly lies in the wings themselves, and not in the wooden bodies of the people who wear them.
  • These preparations had not consumed a great deal of time, but the sleeping Gargoyles were beginning to wake up and move around, and soon some of them would be hunting for their missing wings.
  • Then a sudden turn brought them to a narrow gallery where the buggy could not pass.
  • "Young dragons, of course; but we are not allowed to call ourselves real dragons until we get our full growth," was the reply.
  • Oh, she is sometimes gone for several weeks on her hunting trips, and if we were not tied we would crawl all over the mountain and fight with each other and get into a lot of mischief.
  • "That is not a fair question to ask us," declared another dragonette.
  • "I'm not so sure of that," returned Dorothy.
  • Of course not, my dear.
  • That meant that their world--the real world--was not very far away, and that the succession of perilous adventures they had encountered had at last brought them near the earth's surface, which meant home to them.
  • Folks don't fall into the middle of the earth and then get back again to tell of their adventures--not in real life.
  • But I'm not, my piggy-wees; I'm a humbug wizard.
  • She's a friend of mine, for I met her in the Land of Ev, not long ago, and went to Oz with her.
  • "No, and I'm not anxious to begin," said Eureka.
  • Yes; a wicked witch enchanted her, so she could not rule her kingdom.
  • "It is when it's not alive," acknowledged the girl.
  • Dorothy did not reply to that.
  • "Not at all," replied the Wizard.
  • The cab-horse gave a nervous start and Zeb began to rub his eyes to make sure he was not asleep.
  • "Why not, Mr. Wizard?" asked Jellia, bowing low.
  • "And the people will not willingly part with her," added a tall soldier in a Captain-General's uniform.
  • "Did you not wear green whiskers at one time?" he asked.
  • "But I assure you, my good people, that I do not wish to rule the Emerald City," he added, earnestly.
  • His fame had not been forgotten in the Land of Oz, by any means.
  • "That is quite a history," said Ozma; "but there is a little more history about the Land of Oz that you do not seem to understand--perhaps for the reason that no one ever told it you.
  • "Not at all," returned Nick Chopper.
  • Then they told him dinner would be served directly and he replied that they could not serve it too quickly to suit his convenience.
  • But the royal attendants did not heed the animal's ill temper.
  • "I do not doubt it," the Sawhorse observed, with a tone of pride.
  • I know I'm not much account; but I'm the only horse in all the Land of Oz, so they treat me with great respect.
  • Oh, not a real one, of course.
  • "Not only possible, but true," replied Jim, who was gratified by the impression he had created.
  • "It is not necessary for me to eat," observed the Sawhorse.
  • You do not know the relief of brushing away a fly that has bitten you, nor the delight of eating delicious food, nor the satisfaction of drawing a long breath of fresh, pure air.
  • Jim did not know, but he would not tell the Sawhorse that.
  • "Is not the Real Horse a beautiful animal?" asked the Sawhorse admiringly.
  • "I'm glad of that," said Jim; "for I, also, have a conscience, and it tells me not to crush in your skull with a blow of my powerful hoof."
  • "Not yet," replied Jim.
  • If I could eat grass I would not need a conscience, for nothing could then tempt me to devour babies and lambs.
  • "That I have forgotten," replied the Gump's Head, "and I do not think it is of much importance.
  • They applauded all his tricks and at the end of the performance begged him earnestly not to go away again and leave them.
  • Such a race would not be fair.
  • "Of course not," added Jim, with a touch of scorn; "those little wooden legs of yours are not half as long as my own."
  • "Then why not race with the Sawhorse?" enquired the Scarecrow.
  • Several days of festivity and merry-making followed, for such old friends did not often meet and there was much to be told and talked over between them, and many amusements to be enjoyed in this delightful country.
  • "Not there!" exclaimed Ozma.
  • "Was not the door closed?" asked the Princess.
  • But not a trace could they find of the tiny creature they sought.
  • The kitten will not come.
  • The kitten did not reply.
  • I'm not afraid of Ozma--or anyone else.
  • When I get my thoughts arranged in good order I do not like to have anything upset them or throw them into confusion.
  • "Let the Public Accuser continue," called Ozma from her throne, "and I pray you do not interrupt him."
  • Respected Jury and dearly beloved Ozma, I pray you not to judge this feline prisoner unfeelingly.
  • But don't try to make out I'm too innocent to eat a fat piglet if I could do it and not be found out.
  • I myself, not being built to eat, have no personal experience in such matters.
  • The kitten could not have eaten your piglet--for here it is!
  • If he can produce but seven, then this is not the piglet that was lost, but another one.
  • Eureka was much surprised to find herself in disgrace; but she was, in spite of the fact that she had not eaten the piglet.
  • Dorothy was herself anxious to get home, so she promised Eureka they would not stay in the Land of Oz much longer.
  • Zeb also wanted to see his home, and although he did not find anyone morning for him, the sight of Hugson's Ranch in the picture made him long to get back there.
  • I think this is the loveliest country in the world; but not being fairies Jim and I feel we ought to be where we belong--and that's at the ranch.
  • They did not seem frightened, but chirped softly, as if they knew they were safe.
  • The boy was only four years old, and the girl was not yet six.
  • There were not many stores.
  • He had not gone far when he met a larger boy, who was blowing a whistle.
  • The whistle did not please him any more.
  • The shepherd and his dog could not keep them together.
  • They counted them and were surprised to find that not one lamb of the great flock of seven hundred was missing.
  • Some time later, the shepherd went to the city and told the king that the children had learned to speak one word, but how or from whom, he did not know.
  • These soldiers guarded the streets of the town; they would not let any one go out or come in without their leave.
  • The people did not like this.
  • These men were not afraid of the king's soldiers.
  • He knew where the old North Church stood, but he could not see much in the darkness.
  • They could not see the speeding horse, but they heard the clatter of its hoofs far down the road, and they understood the cry, "Up! up! and defend yourselves!"
  • At Lexington, not far from Concord, there was a sharp fight in which several men were killed.
  • But the king's soldiers did not find the gunpowder.
  • And they did not feel themselves safe until they were once more in Boston.
  • His home was in the country not far from a great forest.
  • "Mother," he would say, "do not be afraid.
  • I am with you, and I will not let anything hurt you.
  • They did not go far into the woods.
  • It will not see me till it comes very near.
  • I will not cry out.
  • It did not try to bite or scratch.
  • It did not even growl.
  • He was not hurt at all.
  • It was not a wolf.
  • You were very brave, and it is lucky that the wolf was not there.
  • You faced what you thought was a great danger, and you were not afraid.
  • It was very dark there, and he could not see anything.
  • But Putnam was not afraid.
  • There was not a sound inside of the cave.
  • They could not give him any help.
  • People did not travel very much.
  • Now the landlord prided himself upon keeping a first-class hotel, and he feared that his guests would not like the rough-looking traveler.
  • It was not long until the man came with another present.
  • "See here," said the Dean in a stern voice, "that is not the way to deliver a message here.
  • The lesson in manners was not forgotten; for, always after that, the man was very polite when he brought his presents.
  • They said that a bright boy like George would not long be a common sailor.
  • Do not let him go to sea.
  • He would not listen to anyone who tried to persuade him to stay at home.
  • He knew that she did not wish him to go.
  • He could not bear to see her grief.
  • Send word to the captain not to wait for me, for I have changed my mind.
  • I am not going to sea.
  • Who has not heard of George Washington?
  • The lad was so much interested in his work that he did not see the stranger.
  • He does not like to do anything else.
  • Men have told me that there is no riddle so cunning that you can not solve it.
  • Still the king did not answer.
  • "I have heard that you are the wisest man in the world," she said, "and surely this simple thing ought not to puzzle you."
  • Not one of the bees so much as looked at those in her left hand.
  • His father and mother were Quakers, and they did not think it was right to spend money for such things.
  • The baby was asleep in her cradle, and he must not make a noise and waken her.
  • The baby smiled but did not wake up.
  • So busy was he with the drawing that he did not think of anything else.
  • He did not even hear his mother's footsteps as she came into the room.
  • He did not hear her soft breathing as she stood over him and watched him finish the wonderful drawing.
  • The father did not answer.
  • He was not old enough to be a soldier, but he could be a scout--and a good scout he was.
  • He was not afraid of anything.
  • "Come with us," they said, "and we will teach you that the king's soldiers are not to be trifled with."
  • The slim, tall boy seemed to grow taller, as he answered, "I'll not be the servant of any Englishman that ever lived."
  • Andrew was not held long as a prisoner.
  • He was not strong enough to work on the farm like his brothers; but he loved books and study.
  • The schoolhouse was two or three miles from home, but he did not mind the long walk through the woods and over the hills.
  • But Daniel's father did not say anything about college.
  • I'm not a lady.
  • He was in trouble because his scholars would not study.
  • But still they would whisper, and he could not prevent it.
  • Little Lucy had not meant to whisper.
  • I could not bear to see her punished.
  • A thousand years ago boys and girls did not learn to read.
  • In those times there were even some kings who could not read.
  • Do not read bad books, they will make you bad.
  • No book is worth reading that does not make you better or wiser.
  • He was not petted and spoiled like many other princes.
  • In Persia we do not have such feasts.
  • King Astyages did not know whether to be pleased or displeased.
  • The king's cupbearer, Sarcas, was very much offended because he was not given a share of the feast.
  • "Well, truly," said Cyrus, "I do not like him.
  • Sarcas himself could not have served the king half so well.
  • "Indeed, grandfather, I did not forget it," answered Cyrus.
  • He does not drink merely to be drinking.
  • The merchants were not fighting men.
  • "It was not for gold that I came here," said Alexander.
  • This treasure does not belong to me, for I bought only the ground; but when I offered it to my neighbor he refused it.
  • The second man then spoke up and said, It is true that I sold him the ground, but I did not reserve anything he might find in it.
  • In those days, people had not learned to be kind to their enemies.
  • But that is not likely.
  • He groped around in the dim light, but could not find any way of escape.
  • It ran into a narrow cleft which he had not seen before, and then through a long, dark passage which was barely large enough for a man's body.
  • They could not believe it.
  • But one of the rulers was not willing to do this.
  • They do not deserve any gifts from the city.
  • They did not kill him, but they drove him out of the city and bade him never return.
  • Coriolanus made his way to the city of Antium, [Footnote: Antium (_pro._ an'shi um).] which was not far from Rome.
  • Coriolanus would not listen to them.
  • "Your life we will not spare," they said; "but we will give you the choice of two things.
  • Then, full of joy, the musician hastened to Corinth, not stopping even to change his dress.
  • He told his wonderful story to the king; but the king would not believe him.
  • Other people think that the dolphin which saved Arion was not a fish, but a ship named the _Dolphin_.
  • Very kind and loving was St. Francis--kind and loving not only to men but to all living things.
  • You toil not, neither do you spin, yet God takes care of you and your little ones.
  • So, do not be ungrateful, but sing His praises and thank Him for his goodness toward you.
  • "Not I! not I!" said all the Mice together.
  • "Not I! not I!" said all the Mice together.
  • There was not a breath of wind to stir the young leaves on the trees.
  • It grew so dark that the people could not see their way along the streets.
  • His voice was clear and strong, and all knew that he, at least, was not afraid.
  • I do not know whether the end of the world has come or not.
  • He had not gone farther than to the end of the innkeeper's field, when to his surprise he found that the road forked.
  • He did not know whether he should take the right-hand fork or the left-hand.
  • Then something happened which Selkirk did not like.
  • Oh, do not leave me here.
  • He could not think of anything else.
  • "I am not afraid" said Robinson Crusoe.
  • He swam to an island that was not far away.
  • The poor child was so tired after his night's work that he could not keep awake.
  • The boy stammered and did not know what to say.
  • What boy or girl has not heard the story of King Robert Brace and the spider?
  • "That is not right," said the brave woman.
  • These are friends, not enemies.
  • He could not hold out much longer.
  • Besides, it is not our custom to deliver goods.
  • It is not heavy.
  • When Robert Fulton became a man, he did not forget his experiment with the old fishing boat.
  • Why should he not cool himself in the refreshing water?
  • Most of the old men answered that they did not know of any such person.
  • "Well, then," said the caliph, "why did you not return it to us at once?"
  • He will not care.'
  • But in the corner, almost hidden from his fellows, one poor man was sitting who did not enjoy the singing.
  • I do not know any song.
  • So he sat there trembling and afraid; for he was a timid, bashful man and did not like to be noticed.
  • "The gentle cows will not ask a song of me," said the poor man.
  • At first he was so bewildered that he could not answer.
  • I do not know any song; and my voice is harsh and unpleasant.
  • His parents and friends begged him not to go.
  • At first he did not see anything that disturbed him; for word had gone before him to remove from sight everything that might be displeasing or painful.
  • Do not all persons live eighty years--yes, many times eighty years?
  • "I am sorry if you do not like it," said Jacquot.
  • But if I had not helped you, you would have been in a worse place.
  • They are not mine.
  • My mother will not be worried.
  • But he would not eat anything.
  • Not dressed in that way? said the cardinal.
  • "Why not?" answered the little king.
  • Let them say what they please, I am not going to change my clothes.
  • There was not a fish in it.
  • They talked and wrangled a long time and could not agree.
  • Give not the merchant nor the fishermen the prize; But give it to that one who is wisest of the wise.
  • He would not take it.
  • "The oracle did not intend that I should have it," he said.
  • I am not the wisest of the wise.
  • Give not the merchant nor the fishermen the prize; But give it to that one who is wisest of the wise.
  • I should be delighted to own so beautiful a piece of workmanship, but I know I am not worthy.
  • They told him that it was not for sale, but that it was to be given to the wisest of the wise.
  • "Well, you will not find that man in Rhodes," said he.
  • Not just a little better, but gloriously and fantastically better.
  • And not just a path, but a well-lit, eight-lane highway.
  • They exist simply because we have not had the means to solve them in the past.
  • To be perfectly clear, I am not saying the Internet and technology will solve every human ill.
  • I make the predictions in this book not to be sensational or controversial.
  • Bad science fiction plots, speculating on futures which could not really happen, are the worst examples of this.
  • This third way is based on the principle that it is possible to see the future by accepting discontinuity but not unpredictability.
  • Discontinuity happens, but it is not unpredictable.
  • I don't dispute the cliché, "Those who do not know history are doomed to repeat it."
  • And because human nature changes either not at all or very slowly, people make the same choices over and over again.
  • Examining history is not like gazing into some fantasy crystal ball, where what we see is prophetic in detail.
  • I submit that the Internet is not defined in that way because it is a technology without an implicit purpose.
  • This is not a shortcoming of our imaginations but rather a simple reality.
  • It took a decade or two for the new medium to be seen in light of itself, not just in terms of what it displaced.
  • My point is: While the Internet does all those things, it is not accurate to say the Internet is only any one of them.
  • This is not merely a linguistic distinction.
  • But my car is not a CD player, GPS navigation system, or air conditioner.
  • The Internet does not, like the car, have a single essence.
  • She drops $300 on Google ads before realizing it might not be a great fit.
  • Our ability to process data, move information, and make things small will progress to a point where they will not be gating factors ever again.
  • In these early days of the Internet Renaissance, the number of great masters is in the tens of thousands, not the hundreds.
  • It was not at all clear at the time that his work would transcend the ages.
  • Now, of course, much of what is on YouTube is not art.
  • On top of the common-good projects supported with our tax dollars, almost all of us—certainly not just the wealthy—have causes we support.
  • This is not to the sixteenth-century Europeans' discredit or even to our credit.
  • Now a billion or more can achieve that dream, and I foresee a time not far off when everyone on the planet can.
  • He turned onto Franz Josef Street, where he was not supposed to have been, and drove right in front of a surprised Princip.
  • It would not be the first time, or the last, that ignorance in the world exacted a high price.
  • The Internet is not unique in solving for this access to information.
  • It does so in orders of magnitude better than what came before it—libraries—but only better, not differently.
  • If somebody outside your village knew something, it did not matter; for you, it did not exist.
  • So the simple fact that all the information in the world may soon be available to everyone via the Internet does not end ignorance, just as the existence of a library in your city doesn't end ignorance.
  • The emissaries, who themselves did not know the correct answer, were to bring the replies of the oracles back to the king.
  • It is wisdom that King Solomon asked God for, not intelligence.
  • But even that is not enough.
  • And wisdom probably concludes, "I should not apply for this credit card."
  • Not just that you went to a certain address but that the address was a movie theater and—based on where you sat and that you ordered tickets online—you saw Episode VII of Star Wars.
  • Everything you saw, that your eyeballs tracked to, how long you looked at it—and not just everything you ever looked at, but your physiological response.
  • But let's not stop there.
  • The statement is not there because you want the log per se but because the logging of the actions is what documents how much you need to pay.
  • I think to the extent the data is not identifiable to a person and is only used to make suggestions to others, people will participate.
  • But let's say everyone had their device set to "broadcast my location but not my identity" constantly.
  • Statistics like this are generally not rigorously calculated.
  • In our modern age, people disagree not just in terms of values they apply to knowledge, but they disagree on actual pieces of knowledge.
  • These are not differences of values but disagreements in terms of knowledge.
  • These are all knowable things, and yet there is not universal agreement on them.
  • The machine should start looking for correlations we would not expect.
  • This section shows not complementary products but, essentially, competitive products.
  • These features weren't on the site when it was first launched because the necessary data did not yet exist.
  • When I watch a Terminator movie, I am rooting for the people, not the machines.
  • Humans should not feel threatened in any way by this, and yet it still makes some people defensive and uncomfortable.
  • I like this goal, and I would like to do it as well, but in bits, not bites.
  • You are not from there, and you want to go out for Italian food for dinner.
  • But you still were working with the biased, anecdotal opinions of a few people not very like you.
  • And not just where do they go, but where is it that people drive the farthest to get to?
  • The traffic to get there is not bad.
  • Of course, the system only shapes decisions insofar as you take its guidance, which begs the question: Will people follow suggestions they may not fully understand?
  • When the salesperson rings up your purchase, no one tells him he had better forget what shoes he sold you with that suit and not to use that information to advise any future clients.
  • These will be waters to navigate carefully, in order to make sure that the right to privacy, a cornerstone of a free society, is not destroyed.
  • The future system I foresee will not be different in substance, but only in degree.
  • But human beings are not machines.
  • Some people have exceptional abilities we do not understand—for example, savants.
  • Regarding disorders and disabilities: We should be able to repair, heal, or replace any part of the body not functioning at the level the person with the disability reasonably wishes it to.
  • I do not know and certainly don't want to try to prove to you that the future will be like that.
  • This goal is within our grasp—and with the vaccine presently priced at about thirty cents a child, shame on us for not ending polio once and for all.
  • Aside from two laboratory samples, one in the United States and one in Russia, it does not exist on the planet.
  • In the last thirty years there has not been a single smallpox death or even a single infection.
  • The second was that the disease clearly passed from person to person, though by what mechanism was not clear.
  • But in other cases, variolation worked: The person who survived it did not subsequently get smallpox.
  • If the conditions weren't sterile—a word that was not even comprehended at the time—the inoculation didn't work, or worse, introduced a new disease.
  • And then we come to Greece, the home of Hippocrates, the "Father of Modern Medicine," who left us not just the oath that bears his name but also a corpus of roughly sixty medical texts based on his teaching.
  • Hippocrates was remarkable not only as a surgeon but also because he systematized medicine in his spare time.
  • When the ancients could not find these solutions, it was not for a lack of intelligence but for a lack of technology.
  • Its makers had not conceived bupropion hydrochloride as a drug to help people quit smoking.
  • And not just certain farms, but farms that used a certain pesticide.
  • Not just a certain pesticide, but pesticides that contained a certain chemical.
  • Not long from now, computers will systematically look through trillions upon trillions of pieces of data for these associations.
  • It is not to our discredit that machines can perform calculations so wondrously fast; rather it is to our credit that we conceived of and built such machines.
  • Though cases like these are not really how the science will be used, they illustrate the principle.
  • In the future, we'll not only know if that is so, but why: Perhaps mental agility is a result of their extensive exposure to a chemical in pencil lead and newsprint that they got by doing all those puzzles.
  • Or maybe smart old people just direct that energy to crosswords and it is not the crosswords doing the job at all ...
  • We may not choose to—we may choose eating cheesecake and bacon over living an estimated extra 2.4 months longer.
  • I am not saying the research scientist loses out to the florist in Akron, Ohio.
  • Finally, this system will not just solve for human illness, but all kinds of other problems as well.
  • Our challenge is to learn how to choose the plowshares, not to abandon metallurgy.
  • Then, people could start reporting all their medical issues—headaches, halitosis, heart disease—and we will begin to see commonalities between genes and conditions we do not generally regard as genetic.
  • Third: We will learn what treatments not to use.
  • Due to genetic factors we will certainly learn about in the future, some drugs and treatments do not work on certain people.
  • We hear of treatments that work some percent of the time or we hear phrases like, "They are not responding to treatment."
  • Imagine being Jenner and not even knowing you were dealing with microbes.
  • With all due respect to Nietzsche, we have looked long into the Abyss, but the Abyss has not looked back into us.
  • Additionally, we will at some point in the not-too-distant future have enough biological understanding of the genome and enough computer horsepower to model complex interactions in the body.
  • Well, not literally, but close.
  • How can we not be excited about the possibilities this offers?
  • Third, pretty much everything we know is published on the Internet and can be found in moments, if not seconds.
  • This will likely not ever be perfect, but any insight it can offer us is a gain.
  • After all, it was the doctor's job to keep you healthy, not to make money when you were sick.
  • I did not ask the American Medical Association their opinion of this arrangement.
  • Trading is not a "zero-sum game."
  • If you are in a desert dying of thirst, you value the first glass of water very highly, the second glass a bit less, and the 802nd not at all.
  • Trade is not like this at all.
  • Consider just a few of the mechanisms by which the Internet promotes trade that otherwise would not have occurred.
  • It would not take much of this for businesses to no longer take credit cards.
  • Such a thing is not possible without the Internet. 4.
  • Most of these people have other jobs and obligations, so without something like Etsy, they might not be able to enter into these trades.
  • This works toward maximizing the utility that item can bring to someone. eBay is not alone in this regard.
  • This is not possible without the Internet. 6.
  • This could not be done without the Internet. 8.
  • This is unprecedented in the history of commerce and could not be done without the Internet. 9.
  • This could not be done without the Internet. 9.
  • This could not be done without the Internet. 10.
  • This could not be done without the Internet.
  • Instead, we are surrounded by things we could not create ourselves.
  • Not in one hundred lifetimes could I make a car.
  • I could not in one hundred lifetimes make a working electric lamp, even knowing what I know now.
  • Technological advance, however, is not limited in that way.
  • Technology marches forward—perhaps not forever, but as close to forever as we can understand.
  • Only it's not set to music.
  • The point is that the cost of making almost everything is mostly energy and intellect, not raw materials.
  • Not by a long shot.
  • But these are questions of technology, not of scarcity, and technology is about to rocket forward.
  • That was indeed the hope for atomic energy in that era, and it did not pan out.
  • First, many things in the physical world that we think of as scarce are not really scarce, just presently beyond our ability to capture.
  • My purpose in this chapter will not be to persuade the reader of any political doctrine of trade; please apply your own political and social values as you see fit.
  • We are sympathetic to the laid-off workers, but no one would suggest the cotton gin not be installed.
  • But that is not what will happen.
  • If you did not internalize the externalities, you would buy the generic brand and save a dollar.
  • However, the company likely won't choose this outcome because the $10 cost of cleanup is not paid by the company but by society.
  • And you could feel good about it; after all, you would be increasing efficiency, not merely acting as a leech to the system.
  • We only have people doing this work because we have not yet developed the technology to get machines to do it.
  • I am not saying if you enjoy manual labor and being exhausted at the end of the day, you shouldn't do it.
  • I am not saying if you love digging ditches, you should do something else.
  • If this is not the case, people will not trade their labor for things that can easily or capriciously be taken away. 3.
  • Conversely, in places where prosperity has not risen, lack of these ingredients plays a significant role.
  • The fact that an unprecedented number of earth's inhabitants today live in poverty is an indictment of governments, not a reflection of some underlying natural limit.
  • The prosperity of some does not require that others be poor.
  • As I have pointed out, technology may in fact have limits, but we do not know what they are.
  • What we should not try to do, in my opinion, is give them human traits.
  • I'm not about to waste my best material on a machine!
  • But not a machine.
  • Machines are not persons and so cannot have personalities.
  • Artificial surrogates for human companionship are always vastly inferior to the real thing; we crave connections with people, not machines.
  • I hesitate to start talking about nanotechnology for fear I will not be able to stop—the entire field is amazing to me!
  • Not a cure, but it sure beats insulin shots.
  • Not toothpaste or roads or libraries or light bulbs or aspirin or mirrors; not even Legos.
  • Not toothpaste or roads or libraries or light bulbs or aspirin or mirrors; not even Legos.
  • So why not the other components?
  • Again, the materials to build the car are abundant; their cost is high because of technology deficiencies around retrieving and refining them, not an underlying rarity.
  • Finally, you might argue that fees paid as royalties to the owners of the intellectual property needed to build the Mercedes for $50 will not fall by a thousandfold.
  • Innovating will become table stakes just to stay in business, and innovation will be used to lower prices, not to increase them.
  • This is not Enron-esque accounting chicanery.
  • Houses will be built by robots using materials not yet invented that are cheaper and more energy efficient.
  • Your house will not be "smart" insofar as it will not seem alive to you any more than your garage door opener or your web browser does.
  • As I observed a few pages ago in "Let Robots Be Robots," an intelligent system like this won't be creepy because we do not want it to be creepy.
  • Not 20 percent better and 20 percent cheaper, but a thousand times better.
  • About clothes, and how robots will weave garments that never wear out from materials not yet invented that will cost very little.
  • Vacationing should fall in price but requires much direct labor, so it will not fall by a thousandfold.
  • You would not be the first.
  • And not just chairs, but bread and muskets and plows.
  • Try to think of the advances we have seen so far in history as the very tip of the iceberg, a hint of what is possible, not even being within sight of what is possible.
  • But I expect that technology and free enterprise will take us across a threshold where things formerly regarded as scarce will not be so any more.
  • It is an attempt to capture the essence of the change, not the nominal value of the multiplier.
  • When the rich believe the poor will not honor property rights.
  • Where I come from the term is "thievery," but believe it or not, they don't call it that.
  • They see themselves as defining law, not breaking it.
  • Such radical redistribution attempts are dangerous games, for the rich are creators of economic opportunity, not just for themselves, but as employers, for society.
  • Although the poor may not believe that wealth is attainable for them, they do not want to rock the boat and risk disrupting the system that guarantees them at least some income.
  • Government is the servant of the people, not the master.
  • But this is not the case historically.
  • Like a TV star that doesn't scale back his expenses after his show is cancelled, these benefits expand, not contract, during periods of economic decline, for two main reasons.
  • I do not think so.
  • Most people would not term that welfare, which has become a loaded phrase associated with the state making a payment to individuals.
  • This income will not be regarded as welfare.
  • Some become so wealthy, in fact, they can live off the interest (the productivity) of their assets, not just their own labor.
  • No, not at all.
  • This is not socialism.
  • Simply because only so many jobs can, in theory, be replaced by machines does not imply anything about the ability of the people now doing them.
  • As I've already said, I believe we will be experiencing so much prosperity in the not-too-distant future that no one will have to work.
  • It will not be welfare (or, at least depending on how you define the term, it will not be perceived as welfare).
  • Freed from worry about losing a job they do not enjoy, encouraged to follow their dreams and passions, I believe most will want to do just that.
  • Imagine if all the people with boring, dead-end machine jobs were told they never had to work another day in their life at a job they did not like.
  • But I am not talking about a state of affairs where overnight someone with a "machine job" gets unlimited wealth.
  • They work at jobs they do not like, doing work a machine should be doing.
  • People in these jobs know two states: working, which they do not enjoy, and relaxation, which is far better.
  • So yeah, if you told them to choose between working and not working, many would choose to relax.
  • But over time, these dehumanizing jobs are what will be "left behind," not the people who perform them.
  • But as we grew up, reality set in that market forces did not allow those activities to pay enough to support us, so at some point we all figured out we had to "earn a living."
  • In fact, let's say his own mother considered donating the portrait he painted of her to Goodwill but decided not to because "the poor have enough problems already."
  • Thus, because Chad is not good at painting, he cannot paint for a living.
  • They have something they love and want to do, but if market forces are not such that they can support themselves doing that, they have to do something else.
  • We live in a place and time where we own thousands of things we could not have made.
  • This simply is not the case.
  • They are not distinct buckets but rather broad characterizations: actual famine, weaponized famine, and structural famine.
  • But before the twentieth century, this was not the case and actual famines were much more common.
  • Since many of the poor were not able-bodied, the workhouses were not profitable institutions.
  • And that doesn't even count the many other charitable organizations that have not filed for this tax-exempt status with the federal government.
  • Governments create entitlements due to public demand for them, and public demand exists where the need is not filled.
  • In discussing nutrition, not only is there little agreement on the nature of the solutions, there is often disagreement on the nature of the problems.
  • I am not only what I eat but am also what I do, what I drink, what I think about, and more.
  • First, it is only useful for factors that are immediately bad for you, not factors that will kill you in ten years.
  • We tend to notice every time the expected effect is triggered by the cause, but may not notice all the times it isn't.
  • In other words, you might not notice the time you ate the MSG and didn't get the headache.
  • If you love "Western medicine" and think all acupuncturists are "quacks," then you are not likely to heed (or even appreciate) your friend's well-meaning efforts to get you to drink your own urine for its health benefits.
  • But in the future when we have more and better information, if it turns out that some of these methods are not net gains, we will know that and look elsewhere for solutions.
  • Nations with high percentages of hungry citizens are not universally food exporters, and we will explore this more later.
  • It is most unlikely that this process of improvement will not continue in the future.
  • The problem is not that the world doesn't have enough food.
  • To me, this makes the problem of hunger that much sadder in the present—to realize that the planet has enough food, just not enough generosity.
  • You can be a subsistence farmer and perhaps produce some excess, but given the prior observation about the fundamental volatility of farming, you will always be at risk of not producing enough.
  • Those who argue they should not say there is no way for poor countries to compete with mechanized Western farming and the extremely high yields it produces.
  • Food security is a real issue, and nations that do not at least produce some kinds of food are at risk.
  • Indigenous animals are not well-suited to be domesticated and assist in farming.
  • Crops native to Africa are not the staples of the world.
  • (Well, I personally have not; I have regressed from this state.
  • The advances were not merely mechanical but chemical as well.
  • I say we can improve things not by 20 or so percent, but by twenty times or more.
  • When I use a term like factory farm, I am envisioning not what these things are now but what they will be.
  • By what logic would anyone assume it will not go to zero?
  • But the food would not only be produced with maximum efficiency; it would be extremely fresh and very healthy.
  • You can't do something that long and not have some strong opinions on the matter.
  • If you are not familiar with this whole issue, look into it; it is fascinating and, I think, important.
  • But I do not believe these technological leaps forward are a threat to good food.
  • It would cost a million dollars and not even be as good as a Chevy.
  • And greener (in the environmental way, not the color way).
  • At times, it may be best to just enjoy the meal and not ask too many questions.
  • Second, the real promise of GM crops will not necessarily come about from the food industry.
  • It will undoubtedly make the most profitable seeds possible but not necessarily the healthiest.
  • Although the original mutation was not caused by human activity, human activity preserved and perpetuated it.
  • We fear it, frankly, because we do not understand it.
  • Who could be against children not going blind?
  • It is not presently available for human consumption.
  • In Africa, most genetically engineered crops that could grow well there are not welcome.
  • American ethanol policies do not "kill" the poor, but they do drive up corn prices.
  • They should be advocating that genetically modified crops be created not because it would result in better looking strawberries, but because GM crops don't require fertilizer or pesticides.
  • This is not science fiction.
  • So I am not saying objections and caution are not warranted.
  • Remember my earlier statement that a farmer treats a thousand acres of corn as a single entity because it is not cost effective to deal with each corn stalk separately?
  • The ultimate goal, I submit, is not to optimize just meter by meter but what I call "grape by grape," down to each individual piece of flora and fauna.
  • In the not too distant future, tiny robots will detect pests on produce and emit a signal to shoo them away.
  • How would it not find its way to the poorest regions of the earth?
  • As mentioned earlier, farmers suffer when they do not have reliable markets for their goods.
  • Micro-lending is not new; the idea of small loans to the entrepreneurial poor is centuries old.
  • It is akin to saying you have a right to life but not a right to a heart.
  • I do not say this to advance any political doctrine.
  • I am not saying governments are supposed to feed the world or that food should be free.
  • Rights do not mean much, he reasoned, to those with an "empty stomach, shirtless back, roofless dwellings ... unemployment and poverty, no education or medical attention."
  • As people were dying in large numbers around them, officials did not think to save them.
  • Yang also quotes Mao as saying in a 1959 meeting, When there is not enough to eat, people starve to death.
  • And if that were not enough, he killed by starvation in the name of a program called—I kid you not—"The Super Great Leap Forward."
  • In using the phrase, "Necessitous men are not free men," Roosevelt was actually quoting from a decision in a well-known 1762 English legal case.
  • The full quote runs: "Necessitous men are not, truly speaking, free men, but, to answer a present exigency, will submit to any terms that the crafty may impose upon them."
  • He is raising the value of citizenship, not cheapening it.
  • While Jefferson's "all men are created equal" statement was not meant by him to include slaves, we have broadened the application of the principle and should continue to do so.
  • To elevate food to the status of a human right does not require government to administer it—far from it.
  • In the United States, you could do it via the tax code, with government only acting as an income redistribution agent but not as a food distributor.
  • But of course, I am not most worried about the United States.
  • In the United States, de Tocqueville's voluntary associations still do the job and anyone willing to make her way to a church or food pantry and say she is hungry will not leave empty handed.
  • I do not think Americans would tolerate widespread, untreated hunger in this nation as long as it could afford otherwise.
  • Do we not do the same in our personal lives?
  • What good is our high economic standing in the world if we do not use it for good purposes?
  • People who buy organic food, for instance, are not doing it simply because they have more money.
  • All this will happen eventually, I believe, even if global hunger policy were not to change one iota.
  • But I also believe that hunger will end when we decide to end it, not only at the point when we are able to end it.
  • Now, I'm faced with explaining why the past was full of war but somehow the future will not be.
  • Do not expect this to be a uniformly reassuring journey; it may be more of a roller-coaster ride with some rather bleak descents.
  • All right then, not the cavalry, but a marshaling of arguments and observations that will show how the end of war is inevitable, or nearly so.
  • I offer these stories not to demonstrate that people can be cruel.
  • They are not tales of aberrant individuals but of societal norms.
  • This is not a defense of our present age; we will come to our own report card soon enough.
  • Once again, this change was not imposed on people through coercion but came (and still comes) gradually through civilization.
  • Monarchy is not inherently bad, and there have been fine kings and queens in history.
  • Not just rulers, either.
  • I am not saying we have ended torture.
  • It is no longer legal for people to be secretly arrested, not charged, and left to rot in jail.
  • Courts of law, not courts of justice.
  • We have not only outlawed cruelty to animals, but increasingly, people care about the living conditions of even the animals they eat.
  • They do this for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is that it often works.
  • As Scottish historian Thomas Carlyle once observed, "Man seldom, or rather never for a length of time and deliberately, rebels against anything that does not deserve rebelling against."
  • The civilizing process is not flawless, and we may disagree on the ways it has manifested itself.
  • Still, I would argue these changes are the results of an overall increase in empathy and that, more often than not, increasing empathy promotes civilization and is splendid.
  • That is not the point.
  • That is not the important point.
  • It is not surprising that we are taking awhile to get it right.
  • They made civilization in times of adversity and want, not in the relative luxury and stability we enjoy today.
  • Yeah, I'm not buying that.
  • To be clear: I am not a pacifist.
  • I do believe some ideals are worth fighting for and, by logical extension, worth killing for—but not many.
  • Of course, the people making that judgment call and the people doing the actual dying usually are not one and the same, and therein lies the problem.
  • Early in his presidency, in a 1953 address that would become known as his "Cross of Iron" speech, he declared, "Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed.
  • This world in arms is not spending money alone.
  • This is not a way of life ...
  • Albert Einstein reflected this when he famously said, "I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones."
  • But in the future this will not be the case.
  • This is not semantics.
  • I am not posing a naïve, rhetorical question.
  • This is not a section about hope, ideals, wishes, or the brotherhood of all mankind.
  • I will not advise getting in touch with our feelings or even group hugs.
  • I will not propose that we should "give peace a chance."
  • This is not me fighting against the tide of history but being swept along with it.
  • The way to end war is not to set up some big world government or eliminate nation-states, which will always retain the right to take unilateral military action to defend themselves.
  • Why do I say world government is not a good idea and nation-states are?
  • I won't speculate on what that size is, but it certainly is not a size 0.
  • When the Soviet Union dissolved only two years later, not with a bang but with a whimper, we were slack-jawed with surprise.
  • I had not heard anyone predict even the possibility of these two events before they came upon us, in what seemed the blink of an eye.
  • Ending war does not mean compromising values.
  • And not a moment too soon.
  • But not, to be sure, without obstacles.
  • Second, in the past, technological improvements did not decrease human beings' propensity to wage war; they only made people better at killing.
  • As Frederick the Great observed almost two centuries earlier, "If my soldiers were to begin to think, not one of them would remain in the army."
  • Technically speaking, I have included a few that are not dependent on the Internet per se, but in which the Internet and technology plays some role.
  • While military service was less important to securing work in commerce, that was not a particularly noteworthy occupation.
  • Military heroes of the last several centuries, such as the aforementioned Lafayette and Hamilton and Travis, were not bloodthirsty.
  • They did not revel in carnage.
  • Success is now defined by creating, not destroying.
  • It is not just that the price of weapons falls and that their destructive ability increases.
  • But at the time the doctrine was in force, MAD was effective (or at least, not proven ineffective).
  • The only winning move is not to play.
  • War disrupts this, and people will have little patience for it if there is not an extremely compelling reason for it.
  • This is not to say that if another Pearl Harbor or another 9/11 occurred, people in any country wouldn't rise to the occasion and make great sacrifices if needed.
  • If you did not, you could retool and make something the military could buy.
  • This is not to say that businesses are so materialistic they will favor a war to get a government contract.
  • But let's adopt the cynic's view for a moment and assume people in these corporations are chiefly concerned about their financial benefit, not about human suffering, when it comes to war.
  • (Not to mention the fact that, if the stuff all hits the fan, widget factories like yours would almost certainly be marked with bull's-eyes on the enemy's aerial bombing maps.)
  • The arch not only celebrates this military victory, it points out that it was profitable.
  • If the weak nation will not willingly do the bidding of the strong one, then it is made to.
  • We will avoid war because it is unprofitable; and while that is not a moral reason, any reason that brings peace is fine by me.
  • (Of course, when a king proves himself through battle, he is not risking his life but the lives of thousands of his subjects.
  • To him, it is a chess game, not personal combat.)
  • Not only are we eliminating historically warlike forms of government, we are replacing them with peaceful ones, namely democracy.
  • The theory is that democracies do not go to war with other democracies.
  • I am not saying tthe world would be better if every country was the size of Liechtenstein.
  • This was fine with Great Britain but not with Maine.
  • They expected the king to choose one border or another, not create his own compromise border.
  • Voluntary acceptance of shared practices is not a surrender of autonomy.
  • There was a time, not so long ago, when almost everyone smoked.
  • Under Hollywood's production code at the time, movies could not include nudity, criminal activity, or offensive language, or depict illegal drug use, venereal disease, or childbirth.
  • Some might argue this is not in and of itself a force for peace.
  • Well, here we are, not quite halfway through our list of ways the Internet, technology, and civilization will come together to end war.
  • I include Twitter in this list as a larger idea, not only as the literal Twitter.com.
  • They may not bump into them very often in what we call "everyday life" but do know them well enough to friend them.
  • This is not a particularly new idea, similar to the phenomenon of getting to know and care about "pen pals" in far-flung places by exchanging postal-mail letters.
  • The system we have is not perfect, but it is highly distributed and bottom up.
  • I realize in these pages I must seem very distrustful of government, but it is not really true.
  • Practically speaking, governments often act as if their first duty is to protect the government, not the people.
  • They were not, for the most part, military men.
  • Their revolution was not made up of a bunch of hotheads with torches and pitchforks.
  • It will be English, although not really the English we speak today.
  • Imagine if today everyone spoke one language and I said that in the future we will speak hundreds of different languages and not be able to understand each other.
  • Because dictators have the intellectuals killed, not the farmers.
  • The future German man will not just be a man of books, but a man of character.
  • I do not think the importance of YouTube lies in its role as a communication method nor as a fundamentally new means of distribution of media.
  • YouTube's contribution to world peace is not simply to add empathy to current events, although that would be enough.
  • You view it as your duty to protest when people who do not hold to those values gain power.
  • But we do not have to rely solely on those.
  • We will live out the realization that, as Bertrand Russell said, "War does not determine who is right, only who is left."
  • You have invented an elixir not of memory, but of reminding.
  • If they had not, lengthy epics would never have survived oral transmission for centuries.
  • That's what interests me about this story (which may or may not be purely true): What Simonides did—recalling the names and locations of everyone at a large banquet—is described as entirely possible and an enviable, practical skill.
  • Augustine said this could not be the case because he could neither hear Ambrose nor see his lips moving.
  • When you reach a step you do not understand, do you not start reading out loud really slowly?
  • A world without hunger, disease, ignorance, poverty, and war is not a perfect world.
  • So while such an attack and its aftermath would not derail our eventual arrival at the next golden age, it quite possibly would delay it.
  • "Big Candle" is not still around and never was.
  • As I see it, the grandchildren of those who would strap bombs on themselves today will not be rushing to imitate their elders.
  • All these problems that technology will solve have made our underlying differences worse—but removing these problems will not eliminate those underlying differences.
  • That claim is simply not true.
  • This book is a call to action, not complacency.
  • My goal is not to convince people that the world will be perfect in the future.
  • We are gaining speed, not winding down.
  • How can this future I describe not be ours?
  • We were not born in that age that had no word for change.
  • I could not understand, and was vexed.
  • Except for my hands and hair I was not badly burned.
  • His methods had probably died with him; and if they had not, how was a little girl in a far-off town in Alabama to receive the benefit of them?
  • The beads were sewed in the right place and I could not contain myself for joy; but immediately I lost all interest in the doll.
  • During the whole trip I did not have one fit of temper, there were so many things to keep my mind and fingers busy.
  • But Miss Sullivan did not arrive until the following March.
  • The little blind children at the Perkins Institution had sent it and Laura Bridgman had dressed it; but I did not know this until afterward.
  • I did not know that I was spelling a word or even that words existed; I was simply making my fingers go in monkey-like imitation.
  • I had not loved the doll.
  • I do not remember what they all were; but I do know that mother, father, sister, teacher were among them--words that were to make the world blossom for me, "like Aaron's rod, with flowers."
  • But about this time I had an experience which taught me that nature is not always kind.
  • A shiver ran through the tree, and the wind sent forth a blast that would have knocked me off had I not clung to the branch with might and main.
  • Her words puzzled me very much because I did not then understand anything unless I touched it.
  • Is this not love?
  • Is this not love?
  • I thought it strange that my teacher could not show me love.
  • For a long time I was still--I was not thinking of the beads in my lap, but trying to find a meaning for "love" in the light of this new idea.
  • Again I asked my teacher, "Is this not love?"
  • Without love you would not be happy or want to play.
  • If I did not know the words and idioms necessary to express my thoughts she supplied them, even suggesting conversation when I was unable to keep up my end of the dialogue.
  • She introduced dry technicalities of science little by little, making every subject so real that I could not help remembering what she taught.
  • Arithmetic seems to have been the only study I did not like.
  • From the first I was not interested in the science of numbers.
  • All the best of me belongs to her--there is not a talent, or an aspiration or a joy in me that has not been awakened by her loving touch.
  • In the pleasure of doing this, I did not stop to look at my own gifts; but when I was ready for them, my impatience for the real Christmas to begin almost got beyond control.
  • I knew the gifts I already had were not those of which friends had thrown out such tantalizing hints, and my teacher said the presents I was to have would be even nicer than these.
  • I found surprises, not in the stocking only, but on the table, on all the chairs, at the door, on the very window-sill; indeed, I could hardly walk without stumbling on a bit of Christmas wrapped up in tissue paper.
  • When I next saw her she was a formless heap of cotton, which I should not have recognized at all except for the two bead eyes which looked out at me reproachfully.
  • I knew I could not see; but it did not seem possible that all the eager, loving children who gathered round me and joined heartily in my frolics were also blind.
  • I could not quite convince myself that there was much world left, for I regarded Boston as the beginning and the end of creation.
  • But the rumble of the machinery made me think it was thundering, and I began to cry, because I feared if it rained we should not be able to have our picnic out of doors.
  • I did not eat them; but I loved their fragrance and enjoyed hunting for them in the leaves and grass.
  • I had to feel for the rails with my toe; but I was not afraid, and got on very well, until all at once there came a faint "puff, puff" from the distance.
  • All the roads were hidden, not a single landmark was visible, only a waste of snow with trees rising out of it.
  • But it must not be supposed that I could really talk in this short time.
  • Miss Fuller and Miss Sullivan could understand me, but most people would not have understood one word in a hundred.
  • I could not be despondent while I anticipated the delight of talking to my mother and reading her responses from her lips.
  • Just here, perhaps, I had better explain our use of the manual alphabet, which seems to puzzle people who do not know us.
  • I place my hand on the hand of the speaker so lightly as not to impede its movements.
  • I do not feel each letter any more than you see each letter separately when you read.
  • When I had made speech my own, I could not wait to go home.
  • I had made my homeward journey, talking constantly to Miss Sullivan, not for the sake of talking, but determined to improve to the last minute.
  • Now, if words and images come to me without effort, it is a pretty sure sign that they are not the offspring of my own mind, but stray waifs that I regretfully dismiss.
  • This question surprised me very much; for I had not the faintest recollection of having had it read to me.
  • For a long time, when I wrote a letter, even to my mother, I was seized with a sudden feeling of terror, and I would spell the sentences over and over, to make sure that I had not read them in a book.
  • But I do not understand how he ever thought a blind and deaf child of eleven could have invented them.
  • "There is no way to become original, except to be born so," says Stevenson, and although I may not be original, I hope sometime to outgrow my artificial, periwigged compositions.
  • Then he evidently retracted his favourable judgment, why I do not know.
  • I never knew even the names of the members of the "court" who did not speak to me.
  • The thought that what I wrote might not be absolutely my own tormented me.
  • An impish fear clutched my hand, so that I could not write any more that day.
  • I studied it with Madame Olivier, a French lady who did not know the manual alphabet, and who was obliged to give her instruction orally.
  • I could not read her lips easily; so my progress was much slower than in German.
  • It was very amusing but I did not like it nearly so well as "Wilhelm Tell."
  • My progress in lip-reading and speech was not what my teachers and I had hoped and expected it would be.
  • When I was not guessing, I was jumping at conclusions, and this fault, in addition to my dullness, aggravated my difficulties more than was right or necessary.
  • So long as we felt his loving presence and knew that he took a watchful interest in our work, fraught with so many difficulties, we could not be discouraged.
  • When asked why I would not go to Wellesley, I replied that there were only girls there.
  • I could not make notes in class or write exercises; but I wrote all my compositions and translations at home on my typewriter.
  • In study hours she had to look up new words for me and read and reread notes and books I did not have in raised print.
  • I rejoiced over all his successes, I shut my eyes to his faults, and wondered, not that he had them, but that they had not crushed or dwarfed his soul.
  • Some of the girls learned to speak to me, so that Miss Sullivan did not have to repeat their conversation.
  • Perhaps an explanation of the method that was in use when I took my examinations will not be amiss here.
  • Each candidate was known, not by his name, but by a number.
  • I wish to say here that I have not had this advantage since in any of my examinations.
  • I could not follow with my eyes the geometrical figures drawn on the blackboard, and my only means of getting a clear idea of them was to make them on a cushion with straight and curved wires, which had bent and pointed ends.
  • As I have said before, I had no aptitude for mathematics; the different points were not explained to me as fully as I wished.
  • The geometrical diagrams were particularly vexing because I could not see the relation of the different parts to one another, even on the cushion.
  • It was not until Mr. Keith taught me that I had a clear idea of mathematics.
  • I did not like his plan, for I wished to enter college with my class.
  • On the seventeenth of November I was not very well, and did not go to school.
  • He explained each time what I did not understand in the previous lesson, assigned new work, and took home with him the Greek exercises which I had written during the week on my typewriter, corrected them fully, and returned them to me.
  • My tutor had plenty of time to explain what I did not understand, so I got on faster and did better work than I ever did in school.
  • The college authorities did not allow Miss Sullivan to read the examination papers to me; so Mr. Eugene C. Vining, one of the instructors at the Perkins Institution for the Blind, was employed to copy the papers for me in American braille.
  • Mr. Vining was a stranger to me, and could not communicate with me, except by writing braille.
  • The proctor was also a stranger, and did not attempt to communicate with me in any way.
  • But on the night before the algebra examination, while I was struggling over some very complicated examples, I could not tell the combinations of bracket, brace and radical.
  • Besides, I could not see what I wrote on my typewriter.
  • Indeed, I am not sure now that I read all the signs correctly.
  • But I do not blame any one.
  • The administrative board of Radcliffe did not realize how difficult they were making my examinations, nor did they understand the peculiar difficulties I had to surmount.
  • If I have since learned differently, I am not going to tell anybody.
  • But I soon discovered that college was not quite the romantic lyceum I had imagined.
  • One goes to college to learn, it seems, not to think.
  • But college is not the universal Athens I thought it was.
  • There one does not meet the great and the wise face to face; one does not even feel their living touch.
  • It is impossible, I think, to read in one day four or five different books in different languages and treating of widely different subjects, and not lose sight of the very ends for which one reads.
  • You are amazed at all the things you know which are not on the examination paper.
  • While my days at Radcliffe were still in the future, they were encircled with a halo of romance, which they have lost; but in the transition from romantic to actual I have learned many things I should never have known had I not tried the experiment.
  • As I have said, I did not study regularly during the early years of my education; nor did I read according to rule.
  • But we did not begin the story until August; the first few weeks of my stay at the seashore were so full of discoveries and excitement that I forgot the very existence of books.
  • The hammock was covered with pine needles, for it had not been used while my teacher was away.
  • Before we began the story Miss Sullivan explained to me the things that she knew I should not understand, and as we read on she explained the unfamiliar words.
  • I did not study nor analyze them--I did not know whether they were well written or not; I never thought about style or authorship.
  • I did not care especially for "The Pilgrim's Progress," which I think I did not finish, or for the "Fables."
  • I do not know why it is, but stories in which animals are made to talk and act like human beings have never appealed to me very strongly.
  • I feel a genuine interest in the animals themselves, because they are real animals and not caricatures of men.
  • It is not necessary that one should be able to define every word and give it its principal parts and its grammatical position in the sentence in order to understand and appreciate a fine poem.
  • My admiration for the Aeneid is not so great, but it is none the less real.
  • Although she did not think I should understand, she began to spell into my hand the story of Joseph and his brothers.
  • I do not think that the knowledge which I have gained of its history and sources compensates me for the unpleasant details it has forced upon my attention.
  • I do not remember a time since I have been capable of loving books that I have not loved Shakespeare.
  • I felt vaguely that they could not be good even if they wished to, because no one seemed willing to help them or to give them a fair chance.
  • The bright, gentle, fanciful plays--the ones I like best now--appear not to have impressed me at first, perhaps because they reflected the habitual sunshine and gaiety of a child's life.
  • When he speaks, it is not to impress others, but because his heart would burst if he did not find an outlet for the thoughts that burn in his soul.
  • I admire Victor Hugo – I appreciate his genius, his brilliancy, his romanticism; though he is not one of my literary passions.
  • Here I am not disfranchised.
  • I trust that my readers have not concluded from the preceding chapter on books that reading is my only pleasure; my pleasures and amusements are many and varied.
  • In the summer of 1901 I visited Nova Scotia, and had opportunities such as I had not enjoyed before to make the acquaintance of the ocean.
  • Our hearts beat fast, and our hands trembled with excitement, not fear, for we had the hearts of vikings, and we knew that our skipper was master of the situation.
  • But I must not forget that I was going to write about last summer in particular.
  • In the country one sees only Nature's fair works, and one's soul is not saddened by the cruel struggle for mere existence that goes on in the crowded city.
  • In yonder city's dingy alleys the sun shines not, and the air is foul.
  • It is impossible not to think of all this when I return to the country after a year of work in town.
  • If I do not succeed they resort to dumb show.
  • Is it not true, then, that my life with all its limitations touches at many points the life of the World Beautiful?
  • Beyond there is light, and music, and sweet companionship; but I may not enter.
  • I have often been asked, "Do not people bore you?"
  • I do not understand quite what that means.
  • My spirit could not reach up to his, but he gave me a real sense of joy in life, and I never left him without carrying away a fine thought that grew in beauty and depth of meaning as I grew.
  • In spite of the lapse of years, they seem so close to me that I should not think it strange if at any moment they should clasp my hand and speak words of endearment as they used to before they went away.
  • One beautiful summer day, not long after my meeting with Dr. Holmes, Miss Sullivan and I visited Whittier in his quiet home on the Merrimac.
  • One does not need to read "A Boy I Knew" to understand him--the most generous, sweet-natured boy I ever knew, a good friend in all sorts of weather, who traces the footprints of love in the life of dogs as well as in that of his fellowmen.
  • I could not keep pace with all these literary folk as they glanced from subject to subject and entered into deep dispute, or made conversation sparkle with epigrams and happy witticisms.
  • Helen Keller's letters are important, not only as a supplementary story of her life, but as a demonstration of her growth in thought and expression--the growth which in itself has made her distinguished.
  • Prince is not good dog.
  • He can not get birds.
  • Nancy was not a good child when I went to Memphis.
  • I will not write more to-day.
  • She does not want me to write more today.
  • She is very good and sweet when she does not cry loud.
  • I hope she will not eat too many of the delicious fruit for they will make her very ill.
  • I hope Harry will not be afraid of my pony.
  • I am not afraid to float now.
  • West Newton is not far from Boston and we went there in the steam cars very quickly.
  • Pony's name was Mollie and I had a nice ride on her back; I was not afraid, I hope my uncle will get me a dear little pony and a little cart very soon.
  • Clifton did not kiss me because he does not like to kiss little girls.
  • We came home in horse cars because it was Sunday and steam cars do not go often on Sunday.
  • Many years ago there lived in England many good people, but the king and his friends were not kind and gentle and patient with good people, because the king did not like to have the people disobey him.
  • People did not like to go to church with the king; but they did like to build very nice little churches for themselves.
  • When they went to Holland they did not know anyone; and they could not know what the people were talking about because they did not know Dutch.
  • But soon they learned some Dutch words; but they loved their own language and they did not want little boys and girls to forget it and learn to talk funny Dutch.
  • Poor people were not happy for their hearts were full of sad thoughts because they did not know much about America.
  • Even when she did not fully understand words or ideas, she liked to set them down as though she did.
  • I hope I will not fall and hurt my head I shall visit little Lord Fauntleroy in England and he will be glad to show me his grand and very ancient castle.
  • I shall not be afraid of Fauntleroy's great dog Dougal.
  • The other day I broke my doll's head off; but that was not a dreadful accident, because dolls do not live and feel, like people.
  • My teacher says, if children learn to be patient and gentle while they are little, that when they grow to be young ladies and gentlemen they will not forget to be kind and loving and brave.
  • A little girl in a story was not courageous.
  • He will not let anything harm us at night.
  • I should like to send a kiss to Vittorio, the little prince of Naples, but teacher says she is afraid you will not remember so many messages.
  • Do not forget to give my love to Miss Calliope Kehayia and Mr. Francis Demetrios Kalopothakes.
  • "I will stay with you," said she to the doll, although she was not at all courageous.
  • Is it not a pitiful story?
  • Her little brown mate has flown away with the other birds; but Annie is not sad, for she likes to stay with me.
  • I will take very good care of him, and not let him fall and hurt himself.
  • Sometimes, when mother does not know it, she goes out into the vineyard, and gets her apron full of delicious grapes.
  • Not far from the mill there was an old house, with many trees growing close to it.
  • I cannot know about many things, when my dear teacher is not here.
  • You must not be afraid of them.
  • The mocking bird does not live in the cold north.
  • I do not know what I shall do in the afternoon yet.
  • I hope she is not lonely and unhappy.
  • When I walk out in my garden I cannot see the beautiful flowers but I know that they are all around me; for is not the air sweet with their fragrance?
  • I know too that the tiny lily-bells are whispering pretty secrets to their companions else they would not look so happy.
  • One carried me in his arms so that my feet would not touch the water.
  • Please do not forget to send me some pretty presents to hang on my tree.
  • I have not been sick at all.
  • I hope I have written my letter nicely, but it is very difficult to write on this paper and teacher is not here to give me better.
  • They do not make honey for us, like the bees, but many of them are as beautiful as the flowers they light upon, and they always delight the hearts of little children.
  • When I was a very little child I used to sit in my mother's lap all the time, because I was very timid, and did not like to be left by myself.
  • I did not know then what she was doing, for I was quite ignorant of all things.
  • I did not know then that it was very naughty to do so.
  • I do not see how we can help thinking about God when He is so good to us all the time.
  • But do you not think that God is happy too because you are happy?
  • And He is happier than any of us because He is greater than any of us, and also because He not merely SEES your happiness as we do, but He also MADE it.
  • And we are always most glad of what we not merely see our friends enjoy, but of what we give them to enjoy.
  • But God does not only want us to be HAPPY; He wants us to be good.
  • I shall want you to tell me all about everything, and not forget the Donkey.
  • Perhaps people would be better in a great many ways, for they could not fight as they do now.
  • It does great credit, not only to you, but to your instructors, who have so broken down the walls that seemed to shut you in that now your outlook seems more bright and cheerful than that of many seeing and hearing children.
  • I did not imagine, when I studied about the forests of Maine, that a strong and beautiful ship would go sailing all over the world, carrying wood from those rich forests, to build pleasant homes and schools and churches in distant countries.
  • I was delighted to get there, though I was much disappointed because we did not arrive on Mr. Anagnos' birthday.
  • We surprised our dear friends, however, for they did not expect us Saturday; but when the bell rung Miss Marrett guessed who was at the door, and Mrs. Hopkins jumped up from the breakfast table and ran to the door to meet us; she was indeed much astonished to see us.
  • Of course the sun did not shine, but we had great open wood fires in the rooms, which were all very sweet with roses and other flowers, which were sent to me from distant friends; and fruits of all kinds from California and other places.
  • Is it not a beautiful plan?
  • I am not blind any longer, for I see with your eyes and hear with your ears.
  • It seems to me that all people who have loving, pitying hearts, are not strangers to each other.
  • He loves to climb much better than to spell, but that is because he does not know yet what a wonderful thing language is.
  • It is very beautiful to think that you can tell so many people of the heavenly Father's tender love for all His children even when they are not gentle and noble as He wishes them to be.
  • He has found out that doors have locks, and that little sticks and bits of paper can be got into the key-hole quite easily; but he does not seem very eager to get them out after they are in.
  • He loves to climb the bed-posts and unscrew the steam valves much better than to spell, but that is because he does not understand that words would help him to make new and interesting discoveries.
  • Then I knew that you had not forgotten the dear little child, for the gift brought with it the thought of tender sympathy.
  • I am very sorry to say that Tommy has not learned any words yet.
  • When I came home teacher read to me "The School-boy," for it is not in our print.
  • Are you not very, very happy? and when you are a Bishop you will preach to more people and more and more will be made glad.
  • My dear Mr. Munsell, Surely I need not tell you that your letter was very welcome.
  • Of course we must not give it up.
  • We thought everything was arranged: but we found Monday that Mrs. Elliott would not be willing to let us invite more than fifty people, because Mrs. Howe's house is quite small.
  • I know I shall not fail.
  • Kind people will not disappoint me, when they know that I plead for helpless little children who live in darkness and ignorance.
  • My little brother, Phillips, is not well, and we think the clear mountain air will benefit him.
  • I do not write on a Braille tablet, as you suppose, but on a grooved board like the piece which I enclose.
  • You could not read Braille; for it is written in dots, not at all like ordinary letters.
  • I received several, and I do not know which was from you.
  • I have loved you for a long time, but I did not think you had ever heard of me until your sweet message came.
  • You must have wondered why your letter has not had an answer, and perhaps you have thought Teacher and me very naughty indeed.
  • Teacher's eyes have been hurting her so that she could not write to any one, and I have been trying to fulfil a promise which I made last summer.
  • I had intended to write the sketch during my vacation: but I was not well, and I did not feel able to write even to my friends.
  • You see, it is not very pleasant to write all about one's self.
  • I sent the sketch to the Companion as soon as it was finished; but I do not know that they will accept it.
  • The reports which you have read in the paper about me are not true at all.
  • Would not it be lovely if Mrs. Pratt could meet us there?
  • I do try not to mourn his death too sadly.
  • I do try to think that he is still near, very near; but sometimes the thought that he is not here, that I shall not see him when I go to Boston,--that he is gone,--rushes over my soul like a great wave of sorrow.
  • A lady seemed surprised that I loved flowers when I could not see their beautiful colors, and when I assured her I did love them, she said, "no doubt you feel the colors with your fingers."
  • But of course, it is not alone for their bright colors that we love the flowers....
  • But I do not think so.
  • I saw the one through which Emperor Dom Pedro listened to the words, "To be, or not to be," at the Centennial.
  • Every day I find how little I know, but I do not feel discouraged since God has given me an eternity in which to learn more.
  • I used to say I did not like arithmetic very well, but now I have changed my mind.
  • I did not like to trouble them while I was trying to get money for poor little Tommy, for of course it was more important that he should be educated than that my people should have books to read. 4.
  • I do not know what books we have, but I think it is a miscellaneous (I think that is the word) collection....
  • I shall prize the little book always, not only for its own value; but because of its associations with you.
  • The two distinguished authors were very gentle and kind, and I could not tell which of them I loved best.
  • I might have seen Mrs. Wiggin, the sweet author of "Birds' Christmas Carol," but she had a dangerous cough and could not come.
  • I was much disappointed not to see her, but I hope I shall have that pleasure some other time.
  • Our friends were greatly surprised to see us, as they had not expected us before the last of this month.
  • We had to change cars at Philadelphia; but we did not mind it much.
  • He said no, it would not be called for about fifteen minutes; so we sat down to wait; but in a moment the man came back and asked Teacher if we would like to go to the train at once.
  • Was that not very kind?
  • It was very exciting; but I must say I did not enjoy it very much.
  • It was so hard to lose him, he was the best and kindest of friends, and I do not know what we shall do without him....
  • I read her lips almost exclusively, (she does not know the manual alphabet) and we get on quite well.
  • But I try hard not to be discouraged.
  • We had looked forward to seeing you there, and so we were greatly disappointed that you did not come.
  • We spent about three weeks in Boston, after leaving New York, and I need not tell you we had a most delightful time.
  • He died last Saturday at my home in Tuscumbia, and I was not there.
  • All the time I was preparing for the great ordeal, I could not suppress an inward fear and trembling lest I should fail, and now it is an unspeakable relief to know that I have passed the examinations with credit.
  • I wish it were not such a bother to move, especially as we have to do it so often!...
  • But alas! they are not, and I shall have to content myself with a stroll in the Gardens.
  • You will think I'm pining away for my beloved Wrentham, which is true in one sense and not in another.
  • I do miss Red Farm and the dear ones there dreadfully; but I am not unhappy.
  • But I must not waste my time wishing idle wishes; and after all my ancient friends are very wise and interesting, and I usually enjoy their society very much indeed.
  • Would a college at Havana not be the noblest and most enduring monument that could be raised to the brave men of the "Maine," as well as a source of infinite good to all concerned?
  • Was that not lovely?
  • I also saw poor Niobe with her youngest child clinging close to her while she implored the cruel goddess not to kill her last darling.
  • But somehow, I should prefer to see the originals in the place where Genius meant them to remain, not only as a hymn of praise to the gods, but also as a monument of the glory of Greece.
  • My teacher's eyes are no better: indeed, I think they grow more troublesome, though she is very brave and patient, and will not give up.
  • I feel as if I ought to give up the idea of going to college altogether: for not all the knowledge in the world could make me happy, if obtained at such a cost.
  • She will not listen to me.
  • However, I am glad that I am not debarred from all pleasure in the pictures.
  • We are all so glad and thankful that Mr. Kipling did not die!
  • She has not had a vacation for twelve years, think of it, and all that time she has been the sunshine of my life.
  • But we shall not be quite separated; we shall see each other every day, I hope.
  • Well, I must confess, I do not like the sign-language, and I do not think it would be of much use to the deaf-blind.
  • They would not allow Teacher to read any of the papers to me; so the papers were copied for me in braille.
  • This arrangement worked very well in the languages, but not nearly so well in the Mathematics.
  • Consequently, I did not do so well as I should have done, if Teacher had been allowed to read the Algebra and Geometry to me.
  • But you must not think I blame any one.
  • Of course they did not realize how difficult and perplexing they were making the examinations for me.
  • How could they--they can see and hear, and I suppose they could not understand matters from my point of view....
  • Not only do we enjoy being together; but we also find our little home most delightful.
  • She said she did not consider a degree of any real value, but thought it was much more desirable to do something original than to waste one's energies only for a degree.
  • Her arguments seemed so wise and practical, that I could not but yield.
  • Why, you yourself seem to think that I taught you American braille, when you do not know a single letter in the system!
  • The college authorities would not permit Miss Sullivan to read the examination papers to me; so Mr. Eugene C. Vining, one of the instructors at the Perkins Institution for the Blind, was employed to copy the papers for me in braille.
  • Mr. Vining was a perfect stranger to me, and could not communicate with me except by writing in braille.
  • The Proctor also was a stranger, and did not attempt to communicate with me in any way; and, as they were both unfamiliar with my speech, they could not readily understand what I said to them.
  • There were about twenty-five thousand people at the game, and, when we went out, the noise was so terrific, we nearly jumped out of our skins, thinking it was the din of war, and not of a football game that we heard.
  • We went to St. Bartholomew's Sunday, and I have not felt so much at home in a church since dear Bishop Brooks died.
  • I do not think I have told you that my dear teacher is reading "The Faery Queen" to me.
  • Am I not very fortunate?
  • You know a student's life is of necessity somewhat circumscribed and narrow and crowds out almost everything that is not in books....
  • In college I should wish to continue most, if not all of these subjects.
  • My friends think it very strange that they should hesitate so long, especially when I have not asked them to simplify my work in the least, but only to modify it so as to meet the existing circumstances.
  • They were very kind; but I could not help feeling that they spoke more from a business than a humanitarian point of view.
  • Still I could not shut my eyes to the force and weight of their arguments, and I saw plainly that I must abandon--'s scheme as impracticable.
  • I had had misgivings on this point; but I could not see how we were to help it.
  • She could not even walk and had very little use of her hands.
  • I was in New York not long ago and I saw Miss Rhoades, who told me that she had seen Katie McGirr.
  • Katie played with Miss Rhoades's rings and took them away, saying with a merry laugh, "You shall not have them again!"
  • The latter wished to send her some books; but she could not find anything simple enough for her!
  • Please do not think either of these very unpleasant thoughts.
  • I am not discouraged, nor am I afraid.
  • Now, however, I see the folly of attempting to hitch one's wagon to a star with harness that does not belong to it.
  • I only spoke a few words, as I did not know I was expected to speak until a few minutes before I was called upon.
  • I have worn it only once, but then I felt that Solomon in all his glory was not to be compared with me!
  • It is evident that the blind should have a good magazine, not a special magazine for the blind, but one of our best monthlies, printed in embossed letters.
  • The blind alone could not support it, but it would not take very much money to make up the additional expense.
  • But why should not the friends of the blind assist The Great Round World, if necessary?
  • If he had not taken upon himself the responsibility of Laura Bridgman's education and led her out of the pit of Acheron back to her human inheritance, should I be a sophomore at Radcliffe College to-day--who can say?
  • Without it I do not see how I could go to college.
  • He quoted the passages in which she explains that college is not the "universal Athens" she had hoped to find, and cited the cases of other remarkable persons whose college life had proved disappointing.
  • Miss Keller does not suppose her views to be of great importance, and when she utters her opinions on important matters she takes it for granted that her reader will receive them as the opinions of a junior in college, not of one who writes with the wisdom of maturity.
  • In her account of her early education Miss Keller is not giving a scientifically accurate record of her life, nor even of the important events.
  • On the other hand she does not know another's expression.
  • When she met Dr. Furness, the Shakespearean scholar, he warned her not to let the college professors tell her too many assumed facts about the life of Shakespeare; all we know, he said, is that Shakespeare was baptized, married, and died.
  • After she had passed her examinations and received her certificate of admission, she was advised by the Dean of Radcliffe and others not to go on.
  • But she was not satisfied until she had carried out her purpose and entered college.
  • If she does not know the answer to a question, she guesses with mischievous assurance.
  • Moreover, Miss Sullivan does not see why Miss Keller should be subjected to the investigation of the scientist, and has not herself made many experiments.
  • When a psychologist asked her if Miss Keller spelled on her fingers in her sleep, Miss Sullivan replied that she did not think it worth while to sit up and watch, such matters were of so little consequence.
  • When the organ was played for her in St. Bartholomew's, the whole building shook with the great pedal notes, but that does not altogether account for what she felt and enjoyed.
  • If her companion does not give her enough details, Miss Keller asks questions until she has completed the view to her satisfaction.
  • She does not see with her eyes, but through the inner faculty to serve which eyes were given to us.
  • This sense is not, however, so finely developed as in some other blind people.
  • As she explains, she is not conscious of the single letters or of separate words.
  • Miss Sullivan and others who live constantly with the deaf can spell very rapidly--fast enough to get a slow lecture, not fast enough to get every word of a rapid speaker.
  • The books are not heavy, because the leaves with the raised type do not lie close.
  • They cost a great deal to publish and they have not a large enough sale to make them profitable to the publisher; but there are several institutions with special funds to pay for embossed books.
  • Miss Keller does not as a rule read very fast, but she reads deliberately, not so much because she feels the words less quickly than we see then, as because it is one of her habits of mind to do things thoroughly and well.
  • This much is certain, she cannot have any sense that other people may not have, and the existence of a special sense is not evident to her or to any one who knows her.
  • Miss Keller is distinctly not a singular proof of occult and mysterious theories, and any attempt to explain her in that way fails to reckon with her normality.
  • She does not, it would seem, prove the existence of spirit without matter, or of innate ideas, or of immortality, or anything else that any other human being does not prove.
  • It should be said that any double-case watch with the crystal removed serves well enough for a blind person whose touch is sufficiently delicate to feel the position of the hands and not disturb or injure them.
  • The finer traits of Miss Keller's character are so well known that one needs not say much about them.
  • She has not even learned that exhibition on which so many pride themselves, of 'righteous indignation.'
  • It was said of old time, 'Lord forgive them, they know not what they do!'
  • In consequence her mind is not only vigorous, but it is pure.
  • Not all the attention that has been paid her since she was a child has made her take herself too seriously.
  • Often, however, her sober ideas are not to be laughed at, for her earnestness carries her listeners with her.
  • His success convinced him that language can be conveyed through type to the mind of the blind-deaf child, who, before education, is in the state of the baby who has not learned to prattle; indeed, is in a much worse state, for the brain has grown in years without natural nourishment.
  • After the first year or two Dr. Howe did not teach Laura Bridgman himself, but gave her over to other teachers, who under his direction carried on the work of teaching her language.
  • But neither temperament nor training allowed her to make her pupil the object of any experiment or observation which did not help in the child's development.
  • As soon as a thing was done, a definite goal passed, the teacher did not always look back and describe the way she had come.
  • The truth is not wonderful enough to suit the newspapers; so they enlarge upon it and invent ridiculous embellishments.
  • Then the educators all over the world said their say and for the most part did not help matters.
  • Teachers of the deaf proved a priori that what Miss Sullivan had done could not be, and some discredit was reflected on her statements, because they were surrounded by the vague eloquence of Mr. Anagnos.
  • I do not doubt that she derived from them much pleasure and not a little profit.
  • I was surprised to find Mrs. Keller a very young-looking woman, not much older than myself, I should think.
  • It did not open easily, and she felt carefully to see if there was a keyhole.
  • Her mother interfered at this point and showed Helen by signs that she must not touch the bag.
  • I shall not attempt to conquer her by force alone; but I shall insist on reasonable obedience from the start.
  • Her untaught, unsatisfied hands destroy whatever they touch because they do not know what else to do with things.
  • She ran downstairs with it and could not be induced to return to my room all day.
  • The two letters "c-a," you see, had reminded her of Fridays "lesson"--not that she had any idea that cake was the name of the thing, but it was simply a matter of association, I suppose.
  • She had not finished the cake she was eating, and I took it away, indicating that if she brought the doll I would give her back the cake.
  • Please do not show my letter to any one.
  • Although I try very hard not to force issues, I find it very difficult to avoid them.
  • This morning I would not let her put her hand in my plate.
  • I let her see that I was eating, but did not let her put her hand in the plate.
  • Helen evidently knew where she was as soon as she touched the boxwood hedges, and made many signs which I did not understand.
  • He says the gentleman was not particularly interested, but said he would see if anything could be done.
  • She lets me kiss her now, and when she is in a particularly gentle mood, she will sit in my lap for a minute or two; but she does not return my caresses.
  • I have told Captain and Mrs. Keller that they must not interfere with me in any way.
  • She called my attention to the new arrangement, and when I did not object she seemed pleased and patted herself.
  • Wherever we go, she asks eagerly for the names of things she has not learned at home.
  • I HAVE DECIDED NOT TO TRY TO HAVE REGULAR LESSONS FOR THE PRESENT.
  • I SHALL USE COMPLETE SENTENCES IN TALKING TO HER, and fill out the meaning with gestures and her descriptive signs when necessity requires it; but I shall not try to keep her mind fixed on any one thing.
  • Again, when I hid the spool, she looked for it in a little box not more than an inch long; and she very soon gave up the search.
  • Helen noticed that the puppies' eyes were closed, and she said, "Eyes--shut. Sleep--no," meaning, "The eyes are shut, but the puppies are not asleep."
  • The other day a friend brought her a new doll from Memphis, and I thought I would see if I could make Helen understand that she must not break it.
  • Then she carried the doll upstairs and put it on the top shelf of the wardrobe, and she has not touched it since.
  • I taught her the word AFRAID, and she said: Helen is not afraid.
  • But "genius" and "originality" are words we should not use lightly.
  • If, indeed, they apply to me even remotely, I do not see that I deserve any laudation on that account.
  • I cannot explain it; but when difficulties arise, I am not perplexed or doubtful.
  • You would be amused to see me hold a squealing pig in my arms, while Helen feels it all over, and asks countless questions--questions not easy to answer either.
  • Of course, I shall not overtax her brain.
  • I hope it will not occur to her to count the hairs of her head.
  • If she could see and hear, I suppose she would get rid of her superfluous energy in ways which would not, perhaps, tax her brain so much, although I suspect that the ordinary child takes his play pretty seriously.
  • The same day she had learned, at different times, the words: hOUSE, WEED, DUST, SWING, MOLASSES, FAST, SLOW, MAPLE-SUGAR and COUNTER, and she had not forgotten one of these last.
  • I told her that she had better not talk about it any more, but think.
  • She smiled and answered, "Viney (can) not spell words."
  • Can flies know not to bite?
  • Of course she asks many questions that are not as intelligent as these.
  • I do not wonder you were surprised to hear that I was going to write something for the report.
  • She is also beginning to realize that she is not like other children.
  • A slip on which was printed, in raised letters, the word BOX was placed on the object, and the same experiment was tried with a great many articles, but she did not immediately comprehend that the label-name represented the thing.
  • Indeed, she was much displeased because I could not find her name in the book.
  • When asked the colour of some one whose occupation she did not know she seemed bewildered, and finally said "blue."
  • The flowers did not seem to give her pleasure, and she was very quiet while we stayed there.
  • I do not think anyone can read, or talk for that matter, until he forgets words and sentences in the technical sense.
  • It was not difficult, however, to make her understand that there was a present for each child, and to her great delight she was permitted to hand the gifts to the children.
  • Constant repetition makes it easier to learn how to spell a word.
  • When I see that she is eager to tell me something, but is hampered because she does not know the words, I supply them and the necessary idioms, and we get along finely.
  • When I told her that Santa Claus would not come until she was asleep, she shut her eyes and said, "He will think girl is asleep."
  • Captain Keller took my hand, but could not speak.
  • I don't know what I should have done, had some of the young people not learned to talk with her.
  • Helen was petted and caressed enough to spoil an angel; but I do not think it is possible to spoil her, she is too unconscious of herself, and too loving.
  • I did not have a chance to finish my letter yesterday.
  • I do not love fierce animals.
  • I do not like sick.
  • Natalie is a good girl and does not cry.
  • I think Mrs. Keller has definitely decided to go with us, but she will not stay all summer.
  • He took us to drive one afternoon, and wanted to give Helen a doll; but she said: I do not like too many children.
  • It would indeed be a herculean task to teach the words if the ideas did not already exist in the child's mind.
  • It is not the word, but the capacity to experience the sensation that counts in his education.
  • "No," she replied, "I think not; but children learn better if they write about things that concern them personally."
  • She is able not only to distinguish with great accuracy the different undulations of the air and the vibrations of the floor made by various sounds and motions, and to recognize her friends and acquaintances the instant she touches their hands or clothing, but she also perceives the state of mind of those around her.
  • Several experiments were tried, to determine positively whether or not she had any perception of sound.
  • All present were astonished when she appeared not only to hear a whistle, but also an ordinary tone of voice.
  • Helen remained motionless through them all, not once showing the least sign that she realized what was going on.
  • This time her countenance changed whenever she was spoken to, but there was not such a decided lighting up of the features as when I had held her hand.
  • Doctor gave her medicine to make her well, but poor Florence did not get well.
  • She does not realize that one can be anything but kind-hearted and tender.
  • She is not conscious of any reason why she should be awkward; consequently, her movements are free and graceful.
  • She is very fond of all the living things at home, and she will not have them unkindly treated.
  • When she is riding in the carriage she will not allow the driver to use the whip, because, she says, "poor horses will cry."
  • They are not very wrong to eat too many grapes because they do not know much.
  • I got the milk to show her that she had used the correct word; but I did not let her drink it until she had, with my assistance, made a complete sentence, as "Give Helen some milk to drink."
  • I do not know where he was going because he was a little strange boy.
  • While not confining myself to any special system of instruction, I have tried to add to her general information and intelligence, to enlarge her acquaintance with things around her, and to bring her into easy and natural relations with people.
  • Calf must not open mouth much to kiss.
  • I am tired, and teacher does not want me to write more.
  • I tried to describe to her the appearance of a camel; but, as we were not allowed to touch the animal, I feared that she did not get a correct idea of its shape.
  • From Miss Sullivan's part of this report I give her most important comments and such biographical matter as does not appear elsewhere in the present volume.
  • There was a hopeless look in the dull eye that I could not help noticing, and then, as I was thinking where I had seen that horse before, she looked full at me and said, 'Black Beauty, is that you?'
  • I have never known her to be willing to leave a lesson when she felt that there was anything in it which she did not understand.
  • I have found it best not to tell her that she cannot understand, because she is almost certain to become excited.
  • Not long ago I tried to show her how to build a tower with her blocks.
  • After a time I became discouraged, and told her I was afraid she could not make it stand, but that I would build it for her; but she did not approve of this plan.
  • Until October, 1889, I had not deemed it best to confine Helen to any regular and systematic course of study.
  • Do not let the cat get the mouse.
  • The word THE she did not know, and of course she wished it explained.
  • When she read, "Do not let the cat get the mouse!" she recognized the negation in the sentence, and seemed to know that the cat must not get the mouse.
  • It was hoped that one so peculiarly endowed by nature as Helen, would, if left entirely to her own resources, throw some light upon such psychological questions as were not exhaustively investigated by Dr. Howe; but their hopes were not to be realized.
  • It is impossible to isolate a child in the midst of society, so that he shall not be influenced by the beliefs of those with whom he associates.
  • After a moment she went on: A. says God is everywhere, and that He is all love; but I do not think a person can be made out of love.
  • Later she said: I do not know if Mother Nature made me.
  • I think my mother got me from heaven, but I do not know where that place is.
  • I wish to write about things I do not understand.
  • Why does not the earth fall, it is so very large and heavy?
  • I was compelled to evade her question, for I could not explain to her the mystery of a self-existent being.
  • I told her that God was everywhere, and that she must not think of Him as a person, but as the life, the mind, the soul of everything.
  • She interrupted me: Everything does not have life.
  • The rocks have not life, and they cannot think.
  • When she referred to our conversation again, it was to ask, "Why did not Jesus go away, so that His enemies could not find Him?"
  • When told that Jesus walked on the sea to meet His disciples, she said, decidedly, "It does not mean WALKED, it means SWAM."
  • When told of the instance in which Jesus raised the dead, she was much perplexed, saying, "I did not know life could come back into the dead body!"
  • "No one knows what the soul is like," I replied; "but we know that it is not the body, and it is that part of us which thinks and loves and hopes, and which Christian people believe will live on after the body is dead."
  • At this moment another thought seemed to flash through her mind, and she added, "But Mr. Anagnos did not speak to my soul."
  • When asked if she would not like to live ALWAYS in a beautiful country called heaven, her first question was, "Where is heaven?"
  • I was obliged to confess that I did not know, but suggested that it might be on one of the stars.
  • At another time she asked, "Do you not think we would be very much happier always, if we did not have to die?"
  • She does not think of one wrong act as harmless, of another as of no consequence, and of another as not intended.
  • She had been living in a world she could not realize.
  • "Oh, please read us the rest, even if we won't understand it," they pleaded, delighted with the rhythm, and the beauty which they felt, even though they could not have explained it.
  • It is not necessary that a child should understand every word in a book before he can read with pleasure and profit.
  • Why not, says Miss Sullivan, make a language lesson out of what they were interested in?
  • We do not take in a sentence word by word, but as a whole.
  • The manual alphabet was not the only means of presenting words to Helen Keller's fingers.
  • Books are the storehouse of language, and any child, whether deaf or not, if he has his attention attracted in any way to printed pages, must learn.
  • He learns not by reading what he understands, but by reading and remembering words he does not understand.
  • It was not a special subject, like geography or arithmetic, but her way to outward things.
  • In the same way she played with Latin, learning not only from the lessons her first Latin teacher gave her, but from going over and over the words of a text, a game she played by herself.
  • It was not a lesson, but only one of her recreations.
  • It is true that a teacher with ten times Miss Sullivan's genius could not have made a pupil so remarkable as Helen Keller out of a child born dull and mentally deficient.
  • Her method might not succeed so completely in the hands of any one else.
  • If Miss Keller is fond of language and not interested especially in mathematics, it is not surprising to find Miss Sullivan's interests very similar.
  • And this does not mean that Miss Keller is unduly dependent on her teacher.
  • And the one to do it is the parent or the special teacher, not the school.
  • This is like the effect of the slow dwelling on long words, not quite well managed, that one notices in a child who is telling a solemn story.
  • Miss Keller's vowels are not firm.
  • When she was at the Wright-Humason School in New York, Dr. Humason tried to improve her voice, not only her word pronunciation, but the voice itself, and gave her lessons in tone and vocal exercises.
  • It is hard to say whether or not Miss Keller's speech is easy to understand.
  • Why do you not teach me to talk like them?
  • From the first she was not content to be drilled in single sounds, but was impatient to pronounce words and sentences.
  • Teachers of the deaf often express surprise that Helen's speech is so good when she has not received any regular instruction in speech since the first few lessons given her by Miss Fuller.
  • I knew that Laura Bridgman had shown the same intuitive desire to produce sounds, and had even learned to pronounce a few simple words, which she took great delight in using, and I did not doubt that Helen could accomplish as much as this.
  • I thought, however, that the advantage she would derive would not repay her for the time and labour that such an experiment would cost.
  • When she was not occupied, she wandered restlessly about the house, making strange though rarely unpleasant sounds.
  • In reading the lips she is not so quick or so accurate as some reports declare.
  • Indeed, when some friend is trying to speak to Miss Keller, and the attempt is not proving successful, Miss Sullivan usually helps by spelling the lost words into Miss Keller's hand.
  • President Roosevelt had little difficulty last spring in making Miss Keller understand him, and especially requested Miss Sullivan not to spell into her hand.
  • It brings me into closer and tenderer relationship with those I love, and makes it possible for me to enjoy the sweet companionship of a great many persons from whom I should be entirely cut off if I could not talk.
  • Of course, it was not easy at first to fly.
  • Do not think of to-days failures, but of the success that may come to-morrow.
  • But the extracts from Miss Sullivan's letters and from her reports, although they are clear and accurate, have not the beauty which distinguishes Miss Keller's English.
  • Her service as a teacher of English is not to be measured by her own skill in composition.
  • I inquired of her where she had read this; she did not remember having read it, did not seem to know that she had learned it.
  • The teachers at the Institution expressed the opinion that the description did not appear in any book in raised print in that library; but one lady, Miss Marrett, took upon herself the task of examining books of poems in ordinary type, and was rewarded by finding the following lines in one of Longfellow's minor poems, entitled 'Snowflakes':
  • In a letter to a friend at the Perkins Institution, dated May 17, 1889, she gives a reproduction from one of Hans Christian Andersen's stories, which I had read to her not long before.
  • As we had never seen or heard of any such story as this before, we inquired of her where she read it; she replied, "I did not read it; it is my story for Mr. Anagnos's birthday."
  • But as she was not able to find her copy, and applications for the volume at bookstores in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Albany, and other places resulted only in failure, search was instituted for the author herself.
  • Please give her my warm love, and tell her not to feel troubled about it any more.
  • It was quite early, the sun had not been up very long; the birds were just beginning to sing joyously.
  • They would not awake until the sun had smiled lovingly upon them.
  • Well, one day King Frost was trying to think of some good that he could do with his treasure; and suddenly he concluded to send some of it to his kind neighbour, Santa Claus, to buy presents of food and clothing for the poor, that they might not suffer so much when King Winter went near their homes.
  • "He will know how to make good use of the treasure," added Jack Frost; then he told the fairies not to loiter by the way, but to do his bidding quickly.
  • Still, for awhile, the frost fairies did not notice this strange occurrence, for they were down on the grass, so far below the tree-tops that the wonderful shower of treasure was a long time in reaching them; but at last one of them said, Hark!
  • King Frost frowned and looked very angry at first, and his fairies trembled for fear and cowered still lower in their hiding-places; but just then two little children came dancing through the wood, and though they did not see King Frost or the fairies, they saw the beautiful colour of the leaves, and laughed with delight, and began picking great bunches to take to their mother.
  • Their pleasure charmed away King Frost's anger, and he, too, began to admire the painted trees, and at last he said to himself, My treasures are not wasted if they make little children happy.
  • Of course, he had not gone far when he noticed the brightness of the leaves, and he quickly guessed the cause when he saw the broken jars from which the treasure was still dropping.
  • At first King Frost was very angry, and the fairies trembled and crouched lower in their hiding-places, and I do not know what might have happened to them if just then a party of boys and girls had not entered the wood.
  • He said to himself, My treasures are not wasted if they make little children happy.
  • I do not know what I shall do.
  • 'I thought everybody had the same thought about the leaves, but I do not know now.
  • I thought very much about the sad news when teacher went to the doctor's; she was not here at dinner and I missed her.'
  • I do not feel that I can add anything more that will be of interest.
  • I hasten to assure you that Helen could not have received any idea of the story from any of her relations or friends here, none of whom can communicate with her readily enough to impress her with the details of a story of that character.
  • She could not remember that any one had ever read to her any stories about King Frost, but said she had talked with her teacher about Jack Frost and the wonderful things he did.
  • She did not know the meaning of the word "plagiarism" until quite recently, when it was explained to her.
  • She could not keep back her tears, and the chief cause of her pain seemed to be the fear lest people should doubt her truthfulness.
  • In this case Helen Keller held almost intact in her mind, unmixed with other ideas, the words of a story which at the time it was read to her she did not fully understand.
  • The reason that we do not observe this process in ordinary children is, because we seldom observe them at all, and because they are fed from so many sources that the memories are confused and mutually destructive.
  • Thus it is that any child may be taught to use correct English by not being allowed to read or hear any other kind.
  • The language must be one used by a nation, not an artificial thing.
  • The deaf child who has only the sign language of De l'Epee is an intellectual Philip Nolan, an alien from all races, and his thoughts are not the thoughts of an Englishman, or a Frenchman, or a Spaniard.
  • The Lord's prayer in signs is not the Lord's prayer in English.
  • In the early years of her education she had only good things to read; some were, indeed, trivial and not excellent in style, but not one was positively bad in manner or substance.
  • They did not know for some time after my recovery that the cruel fever had taken my sight and hearing; taken all the light and music and gladness out of my little life.
  • But all was not lost!
  • I do not remember what they all were; but I do know that MOTHER, FATHER, SISTER and TEACHER were among them.
  • "Not yet," she responded, laughing.
  • I do not know whether the difference or the similarity in phrasing between the child's version and the woman's is the more remarkable.
  • Of course I do not refer to beautiful sentiments, but to the higher truths relating to everyday life.
  • To be sure, I take the keenest interest in everything that concerns those who surround me; it is this very interest which makes it so difficult for me to carry on a conversation with some people who will not talk or say what they think, but I should not be sorry to find more friends ready to talk with me now and then about the wonderful things I read.
  • We need not be like "Les Femmes Savantes" but we ought to have something to say about what we learn as well as about what we MUST do, and what our professors say or how they mark our themes.
  • The very fact that the nineteenth century has not produced many authors whom the world may count among the greatest of all time does not in my opinion justify the remark, "There may come a time when people cease to write."
  • This is an age of workers, not of thinkers.
  • I am not one of those on whom fortune deigns to smile.
  • My house is not resplendent with ivory and gold; nor is it adorned with marble arches, resting on graceful columns brought from the quarries of distant Africa.
  • You forget that death comes to the rich and the poor alike, and comes once for all; but remember, Acheron could not be bribed by gold to ferry the crafty Prometheus back to the sunlit world.
  • I rarely have dreams that are not in keeping with what I really think and feel, but one night my very nature seemed to change, and I stood in the eye of the world a mighty man and a terrible.
  • I dared not scream, and I dared not stay in bed.
  • Perhaps this was a confused recollection of the story I had heard not long before about Red Riding Hood.
  • At all events, I slipped down from the bed and nestled close to the fire which had not flickered out.
  • Age is no better, hardly so well, qualified for an instructor as youth, for it has not profited so much as it has lost.
  • Here is life, an experiment to a great extent untried by me; but it does not avail me that they have tried it.
  • This was not the light in which I hoed them.
  • Confucius said, "To know that we know what we know, and that we do not know what we do not know, that is true knowledge."
  • Man has invented, not only houses, but clothes and cooked food; and possibly from the accidental discovery of the warmth of fire, and the consequent use of it, at first a luxury, arose the present necessity to sit by it.
  • Of course the vital heat is not to be confounded with fire; but so much for analogy.
  • Most of the luxuries, and many of the so-called comforts of life, are not only not indispensable, but positive hindrances to the elevation of mankind.
  • We know not much about them.
  • There are nowadays professors of philosophy, but not philosophers.
  • It is to solve some of the problems of life, not only theoretically, but practically.
  • He is not fed, sheltered, clothed, warmed, like his contemporaries.
  • How can a man be a philosopher and not maintain his vital heat by better methods than other men?
  • Surely not more warmth of the same kind, as more and richer food, larger and more splendid houses, finer and more abundant clothing, more numerous, incessant, and hotter fires, and the like.
  • To anticipate, not the sunrise and the dawn merely, but, if possible, Nature herself!
  • It is true, I never assisted the sun materially in his rising, but, doubt not, it was of the last importance only to be present at it.
  • However, I have not set my heart on that.
  • Not long since, a strolling Indian went to sell baskets at the house of a well-known lawyer in my neighborhood.
  • "No, we do not want any," was the reply.
  • I too had woven a kind of basket of a delicate texture, but I had not made it worth any one's while to buy them.
  • I determined to go into business at once, and not wait to acquire the usual capital, using such slender means as I had already got.
  • I have thought that Walden Pond would be a good place for business, not solely on account of the railroad and the ice trade; it offers advantages which it may not be good policy to divulge; it is a good port and a good foundation.
  • As this business was to be entered into without the usual capital, it may not be easy to conjecture where those means, that will still be indispensable to every such undertaking, were to be obtained.
  • But even if the rent is not mended, perhaps the worst vice betrayed is improvidence.
  • A man who has at length found something to do will not need to get a new suit to do it in; for him the old will do, that has lain dusty in the garret for an indeterminate period.
  • I say, beware of all enterprises that require new clothes, and not rather a new wearer of clothes.
  • If there is not a new man, how can the new clothes be made to fit?
  • All men want, not something to do with, but something to do, or rather something to be.
  • Of what use this measuring of me if she does not measure my character, but only the breadth of my shoulders, as it were a peg to bang the coat on?
  • We worship not the Graces, nor the Parcae, but Fashion.
  • Nevertheless, we will not forget that some Egyptian wheat was handed down to us by a mummy.
  • Comparatively, tattooing is not the hideous custom which it is called.
  • It is not barbarous merely because the printing is skin-deep and unalterable.
  • The condition of the operatives is becoming every day more like that of the English; and it cannot be wondered at, since, as far as I have heard or observed, the principal object is, not that mankind may be well and honestly clad, but, unquestionably, that corporations may be enriched.
  • Who does not remember the interest with which, when young, he looked at shelving rocks, or any approach to a cave?
  • At last, we know not what it is to live in the open air, and our lives are domestic in more senses than we think.
  • It would be well, perhaps, if we were to spend more of our days and nights without any obstruction between us and the celestial bodies, if the poet did not speak so much from under a roof, or the saint dwell there so long.
  • This did not appear the worst, nor by any means a despicable alternative.
  • Many a man is harassed to death to pay the rent of a larger and more luxurious box who would not have frozen to death in such a box as this.
  • The meaner sort are covered with mats which they make of a kind of bulrush, and are also indifferently tight and warm, but not so good as the former....
  • In the savage state every family owns a shelter as good as the best, and sufficient for its coarser and simpler wants; but I think that I speak within bounds when I say that, though the birds of the air have their nests, and the foxes their holes, and the savages their wigwams, in modern civilized society not more than one half the families own a shelter.
  • But how happens it that he who is said to enjoy these things is so commonly a poor civilized man, while the savage, who has them not, is rich as a savage?
  • But perhaps a man is not required to bury himself.
  • As I live, saith the Lord God, ye shall not have occasion any more to use this proverb in Israel.
  • But this puts an infinitely worse face on the matter, and suggests, beside, that probably not even the other three succeed in saving their souls, but are perchance bankrupt in a worse sense than they who fail honestly.
  • And when the farmer has got his house, he may not be the richer but the poorer for it, and it be the house that has got him.
  • It has created palaces, but it was not so easy to create noblemen and kings.
  • The myriads who built the pyramids to be the tombs of the Pharaohs were fed on garlic, and it may be were not decently buried themselves.
  • The mason who finishes the cornice of the palace returns at night perchance to a hut not so good as a wigwam.
  • It is a mistake to suppose that, in a country where the usual evidences of civilization exist, the condition of a very large body of the inhabitants may not be as degraded as that of savages.
  • I refer to the degraded poor, not now to the degraded rich.
  • Shall we always study to obtain more of these things, and not sometimes to be content with less?
  • Why should not our furniture be as simple as the Arab's or the Indian's?
  • When I think of the benefactors of the race, whom we have apotheosized as messengers from heaven, bearers of divine gifts to man, I do not see in my mind any retinue at their heels, any carload of fashionable furniture.
  • Or what if I were to allow--would it not be a singular allowance?--that our furniture should be more complex than the Arab's, in proportion as we are morally and intellectually his superiors!
  • At present our houses are cluttered and defiled with it, and a good housewife would sweep out the greater part into the dust hole, and not leave her morning's work undone.
  • There is not a nail to hang a picture on, nor a shelf to receive the bust of a hero or a saint.
  • When I called to see it he was not at home.
  • It was of small dimensions, with a peaked cottage roof, and not much else to be seen, the dirt being raised five feet all around as if it were a compost heap.
  • It was dark, and had a dirt floor for the most part, dank, clammy, and aguish, only here a board and there a board which would not bear removal.
  • She lighted a lamp to show me the inside of the roof and the walls, and also that the board floor extended under the bed, warning me not to step into the cellar, a sort of dust hole two feet deep.
  • The sides were left shelving, and not stoned; but the sun having never shone on them, the sand still keeps its place.
  • It is not the tailor alone who is the ninth part of a man; it is as much the preacher, and the merchant, and the farmer.
  • A sentimental reformer in architecture, he began at the cornice, not at the foundation.
  • If I seem to boast more than is becoming, my excuse is that I brag for humanity rather than for myself; and my shortcomings and inconsistencies do not affect the truth of my statement.
  • "But," says one, "you do not mean that the students should go to work with their hands instead of their heads?"
  • I do not mean that exactly, but I mean something which he might think a good deal like that; I mean that they should not play life, or study it merely, while the community supports them at this expensive game, but earnestly live it from beginning to end.
  • As if the main object were to talk fast and not to talk sensibly.
  • After all, the man whose horse trots a mile in a minute does not carry the most important messages; he is not an evangelist, nor does he come round eating locusts and wild honey.
  • I desire to speak impartially on this point, and as one not interested in the success or failure of the present economical and social arrangements.
  • I was more independent than any farmer in Concord, for I was not anchored to a house or farm, but could follow the bent of my genius, which is a very crooked one, every moment.
  • However, I should never have broken a horse or bull and taken him to board for any work he might do for me, for fear I should become a horseman or a herdsman merely; and if society seems to be the gainer by so doing, are we certain that what is one man's gain is not another's loss, and that the stable-boy has equal cause with his master to be satisfied?
  • Man thus not only works for the animal within him, but, for a symbol of this, he works for the animal without him.
  • This town is said to have the largest houses for oxen, cows, and horses hereabouts, and it is not behindhand in its public buildings; but there are very few halls for free worship or free speech in this county.
  • It should not be by their architecture, but why not even by their power of abstract thought, that nations should seek to commemorate themselves?
  • A simple and independent mind does not toil at the bidding of any prince.
  • Genius is not a retainer to any emperor, nor is its material silver, or gold, or marble, except to a trifling extent.
  • In Arcadia, when I was there, I did not see any hammering stone.
  • For my part, I should like to know who in those days did not build them--who were above such trifling.
  • Nothing was given me of which I have not rendered some account.
  • Even the little variety which I used was a yielding to the demands of appetite, and not of health.
  • Not a word about leaven.
  • But I did not always use this staff of life.
  • Every New Englander might easily raise all his own breadstuffs in this land of rye and Indian corn, and not depend on distant and fluctuating markets for them.
  • I do not learn that the Indians ever troubled themselves to go after it.
  • As for a habitat, if I were not permitted still to squat, I might purchase one acre at the same price for which the land I cultivated was sold--namely, eight dollars and eight cents.
  • My furniture, part of which I made myself--and the rest cost me nothing of which I have not rendered an account--consisted of a bed, a table, a desk, three chairs, a looking-glass three inches in diameter, a pair of tongs and andirons, a kettle, a skillet, and a frying-pan, a dipper, a wash-bowl, two knives and forks, three plates, one cup, one spoon, a jug for oil, a jug for molasses, and a japanned lamp.
  • What man but a philosopher would not be ashamed to see his furniture packed in a cart and going up country exposed to the light of heaven and the eyes of men, a beggarly account of empty boxes?
  • It is the same as if all these traps were buckled to a man's belt, and he could not move over the rough country where our lines are cast without dragging them--dragging his trap.
  • Even those who seem for a long while not to have any, if you inquire more narrowly you will find have some stored in somebody's barn.
  • I look upon England today as an old gentleman who is travelling with a great deal of baggage, trumpery which has accumulated from long housekeeping, which he has not the courage to burn; great trunk, little trunk, bandbox, and bundle.
  • The moon will not sour milk nor taint meat of mine, nor will the sun injure my furniture or fade my carpet; and if he is sometimes too warm a friend, I find it still better economy to retreat behind some curtain which nature has provided, than to add a single item to the details of housekeeping.
  • As I did not teach for the good of my fellow-men, but simply for a livelihood, this was a failure.
  • It is not necessary that a man should earn his living by the sweat of his brow, unless he sweats easier than I do.
  • The youth may build or plant or sail, only let him not be hindered from doing that which he tells me he would like to do.
  • We may not arrive at our port within a calculable period, but we would preserve the true course.
  • Undoubtedly, in this case, what is true for one is truer still for a thousand, as a large house is not proportionally more expensive than a small one, since one roof may cover, one cellar underlie, and one wall separate several apartments.
  • If a man has faith, he will co-operate with equal faith everywhere; if he has not faith, he will continue to live like the rest of the world, whatever company he is joined to.
  • It was easy to see that they could not long be companions or co-operate, since one would not operate at all.
  • Probably I should not consciously and deliberately forsake my particular calling to do the good which society demands of me, to save the universe from annihilation; and I believe that a like but infinitely greater steadfastness elsewhere is all that now preserves it.
  • Philanthropy is not love for one's fellow-man in the broadest sense.
  • Howard was no doubt an exceedingly kind and worthy man in his way, and has his reward; but, comparatively speaking, what are a hundred Howards to us, if their philanthropy do not help us in our best estate, when we are most worthy to be helped?
  • Being superior to physical suffering, it sometimes chanced that they were superior to any consolation which the missionaries could offer; and the law to do as you would be done by fell with less persuasiveness on the ears of those who, for their part, did not care how they were done by, who loved their enemies after a new fashion, and came very near freely forgiving them all they did.
  • If you give money, spend yourself with it, and do not merely abandon it to them.
  • Often the poor man is not so cold and hungry as he is dirty and ragged and gross.
  • It is partly his taste, and not merely his misfortune.
  • Would they not be kinder if they employed themselves there?
  • The last were not England's best men and women; only, perhaps, her best philanthropists.
  • I do not value chiefly a man's uprightness and benevolence, which are, as it were, his stem and leaves.
  • We should impart our courage, and not our despair, our health and ease, and not our disease, and take care that this does not spread by contagion.
  • If anything ail a man, so that he does not perform his functions, if he have a pain in his bowels even--for that is the seat of sympathy--he forthwith sets about reforming--the world.
  • I believe that what so saddens the reformer is not his sympathy with his fellows in distress, but, though he be the holiest son of God, is his private ail.
  • If you should ever be betrayed into any of these philanthropies, do not let your left hand know what your right hand does, for it is not worth knowing.
  • Do not stay to be an overseer of the poor, but endeavor to become one of the worthies of the world.
  • I discovered many a site for a house not likely to be soon improved, which some might have thought too far from the village, but to my eyes the village was too far from it.
  • I think I shall not buy greedily, but go round and round it as long as I live, and be buried in it first, that it may please me the more at last.
  • I did not need to go outdoors to take the air, for the atmosphere within had lost none of its freshness.
  • It was not so much within doors as behind a door where I sat, even in the rainiest weather.
  • Such was not my abode, for I found myself suddenly neighbor to the birds; not by having imprisoned one, but having caged myself near them.
  • But in other directions, even from this point, I could not see over or beyond the woods which surrounded me.
  • One value even of the smallest well is, that when you look into it you see that earth is not continent but insular.
  • Though the view from my door was still more contracted, I did not feel crowded or confined in the least.
  • It matters not what the clocks say or the attitudes and labors of men.
  • They are not such poor calculators.
  • I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.
  • I say, let your affairs be as two or three, and not a hundred or a thousand; instead of a million count half a dozen, and keep your accounts on your thumb-nail.
  • If we do not get out sleepers, and forge rails, and devote days and nights to the work, but go to tinkering upon our lives to improve them, who will build railroads?
  • And if railroads are not built, how shall we get to heaven in season?
  • We do not ride on the railroad; it rides upon us.
  • If men would steadily observe realities only, and not allow themselves to be deluded, life, to compare it with such things as we know, would be like a fairy tale and the Arabian Nights' Entertainments.
  • If he should give us an account of the realities he beheld there, we should not recognize the place in his description.
  • Let us spend one day as deliberately as Nature, and not be thrown off the track by every nutshell and mosquito's wing that falls on the rails.
  • Let us not be upset and overwhelmed in that terrible rapid and whirlpool called a dinner, situated in the meridian shallows.
  • I know not the first letter of the alphabet.
  • I do not wish to be any more busy with my hands than is necessary.
  • It is not in vain that the farmer remembers and repeats the few Latin words which he has heard.
  • They are the only oracles which are not decayed, and there are such answers to the most modern inquiry in them as Delphi and Dodona never gave.
  • It is not enough even to be able to speak the language of that nation by which they are written, for there is a memorable interval between the spoken and the written language, the language heard and the language read.
  • The crowds of men who merely spoke the Greek and Latin tongues in the Middle Ages were not entitled by the accident of birth to read the works of genius written in those languages; for these were not written in that Greek or Latin which they knew, but in the select language of literature.
  • They had not learned the nobler dialects of Greece and Rome, but the very materials on which they were written were waste paper to them, and they prized instead a cheap contemporary literature.
  • What the Roman and Grecian multitude could not hear, after the lapse of ages a few scholars read, and a few scholars only are still reading it.
  • They are not exhalations like our daily colloquies and vaporous breath.
  • It may be translated into every language, and not only be read but actually breathed from all human lips;--not be represented on canvas or in marble only, but be carved out of the breath of life itself.
  • They have no cause of their own to plead, but while they enlighten and sustain the reader his common sense will not refuse them.
  • There is a work in several volumes in our Circulating Library entitled "Little Reading," which I thought referred to a town of that name which I had not been to.
  • The next time the novelist rings the bell I will not stir though the meeting-house burn down.
  • The best books are not read even by those who are called good readers.
  • I know a woodchopper, of middle age, who takes a French paper, not for news as he says, for he is above that, but to "keep himself in practice," he being a Canadian by birth; and when I ask him what he considers the best thing he can do in this world, he says, beside this, to keep up and add to his English.
  • Most men do not know that any nation but the Hebrews have had a scripture.
  • We are underbred and low-lived and illiterate; and in this respect I confess I do not make any very broad distinction between the illiterateness of my townsman who cannot read at all and the illiterateness of him who has learned to read only what is for children and feeble intellects.
  • It is not all books that are as dull as their readers.
  • I do not wish to flatter my townsmen, nor to be flattered by them, for that will not advance either of us.
  • It is time that we had uncommon schools, that we did not leave off our education when we begin to be men and women.
  • Can we not hire some Abelard to lecture to us?
  • If we live in the Nineteenth Century, why should we not enjoy the advantages which the Nineteenth Century offers?
  • New England can hire all the wise men in the world to come and teach her, and board them round the while, and not be provincial at all.
  • I did not read books the first summer; I hoed beans.
  • There were times when I could not afford to sacrifice the bloom of the present moment to any work, whether of the head or hands.
  • They were not time subtracted from my life, but so much over and above my usual allowance.
  • For the most part, I minded not how the hours went.
  • My days were not days of the week, bearing the stamp of any heathen deity, nor were they minced into hours and fretted by the ticking of a clock; for I lived like the Puri Indians, of whom it is said that "for yesterday, today, and tomorrow they have only one word, and they express the variety of meaning by pointing backward for yesterday forward for tomorrow, and overhead for the passing day."
  • Follow your genius closely enough, and it will not fail to show you a fresh prospect every hour.
  • It was pleasant to see my whole household effects out on the grass, making a little pile like a gypsy's pack, and my three-legged table, from which I did not remove the books and pen and ink, standing amid the pines and hickories.
  • Have not men improved somewhat in punctuality since the railroad was invented?
  • Do they not talk and think faster in the depot than they did in the stage-office?
  • It does not clasp its hands and pray to Jupiter.
  • Here goes lumber from the Maine woods, which did not go out to sea in the last freshet, risen four dollars on the thousand because of what did go out or was split up; pine, spruce, cedar--first, second, third, and fourth qualities, so lately all of one quality, to wave over the bear, and moose, and caribou.
  • They will not be in at the death.
  • It is new information and not merely a repetition of what was presented in the first chapter.
  • At evening, the distant lowing of some cow in the horizon beyond the woods sounded sweet and melodious, and at first I would mistake it for the voices of certain minstrels by whom I was sometimes serenaded, who might be straying over hill and dale; but soon I was not unpleasantly disappointed when it was prolonged into the cheap and natural music of the cow.
  • Who would not be early to rise, and rise earlier and earlier every successive day of his life, till he became unspeakably healthy, wealthy, and wise?
  • The wildest animals do not repose, but seek their prey now; the fox, and skunk, and rabbit, now roam the fields and woods without fear.
  • The thick wood is not just at our door, nor the pond, but somewhat is always clearing, familiar and worn by us, appropriated and fenced in some way, and reclaimed from Nature.
  • I do not flatter myself, but if it be possible they flatter me.
  • I have never felt lonesome, or in the least oppressed by a sense of solitude, but once, and that was a few weeks after I came to the woods, when, for an hour, I doubted if the near neighborhood of man was not essential to a serene and healthy life.
  • Why should I feel lonely? is not our planet in the Milky Way?
  • This which you put seems to me not to be the most important question.
  • I answered that I was very sure I liked it passably well; I was not joking.
  • Next to us is not the workman whom we have hired, with whom we love so well to talk, but the workman whose work we are.
  • We are the subjects of an experiment which is not a little interesting to me.
  • Confucius says truly, "Virtue does not remain as an abandoned orphan; it must of necessity have neighbors."
  • We are not wholly involved in Nature.
  • I may be affected by a theatrical exhibition; on the other hand, I may not be affected by an actual event which appears to concern me much more.
  • We meet at very short intervals, not having had time to acquire any new value for each other.
  • We have had to agree on a certain set of rules, called etiquette and politeness, to make this frequent meeting tolerable and that we need not come to open war.
  • The value of a man is not in his skin, that we should touch him.
  • Shall I not have intelligence with the earth?
  • Am I not partly leaves and vegetable mould myself?
  • Not my or thy great-grandfather's, but our great-grandmother Nature's universal, vegetable, botanic medicines, by which she has kept herself young always, outlived so many old Parrs in her day, and fed her health with their decaying fatness.
  • In my house we were so near that we could not begin to hear--we could not speak low enough to be heard; as when you throw two stones into calm water so near that they break each other's undulations.
  • As the conversation began to assume a loftier and grander tone, we gradually shoved our chairs farther apart till they touched the wall in opposite corners, and then commonly there was not room enough.
  • You need not rest your reputation on the dinners you give.
  • This meal only we had in two nights and a day; and had not one of us bought a partridge, we had taken our journey fasting.
  • As for lodging, it is true they were but poorly entertained, though what they found an inconvenience was no doubt intended for an honor; but as far as eating was concerned, I do not see how the Indians could have done better.
  • He, too, has heard of Homer, and, "if it were not for books," would "not know what to do rainy days," though perhaps he has not read one wholly through for many rainy seasons.
  • To him Homer was a great writer, though what his writing was about he did not know.
  • Frequently he would leave his dinner in the bushes, when his dog had caught a woodchuck by the way, and go back a mile and a half to dress it and leave it in the cellar of the house where he boarded, after deliberating first for half an hour whether he could not sink it in the pond safely till nightfall--loving to dwell long upon these themes.
  • If working every day were not my trade, I could get all the meat I should want by hunting-pigeons, woodchucks, rabbits, partridges--by gosh!
  • I asked him once if he was not sometimes tired at night, after working all day; and he answered, with a sincere and serious look, "Gorrappit, I never was tired in my life."
  • He would not play any part.
  • He could defend many institutions better than any philosopher, because, in describing them as they concerned him, he gave the true reason for their prevalence, and speculation had not suggested to him any other.
  • I asked him once, when I had not seen him for many months, if he had got a new idea this summer.
  • "Good Lord"--said he, "a man that has to work as I do, if he does not forget the ideas he has had, he will do well.
  • With respect to wit, I learned that there was not much difference between the half and the whole.
  • I did not know at first but it was the result of a wise policy.
  • I require of a visitor that he be not actually starving, though he may have the very best appetite in the world, however he got it.
  • Objects of charity are not guests.
  • Men who did not know when their visit had terminated, though I went about my business again, answering them from greater and greater remoteness.
  • I could not but notice some of the peculiarities of my visitors.
  • It was the only open and cultivated field for a great distance on either side of the road, so they made the most of it; and sometimes the man in the field heard more of travellers' gossip and comment than was meant for his ear: "Beans so late! peas so late!"--for I continued to plant when others had begun to hoe--the ministerial husbandman had not suspected it.
  • This was one field not in Mr. Coleman's report.
  • Mine was, as it were, the connecting link between wild and cultivated fields; as some states are civilized, and others half-civilized, and others savage or barbarous, so my field was, though not in a bad sense, a half-cultivated field.
  • Near at hand, upon the topmost spray of a birch, sings the brown thrasher--or red mavis, as some love to call him--all the morning, glad of your society, that would find out another farmer's field if yours were not here.
  • But this was not corn, and so it was safe from such enemies as he.
  • A long war, not with cranes, but with weeds, those Trojans who had sun and rain and dews on their side.
  • I saw an old man the other day, to my astonishment, making the holes with a hoe for the seventieth time at least, and not for himself to lie down in!
  • But why should not the New Englander try new adventures, and not lay so much stress on his grain, his potato and grass crop, and his orchards--raise other crops than these?
  • Why concern ourselves so much about our beans for seed, and not be concerned at all about a new generation of men?
  • This broad field which I have looked at so long looks not to me as the principal cultivator, but away from me to influences more genial to it, which water and make it green.
  • These beans have results which are not harvested by me.
  • Do they not grow for woodchucks partly?
  • Sometimes I bolted suddenly, and nobody could tell my whereabouts, for I did not stand much about gracefulness, and never hesitated at a gap in a fence.
  • In our most trivial walks, we are constantly, though unconsciously, steering like pilots by certain well-known beacons and headlands, and if we go beyond our usual course we still carry in our minds the bearing of some neighboring cape; and not till we are completely lost, or turned round--for a man needs only to be turned round once with his eyes shut in this world to be lost--do we appreciate the vastness and strangeness of nature.
  • I never fastened my door night or day, though I was to be absent several days; not even when the next fall I spent a fortnight in the woods of Maine.
  • These take place only in communities where some have got more than is sufficient while others have not enough.
  • The fruits do not yield their true flavor to the purchaser of them, nor to him who raises them for the market.
  • Once in a while we sat together on the pond, he at one end of the boat, and I at the other; but not many words passed between us, for he had grown deaf in his later years, but he occasionally hummed a psalm, which harmonized well enough with my philosophy.
  • The shore is composed of a belt of smooth rounded white stones like paving-stones, excepting one or two short sand beaches, and is so steep that in many places a single leap will carry you into water over your head; and were it not for its remarkable transparency, that would be the last to be seen of its bottom till it rose on the opposite side.
  • Not an intermitting spring!
  • Perhaps on that spring morning when Adam and Eve were driven out of Eden Walden Pond was already in existence, and even then breaking up in a gentle spring rain accompanied with mist and a southerly wind, and covered with myriads of ducks and geese, which had not heard of the fall, when still such pure lakes sufficed them.
  • The pond rises and falls, but whether regularly or not, and within what period, nobody knows, though, as usual, many pretend to know.
  • It is commonly higher in the winter and lower in the summer, though not corresponding to the general wet and dryness.
  • If the name was not derived from that of some English locality--Saffron Walden, for instance--one might suppose that it was called originally Walled-in Pond.
  • For four months in the year its water is as cold as it is pure at all times; and I think that it is then as good as any, if not the best, in the town.
  • The temperature of the Boiling Spring the same day was 45º, or the warmest of any water tried, though it is the coldest that I know of in summer, when, beside, shallow and stagnant surface water is not mingled with it.
  • Its pickerel, though not abundant, are its chief boast.
  • The specific name reticulatus would not apply to this; it should be guttatus rather.
  • They are similar to those found in rivers; but as there are no suckers nor lampreys here, I know not by what fish they could be made.
  • The forest has never so good a setting, nor is so distinctly beautiful, as when seen from the middle of a small lake amid hills which rise from the water's edge; for the water in which it is reflected not only makes the best foreground in such a case, but, with its winding shore, the most natural and agreeable boundary to it.
  • It is like molten glass cooled but not congealed, and the few motes in it are pure and beautiful like the imperfections in glass.
  • From a hilltop you can see a fish leap in almost any part; for not a pickerel or shiner picks an insect from this smooth surface but it manifestly disturbs the equilibrium of the whole lake.
  • He did not know whose it was; it belonged to the pond.
  • It has not acquired one permanent wrinkle after all its ripples.
  • The engineer does not forget at night, or his nature does not, that he has beheld this vision of serenity and purity once at least during the day.
  • It is much larger, being said to contain one hundred and ninety-seven acres, and is more fertile in fish; but it is comparatively shallow, and not remarkably pure.
  • Moreover, the waves, I suspect, do not so much construct as wear down a material which has already acquired consistency.
  • It did not turn his mill, and it was no privilege to him to behold it.
  • Since the wood-cutters, and the railroad, and I myself have profaned Walden, perhaps the most attractive, if not the most beautiful, of all our lakes, the gem of the woods, is White Pond;--a poor name from its commonness, whether derived from the remarkable purity of its waters or the color of its sands.
  • His father, eighty years old, could not remember when it was not there.
  • But the only true America is that country where you are at liberty to pursue such a mode of life as may enable you to do without these, and where the state does not endeavor to compel you to sustain the slavery and war and other superfluous expenses which directly or indirectly result from the use of such things.
  • A man will not need to study history to find out what is best for his own culture.
  • I am not squeamish in such cases when manners are concerned.
  • Let not to get a living be thy trade, but thy sport.
  • Poor John Field!--I trust he does not read this, unless he will improve by it--thinking to live by some derivative old-country mode in this primitive new country--to catch perch with shiners.
  • I love the wild not less than the good.
  • Almost every New England boy among my contemporaries shouldered a fowling-piece between the ages of ten and fourteen; and his hunting and fishing grounds were not limited, like the preserves of an English nobleman, but were more boundless even than those of a savage.
  • No wonder, then, that he did not oftener stay to play on the common.
  • But already a change is taking place, owing, not to an increased humanity, but to an increased scarcity of game, for perhaps the hunter is the greatest friend of the animals hunted, not excepting the Humane Society.
  • Not that I am less humane than others, but I did not perceive that my feelings were much affected.
  • Not that I am less humane than others, but I did not perceive that my feelings were much affected.
  • I did not pity the fishes nor the worms.
  • I warn you, mothers, that my sympathies do not always make the usual phil-anthropic distinctions.
  • Commonly they did not think that they were lucky, or well paid for their time, unless they got a long string of fish, though they had the opportunity of seeing the pond all the while.
  • I think that I do not mistake.
  • Like many of my contemporaries, I had rarely for many years used animal food, or tea, or coffee, etc.; not so much because of any ill effects which I had traced to them, as because they were not agreeable to my imagination.
  • The repugnance to animal food is not the effect of experience, but is an instinct.
  • The fruits eaten temperately need not make us ashamed of our appetites, nor interrupt the worthiest pursuits.
  • It is not worth the while to live by rich cookery.
  • Yet till this is otherwise we are not civilized, and, if gentlemen and ladies, are not true men and women.
  • It may be vain to ask why the imagination will not be reconciled to flesh and fat.
  • Is it not a reproach that man is a carnivorous animal?
  • I believe that water is the only drink for a wise man; wine is not so noble a liquor; and think of dashing the hopes of a morning with a cup of warm coffee, or of an evening with a dish of tea!
  • Of all ebriosity, who does not prefer to be intoxicated by the air he breathes?
  • Who has not sometimes derived an inexpressible satisfaction from his food in which appetite had no share?
  • Not that food which entereth into the mouth defileth a man, but the appetite with which it is eaten.
  • Though the youth at last grows indifferent, the laws of the universe are not indifferent, but are forever on the side of the most sensitive.
  • Listen to every zephyr for some reproof, for it is surely there, and he is unfortunate who does not hear it.
  • I fear that it may enjoy a certain health of its own; that we may be well, yet not pure.
  • He shall not know it.
  • We have heard of this virtue, but we know not what it is.
  • What avails it that you are Christian, if you are not purer than the heathen, if you deny yourself no more, if you are not more religious?
  • I hesitate to say these things, but it is not because of the subject--I care not how obscene my words are--but because I cannot speak of them without betraying my impurity.
  • He teaches how to eat, drink, cohabit, void excrement and urine, and the like, elevating what is mean, and does not falsely excuse himself by calling these things trifles.
  • He had not attended to the train of his thoughts long when he heard some one playing on a flute, and that sound harmonized with his mood.
  • I have not heard so much as a locust over the sweet-fern these three hours.
  • He that does not eat need not work.
  • Better not keep a house.
  • I thought, as I have my living to get, and have not eaten to-day, that I might go a-fishing.
  • But that we may not be delayed, you shall be digging the bait meanwhile.
  • Or, if you choose to go farther, it will not be unwise, for I have found the increase of fair bait to be very nearly as the squares of the distances.
  • I know not whether it was the dumps or a budding ecstasy.
  • There's good sport there if the water be not too high.
  • They are not callow like the young of most birds, but more perfectly developed and precocious even than chickens.
  • They suggest not merely the purity of infancy, but a wisdom clarified by experience.
  • Such an eye was not born when the bird was, but is coeval with the sky it reflects.
  • The woods do not yield another such a gem.
  • The traveller does not often look into such a limpid well.
  • Or I heard the peep of the young when I could not see the parent bird.
  • Looking farther, I was surprised to find that the chips were covered with such combatants, that it was not a duellum, but a bellum, a war between two races of ants, the red always pitted against the black, and frequently two red ones to one black.
  • There was not one hireling there.
  • Whether he finally survived that combat, and spent the remainder of his days in some Hotel des Invalides, I do not know; but I thought that his industry would not be worth much thereafter.
  • If I endeavored to overtake him in a boat, in order to see how he would manoeuvre, he would dive and be completely lost, so that I did not discover him again, sometimes, till the latter part of the day.
  • He manoeuvred so cunningly that I could not get within half a dozen rods of him.
  • He led me at once to the widest part of the pond, and could not be driven from it.
  • Did not his white breast enough betray him?
  • Though the sky was by this time overcast, the pond was so smooth that I could see where he broke the surface when I did not hear him.
  • When compelled to rise they would sometimes circle round and round and over the pond at a considerable height, from which they could easily see to other ponds and the river, like black motes in the sky; and, when I thought they had gone off thither long since, they would settle down by a slanting flight of a quarter of a mile on to a distant part which was left free; but what beside safety they got by sailing in the middle of Walden I do not know, unless they love its water for the same reason that I do.
  • It was very exciting at that season to roam the then boundless chestnut woods of Lincoln--they now sleep their long sleep under the railroad--with a bag on my shoulder, and a stick to open burs with in my hand, for I did not always wait for the frost, amid the rustling of leaves and the loud reproofs of the red squirrels and the jays, whose half-consumed nuts I sometimes stole, for the burs which they had selected were sure to contain sound ones.
  • Each morning, when they were numbed with cold, I swept some of them out, but I did not trouble myself much to get rid of them; I even felt complimented by their regarding my house as a desirable shelter.
  • They never molested me seriously, though they bedded with me; and they gradually disappeared, into what crevices I do not know, avoiding winter and unspeakable cold.
  • Should not every apartment in which man dwells be lofty enough to create some obscurity overhead, where flickering shadows may play at evening about the rafters?
  • Nowadays the host does not admit you to his hearth, but has got the mason to build one for yourself somewhere in his alley, and hospitality is the art of keeping you at the greatest distance.
  • I did not plaster till it was freezing weather.
  • But these within the ice are not so numerous nor obvious as those beneath.
  • Though completely waterlogged and almost as heavy as lead, they not only burned long, but made a very hot fire; nay, I thought that they burned better for the soaking, as if the pitch, being confined by the water, burned longer, as in a lamp.
  • My house was not empty though I was gone.
  • The next winter I used a small cooking-stove for economy, since I did not own the forest; but it did not keep fire so well as the open fireplace.
  • The stove not only took up room and scented the house, but it concealed the fire, and I felt as if I had lost a companion.
  • East of my bean-field, across the road, lived Cato Ingraham, slave of Duncan Ingraham, Esquire, gentleman, of Concord village, who built his slave a house, and gave him permission to live in Walden Woods;--Cato, not Uticensis, but Concordiensis.
  • Not long since I read his epitaph in the old Lincoln burying-ground, a little on one side, near the unmarked graves of some British grenadiers who fell in the retreat from Concord--where he is styled "Sippio Brister"--Scipio Africanus he had some title to be called--"a man of color," as if he were discolored.
  • It was set on fire by mischievous boys, one Election night, if I do not mistake.
  • I had read of the potter's clay and wheel in Scripture, but it had never occurred to me that the pots we use were not such as had come down unbroken from those days, or grown on trees like gourds somewhere, and I was pleased to hear that so fictile an art was ever practiced in my neighborhood.
  • He died in the road at the foot of Brister's Hill shortly after I came to the woods, so that I have not remembered him as a neighbor.
  • One black chicken which the administrator could not catch, black as night and as silent, not even croaking, awaiting Reynard, still went to roost in the next apartment.
  • Sometimes the well dent is visible, where once a spring oozed; now dry and tearless grass; or it was covered deep--not to be discovered till some late day--with a flat stone under the sod, when the last of the race departed.
  • Might not the basket, stable-broom, mat-making, corn-parching, linen-spinning, and pottery business have thrived here, making the wilderness to blossom like the rose, and a numerous posterity have inherited the land of their fathers?
  • I am not aware that any man has ever built on the spot which I occupy.
  • When the farmers could not get to the woods and swamps with their teams, and were obliged to cut down the shade trees before their houses, and, when the crust was harder, cut off the trees in the swamps, ten feet from the ground, as it appeared the next spring.
  • He could hear me when I moved and cronched the snow with my feet, but could not plainly see me.
  • I do not see how he can ever die; Nature cannot spare him.
  • We waded so gently and reverently, or we pulled together so smoothly, that the fishes of thought were not scared from the stream, nor feared any angler on the bank, but came and went grandly, like the clouds which float through the western sky, and the mother-o'-pearl flocks which sometimes form and dissolve there.
  • I often performed this duty of hospitality, waited long enough to milk a whole herd of cows, but did not see the man approaching from the town.
  • When the ponds were firmly frozen, they afforded not only new and shorter routes to many points, but new views from their surfaces of the familiar landscape around them.
  • They were manifestly thieves, and I had not much respect for them; but the squirrels, though at first shy, went to work as if they were taking what was their own.
  • Whichever side you walk in the woods the partridge bursts away on whirring wings, jarring the snow from the dry leaves and twigs on high, which comes sifting down in the sunbeams like golden dust, for this brave bird is not to be scared by winter.
  • They will come regularly every evening to particular trees, where the cunning sportsman lies in wait for them, and the distant orchards next the woods suffer thus not a little.
  • Sometimes, however, he will run upon a wall many rods, and then leap off far to one side, and he appears to know that water will not retain his scent.
  • But I fear that he was not the wiser for all I told him, for every time I attempted to answer his questions he interrupted me by asking, "What do you do here?"
  • Not without reason was its slenderness.
  • That must be a poor country indeed that does not support a hare.
  • First I take an axe and pail and go in search of water, if that be not a dream.
  • The things which they practice are said not yet to be known.
  • But I can assure my readers that Walden has a reasonably tight bottom at a not unreasonable, though at an unusual, depth.
  • This is a remarkable depth for so small an area; yet not an inch of it can be spared by the imagination.
  • Would it not react on the minds of men?
  • A factory-owner, hearing what depth I had found, thought that it could not be true, for, judging from his acquaintance with dams, sand would not lie at so steep an angle.
  • But the deepest ponds are not so deep in proportion to their area as most suppose, and, if drained, would not leave very remarkable valleys.
  • They are not like cups between the hills; for this one, which is so unusually deep for its area, appears in a vertical section through its centre not deeper than a shallow plate.
  • As I sounded through the ice I could determine the shape of the bottom with greater accuracy than is possible in surveying harbors which do not freeze over, and I was surprised at its general regularity.
  • Is not this the rule also for the height of mountains, regarded as the opposite of valleys?
  • We know that a hill is not highest at its narrowest part.
  • Now we know only a few laws, and our result is vitiated, not, of course, by any confusion or irregularity in Nature, but by our ignorance of essential elements in the calculation.
  • Our notions of law and harmony are commonly confined to those instances which we detect; but the harmony which results from a far greater number of seemingly conflicting, but really concurring, laws, which we have not detected, is still more wonderful.
  • Even when cleft or bored through it is not comprehended in its entireness.
  • Such a rule of the two diameters not only guides us toward the sun in the system and the heart in man, but draws lines through the length and breadth of the aggregate of a man's particular daily behaviors and waves of life into his coves and inlets, and where they intersect will be the height or depth of his character.
  • At the advent of each individual into this life, may we not suppose that such a bar has risen to the surface somewhere?
  • It was a small cavity under ten feet of water; but I think that I can warrant the pond not to need soldering till they find a worse leak than that.
  • I did not know whether they had come to sow a crop of winter rye, or some other kind of grain recently introduced from Iceland.
  • This heap, made in the winter of '46-7 and estimated to contain ten thousand tons, was finally covered with hay and boards; and though it was unroofed the following July, and a part of it carried off, the rest remaining exposed to the sun, it stood over that summer and the next winter, and was not quite melted till September, 1848.
  • In the morning I bathe my intellect in the stupendous and cosmogonal philosophy of the Bhagvat-Geeta, since whose composition years of the gods have elapsed, and in comparison with which our modern world and its literature seem puny and trivial; and I doubt if that philosophy is not to be referred to a previous state of existence, so remote is its sublimity from our conceptions.
  • But such was not the effect on Walden that year, for she had soon got a thick new garment to take the place of the old.
  • I never knew it to open in the course of a winter, not excepting that of '52-3, which gave the ponds so severe a trial.
  • Every morning, generally speaking, the shallow water is being warmed more rapidly than the deep, though it may not be made so warm after all, and every evening it is being cooled more rapidly until the morning.
  • Not seeing any ducks, he hid his boat on the north or back side of an island in the pond, and then concealed himself in the bushes on the south side, to await them.
  • Is not the hand a spreading palm leaf with its lobes and veins?
  • And not only it, but the institutions upon it are plastic like clay in the hands of the potter.
  • I heard a robin in the distance, the first I had heard for many a thousand years, methought, whose note I shall not forget for many a thousand more--the same sweet and powerful song as of yore.
  • This at least is not the Turdus migratorius.
  • I knew that it would not rain any more.
  • Why the jailer does not leave open his prison doors--why the judge does not dismis his case--why the preacher does not dismiss his congregation!
  • It is because they do not obey the hint which God gives them, nor accept the pardon which he freely offers to all.
  • As soon as the breath of evening does not suffice longer to preserve them, then the nature of man does not differ much from that of the brute.
  • Punishment and fear were not; nor were threatening words read On suspended brass; nor did the suppliant crowd fear The words of their judge; but were safe without an avenger.
  • The Merlin it seemed to me it might be called: but I care not for its name.
  • It was not lonely, but made all the earth lonely beneath it.
  • Our village life would stagnate if it were not for the unexplored forests and meadows which surround it.
  • Poison is not poisonous after all, nor are any wounds fatal.
  • Its pleadings will not bear to be stereotyped.
  • Thank Heaven, here is not all the world.
  • The buckeye does not grow in New England, and the mockingbird is rarely heard here.
  • One hastens to southern Africa to chase the giraffe; but surely that is not the game he would be after.
  • Is not our own interior white on the chart? black though it may prove, like the coast, when discovered.
  • Nay, be a Columbus to whole new continents and worlds within you, opening new channels, not of trade, but of thought.
  • It is not worth the while to go round the world to count the cats in Zanzibar.
  • He declared that "a soldier who fights in the ranks does not require half so much courage as a footpad"--"that honor and religion have never stood in the way of a well-considered and a firm resolve."
  • This was manly, as the world goes; and yet it was idle, if not desperate.
  • Perhaps it seemed to me that I had several more lives to live, and could not spare any more time for that one.
  • I had not lived there a week before my feet wore a path from my door to the pond-side; and though it is five or six years since I trod it, it is still quite distinct.
  • If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be.
  • As if that were important, and there were not enough to understand you without them.
  • As if Nature could support but one order of understandings, could not sustain birds as well as quadrupeds, flying as well as creeping things, and hush and whoa, which Bright can understand, were the best English.
  • While England endeavors to cure the potato-rot, will not any endeavor to cure the brain-rot, which prevails so much more widely and fatally?
  • I do not suppose that I have attained to obscurity, but I should be proud if no more fatal fault were found with my pages on this score than was found with the Walden ice.
  • The purity men love is like the mists which envelop the earth, and not like the azure ether beyond.
  • Shall a man go and hang himself because he belongs to the race of pygmies, and not be the biggest pygmy that he can?
  • If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer.
  • It is not important that he should mature as soon as an apple tree or an oak.
  • If the condition of things which we were made for is not yet, what were any reality which we can substitute?
  • We will not be shipwrecked on a vain reality.
  • He proceeded instantly to the forest for wood, being resolved that it should not be made of unsuitable material; and as he searched for and rejected stick after stick, his friends gradually deserted him, for they grew old in their works and died, but he grew not older by a moment.
  • For the most part, we are not where we are, but in a false position.
  • Say what you have to say, not what you ought.
  • However mean your life is, meet it and live it; do not shun it and call it hard names.
  • It is not so bad as you are.
  • I do not see but a quiet mind may live as contentedly there, and have as cheering thoughts, as in a palace.
  • Do not trouble yourself much to get new things, whether clothes or friends.
  • Things do not change; we change.
  • God will see that you do not want society.
  • Do not seek so anxiously to be developed, to subject yourself to many influences to be played on; it is all dissipation.
  • Money is not required to buy one necessary of the soul.
  • I love to weigh, to settle, to gravitate toward that which most strongly and rightfully attracts me--not hang by the beam of the scale and try to weigh less--not suppose a case, but take the case that is; to travel the only path I can, and that on which no power can resist me.
  • Let us not play at kittly-benders.
  • "So it has," answered the latter, "but you have not got half way to it yet."
  • I would not be one of those who will foolishly drive a nail into mere lath and plastering; such a deed would keep me awake nights.
  • Do not depend on the putty.
  • Drive a nail home and clinch it so faithfully that you can wake up in the night and think of your work with satisfaction--a work at which you would not be ashamed to invoke the Muse.
  • I sat at a table where were rich food and wine in abundance, and obsequious attendance, but sincerity and truth were not; and I went away hungry from the inhospitable board.
  • They talked to me of the age of the wine and the fame of the vintage; but I thought of an older, a newer, and purer wine, of a more glorious vintage, which they had not got, and could not buy.
  • There is not one of my readers who has yet lived a whole human life.
  • Most have not delved six feet beneath the surface, nor leaped as many above it.
  • We know not where we are.
  • The government of the world I live in was not framed, like that of Britain, in after-dinner conversations over the wine.
  • It was not always dry land where we dwell.
  • Who does not feel his faith in a resurrection and immortality strengthened by hearing of this?
  • Carried out, it finally amounts to this, which also I believe,--"That government is best which governs not at all"; and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have.
  • Witness the present Mexican war, the work of comparatively a few individuals using the standing government as their tool; for, in the outset, the people would not have consented to this measure.
  • It has not the vitality and force of a single living man; for a single man can bend it to his will.
  • But it is not the less necessary for this; for the people must have some complicated machinery or other, and hear its din, to satisfy that idea of government which they have.
  • After all, the practical reason why, when the power is once in the hands of the people, a majority are permitted, and for a long period continue, to rule, is not because they are most likely to be in the right, nor because this seems fairest to the minority, but because they are physically the strongest.
  • It is not desirable to cultivate a respect for the law, so much as for the right.
  • But almost all say that such is not the case now.
  • What makes this duty the more urgent is the fact that the country so overrun is not our own, but ours is the invading army.
  • I quarrel not with far-off foes, but with those who, near at home, co-operate with, and do the bidding of those far away, and without whom the latter would be harmless.
  • We are accustomed to say, that the mass of men are unprepared; but improvement is slow, because the few are not materially wiser or better than the many.
  • It is not so important that many should be as good as you, as that there be some absolute goodness somewhere; for that will leaven the whole lump.
  • The character of the voters is not staked.
  • I cast my vote, perchance, as I think right; but I am not vitally concerned that that right should prevail.
  • A wise man will not leave the right to the mercy of chance, nor wish it to prevail through the power of the majority.
  • Can we not count upon some independent votes?
  • Are there not many individuals in the country who do not attend conventions?
  • It is not a man's duty, as a matter of course, to devote himself to the eradication of any, even the most enormous wrong; he may still properly have other concerns to engage him; but it is his duty, at least, to wash his hands of it, and, if he gives it no thought longer, not to give it practically his support.
  • If I devote myself to other pursuits and contemplations, I must first see, at least, that I do not pursue them sitting upon another man's shoulders.
  • The soldier is applauded who refuses to serve in an unjust war by those who do not refuse to sustain the unjust government which makes the war; is applauded by those whose own act and authority he disregards and sets at naught; as if the state were penitent to that degree that it hired one to scourge it while it sinned, but not to that degree that it left off sinning for a moment.
  • After the first blush of sin comes its indifference; and from immoral it becomes, as it were, unmoral, and not quite unnecessary to that life which we have made.
  • Why do they not dissolve it themselves--the union between themselves and the State--and refuse to pay their quota into its treasury?
  • Do not they stand in the same relation to the State, that the State does to the Union?
  • And have not the same reasons prevented the State from resisting the Union, which have prevented them from resisting the State?
  • Action from principle--the perception and the performance of right--changes things and relations; it is essentially revolutionary, and does not consist wholly with anything which was.
  • It not only divides states and churches, it divides families; ay, it divides the individual, separating the diabolical in him from the divine.
  • Why does it not encourage its citizens to be on the alert to point out its faults, and do better than it would have them?
  • One would think, that a deliberate and practical denial of its authority was the only offence never contemplated by government; else, why has it not assigned its definite, its suitable and proportionate, penalty?
  • As for adopting the ways which the State has provided for remedying the evil, I know not of such ways.
  • I came into this world, not chiefly to make this a good place to live in, but to live in it, be it good or bad.
  • A man has not everything to do, but something; and because he cannot do everything, it is not necessary that he should do something wrong.
  • I do not hesitate to say, that those who call themselves Abolitionists should at once effectually withdraw their support, both in person and property, from the government of Massachusetts, and not wait till they constitute a majority of one, before they suffer the right to prevail through them.
  • For it matters not how small the beginning may seem to be: what is once well done is done forever.
  • Cast your whole vote, not a strip of paper merely, but your whole influence.
  • A minority is powerless while it conforms to the majority; it is not even a minority then; but it is irresistible when it clogs by its whole weight.
  • If a thousand men were not to pay their tax-bills this year, that would not be a violent and bloody measure, as it would be to pay them, and enable the State to commit violence and shed innocent blood.
  • Is there not a sort of blood shed when the conscience is wounded?
  • But the rich man--not to make any invidious comparison--is always sold to the institution which makes him rich.
  • For my own part, I should not like to think that I ever rely on the protection of the State.
  • You must live within yourself, and depend upon yourself always tucked up and ready for a start, and not have many affairs.
  • Confucius said, "If a state is governed by the principles of reason, poverty and misery are subjects of shame; if a state is not governed by the principles of reason, riches and honors are the subjects of shame."
  • I did not see why the schoolmaster should be taxed to support the priest, and not the priest the schoolmaster: for I was not the State's schoolmaster, but I supported myself by voluntary subscription.
  • I did not see why the lyceum should not present its tax-bill, and have the State to back its demand, as well as the Church.
  • If I had known how to name them, I should then have signed off in detail from all the societies which I never signed on to; but I did not know where to find a complete list.
  • I did not for a moment feel confined, and the walls seemed a great waste of stone and mortar.
  • They plainly did not know how to treat me, but behaved like persons who are underbred.
  • As they could not reach me, they had resolved to punish my body; just as boys, if they cannot come at some person against whom they have a spite, will abuse his dog.
  • I saw that the State was half-witted, that it was timid as a lone woman with her silver spoons, and that it did not know its friends from its foes, and I lost all my remaining respect for it, and pitied it.
  • I was not born to be forced.
  • I do not hear of men being forced to have this way or that by masses of men.
  • It may be in a great strait, and not know what to do: I cannot help that.
  • It is not worth the while to snivel about it.
  • I am not responsible for the successful working of the machinery of society.
  • I am not the son of the engineer.
  • Probably this is the only house in the town where verses are composed, which are afterward printed in a circular form, but not published.
  • Soon after he was let out to work at haying in a neighboring field, whither he went every day, and would not be back till noon; so he bade me good-day, saying that he doubted if he should see me again.
  • My neighbors did not thus salute me, but first looked at me, and then at one another, as if I had returned from a long journey.
  • If they pay the tax from a mistaken interest in the individual taxed, to save his property, or prevent his going to jail, it is because they have not considered wisely how far they let their private feelings interfere with the public good.
  • You do not resist cold and hunger, the winds and the waves, thus obstinately; you quietly submit to a thousand similar necessities.
  • You do not put your head into the fire.
  • I do not wish to split hairs, to make fine distinctions, or set myself up as better than my neighbors.
  • It is not many moments that I live under a government, even in this world.
  • If a man is thought-free, fancy-free, imagination-free, that which is not never for a long time appearing to be to him, unwise rulers or reformers cannot fatally interrupt him.
  • They are wont to forget that the world is not governed by policy and expediency.
  • Truth is always in harmony with herself, and is not concerned chiefly to reveal the justice that may consist with wrong-doing.
  • He is not a leader, but a follower.
  • We love eloquence for its own sake, and not for any truth which it may utter, or any heroism it may inspire.
  • If we were left solely to the wordy wit of legislators in Congress for our guidance, uncorrected by the seasonable experience and the effectual complaints of the people, America would not long retain her rank among the nations.
  • Is it not possible to take a step further towards recognizing and organizing the rights of man?
  • And what little they have promised they will not perform!
  • If you were not a father there would be nothing I could reproach you with, said Anna Pavlovna, looking up pensively.
  • Each visitor performed the ceremony of greeting this old aunt whom not one of them knew, not one of them wanted to know, and not one of them cared about.
  • And each visitor, though politeness prevented his showing impatience, left the old woman with a sense of relief at having performed a vexatious duty and did not return to her the whole evening.
  • "Mind, Annette, I hope you have not played a wicked trick on me," she added, turning to her hostess.
  • And having got rid of this young man who did not know how to behave, she resumed her duties as hostess and continued to listen and watch, ready to help at any point where the conversation might happen to flag.
  • He knew that all the intellectual lights of Petersburg were gathered there and, like a child in a toyshop, did not know which way to look, afraid of missing any clever conversation that was to be heard.
  • Helene was so lovely that not only did she not show any trace of coquetry, but on the contrary she even appeared shy of her unquestionable and all too victorious beauty.
  • Not letting the abbe and Pierre escape, Anna Pavlovna, the more conveniently to keep them under observation, brought them into the larger circle.
  • It was evident that he not only knew everyone in the drawing room, but had found them to be so tiresome that it wearied him to look at or listen to them.
  • Are you not ashamed to deprive us of your charming wife?
  • May I? he added in a low voice so as not to disturb the vicomte who was continuing his story.
  • It was evident that he did not like the vicomte and was aiming his remarks at him, though without looking at him.
  • "'I showed them the path to glory, but they did not follow it,'" Prince Andrew continued after a short silence, again quoting Napoleon's words.
  • I do not know how far he was justified in saying so.
  • "Not in the least," replied the vicomte.
  • "The execution of the Duc d'Enghien," declared Monsieur Pierre, "was a political necessity, and it seems to me that Napoleon showed greatness of soul by not fearing to take on himself the whole responsibility of that deed."
  • He could not do that.
  • I am not speaking of regicide, I am speaking about ideas.
  • Those were extremes, no doubt, but they are not what is most important.
  • Who does not love liberty and equality?
  • But when she saw that Pierre's sacrilegious words had not exasperated the vicomte, and had convinced herself that it was impossible to stop him, she rallied her forces and joined the vicomte in a vigorous attack on the orator.
  • "I should like," said the vicomte, "to ask how monsieur explains the 18th Brumaire; was not that an imposture?
  • It was a swindle, and not at all like the conduct of a great man!
  • Pierre, not knowing whom to answer, looked at them all and smiled.
  • The vicomte who was meeting him for the first time saw clearly that this young Jacobin was not so terrible as his words suggested.
  • Stout, about the average height, broad, with huge red hands; he did not know, as the saying is, how to enter a drawing room and still less how to leave one; that is, how to say something particularly agreeable before going away.
  • They listened to the French sentences which to them were meaningless, with an air of understanding but not wishing to appear to do so.
  • "I am very glad I did not go to the ambassador's," said Prince Hippolyte "-so dull-.
  • Hippolyte spluttered again, and amid his laughter said, And you were saying that the Russian ladies are not equal to the French?
  • In my opinion perpetual peace is possible but--I do not know how to express it... not by a balance of political power....
  • It was evident that Prince Andrew was not interested in such abstract conversation.
  • If it were a war for freedom I could understand it and should be the first to enter the army; but to help England and Austria against the greatest man in the world is not right.
  • I am going because the life I am leading here does not suit me!
  • How stupid you men all are not to have married her!
  • Pierre looked at his friend and, noticing that he did not like the conversation, gave no reply.
  • And he expects me not to be afraid.
  • Her tone was now querulous and her lip drawn up, giving her not a joyful, but an animal, squirrel-like expression.
  • "I still can't understand what you are afraid of," said Prince Andrew slowly, not taking his eyes off his wife.
  • He did not finish his sentence, but his tone showed how highly he thought of his friend and how much he expected of him in the future.
  • And if Pierre was often struck by Andrew's lack of capacity for philosophical meditation (to which he himself was particularly addicted), he regarded even this not as a defect but as a sign of strength.
  • But he did not say what "it really" was.
  • You give me your word of honor not to go?
  • But he immediately recalled his promise to Prince Andrew not to go there.
  • Wait a bit, he is not drunk yet!
  • Pushing away the footmen he tugged at the frame, but could not move it.
  • Anatole did not release him, and though he kept nodding to show that he understood, Anatole went on translating Dolokhov's words into English.
  • Dolokhov stood frowning and did not speak.
  • The young people were in one of the inner rooms, not considering it necessary to take part in receiving the visitors.
  • "What is that?" asked the countess as if she did not know what the visitor alluded to, though she had already heard about the cause of Count Bezukhov's distress some fifteen times.
  • "But do you know, my dear, that was a capital joke," said the count; and seeing that the elder visitor was not listening, he turned to the young ladies.
  • The countess looked at her callers, smiling affably, but not concealing the fact that she would not be distressed if they now rose and took their leave.
  • It was evident that she had not intended her flight to bring her so far.
  • Escaping from her father she ran to hide her flushed face in the lace of her mother's mantilla--not paying the least attention to her severe remark--and began to laugh.
  • She leaned against her mother and burst into such a loud, ringing fit of laughter that even the prim visitor could not help joining in.
  • Natasha did not like the visitor's tone of condescension to childish things.
  • She did not reply, but looked at her seriously.
  • The two young men, the student and the officer, friends from childhood, were of the same age and both handsome fellows, though not alike.
  • Boris did not laugh.
  • The only young people remaining in the drawing room, not counting the young lady visitor and the countess' eldest daughter (who was four years older than her sister and behaved already like a grown-up person), were Nicholas and Sonya, the niece.
  • The visitor, not knowing what to say, shook her head.
  • Well, well, God grant it, he added, not noticing his visitor's sarcastic smile.
  • "Oh no, not at all too young!" replied the count.
  • She was already growing impatient, and stamped her foot, ready to cry at his not coming at once, when she heard the young man's discreet steps approaching neither quickly nor slowly.
  • Sonya did not pull it away, and left off crying.
  • Boris looked attentively and kindly at her eager face, but did not reply.
  • The countess wished to have a tête-à-tête talk with the friend of her childhood, Princess Anna Mikhaylovna, whom she had not seen properly since she returned from Petersburg.
  • There are not many left of us old friends!
  • "Vera," she said to her eldest daughter who was evidently not a favorite, "how is it you have so little tact?
  • Don't you see you are not wanted here?
  • The handsome Vera smiled contemptuously but did not seem at all hurt.
  • "How often have I asked you not to take my things?" she said.
  • "I should think not," said Vera, "because there can never be anything wrong in my behavior.
  • "Ah, my dear," said the countess, "my life is not all roses either.
  • I have not seen him since we acted together at the Rumyantsovs' theatricals.
  • His position has not turned his head at all.
  • Would you believe it, I have literally not a penny and don't know how to equip Boris.
  • I shall not be able to equip him.
  • I shall not disturb him, my friend...
  • "Would not such a meeting be too trying for him, dear Anna Mikhaylovna?" said he.
  • The princess gave no reply and did not even smile, but left the room as Anna Mikhaylovna took off her gloves and, occupying the position she had conquered, settled down in an armchair, inviting Prince Vasili to take a seat beside her.
  • Here he is, and the count has not once asked for him.
  • The count is very, very ill, and you must not see him at all.
  • I have come with my mother to see the count, but it seems he is not well.
  • Boris felt that Pierre did not recognize him but did not consider it necessary to introduce himself, and without experiencing the least embarrassment looked Pierre straight in the face.
  • Boris knew nothing about the Boulogne expedition; he did not read the papers and it was the first time he had heard Villeneuve's name.
  • I know nothing about it and have not thought about it.
  • "And it must seem to you," said Boris flushing slightly, but not changing his tone or attitude, "it must seem to you that everyone is trying to get something out of the rich man?"
  • For a long time Pierre could not understand, but when he did, he jumped up from the sofa, seized Boris under the elbow in his quick, clumsy way, and, blushing far more than Boris, began to speak with a feeling of mingled shame and vexation.
  • Perhaps you did not like it?
  • We have not met for such a long time... not since we were children.
  • I could not have done it myself, I should not have had the courage, but it's splendid.
  • He has not sent for me....
  • He must not be left like this.
  • The thousand rubles I paid for Taras were not ill- spent.
  • One would not know him, he is so ill!
  • His favorite occupation when not playing boston, a card game he was very fond of, was that of listener, especially when he succeeded in setting two loquacious talkers at one another.
  • Berg evidently enjoyed narrating all this, and did not seem to suspect that others, too, might have their own interests.
  • It was just the moment before a big dinner when the assembled guests, expecting the summons to zakuska, * avoid engaging in any long conversation but think it necessary to move about and talk, in order to show that they are not at all impatient for their food.
  • He was in the way and was the only one who did not notice the fact.
  • You have not yet seen my husband?
  • From behind the crystal decanters and fruit vases, the count kept glancing at his wife and her tall cap with its light-blue ribbons, and busily filled his neighbors' glasses, not neglecting his own.
  • Berg with tender smiles was saying to Vera that love is not an earthly but a heavenly feeling.
  • "Connaissez-vous le Proverbe: * 'Jerome, Jerome, do not roam, but turn spindles at home!'?" said Shinshin, puckering his brows and smiling.
  • She looked round and seeing that her friend was not in the room ran to look for her.
  • Sonya tried to lift her head to answer but could not, and hid her face still deeper in the bed.
  • "Nicholas is going away in a week's time, his... papers... have come... he told me himself... but still I should not cry," and she showed a paper she held in her hand--with the verses Nicholas had written, "still, I should not cry, but you can't... no one can understand... what a soul he has!"
  • Sonya could not continue, and again hid her face in her hands and in the feather bed.
  • He had not finished the last verse before the young people began to get ready to dance in the large hall, and the sound of the feet and the coughing of the musicians were heard from the gallery.
  • But his partner could not and did not want to dance well.
  • The other couples could not attract a moment's attention to their own evolutions and did not even try to do so.
  • "The limits of human life... are fixed and may not be o'erpassed," said an old priest to a lady who had taken a seat beside him and was listening naively to his words.
  • "Tonight, not later," said he in a low voice, and he moved away with a decorous smile of self-satisfaction at being able clearly to understand and state the patient's condition.
  • The princess, holding her little dog on her lap with her thin bony hands, looked attentively into Prince Vasili's eyes evidently resolved not to be the first to break silence, if she had to wait till morning.
  • Prince Vasili looked questioningly at the princess, but could not make out whether she was considering what he had just said or whether she was simply looking at him.
  • But... in short, the fact is... you know yourself that last winter the count made a will by which he left all his property, not to us his direct heirs, but to Pierre.
  • "I can tell you more," continued Prince Vasili, seizing her hand, "that letter was written, though it was not sent, and the Emperor knew of it.
  • If not, then as soon as all is over," and Prince Vasili sighed to intimate what he meant by the words all is over, "and the count's papers are opened, the will and letter will be delivered to the Emperor, and the petition will certainly be granted.
  • "And our share?" asked the princess smiling ironically, as if anything might happen, only not that.
  • "What next?" the princess interrupted, smiling sardonically and not changing the expression of her eyes.
  • "My dear Princess Catherine Semenovna," began Prince Vasili impatiently, "I came here not to wrangle with you, but to talk about your interests as with a kinswoman, a good, kind, true relation.
  • Yes, but you are not the only one.
  • But the princess did not listen to him.
  • "Do you or do you not know where that will is?" insisted Prince Vasili, his cheeks twitching more than ever.
  • Our duty, my dear, is to rectify his mistake, to ease his last moments by not letting him commit this injustice, and not to let him die feeling that he is rendering unhappy those who...
  • "Who sacrificed everything for him," chimed in the princess, who would again have risen had not the prince still held her fast, "though he never could appreciate it.
  • That's not the point, my dear.
  • It's that protege of yours, that sweet Princess Drubetskaya, that Anna Mikhaylovna whom I would not take for a housemaid... the infamous, vile woman!
  • Do not let us lose any time...
  • Last winter she wheedled herself in here and told the count such vile, disgraceful things about us, especially about Sophie--I can't repeat them--that it made the count quite ill and he would not see us for a whole fortnight.
  • We've got to it at last--why did you not tell me about it sooner?
  • He noticed that they had not come to the front entrance but to the back door.
  • But neither Anna Mikhaylovna nor the footman nor the coachman, who could not help seeing these people, took any notice of them.
  • These men pressed close to the wall to let Pierre and Anna Mikhaylovna pass and did not evince the least surprise at seeing them there.
  • "Perhaps the count did not ask for me," said Pierre when he reached the landing.
  • I shall not forget your interests.
  • Pierre did not understand a word, but the conviction that all this had to be grew stronger, and he meekly followed Anna Mikhaylovna who was already opening a door.
  • Pierre could not make out what it was all about, and still less what "watching over his interests" meant, but he decided that all these things had to be.
  • Not two minutes had passed before Prince Vasili with head erect majestically entered the room.
  • He could not walk well on tiptoe and his whole body jerked at each step.
  • "If you do not understand these sentiments," he seemed to be saying, "so much the worse for you!"
  • She evidently felt unable to look at him without laughing, but could not resist looking at him: so to be out of temptation she slipped quietly behind one of the columns.
  • The sick man was so surrounded by doctors, princesses, and servants that Pierre could no longer see the reddish-yellow face with its gray mane-- which, though he saw other faces as well, he had not lost sight of for a single moment during the whole service.
  • When Pierre came up the count was gazing straight at him, but with a look the significance of which could not be understood by mortal man.
  • Pierre hesitated, not knowing what to do, and glanced inquiringly at his guide.
  • Pierre, carefully stretching his neck so as not to touch the quilt, followed her suggestion and pressed his lips to the large boned, fleshy hand.
  • Go and take something, my poor Anna Mikhaylovna, or you will not hold out.
  • Pierre did not eat anything though he would very much have liked to.
  • "Permit me, Princess, to know what is necessary and what is not necessary," said the younger of the two speakers, evidently in the same state of excitement as when she had slammed the door of her room.
  • "I know, my dear, kind princess," said Anna Mikhaylovna, seizing the portfolio so firmly that it was plain she would not let go easily.
  • The princess did not reply.
  • Their efforts in the struggle for the portfolio were the only sounds audible, but it was evident that if the princess did speak, her words would not be flattering to Anna Mikhaylovna.
  • I think he will not be out of place in a family consultation; is it not so, Prince?
  • But Anna Mikhaylovna did not obey him.
  • Yes, my dear, this is a great loss for us all, not to speak of you.
  • The will has not yet been opened.
  • I know you well enough to be sure that this will not turn your head, but it imposes duties on you, and you must be a man.
  • You know, Uncle promised me only the day before yesterday not to forget Boris.
  • She said the count had died as she would herself wish to die, that his end was not only touching but edifying.
  • At Bald Hills, Prince Nicholas Andreevich Bolkonski's estate, the arrival of young Prince Andrew and his wife was daily expected, but this expectation did not upset the regular routine of life in the old prince's household.
  • He always came to table under precisely the same conditions, and not only at the same hour but at the same minute.
  • Why are we not together as we were last summer, in your big study, on the blue sofa, the confidential sofa?
  • But the princess never saw the beautiful expression of her own eyes--the look they had when she was not thinking of herself.
  • Let us not seek to penetrate what mysteries they contain; for how can we, miserable sinners that we are, know the terrible and holy secrets of Providence while we remain in this flesh which forms an impenetrable veil between us and the Eternal?
  • My father has not spoken to me of a suitor, but has only told me that he has received a letter and is expecting a visit from Prince Vasili.
  • Not only where you are--at the heart of affairs and of the world--is the talk all of war, even here amid fieldwork and the calm of nature--which townsfolk consider characteristic of the country--rumors of war are heard and painfully felt.
  • I do not allow myself to judge him and would not have others do so.
  • Prince Andrew apparently knew this as well as Tikhon; he looked at his watch as if to ascertain whether his father's habits had changed since he was at home last, and, having assured himself that they had not, he turned to his wife.
  • She was not expecting us?
  • "I dreamed last night..."--"You were not expecting us?..."
  • Ah, Andrew, I did not see you.
  • Princess Mary did not listen to the end, but continuing her train of thought turned to her sister-in-law with a tender glance at her figure.
  • The old prince always dressed in old-fashioned style, wearing an antique coat and powdered hair; and when Prince Andrew entered his father's dressing room (not with the contemptuous look and manner he wore in drawing rooms, but with the animated face with which he talked to Pierre), the old man was sitting on a large leather-covered chair, wrapped in a powdering mantle, entrusting his head to Tikhon.
  • "Give me time to collect my wits, Father," said he, with a smile that showed that his father's foibles did not prevent his son from loving and honoring him.
  • Why, I have not yet had time to settle down!
  • The old prince did not evince the least interest during this explanation, but as if he were not listening to it continued to dress while walking about, and three times unexpectedly interrupted.
  • This meant that Tikhon was not handing him the waistcoat he wanted.
  • Napoleon has also formed his plan by now, not worse than this one.
  • At the appointed hour the prince, powdered and shaven, entered the dining room.
  • The prince, who generally kept very strictly to social distinctions and rarely admitted even important government officials to his table, had unexpectedly selected Michael Ivanovich (who always went into a corner to blow his nose on his checked handkerchief) to illustrate the theory that all men are equals, and had more than once impressed on his daughter that Michael Ivanovich was "not a whit worse than you or I."
  • She did not understand what he was laughing at.
  • Princess Mary could not understand the boldness of her brother's criticism and was about to reply, when the expected footsteps were heard coming from the study.
  • He laughed in his usual dry, cold, unpleasant way, with his lips only and not with his eyes.
  • The little princess did not, or did not wish to, hear his words.
  • Michael Ivanovich did not at all know when "you and I" had said such things about Bonaparte, but understanding that he was wanted as a peg on which to hang the prince's favorite topic, he looked inquiringly at the young prince, wondering what would follow.
  • "The past always seems good," said he, "but did not Suvorov himself fall into a trap Moreau set him, and from which he did not know how to escape?"
  • The old prince, not altering his routine, retired as usual after dinner.
  • You are not angry with me for coming?
  • Don't forget that she has grown up and been educated in society, and so her position now is not a rosy one.
  • No--promise that you will not refuse!
  • (She still did not take out what she was holding in her reticule.)
  • If it does not weigh a hundredweight and won't break my neck...
  • I do not think I have complained of my wife to you, Masha, or blamed her.
  • Know this, Masha: I can't reproach, have not reproached, and never shall reproach my wife with anything, and I cannot reproach myself with anything in regard to her; and that always will be so in whatever circumstances I may be placed.
  • His fine eyes lit up with a thoughtful, kindly, and unaccustomed brightness, but he was looking not at his sister but over her head toward the darkness of the open doorway.
  • It was an autumn night, so dark that the coachman could not see the carriage pole.
  • For not dilly-dallying and not hanging to a woman's apron strings.
  • The old prince stopped writing and, as if not understanding, fixed his stern eyes on his son.
  • "I know that no one can help if nature does not do her work," said Prince Andrew, evidently confused.
  • Andrew did not speak; he was both pleased and displeased that his father understood him.
  • Give this letter to Michael Ilarionovich. * I have written that he should make use of you in proper places and not keep you long as an adjutant: a bad position!
  • Nicholas Bolkonski's son need not serve under anyone if he is in disfavor.
  • He spoke so rapidly that he did not finish half his words, but his son was accustomed to understand him.
  • Andrew did not tell his father that he would no doubt live a long time yet.
  • He felt that he must not say it.
  • "Remember this, Prince Andrew, if they kill you it will hurt me, your old father..." he paused unexpectedly, and then in a querulous voice suddenly shrieked: "but if I hear that you have not behaved like a son of Nicholas Bolkonski, I shall be ashamed!"
  • "You need not have said that to me, Father," said the son with a smile.
  • "I also wanted to ask you," continued Prince Andrew, "if I'm killed and if I have a son, do not let him be taken away from you--as I said yesterday... let him grow up with you....
  • "Not let the wife have him?" said the old man, and laughed.
  • Though the words of the order were not clear to the regimental commander, and the question arose whether the troops were to be in marching order or not, it was decided at a consultation between the battalion commanders to present the regiment in parade order, on the principle that it is always better to "bow too low than not bow low enough."
  • However, I think the regiment is not a bad one, eh?
  • It would not be turned off the field even on the Tsaritsin Meadow.
  • A member of the Hofkriegsrath from Vienna had come to Kutuzov the day before with proposals and demands for him to join up with the army of the Archduke Ferdinand and Mack, and Kutuzov, not considering this junction advisable, meant, among other arguments in support of his view, to show the Austrian general the wretched state in which the troops arrived from Russia.
  • When the eager but misrepeated words had reached their destination in a cry of: "The general to the third company," the missing officer appeared from behind his company and, though he was a middle-aged man and not in the habit of running, trotted awkwardly stumbling on his toes toward the general.
  • The captain's face showed the uneasiness of a schoolboy who is told to repeat a lesson he has not learned.
  • Having snapped at an officer for an unpolished badge, at another because his line was not straight, he reached the third company.
  • Change his coat... the ras... he did not finish.
  • Kutuzov and the Austrian general were talking in low voices and Kutuzov smiled slightly as treading heavily he stepped down from the carriage just as if those two thousand men breathlessly gazing at him and the regimental commander did not exist.
  • Looking at their boots he several times shook his head sadly, pointing them out to the Austrian general with an expression which seemed to say that he was not blaming anyone, but could not help noticing what a bad state of things it was.
  • His suite, not having expected this, involuntarily came closer to him.
  • The regimental commander was afraid he might be blamed for this and did not answer.
  • The hussar at that moment noticed the face of the red-nosed captain and his drawn-in stomach, and mimicked his expression and pose with such exactitude that Nesvitski could not help laughing.
  • Dolokhov, who had already changed into a soldier's gray greatcoat, did not wait to be called.
  • Dolokhov looked round but did not say anything, nor did the mocking smile on his lips change.
  • It was Dolokhov marching with particular grace and boldness in time to the song and looking at those driving past as if he pitied all who were not at that moment marching with the company.
  • Zherkov had met Dolokhov abroad as a private and had not seen fit to recognize him.
  • I've sworn not to.
  • And Kutuzov smiled in a way that seemed to say, You are quite at liberty not to believe me and I don't even care whether you do or not, but you have no grounds for telling me so.
  • Also, as we are masters of Ulm, we cannot be deprived of the advantage of commanding both sides of the Danube, so that should the enemy not cross the Lech, we can cross the Danube, throw ourselves on his line of communications, recross the river lower down, and frustrate his intention should he try to direct his whole force against our faithful ally.
  • Though not much time had passed since Prince Andrew had left Russia, he had changed greatly during that period.
  • I am ordered to write a memorandum explaining why we are not advancing.
  • The unknown general looked disdainfully down at Kozlovski, who was rather short, as if surprised that anyone should not know him.
  • He feared that Bonaparte's genius might outweigh all the courage of the Russian troops, and at the same time could not admit the idea of his hero being disgraced.
  • "Schon fleissig?" * said Rostov with the same gay brotherly smile which did not leave his eager face.
  • I lost yesterday like a damned fool! cried Denisov, not pronouncing his r's.
  • Just fancy, he didn't let me win a single cahd, not one cahd.
  • "Oh, he's all right, a good horse," answered Rostov, though the horse for which he had paid seven hundred rubbles was not worth half that sum.
  • It's not a secret.
  • Send him to the devil, I'm busy! he shouted to Lavrushka, who went up to him not in the least abashed.
  • The purse was not there.
  • The purse was not there.
  • He could not draw breath.
  • So that if it is not so, then...
  • He could not finish, and ran out of the room.
  • "The master is not in, he's gone to headquarters," said Telyanin's orderly.
  • Rostov did not speak.
  • Every muscle of Telyanin's pale, terrified face began to quiver, his eyes still shifted from side to side but with a downward look not rising to Rostov's face, and his sobs were audible.
  • I'm not to blame that the conversation began in the presence of other officers.
  • Perhaps I ought not to have spoken before them, but I am not a diplomatist.
  • No one thinks you a coward, but that's not the point.
  • Ask Denisov whether it is not out of the question for a cadet to demand satisfaction of his regimental commander?
  • He did not shut me up, he said I was telling an untruth.
  • "Not on any account!" exclaimed Rostov.
  • "I did not expect this of you," said the staff captain seriously and severely.
  • And Bogdanich was a brick: he told you you were saying what was not true.
  • It's not pleasant, but what's to be done, my dear fellow?
  • You are offended at being put on duty a bit, but why not apologize to an old and honorable officer?
  • But it's not all the same to us!
  • Am I not right, Denisov?
  • It's not the same!
  • Denisov remained silent and did not move, but occasionally looked with his glittering black eyes at Rostov.
  • And all this is not right, it's not right!
  • You may take offense or not but I always stick to mother truth.
  • No, on my word it's not obstinacy!
  • Illness or not, he'd better not cwoss my path.
  • Why are you not eating anything, gentlemen?
  • "Would not your excellency like a little refreshment?" he said.
  • The German closed his eyes, signifying that he did not understand.
  • Nesvitski like the rest of the men on the bridge did not take his eyes off the women till they had passed.
  • "How's it you're not drunk today?" said Nesvitski when the other had ridden up to him.
  • It seemed to Rostov that Bogdanich was only pretending not to notice him, and that his whole aim now was to test the cadet's courage, so he drew himself up and looked around him merrily; then it seemed to him that Bogdanich rode so near in order to show him his courage.
  • After his dismissal from headquarters Zherkov had not remained in the regiment, saying he was not such a fool as to slave at the front when he could get more rewards by doing nothing on the staff, and had succeeded in attaching himself as an orderly officer to Prince Bagration.
  • You said the bridge would be burned, but who would it burn, I could not know by the holy spirit!
  • Rostov did not think what this call for stretchers meant; he ran on, trying only to be ahead of the others; but just at the bridge, not looking at the ground, he came on some sticky, trodden mud, stumbled, and fell on his hands.
  • Rostov, absorbed by his relations with Bogdanich, had paused on the bridge not knowing what to do.
  • For the first time, after a fortnight's retreat, the Russian troops had halted and after a fight had not only held the field but had repulsed the French.
  • Despite his apparently delicate build Prince Andrew could endure physical fatigue far better than many very muscular men, and on the night of the battle, having arrived at Krems excited but not weary, with dispatches from Dokhturov to Kutuzov, he was sent immediately with a special dispatch to Brunn.
  • To be so sent meant not only a reward but an important step toward promotion.
  • Then he began to imagine that the Russians were running away and that he himself was killed, but he quickly roused himself with a feeling of joy, as if learning afresh that this was not so but that on the contrary the French had run away.
  • His face took on the stupid artificial smile (which does not even attempt to hide its artificiality) of a man who is continually receiving many petitioners one after another.
  • But Mortier is not captured.
  • His Majesty will no doubt wish to see you, but not today.
  • I could not have a more welcome visitor, said Bilibin as he came out to meet Prince Andrew.
  • Besides it was pleasant, after his reception by the Austrians, to speak if not in Russian (for they were speaking French) at least with a Russian who would, he supposed, share the general Russian antipathy to the Austrians which was then particularly strong.
  • He was not one of those many diplomats who are esteemed because they have certain negative qualities, avoid doing certain things, and speak French.
  • It was not the question "What for?" but the question "How?" that interested him.
  • What the diplomatic matter might be he did not care, but it gave him great pleasure to prepare a circular, memorandum, or report, skillfully, pointedly, and elegantly.
  • Bilibin's services were valued not only for what he wrote, but also for his skill in dealing and conversing with those in the highest spheres.
  • * "But my dear fellow, with all my respect for the Orthodox Russian army, I must say that your victory was not particularly victorious."
  • Because not everything happens as one expects or with the smoothness of a parade.
  • We had expected, as I told you, to get at their rear by seven in the morning but had not reached it by five in the afternoon.
  • So don't be surprised if not only the Minister of War but also his Most August Majesty the Emperor and King Francis is not much delighted by your victory.
  • Even I, a poor secretary of the Russian Embassy, do not feel any need in token of my joy to give my Franz a thaler, or let him go with his Liebchen to the Prater...
  • I confess I do not understand: perhaps there are diplomatic subtleties here beyond my feeble intelligence, but I can't make it out.
  • Kutuzov alone at last gains a real victory, destroying the spell of the invincibility of the French, and the Minister of War does not even care to hear the details.
  • Not only occupied, but Bonaparte is at Schonbrunn, and the count, our dear Count Vrbna, goes to him for orders.
  • After the fatigues and impressions of the journey, his reception, and especially after having dined, Bolkonski felt that he could not take in the full significance of the words he heard.
  • You see that your victory is not a matter for great rejoicing and that you can't be received as a savior.
  • "But still this does not mean that the campaign is over," said Prince Andrew.
  • If not it is merely a question of settling where the preliminaries of the new Campo Formio are to be drawn up.
  • Having dressed for his attendance at court in full parade uniform, which he had not worn for a long time, he went into Bilibin's study fresh, animated, and handsome, with his hand bandaged.
  • These gentlemen received Prince Andrew as one of themselves, an honor they did not extend to many.
  • "Wait, I have not finished..." he said to Prince Andrew, seizing him by the arm, "I believe that intervention will be stronger than nonintervention.
  • He was evidently distressed, and breathed painfully, but could not restrain the wild laughter that convulsed his usually impassive features.
  • He has a passion for giving audiences, but he does not like talking himself and can't do it, as you will see.
  • Before the conversation began Prince Andrew was struck by the fact that the Emperor seemed confused and blushed as if not knowing what to say.
  • Yesterday's adjutant reproached him for not having stayed at the palace, and offered him his own house.
  • He did not know whom to answer, and for a few seconds collected his thoughts.
  • Prince Andrew could not understand.
  • But where do you come from not to know what every coachman in the town knows?
  • Why, the French have crossed the bridge that Auersperg was defending, and the bridge was not blown up: so Murat is now rushing along the road to Brunn and will be here in a day or two.
  • But why did they not blow up the bridge, if it was mined?
  • No one, not even Bonaparte, knows why.
  • "I am not jesting," Bilibin went on.
  • It is not exactly stupidity, nor rascality....
  • "It's not treachery nor rascality nor stupidity: it is just as at Ulm... it is..."--he seemed to be trying to find the right expression.
  • "Not at all," said Prince Andrew.
  • You are faced by one of two things," and the skin over his left temple puckered, "either you will not reach your regiment before peace is concluded, or you will share defeat and disgrace with Kutuzov's whole army."
  • That same night, having taken leave of the Minister of War, Bolkonski set off to rejoin the army, not knowing where he would find it and fearing to be captured by the French on the way to Krems.
  • All along the sides of the road fallen horses were to be seen, some flayed, some not, and broken-down carts beside which solitary soldiers sat waiting for something, and again soldiers straggling from their companies, crowds of whom set off to the neighboring villages, or returned from them dragging sheep, fowls, hay, and bulging sacks.
  • I am commander here, not you!
  • Prince Andrew saw that the officer was in that state of senseless, tipsy rage when a man does not know what he is saying.
  • "This is a mob of scoundrels and not an army," he was thinking as he went up to the window of the first house, when a familiar voice called him by name.
  • Kozlovski's face looked worn--he too had evidently not slept all night.
  • He glanced at Prince Andrew and did not even nod to him.
  • Kutuzov did not reply.
  • There was not a trace of agitation on his face.
  • Bagration replied that he was not authorized either to accept or refuse a truce and sent his adjutant to Kutuzov to report the offer he had received.
  • Bonaparte himself, not trusting to his generals, moved with all the Guards to the field of battle, afraid of letting a ready victim escape, and Bagration's four thousand men merrily lighted campfires, dried and warmed themselves, cooked their porridge for the first time for three days, and not one of them knew or imagined what was in store for him.
  • Bonaparte's adjutant had not yet reached Murat's detachment and the battle had not yet begun.
  • They talked of peace but did not believe in its possibility; others talked of a battle but also disbelieved in the nearness of an engagement.
  • "Yes, let's go in and I will get myself a roll and some cheese," said Prince Andrew who had not yet had time to eat anything.
  • Now you, Captain, and he turned to a thin, dirty little artillery officer who without his boots (he had given them to the canteen keeper to dry), in only his stockings, rose when they entered, smiling not altogether comfortably.
  • But before he had finished he felt that his jest was unacceptable and had not come off.
  • Another company, a lucky one for not all the companies had vodka, crowded round a pockmarked, broad-shouldered sergeant major who, tilting a keg, filled one after another the canteen lids held out to him.
  • All their faces were as serene as if all this were happening at home awaiting peaceful encampment, and not within sight of the enemy before an action in which at least half of them would be left on the field.
  • "Now then, go on, go on!" incited the officer, bending forward and trying not to lose a word of the speech which was incomprehensible to him.
  • "Only take care you and your Cossacks are not all captured!" said the French grenadier.
  • Suddenly, however, he was struck by a voice coming from the shed, and its tone was so sincere that he could not but listen.
  • Another, a younger voice, interrupted him: "Afraid or not, you can't escape it anyhow."
  • He did not finish.
  • The smoke above it had not yet dispersed.
  • The smoke of the first shot had not yet dispersed before another puff appeared, followed by a report.
  • The short, round- shouldered Captain Tushin, stumbling over the tail of the gun carriage, moved forward and, not noticing the general, looked out shading his eyes with his small hand.
  • Prince Andrew listened attentively to Bagration's colloquies with the commanding officers and the orders he gave them and, to his surprise, found that no orders were really given, but that Prince Bagration tried to make it appear that everything done by necessity, by accident, or by the will of subordinate commanders was done, if not by his direct command, at least in accord with his intentions.
  • It can't be an attack, for they are not moving; it can't be a square--for they are not drawn up for that.
  • They were still firing, not at the cavalry which had disappeared, but at French infantry who had come into the hollow and were firing at our men.
  • He spoke as if those bullets could not kill him, and his half-closed eyes gave still more persuasiveness to his words.
  • The staff officer joined in the colonel's appeals, but Bagration did not reply; he only gave an order to cease firing and re-form, so as to give room for the two approaching battalions.
  • He carried close to his leg a narrow unsheathed sword (small, curved, and not like a real weapon) and looked now at the superior officers and now back at the men without losing step, his whole powerful body turning flexibly.
  • The retirement of the center to the other side of the dip in the ground at the rear was hurried and noisy, but the different companies did not get mixed.
  • Zherkov, not removing his hand from his cap, turned his horse about and galloped off.
  • He was seized by panic and could not go where it was dangerous.
  • Having reached the left flank, instead of going to the front where the firing was, he began to look for the general and his staff where they could not possibly be, and so did not deliver the order.
  • From privates to general they were not expecting a battle and were engaged in peaceful occupations, the cavalry feeding the horses and the infantry collecting wood.
  • I am not considering my own pleasure and I won't allow it to be said!
  • All were conscious of this unseen line, and the question whether they would cross it or not, and how they would cross it, agitated them all.
  • The troops of the left flank, infantry and hussars alike, felt that the commander did not himself know what to do, and this irresolution communicated itself to the men.
  • Before him, on the right, Rostov saw the front lines of his hussars and still farther ahead a dark line which he could not see distinctly but took to be the enemy.
  • How is it I am not moving?
  • Blood was flowing from his head; he struggled but could not rise.
  • Where our men were, and where the French, he did not know.
  • "Where, on which side, was now the line that had so sharply divided the two armies?" he asked himself and could not answer.
  • The wrist felt as if it were not his.
  • One of them said something strange, not in Russian.
  • For more than ten seconds he stood not moving from the spot or realizing the situation.
  • He did not now run with the feeling of doubt and conflict with which he had trodden the Enns bridge, but with the feeling of a hare fleeing from the hounds.
  • A shudder of terror went through him: "No, better not look," he thought, but having reached the bushes he glanced round once more.
  • Though the commander was occupied in giving instructions to Major Ekonomov, he could not help taking notice of the soldier.
  • But Dolokhov did not go away; he untied the handkerchief around his head, pulled it off, and showed the blood congealed on his hair.
  • Their spirits once roused were, however, not diminished, but only changed character.
  • Amid the smoke, deafened by the incessant reports which always made him jump, Tushin not taking his pipe from his mouth ran from gun to gun, now aiming, now counting the charges, now giving orders about replacing dead or wounded horses and harnessing fresh ones, and shouting in his feeble voice, so high pitched and irresolute.
  • Owing to the terrible uproar and the necessity for concentration and activity, Tushin did not experience the slightest unpleasant sense of fear, and the thought that he might be killed or badly wounded never occurred to him.
  • The enemy's guns were in his fancy not guns but pipes from which occasional puffs were blown by an invisible smoker.
  • But the staff officer did not finish what he wanted to say.
  • He delivered the order and did not leave the battery.
  • Not like your honor!
  • They were both so busy as to seem not to notice one another.
  • It had grown so dark that one could not distinguish the uniforms ten paces off, and the firing had begun to subside.
  • They all rushed out of the village again, but Tushin's guns could not move, and the artillerymen, Tushin, and the cadet exchanged silent glances as they awaited their fate.
  • "Not hurt, Petrov?" asked one.
  • The general had so wished to do this and was so sorry he had not managed to do it that it seemed to him as if it had really happened.
  • Could one possibly make out amid all that confusion what did or did not happen?
  • He had not seen the hussars all that day, but had heard about them from an infantry officer.
  • "I had not the pleasure of seeing you," said Prince Andrew, coldly and abruptly.
  • As he stepped past the generals in the crowded hut, feeling embarrassed as he always was by the sight of his superiors, he did not notice the staff of the banner and stumbled over it.
  • "How was it a gun was abandoned?" asked Bagration, frowning, not so much at the captain as at those who were laughing, among whom Zherkov laughed loudest.
  • Tushin did not say that there were no covering troops, though that was perfectly true.
  • Prince Bagration, apparently not wishing to be severe, found nothing to say; the others did not venture to intervene.
  • He tried to get away from them, but they would not for an instant let his shoulder move a hair's breadth.
  • It would not ache--it would be well--if only they did not pull it, but it was impossible to get rid of them.
  • Tushin had not returned, the doctor had not come.
  • Rostov did not listen to the soldier.
  • Next day the French army did not renew their attack, and the remnant of Bagration's detachment was reunited to Kutuzov's army.
  • Prince Vasili was not a man who deliberately thought out his plans.
  • Of these plans he had not merely one or two in his head but dozens, some only beginning to form themselves, some approaching achievement, and some in course of disintegration.
  • She could not refrain from weeping at these words.
  • Prince Vasili had come to the conclusion that it was necessary to throw this bone--a bill for thirty thousand rubles--to the poor princess that it might not occur to her to speak of his share in the affair of the inlaid portfolio.
  • It seemed so natural to Pierre that everyone should like him, and it would have seemed so unnatural had anyone disliked him, that he could not but believe in the sincerity of those around him.
  • From the death of Count Bezukhov he did not let go his hold of the lad.
  • Even if Anna Pavlovna did not say so, he could see that she wished to and only refrained out of regard for his modesty.
  • When he read that sentence, Pierre felt for the first time that some link which other people recognized had grown up between himself and Helene, and that thought both alarmed him, as if some obligation were being imposed on him which he could not fulfill, and pleased him as an entertaining supposition.
  • Helene smiled, with a look implying that she did not admit the possibility of anyone seeing her without being enchanted.
  • He did not see her marble beauty forming a complete whole with her dress, but all the charm of her body only covered by her garments.
  • You had not noticed that I am a woman?
  • And at that moment Pierre felt that Helene not only could, but must, be his wife, and that it could not be otherwise.
  • How and when this would be he did not know, he did not even know if it would be a good thing (he even felt, he knew not why, that it would be a bad thing), but he knew it would happen.
  • Pierre did not look at Helene nor she at him.
  • When he got home he could not sleep for a long time for thinking of what had happened.
  • And he again saw her not as the daughter of Prince Vasili, but visualized her whole body only veiled by its gray dress.
  • "This is all very fine, but things must be settled," said Prince Vasili to himself, with a sorrowful sigh, one morning, feeling that Pierre who was under such obligations to him ("But never mind that") was not behaving very well in this matter.
  • I will invite two or three people, and if he does not understand what he ought to do then it will be my affair--yes, my affair.
  • No, she is not stupid, she is an excellent girl," he sometimes said to himself "she never makes a mistake, never says anything stupid.
  • She says little, but what she does say is always clear and simple, so she is not stupid.
  • She never was abashed and is not abashed now, so she cannot be a bad woman!
  • He had often begun to make reflections or think aloud in her company, and she had always answered him either by a brief but appropriate remark--showing that it did not interest her--or by a silent look and smile which more palpably than anything else showed Pierre her superiority.
  • Prince Vasili was not having any supper: he went round the table in a merry mood, sitting down now by one, now by another, of the guests.
  • To each of them he made some careless and agreeable remark except to Pierre and Helene, whose presence he seemed not to notice.
  • "Exactly, not a hair's breadth farther," answered Prince Vasili, laughing, "'Sergey Kuzmich...
  • Poor Vyazmitinov could not get any farther!
  • Jests fell flat, news was not interesting, and the animation was evidently forced.
  • He did not see, hear, or understand anything clearly.
  • Now I know that not because of her alone, nor of myself alone, but because of everyone, it must inevitably come about.
  • I do not know, but it will certainly happen! thought Pierre, glancing at those dazzling shoulders close to his eyes.
  • Or he would suddenly feel ashamed of he knew not what.
  • So why should I not stay at his house?
  • Then it would suddenly seem to him that it was not she but he was so unusually beautiful, and that that was why they all looked so at him, and flattered by this general admiration he would expand his chest, raise his head, and rejoice at his good fortune.
  • But Pierre was so absorbed that he did not understand what was said.
  • The old princess did not reply, she was tormented by jealousy of her daughter's happiness.
  • Now he felt that it was inevitable, but he could not make up his mind to take the final step.
  • "This happiness is not for you," some inner voice whispered to him.
  • This happiness is for those who have not in them what there is in you.
  • Some of the nearest relatives had not yet left.
  • Prince Vasili gave him a look of stern inquiry, as though what Pierre had just said was so strange that one could not take it in.
  • Pierre smiled, but his smile showed that he knew it was not the story about Sergey Kuzmich that interested Prince Vasili just then, and Prince Vasili saw that Pierre knew this.
  • "The step must be taken but I cannot, I cannot!" thought Pierre, and he again began speaking about indifferent matters, about Sergey Kuzmich, asking what the point of the story was as he had not heard it properly.
  • Prince Vasili passed by, seeming not to hear the ladies, and sat down on a sofa in a far corner of the room.
  • "Something special is always said in such cases," he thought, but could not remember what it was that people say.
  • Whether he was in a bad temper because Prince Vasili was coming, or whether his being in a bad temper made him specially annoyed at Prince Vasili's visit, he was in a bad temper, and in the morning Tikhon had already advised the architect not to go to the prince with his report.
  • The road is not swept for the princess my daughter, but for a minister!
  • I'll teach you to think! and lifting his stick he swung it and would have hit Alpatych, the overseer, had not the latter instinctively avoided the blow.
  • She thought: "If I seem not to notice he will think that I do not sympathize with him; if I seem sad and out of spirits myself, he will say (as he has done before) that I'm in the dumps."
  • And the other one is not here.
  • "She is not very well," answered Mademoiselle Bourienne with a bright smile, "so she won't come down.
  • His plate seemed to him not quite clean, and pointing to a spot he flung it away.
  • The little princess was not unwell, but had such an overpowering fear of the prince that, hearing he was in a bad humor, she had decided not to appear.
  • And why not marry her if she really has so much money?
  • They'll be announcing that the gentlemen are in the drawing room and we shall have to go down, and you have not smartened yourself up at all!
  • Princess Mary's self-esteem was wounded by the fact that the arrival of a suitor agitated her, and still more so by both her companions' not having the least conception that it could be otherwise.
  • "No really, my dear, this dress is not pretty," said Lise, looking sideways at Princess Mary from a little distance.
  • But this one is too light, it's not becoming!
  • It was not the dress, but the face and whole figure of Princess Mary that was not pretty, but neither Mademoiselle Bourienne nor the little princess felt this; they still thought that if a blue ribbon were placed in the hair, the hair combed up, and the blue scarf arranged lower on the best maroon dress, and so on, all would be well.
  • They forgot that the frightened face and the figure could not be altered, and that however they might change the setting and adornment of that face, it would still remain piteous and plain.
  • "No, it will not do," she said decidedly, clasping her hands.
  • No, Mary, really this dress does not suit you.
  • Not in the least!
  • This expression in Princess Mary did not frighten them (she never inspired fear in anyone), but they knew that when it appeared on her face, she became mute and was not to be shaken in her determination.
  • She did not comply with Lise's request, she not only left her hair as it was, but did not even look in her glass.
  • Desire nothing for thyself, seek nothing, be not anxious or envious.
  • What could all that matter in comparison with the will of God, without Whose care not a hair of man's head can fall?
  • And she saw Mademoiselle Bourienne, with her ribbon and pretty face, and her unusually animated look which was fixed on him, but him she could not see, she only saw something large, brilliant, and handsome moving toward her as she entered the room.
  • She still could not see him.
  • Anatole stood with his right thumb under a button of his uniform, his chest expanded and his back drawn in, slightly swinging one foot, and, with his head a little bent, looked with beaming face at the princess without speaking and evidently not thinking about her at all.
  • Anatole was not quick-witted, nor ready or eloquent in conversation, but he had the faculty, so invaluable in society, of composure and imperturbable self-possession.
  • Perhaps he did not really think this when he met women--even probably he did not, for in general he thought very little--but his looks and manner gave that impression.
  • The princess felt this, and as if wishing to show him that she did not even dare expect to interest him, she turned to his father.
  • It's not as at Annette's * receptions where you always ran away; you remember cette chere Annette!
  • When he saw the pretty little Bourienne, Anatole came to the conclusion that he would not find Bald Hills dull either.
  • "Not at all bad!" he thought, examining her, "not at all bad, that little companion!
  • "Not at all bad!" he thought, examining her, "not at all bad, that little companion!
  • His birth and position in society were not bad.
  • "You must do as you please," said Prince Bolkonski, bowing to his daughter-in-law, "but she need not make a fool of herself, she's plain enough as it is."
  • "But am I not too cold with him?" thought the princess.
  • I try to be reserved because in the depth of my soul I feel too near to him already, but then he cannot know what I think of him and may imagine that I do not like him.
  • Of course, she, a handsome young woman without any definite position, without relations or even a country, did not intend to devote her life to serving Prince Bolkonski, to reading aloud to him and being friends with Princess Mary.
  • But Anatole's expression, though his eyes were fixed on her, referred not to her but to the movements of Mademoiselle Bourienne's little foot, which he was then touching with his own under the clavichord.
  • Can it be possible? she thought, not daring to look at his face, but still feeling his eyes gazing at her.
  • She did not know how she found the courage, but she looked straight into his handsome face as it came near to her shortsighted eyes.
  • "Is it possible that Amelie" (Mademoiselle Bourienne) "thinks I could be jealous of her, and not value her pure affection and devotion to me?"
  • Not till then! she said.
  • She could not lie either on her face or on her side.
  • "I should be glad enough to fall asleep, so it's not my fault!" and her voice quivered like that of a child about to cry.
  • The old prince did not sleep either.
  • The insult was the more pointed because it concerned not himself but another, his daughter, whom he loved more than himself.
  • And how is it she has not pride enough to see it?
  • The old prince knew that if he told his daughter she was making a mistake and that Anatole meant to flirt with Mademoiselle Bourienne, Princess Mary's self-esteem would be wounded and his point (not to be parted from her) would be gained, so pacifying himself with this thought, he called Tikhon and began to undress.
  • They came to disturb my life--and there is not much of it left.
  • "I expect you have guessed that Prince Vasili has not come and brought his pupil with him" (for some reason Prince Bolkonski referred to Anatole as a "pupil") "for the sake of my beautiful eyes.
  • "I do not know what you think, Father," whispered the princess.
  • I'm not going to get married.
  • But I do not know, Father!
  • It was untrue to be sure, but still it was terrible, and she could not help thinking of it.
  • She could not understand it.
  • Do you wish or not to be Prince Anatole Kuragin's wife?
  • But, my dear, will you not give us a little hope of touching this heart, so kind and generous?
  • If he is not rich I will give her the means; I will ask my father and Andrew.
  • Not till midwinter was the count at last handed a letter addressed in his son's handwriting.
  • "I'm not a goose, but they are who cry about trifles," said Petya.
  • It's not that I don't remember--I know what he is like, but not as I remember Nikolenka.
  • But Natasha had not yet felt anything like it.
  • She believed it could be, but did not understand it.
  • I'm not going to.
  • "Not more stupid than you, madam," said the nine-year-old Petya, with the air of an old brigadier.
  • From all he says one should be glad and not cry.
  • Nicholas' letter was read over hundreds of times, and those who were considered worthy to hear it had to come to the countess, for she did not let it out of her hands.
  • The universal experience of ages, showing that children do grow imperceptibly from the cradle to manhood, did not exist for the countess.
  • As twenty years before, it seemed impossible that the little creature who lived somewhere under her heart would ever cry, suck her breast, and begin to speak, so now she could not believe that that little creature could be this strong, brave man, this model son and officer that, judging by this letter, he now was.
  • Not a word about himself....
  • Rostov had not yet had time to get his uniform.
  • Boris rose to meet Rostov, but in doing so did not omit to steady and replace some chessmen that were falling.
  • They had not met for nearly half a year and, being at the age when young men take their first steps on life's road, each saw immense changes in the other, quite a new reflection of the society in which they had taken those first steps.
  • "I did not expect you today," he added.
  • I did not think he would get it to you so quickly....
  • Oh, what a pig I am, not to have written and to have given them such a fright!
  • "Why not?" inquired Boris.
  • But that's not the point...
  • So far everything's all right, but I confess I should much like to be an adjutant and not remain at the front.
  • Would you believe it, Count, I was not at all alarmed, because I knew I was right.
  • It was not a matter of life but rather of death, as the saying is.
  • I knew I was in the right so I kept silent; was not that best, Count?...
  • The next day it was not even mentioned in the Orders of the Day.
  • He could not tell them simply that everyone went at a trot and that he fell off his horse and sprained his arm and then ran as hard as he could from a Frenchman into the wood.
  • Rostov flushed up on noticing this, but he did not care, this was a mere stranger.
  • Our stories have some weight, not like the stories of those fellows on the staff who get rewards without doing anything!
  • It seemed as though not the trumpeters were playing, but as if the army itself, rejoicing at the Emperors' approach, had naturally burst into music.
  • The Tsar said something more which Rostov did not hear, and the soldiers, straining their lungs, shouted "Hurrah!"
  • "Of course not!" he now thought.
  • Commanded by the Emperor himself they could not fail to vanquish anyone, be it whom it might: so thought Rostov and most of the officers after the review.
  • He did not find Prince Andrew in Olmutz that day, but the appearance of the town where the headquarters and the diplomatic corps were stationed and the two Emperors were living with their suites, households, and courts only strengthened his desire to belong to that higher world.
  • Bolkonski was not there.
  • When he entered, Prince Andrew, his eyes drooping contemptuously (with that peculiar expression of polite weariness which plainly says, "If it were not my duty I would not talk to you for a moment"), was listening to an old Russian general with decorations, who stood very erect, almost on tiptoe, with a soldier's obsequious expression on his purple face, reporting something.
  • More than ever was Boris resolved to serve in future not according to the written code, but under this unwritten law.
  • I am very sorry you did not find me in yesterday.
  • "Yes, I was thinking"--for some reason Boris could not help blushing-- "of asking the commander-in-chief.
  • While Prince Andrew went to report about the purple-faced general, that gentleman--evidently not sharing Boris' conception of the advantages of the unwritten code of subordination--looked so fixedly at the presumptuous lieutenant who had prevented his finishing what he had to say to the adjutant that Boris felt uncomfortable.
  • He would say a lot of pleasant things, ask you to dinner" ("That would not be bad as regards the unwritten code," thought Boris), "but nothing more would come of it.
  • But this is what we'll do: I have a good friend, an adjutant general and an excellent fellow, Prince Dolgorukov; and though you may not know it, the fact is that now Kutuzov with his staff and all of us count for nothing.
  • But what was most amusing," he continued, with a sudden, good-natured laugh, "was that we could not think how to address the reply!
  • If not as 'Consul' and of course not as 'Emperor,' it seemed to me it should be to 'General Bonaparte.'
  • The day was bright and sunny after a sharp night frost, and the cheerful glitter of that autumn day was in keeping with the news of victory which was conveyed, not only by the tales of those who had taken part in it, but also by the joyful expression on the faces of soldiers, officers, generals, and adjutants, as they passed Rostov going or coming.
  • It was plain that he did not quite grasp where he was.
  • Rostov did not know or remember how he ran to his place and mounted.
  • Not daring to look round and without looking round, he was ecstatically conscious of his approach.
  • He felt it not only from the sound of the hoofs of the approaching cavalcade, but because as he drew near everything grew brighter, more joyful, more significant, and more festive around him.
  • Casually, while surveying the squadron, the Emperor's eyes met Rostov's and rested on them for not more than two seconds.
  • Rostov saw how the Emperor's rather round shoulders shuddered as if a cold shiver had run down them, how his left foot began convulsively tapping the horse's side with the spur, and how the well-trained horse looked round unconcerned and did not stir.
  • "Not 'our Sovereign, the Emperor,' as they say at official dinners," said he, "but the health of our Sovereign, that good, enchanting, and great man!
  • "If we fought before," he said, "not letting the French pass, as at Schon Grabern, what shall we not do now when he is at the front?
  • Is it not so, gentlemen?
  • And Rostov got up and went wandering among the campfires, dreaming of what happiness it would be to die--not in saving the Emperor's life (he did not even dare to dream of that), but simply to die before his eyes.
  • And he was not the only man to experience that feeling during those memorable days preceding the battle of Austerlitz: nine tenths of the men in the Russian army were then in love, though less ecstatically, with their Tsar and the glory of the Russian arms.
  • As soon as Prince Andrew began to demonstrate the defects of the latter and the merits of his own plan, Prince Dolgorukov ceased to listen to him and gazed absent-mindedly not at the map, but at Prince Andrew's face.
  • Except your Kutuzov, there is not a single Russian in command of a column!
  • On the way home, Prince Andrew could not refrain from asking Kutuzov, who was sitting silently beside him, what he thought of tomorrow's battle.
  • Whether he was pulling it or being pushed by it he did not know, but rushed along at headlong speed with no time to consider what this movement might lead to.
  • He interrupted him, talked rapidly and indistinctly, without looking at the man he was addressing, and did not reply to questions put to him.
  • At last Bagration's orderly came with the news that the prince could not attend.
  • "Since Prince Bagration is not coming, we may begin," said Weyrother, hurriedly rising from his seat and going up to the table on which an enormous map of the environs of Brunn was spread out.
  • He asked Weyrother several times to repeat words he had not clearly heard and the difficult names of villages.
  • When the reading which lasted more than an hour was over, Langeron again brought his snuffbox to rest and, without looking at Weyrother or at anyone in particular, began to say how difficult it was to carry out such a plan in which the enemy's position was assumed to be known, whereas it was perhaps not known, since the enemy was in movement.
  • Langeron's objections were valid but it was obvious that their chief aim was to show General Weyrother--who had read his dispositions with as much self-confidence as if he were addressing school children--that he had to do, not with fools, but with men who could teach him something in military matters.
  • Weyrother again gave that smile which seemed to say that to him it was strange and ridiculous to meet objections from Russian generals and to have to prove to them what he had not merely convinced himself of, but had also convinced the sovereign Emperors of.
  • Whether Dolgorukov and Weyrother, or Kutuzov, Langeron, and the others who did not approve of the plan of attack, were right--he did not know.
  • But was it really not possible for Kutuzov to state his views plainly to the Emperor?
  • Prince Andrew, however, did not answer that voice and went on dreaming of his triumphs.
  • If before that you are not ten times wounded, killed, or betrayed, well... what then?...
  • "Well then," Prince Andrew answered himself, "I don't know what will happen and don't want to know, and can't, but if I want this--want glory, want to be known to men, want to be loved by them, it is not my fault that I want it and want nothing but that and live only for that.
  • On this knoll there was a white patch that Rostov could not at all make out: was it a glade in the wood lit up by the moon, or some unmelted snow, or some white houses?
  • No, that's not it--that's tomorrow.
  • But that's nonsense, the chief thing is not to forget the important thing I was thinking of.
  • Rostov could hear the sound of French words but could not distinguish them.
  • The hussar did not reply.
  • Bagration called to him from the hill not to go beyond the stream, but Rostov pretended not to hear him and did not stop but rode on and on, continually mistaking bushes for trees and gullies for men and continually discovering his mistakes.
  • "It's plain that they have not all gone yet, Prince," said Bagration.
  • But Rostov did not reply.
  • Do not break your ranks on the plea of removing the wounded!
  • The officers were hurriedly drinking tea and breakfasting, the soldiers, munching biscuit and beating a tattoo with their feet to warm themselves, gathering round the fires throwing into the flames the remains of sheds, chairs, tables, wheels, tubs, and everything that they did not want or could not carry away with them.
  • The fog had grown so dense that though it was growing light they could not see ten paces ahead.
  • Then a general rode past shouting something angrily, not in Russian.
  • The general shouted a demand that the cavalry should be halted, the Austrian argued that not he, but the higher command, was to blame.
  • The whole French army, and even Napoleon himself with his staff, were not on the far side of the streams and hollows of Sokolnitz and Schlappanitz beyond which we intended to take up our position and begin the action, but were on this side, so close to our own forces that Napoleon with the naked eye could distinguish a mounted man from one on foot.
  • Not a single muscle of his face--which in those days was still thin--moved.
  • But still he did not begin the engagement.
  • The marshals stood behind him not venturing to distract his attention.
  • How it would come about he did not know, but he felt sure it would do so.
  • His own strategic plan, which obviously could not now be carried out, was forgotten.
  • He could not look calmly at the standards of the passing battalions.
  • Seeing him, Kutuzov's malevolent and caustic expression softened, as if admitting that what was being done was not his adjutant's fault, and still not answering the Austrian adjutant, he addressed Bolkonski.
  • What are they doing? he murmured to himself, still not replying to the Austrian.
  • He beckoned to one of his white adjutants and asked some question--"Most likely he is asking at what o'clock they started," thought Prince Andrew, watching his old acquaintance with a smile he could not repress as he recalled his reception at Brunn.
  • The Emperor, frowning slightly, bent his ear forward as if he had not quite heard.
  • The Tsar heard but obviously did not like the reply; he shrugged his rather round shoulders and glanced at Novosiltsev who was near him, as if complaining of Kutuzov.
  • "You know, Michael Ilarionovich, we are not on the Empress' Field where a parade does not begin till all the troops are assembled," said the Tsar with another glance at the Emperor Francis, as if inviting him if not to join in at least to listen to what he was saying.
  • But the Emperor Francis continued to look about him and did not listen.
  • "That is just why I do not begin, sire," said Kutuzov in a resounding voice, apparently to preclude the possibility of not being heard, and again something in his face twitched--"That is just why I do not begin, sire, because we are not on parade and not on the Empress' Field," said clearly and distinctly.
  • "Old though he may be, he should not, he certainly should not, speak like that," their glances seemed to say.
  • "Lads, it's not the first village you've had to take," cried he.
  • "Look, look!" said this adjutant, looking not at the troops in the distance, but down the hill before him.
  • Bolkonski only tried not to lose touch with it, and looked around bewildered and unable to grasp what was happening in front of him.
  • Nesvitski with an angry face, red and unlike himself, was shouting to Kutuzov that if he did not ride away at once he would certainly be taken prisoner.
  • "The wound is not here, it is there!" said Kutuzov, pressing the handkerchief to his wounded cheek and pointing to the fleeing soldiers.
  • But he did not look at them: he looked only at what was going on in front of him--at the battery.
  • He will not get away before the Frenchman remembers his bayonet and stabs him....
  • But Prince Andrew did not see how it ended.
  • Above him there was now nothing but the sky--the lofty sky, not clear yet still immeasurably lofty, with gray clouds gliding slowly across it.
  • "How quiet, peaceful, and solemn; not at all as I ran," thought Prince Andrew--"not as we ran, shouting and fighting, not at all as the gunner and the Frenchman with frightened and angry faces struggled for the mop: how differently do those clouds glide across that lofty infinite sky!
  • How was it I did not see that lofty sky before?
  • But even it does not exist, there is nothing but quiet and peace.
  • On our right flank commanded by Bagration, at nine o'clock the battle had not yet begun.
  • Bagration knew that as the distance between the two flanks was more than six miles, even if the messenger were not killed (which he very likely would be), and found the commander-in-chief (which would be very difficult), he would not be able to get back before evening.
  • He had not ridden many hundred yards after that before he saw to his left, across the whole width of the field, an enormous mass of cavalry in brilliant white uniforms, mounted on black horses, trotting straight toward him and across his path.
  • Rostov, fearing to be crushed or swept into the attack on the French, galloped along the front as hard as his horse could go, but still was not in time to avoid them.
  • "What?" he answered, not recognizing Boris.
  • He said something more, but Rostov did not wait to hear it and rode away.
  • The idea of defeat and flight could not enter Rostov's head.
  • "Not killed--wounded!" another officer corrected him.
  • Rostov rode on at a footpace not knowing why or to whom he was now going.
  • The French had not yet occupied that region, and the Russians--the uninjured and slightly wounded--had left it long ago.
  • The French cannon did not reach there and the musketry fire sounded far away.
  • Some said the report that the Emperor was wounded was correct, others that it was not, and explained the false rumor that had spread by the fact that the Emperor's carriage had really galloped from the field of battle with the pale and terrified Ober-Hofmarschal Count Tolstoy, who had ridden out to the battlefield with others in the Emperor's suite.
  • One officer told Rostov that he had seen someone from headquarters behind the village to the left, and thither Rostov rode, not hoping to find anyone but merely to ease his conscience.
  • Not one of the innumerable speeches addressed to the Emperor that he had composed in his imagination could he now recall.
  • He might... not only might but should, have gone up to the sovereign.
  • It was a unique chance to show his devotion to the Emperor and he had not made use of it....
  • From one of the drivers he learned that Kutuzov's staff were not far off, in the village the vehicles were going to.
  • The ice bore him but it swayed and creaked, and it was plain that it would give way not only under a cannon or a crowd, but very soon even under his weight alone.
  • Go on! innumerable voices suddenly shouted after the ball had struck the general, the men themselves not knowing what, or why, they were shouting.
  • He did not know how long his unconsciousness lasted.
  • "Where is it, that lofty sky that I did not know till now, but saw today?" was his first thought.
  • "And I did not know this suffering either," he thought.
  • Yes, I did not know anything, anything at all till now.
  • He did not turn his head and did not see those who, judging by the sound of hoofs and voices, had ridden up and stopped near him.
  • Not only did they not interest him, but he took no notice of them and at once forgot them.
  • Not only did they not interest him, but he took no notice of them and at once forgot them.
  • He did not regain consciousness till late in the day, when with other wounded and captured Russian officers he was carried to the hospital.
  • Prince Andrew did not see how and by whom it was replaced, but the little icon with its thin gold chain suddenly appeared upon his chest outside his uniform.
  • "He is a nervous, bilious subject," said Larrey, "and will not recover."
  • Meeting a comrade at the last post station but one before Moscow, Denisov had drunk three bottles of wine with him and, despite the jolting ruts across the snow-covered road, did not once wake up on the way to Moscow, but lay at the bottom of the sleigh beside Rostov, who grew more and more impatient the nearer they got to Moscow.
  • Then they've not gone to bed yet?
  • It seemed to him the horses were not moving at all.
  • The well-known old door handle, which always angered the countess when it was not properly cleaned, turned as loosely as ever.
  • Rostov, who had completely forgotten Denisov, not wishing anyone to forestall him, threw off his fur coat and ran on tiptoe through the large dark ballroom.
  • He could not distinguish which was Papa, which Natasha, and which Petya.
  • Only his mother was not there, he noticed that.
  • And I did not know...
  • She gazed at him, not taking her eyes off him, and smiling and holding her breath.
  • The old countess had not yet come.
  • Yet it was she, dressed in a new gown which he did not know, made since he had left.
  • She could not lift her face, but only pressed it to the cold braiding of his hussar's jacket.
  • The old countess, not letting go of his hand and kissing it every moment, sat beside him: the rest, crowding round him, watched every movement, word, or look of his, never taking their blissfully adoring eyes off him.
  • They hardly gave one another time to ask questions and give replies concerning a thousand little matters which could not interest anyone but themselves.
  • Rostov felt that, under the influence of the warm rays of love, that childlike smile which had not once appeared on his face since he left home now for the first time after eighteen months again brightened his soul and his face.
  • Sitting on the sofa with the little cushions on its arms, in what used to be his old schoolroom, and looking into Natasha's wildly bright eyes, Rostov re-entered that world of home and childhood which had no meaning for anyone else, but gave him some of the best joys of his life; and the burning of an arm with a ruler as a proof of love did not seem to him senseless, he understood and was not surprised at it.
  • Why should he not love her now, and even marry her, Rostov thought, but just now there were so many other pleasures and interests before him!
  • Not seen Duport--the famous dancer?
  • See! she said, but could not maintain herself on her toes any longer.
  • He did not know how to behave with her.
  • He kissed her hand and addressed her not as thou but as you--Sonya.
  • Vera's remark was correct, as her remarks always were, but, like most of her observations, it made everyone feel uncomfortable, not only Sonya, Nicholas, and Natasha, but even the old countess, who--dreading this love affair which might hinder Nicholas from making a brilliant match-- blushed like a girl.
  • During Rostov's short stay in Moscow, before rejoining the army, he did not draw closer to Sonya, but rather drifted away from her.
  • That's so, your excellency, all they have to do is to eat a good dinner, but providing it and serving it all up, that's not their business!
  • At that time, the Russians were so used to victories that on receiving news of the defeat some would simply not believe it, while others sought some extraordinary explanation of so strange an event.
  • The men who set the tone in conversation--Count Rostopchin, Prince Yuri Dolgorukov, Valuev, Count Markov, and Prince Vyazemski--did not show themselves at the club, but met in private houses in intimate circles, and the Moscovites who took their opinions from others--Ilya Rostov among them--remained for a while without any definite opinion on the subject of the war and without leaders.
  • Berg was mentioned, by those who did not know him, as having, when wounded in the right hand, taken his sword in the left, and gone forward.
  • Bagration was embarrassed, not wishing to avail himself of their courtesy, and this caused some delay at the doors, but after all he did at last enter first.
  • He walked shyly and awkwardly over the parquet floor of the reception room, not knowing what to do with his hands; he was more accustomed to walk over a plowed field under fire, as he had done at the head of the Kursk regiment at Schon Grabern--and he would have found that easier.
  • E'en fortunate Napoleon Knows by experience, now, Bagration, And dare not Herculean Russians trouble...
  • The dinner, both the Lenten and the other fare, was splendid, yet he could not feel quite at ease till the end of the meal.
  • Courage conquest guarantees; Have we not Bagration?
  • Involuntarily recalling his wife's past and her relations with Dolokhov, Pierre saw clearly that what was said in the letter might be true, or might at least seem to be true had it not referred to his wife.
  • Pierre recalled how Helene had smilingly expressed disapproval of Dolokhov's living at their house, and how cynically Dolokhov had praised his wife's beauty to him and from that time till they came to Moscow had not left them for a day.
  • Yes, if it were true, but I do not believe it.
  • Rostov looked inimically at Pierre, first because Pierre appeared to his hussar eyes as a rich civilian, the husband of a beauty, and in a word--an old woman; and secondly because Pierre in his preoccupation and absent-mindedness had not recognized Rostov and had not responded to his greeting.
  • When the Emperor's health was drunk, Pierre, lost in thought, did not rise or lift his glass.
  • Pierre did not catch what they were saying, but knew they were talking about him.
  • 'Everyone fears a bear,' he says, 'but when you see one your fear's all gone, and your only thought is not to let him get away!'
  • He had evidently not slept that night.
  • He was entirely absorbed by two considerations: his wife's guilt, of which after his sleepless night he had not the slightest doubt, and the guiltlessness of Dolokhov, who had no reason to preserve the honor of a man who was nothing to him....
  • "I should not be doing my duty, Count," he said in timid tones, "and should not justify your confidence and the honor you have done me in choosing me for your second, if at this grave, this very grave, moment I did not tell you the whole truth.
  • You were not right, not quite in the right, you were impetuous...
  • His left hand he held carefully back, because he wished to support his right hand with it and knew he must not do so.
  • Not at all expecting so loud a report, Pierre shuddered at the sound and then, smiling at his own sensations, stood still.
  • "Plea..." began Dolokhov, but could not at first pronounce the word.
  • But it's not that, my friend- said Dolokhov with a gasping voice.
  • When he had become a little quieter, he explained to Rostov that he was living with his mother, who, if she saw him dying, would not survive it.
  • The night after the duel he did not go to his bedroom but, as he often did, remained in his father's room, that huge room in which Count Bezukhov had died.
  • He lay down on the sofa meaning to fall asleep and forget all that had happened to him, but could not do so.
  • Such a storm of feelings, thoughts, and memories suddenly arose within him that he could not fall asleep, nor even remain in one place, but had to jump up and pace the room with rapid steps.
  • I felt then that it was not so, that I had no right to do it.
  • I then thought that I did not understand her.
  • She did not give him the money, but let herself be kissed.
  • Her father in jest tried to rouse her jealousy, and she replied with a calm smile that she was not so stupid as to be jealous: 'Let him do what he pleases,' she used to say of me.
  • She laughed contemptuously and said she was not a fool to want to have children, and that she was not going to have any children by me.
  • I'm not such a fool....
  • Often seeing the success she had with young and old men and women Pierre could not understand why he did not love her.
  • "Yes, I never loved her," said he to himself; "I knew she was a depraved woman," he repeated, "but dared not admit it to myself.
  • Pierre was one of those people who, in spite of an appearance of what is called weak character, do not seek a confidant in their troubles.
  • He could not imagine how he could speak to her now.
  • With her imperturbable calm she did not begin to speak in front of the valet.
  • She did not sit down but looked at him with a contemptuous smile, waiting for the valet to go.
  • Pierre turned over heavily on the ottoman and opened his mouth, but could not reply.
  • That I shall be the laughingstock of all Moscow, that everyone will say that you, drunk and not knowing what you were about, challenged a man you are jealous of without cause.
  • "Hm... Hm...!" growled Pierre, frowning without looking at her, and not moving a muscle.
  • Pierre wished to say something, looked at her with eyes whose strange expression she did not understand, and lay down again.
  • He was suffering physically at that moment, there was a weight on his chest and he could not breathe.
  • God knows what he would have done at that moment had Helene not fled from the room.
  • When Princess Mary went to him at the usual hour he was working at his lathe and, as usual, did not look round at her.
  • He's not among the prisoners nor among the killed!
  • The princess did not fall down or faint.
  • "Father," she said, "do not turn away from me, let us weep together."
  • It was evident that her eyes did not see Princess Mary but were looking within... into herself... at something joyful and mysterious taking place within her.
  • Princess Mary could not lift her head, she was weeping.
  • Unobservant as was the little princess, these tears, the cause of which she did not understand, agitated her.
  • She had determined not to tell her and persuaded her father to hide the terrible news from her till after her confinement, which was expected within a few days.
  • He tried not to change his former way of life, but his strength failed him.
  • "Your excellency, should not Mary Bogdanovna be sent for?" said one of the maids who was present.
  • "Well, the Lord be thanked, Princess," said Mary Bogdanovna, not hastening her steps.
  • You young ladies should not know anything about it.
  • "But how is it the doctor from Moscow is not here yet?" said the princess.
  • She did not venture to ask any questions, and shut the door again, now sitting down in her easy chair, now taking her prayer book, now kneeling before the icon stand.
  • To her surprise and distress she found that her prayers did not calm her excitement.
  • "Very good!" said the prince closing the door behind him, and Tikhon did not hear the slightest sound from the study after that.
  • "Princess, my dear, there's someone driving up the avenue!" she said, holding the casement and not closing it.
  • I must go and meet him, he does not know Russian.
  • "You did not get my letter?" he asked, and not waiting for a reply-- which he would not have received, for the princess was unable to speak-- he turned back, rapidly mounted the stairs again with the doctor who had entered the hall after him (they had met at the last post station), and again embraced his sister.
  • She saw her husband, but did not realize the significance of his appearance before her now.
  • She was not surprised at his having come; she did not realize that he had come.
  • Then suddenly a terrible shriek--it could not be hers, she could not scream like that--came from the bedroom.
  • He could not weep.
  • He looked up joyfully at the baby when the nurse brought it to him and nodded approval when she told him that the wax with the baby's hair had not sunk in the font but had floated.
  • As a result he could not go to the country with the rest of the family, but was kept all summer in Moscow by his new duties.
  • I think there were not many such gallant sons of the fatherland out there as he.
  • And then to call him out, reckoning on Fedya not fighting because he owed him money!
  • I have not yet met that divine purity and devotion I look for in women.
  • Dolokhov, who did not usually care for the society of ladies, began to come often to the house, and the question for whose sake he came (though no one spoke of it) was soon settled.
  • He was pointedly attentive to Sonya and looked at her in such a way that not only could she not bear his glances without coloring, but even the old countess and Natasha blushed when they saw his looks.
  • Rostov noticed something new in Dolokhov's relations with Sonya, but he did not explain to himself what these new relations were.
  • But he was not as much at ease with Sonya and Dolokhov as before and was less frequently at home.
  • For the Rostov family the whole interest of these preparations for war lay in the fact that Nicholas would not hear of remaining in Moscow, and only awaited the termination of Denisov's furlough after Christmas to return with him to their regiment.
  • His approaching departure did not prevent his amusing himself, but rather gave zest to his pleasures.
  • "Where would I not go at the countess' command!" said Denisov, who at the Rostovs' had jocularly assumed the role of Natasha's knight.
  • "I told you, but you would not believe it," she said triumphantly.
  • "Yes, my Sonya could not have done otherwise!" thought Nicholas.
  • Do you know, Nicholas--don't be angry--but I know you will not marry her.
  • Mamma does not wish it.
  • You are an angel: I am not worthy of you, but I am afraid of misleading you.
  • She was not in love with anyone in particular, but with everyone.
  • Nicholas could not refuse Iogel and asked Sonya to dance.
  • Denisov did not take his eyes off her and beat time with his saber in a way that clearly indicated that if he was not dancing it was because he would not and not because he could not.
  • "This is not at all the thing," he said.
  • Only on horse back and in the mazurka was Denisov's short stature not noticeable and he looked the fine fellow he felt himself to be.
  • He glided silently on one foot half across the room, and seeming not to notice the chairs was dashing straight at them, when suddenly, clinking his spurs and spreading out his legs, he stopped short on his heels, stood so a second, stamped on the spot clanking his spurs, whirled rapidly round, and, striking his left heel against his right, flew round again in a circle.
  • When at last, smartly whirling his partner round in front of her chair, he drew up with a click of his spurs and bowed to her, Natasha did not even make him a curtsy.
  • She fixed her eyes on him in amazement, smiling as if she did not recognize him.
  • Denisov, flushed after the mazurka and mopping himself with his handkerchief, sat down by Natasha and did not leave her for the rest of the evening.
  • For two days after that Rostov did not see Dolokhov at his own or at Dolokhov's home: on the third day he received a note from him:
  • Rostov had not seen him since his proposal and Sonya's refusal and felt uncomfortable at the thought of how they would meet.
  • "Well, you'd better not play," Dolokhov added, and springing a new pack of cards said: "Bank, gentlemen!"
  • Rostov sat down by his side and at first did not play.
  • And strange to say Nicholas felt that he could not help taking up a card, putting a small stake on it, and beginning to play.
  • "Leave it," said Dolokhov, though he did not seem to be even looking at Rostov, "you'll win it back all the sooner.
  • Nicholas had replied that it would be more than enough for him and that he gave his word of honor not to take anything more till the spring.
  • Now only twelve hundred rubles was left of that money, so that this seven of hearts meant for him not only the loss of sixteen hundred rubles, but the necessity of going back on his word.
  • One tormenting impression did not leave him: that those broad- boned reddish hands with hairy wrists visible from under the shirt sleeves, those hands which he loved and hated, held him in their power.
  • But it's not his fault.
  • And it's not my fault either," he thought to himself, "I have done nothing wrong.
  • And I did not realize how happy I was!
  • He was flushed and bathed in perspiration, though the room was not hot.
  • Dolokhov cut him short, as if to remind him that it was not for him to jest.
  • "My cousin has nothing to do with this and it's not necessary to mention her!" he exclaimed fiercely.
  • To say "tomorrow" and keep up a dignified tone was not difficult, but to go home alone, see his sisters, brother, mother, and father, confess and ask for money he had no right to after giving his word of honor, was terrible.
  • At home, they had not yet gone to bed.
  • "No, Papa is not back yet," said Sonya.
  • A bullet through my brain is the only thing left me--not singing! his thoughts ran on.
  • Nicholas tried to say "Yes," but could not: and he nearly burst into sobs.
  • The count was lighting his pipe and did not notice his son's condition.
  • I told you it would not be enough.
  • "It can't be helped It happens to everyone!" said the son, with a bold, free, and easy tone, while in his soul he regarded himself as a worthless scoundrel whose whole life could not atone for his crime.
  • Yes, who has not done it?
  • While father and son were having their explanation, the mother and daughter were having one not less important.
  • The countess did not believe her ears.
  • "No, he's not a fool!" replied Natasha indignantly and seriously.
  • No, Mamma, I'm not in love with him, I suppose I'm not in love with him.
  • I know he did not mean to say it, but it came out accidently.
  • No, not on any account!
  • No, but you are so nice... but it won't do...not that... but as a friend, I shall always love you.
  • Denisov bent over her hand and she heard strange sounds she did not understand.
  • In that case you would not have obliged me to give this refusal.
  • Natasha could not remain calm, seeing him in such a plight.
  • He did not wish to stay another day in Moscow.
  • After Denisov's departure, Rostov spent another fortnight in Moscow, without going out of the house, waiting for the money his father could not at once raise, and he spent most of his time in the girls' room.
  • At the Torzhok post station, either there were no horses or the postmaster would not supply them.
  • It was as if the thread of the chief screw which held his life together were stripped, so that the screw could not get in or out, but went on turning uselessly in the same place.
  • There was no answer to any of these questions, except one, and that not a logical answer and not at all a reply to them.
  • God could not have put into her heart an impulse that was against His will.
  • My wife--as she once was--did not struggle, and perhaps she was right.
  • His servant was also a yellow, wrinkled old man, without beard or mustache, evidently not because he was shaven but because they had never grown.
  • * To indicate he did not want more tea.
  • Pierre looked at him and had not time to turn away when the old man, opening his eyes, fixed his steady and severe gaze straight on Pierre's face.
  • The stranger's face was not genial, it was even cold and severe, but in spite of this, both the face and words of his new acquaintance were irresistibly attractive to Pierre.
  • Oh no, not at all!
  • "I ought to tell you that I do not believe... do not believe in God," said Pierre, regretfully and with an effort, feeling it essential to speak the whole truth.
  • The Mason looked intently at Pierre and smiled as a rich man with millions in hand might smile at a poor fellow who told him that he, poor man, had not the five rubles that would make him happy.
  • You do not know Him and that is why you are unhappy.
  • You do not know Him, but He is here, He is in me, He is in my words, He is in thee, and even in those blasphemous words thou hast just uttered! pronounced the Mason in a stern and tremulous voice.
  • "If He were not," he said quietly, "you and I would not be speaking of Him, my dear sir.
  • Who invented Him, if He did not exist?
  • Pierre could not and did not wish to break this silence.
  • "He exists, but to understand Him is hard," the Mason began again, looking not at Pierre but straight before him, and turning the leaves of his book with his old hands which from excitement he could not keep still.
  • And thou art more foolish and unreasonable than a little child, who, playing with the parts of a skillfully made watch, dares to say that, as he does not understand its use, he does not believe in the master who made it.
  • Pierre listened with swelling heart, gazing into the Mason's face with shining eyes, not interrupting or questioning him, but believing with his whole soul what the stranger said.
  • "He is not to be apprehended by reason, but by life," said the Mason.
  • "I do not understand," said Pierre, feeling with dismay doubts reawakening.
  • He was afraid of any want of clearness, any weakness, in the Mason's arguments; he dreaded not to be able to believe in him.
  • A man offended you and you shot him, and you say you do not know God and hate your life.
  • Will you not rest here?
  • "Yes, I never thought of it, but I have led a contemptible and profligate life, though I did not like it and did not want to," thought Pierre.
  • Pierre wished to say this to the Mason, but did not dare to.
  • But do not suppose me to be so bad.
  • Pierre could not go on.
  • Not a trace of his former doubts remained in his soul.
  • "One more question, Count," he said, "which I beg you to answer in all sincerity--not as a future Mason but as an honest man: have you renounced your former convictions--do you believe in God?"
  • He was not at all surprised by what he saw.
  • Why have you, who do not believe in the truth of the light and who have not seen the light, come here?
  • For a long time he could not utter a word, so that the Rhetor had to repeat his question.
  • "No, I considered it erroneous and did not follow it," said Pierre, so softly that the Rhetor did not hear him and asked him what he was saying.
  • Is that not so? said the Rhetor, after a moment's pause.
  • But since this mystery is of such a nature that nobody can know or use it unless he be prepared by long and diligent self-purification, not everyone can hope to attain it quickly.
  • The important mystery mentioned by the Rhetor, though it aroused his curiosity, did not seem to him essential, and the second aim, that of purifying and regenerating himself, did not much interest him because at that moment he felt with delight that he was already perfectly cured of his former faults and was ready for all that was good.
  • "In the seventh place, try, by the frequent thought of death," the Rhetor said, "to bring yourself to regard it not as a dreaded foe, but as a friend that frees the soul grown weary in the labors of virtue from this distressful life, and leads it to its place of recompense and peace."
  • "I must also inform you," said the Rhetor, "that our Order delivers its teaching not in words only but also by other means, which may perhaps have a stronger effect on the sincere seeker after wisdom and virtue than mere words.
  • A hieroglyph," said the Rhetor, "is an emblem of something not cognizable by the senses but which possesses qualities resembling those of the symbol."
  • Pierre knew very well what a hieroglyph was, but dared not speak.
  • Pierre quickly took out his purse and watch, but could not manage for some time to get the wedding ring off his fat finger.
  • Pierre hurriedly began taking off his right boot also and was going to tuck up the other trouser leg to save this stranger the trouble, but the Mason told him that was not necessary and gave him a slipper for his left foot.
  • He went over his vices in his mind, not knowing to which of them to give the pre-eminence.
  • The Mason did not move and for a long time said nothing after this answer.
  • The source of blessedness is not without us but within....
  • Soon after this there came into the dark chamber to fetch Pierre, not the Rhetor but Pierre's sponsor, Willarski, whom he recognized by his voice.
  • In the President's chair sat a young man he did not know, with a peculiar cross hanging from his neck.
  • Pierre glanced at the serious faces of those around, remembered all he had already gone through, and realized that he could not stop halfway.
  • As to the first pair of gloves, a man's, he said that Pierre could not know their meaning but must keep them.
  • And after a pause, he added: "But beware, dear brother, that these gloves do not deck hands that are unclean."
  • They were very long, and Pierre, from joy, agitation, and embarrassment, was not in a state to understand what was being read.
  • Forgive thy enemy, do not avenge thyself except by doing him good.
  • He finished and, getting up, embraced and kissed Pierre, who, with tears of joy in his eyes, looked round him, not knowing how to answer the congratulations and greetings from acquaintances that met him on all sides.
  • Pierre tried several times to speak, but, on one hand, Prince Vasili did not let him and, on the other, Pierre himself feared to begin to speak in the tone of decided refusal and disagreement in which he had firmly resolved to answer his father-in-law.
  • He blinked, went red, got up and sat down again, struggling with himself to do what was for him the most difficult thing in life--to say an unpleasant thing to a man's face, to say what the other, whoever he might be, did not expect.
  • Prince, I did not ask you here.
  • And when after Pierre's departure Helene returned to Petersburg, she was received by all her acquaintances not only cordially, but even with a shade of deference due to her misfortune.
  • We shall not cease to express our sincere views on that subject, and can only say to the King of Prussia and others: 'So much the worse for you.
  • Anna Pavlovna gave him her shriveled hand to kiss and introduced him to several persons whom he did not know, giving him a whispered description of each.
  • Vienna considers the bases of the proposed treaty so unattainable that not even a continuity of most brilliant successes would secure them, and she doubts the means we have of gaining them.
  • "You absolutely must come and see me," she said in a tone that implied that, for certain considerations he could not know of, this was absolutely necessary.
  • We are not fighting pour le Roi de Prusse, but for right principles.
  • The conversation did not flag all evening and turned chiefly on the political news.
  • A snuffbox with the Emperor's portrait is a reward but not a distinction," said the diplomatist--"a gift, rather."
  • Partly because of the depressing memories associated with Bald Hills, partly because Prince Andrew did not always feel equal to bearing with his father's peculiarities, and partly because he needed solitude, Prince Andrew made use of Bogucharovo, began building and spent most of his time there.
  • After the Austerlitz campaign Prince Andrew had firmly resolved not to continue his military service, and when the war recommenced and everybody had to serve, he took a post under his father in the recruitment so as to avoid active service.
  • Not finding the young prince in his study the valet went with the letters to Princess Mary's apartments, but did not find him there.
  • Not finding the young prince in his study the valet went with the letters to Princess Mary's apartments, but did not find him there.
  • "My dear, really... it's better not to wake him... he's asleep," said the princess in a tone of entreaty.
  • "Perhaps we'd really better not wake him," he said hesitating.
  • Have just this moment received by special messenger very joyful news--if it's not false.
  • I can't make out what the commander at Korchevo--a certain Khandrikov--is up to; till now the additional men and provisions have not arrived.
  • Gallop off to him at once and say I'll have his head off if everything is not here in a week.
  • Yes, we have gained a victory over Bonaparte, just when I'm not serving.
  • I shall await your most gracious permission here in hospital, that I may not have to play the part of a secretary rather than commander in the army.
  • My removal from the army does not produce the slightest stir--a blind man has left it.
  • Buxhowden is commander-in-chief by seniority, but General Bennigsen does not quite see it; more particularly as it is he and his corps who are within sight of the enemy and he wishes to profit by the opportunity to fight a battle 'on his own hand' as the Germans say.
  • In short, we retreat after the battle but send a courier to Petersburg with news of a victory, and General Bennigsen, hoping to receive from Petersburg the post of commander in chief as a reward for his victory, does not give up the command of the army to General Buxhowden.
  • So energetically do we pursue this aim that after crossing an unfordable river we burn the bridges to separate ourselves from our enemy, who at the moment is not Bonaparte but Buxhowden.
  • It was not what he had read that vexed him, but the fact that the life out there in which he had now no part could perturb him.
  • He drew the curtain aside and for some time his frightened, restless eyes could not find the baby.
  • He was not dead, but evidently the crisis was over and he was convalescent.
  • Prince Andrew longed to snatch up, to squeeze, to hold to his heart, this helpless little creature, but dared not do so.
  • He did not look round, but still gazing at the infant's face listened to his regular breathing.
  • Each made the other a warning gesture and stood still in the dim light beneath the curtain as if not wishing to leave that seclusion where they three were shut off from all the world.
  • The building of a new church, previously begun, had cost about 10,000 in each of the last two years, and he did not know how the rest, about 100,000 rubles, was spent, and almost every year he was obliged to borrow.
  • But he felt that this did not forward matters at all.
  • He felt that these consultations were detached from real affairs and did not link up with them or make them move.
  • Temptations to Pierre's greatest weakness-- the one to which he had confessed when admitted to the Lodge--were so strong that he could not resist them.
  • Everywhere preparations were made not for ceremonious welcomes (which he knew Pierre would not like), but for just such gratefully religious ones, with offerings of icons and the bread and salt of hospitality, as, according to his understanding of his master, would touch and delude him.
  • The estates he had not before visited were each more picturesque than the other; the serfs everywhere seemed thriving and touchingly grateful for the benefits conferred on them.
  • What Pierre did not know was that the place where they presented him with bread and salt and wished to build a chantry in honor of Peter and Paul was a market village where a fair was held on St. Peter's day, and that the richest peasants (who formed the deputation) had begun the chantry long before, but that nine tenths of the peasants in that villages were in a state of the greatest poverty.
  • He did not know that since the nursing mothers were no longer sent to work on his land, they did still harder work on their own land.
  • He did not know that the priest who met him with the cross oppressed the peasants by his exactions, and that the pupils' parents wept at having to let him take their children and secured their release by heavy payments.
  • He did not know that the brick buildings, built to plan, were being built by serfs whose manorial labor was thus increased, though lessened on paper.
  • Returning from his journey through South Russia in the happiest state of mind, Pierre carried out an intention he had long had of visiting his friend Bolkonski, whom he had not seen for two years.
  • "Well, I did not expect you, I am very glad," said Prince Andrew.
  • They went out and walked about till dinnertime, talking of the political news and common acquaintances like people who do not know each other intimately.
  • However, this is not at all interesting.
  • "One thing I thank God for is that I did not kill that man," said Pierre.
  • It is not given to man to know what is right and what is wrong.
  • To live only so as not to do evil and not to have to repent is not enough.
  • No, I shall not agree with you, and you do not really believe what you are saying.
  • The same love of others, a desire to do something for them, a desire for their approval.--So I lived for others, and not almost, but quite, ruined my life.
  • "But that's just the same as myself--they are not others," explained Prince Andrew.
  • But what's right and what's good must be judged by one who knows all, but not by us.
  • Just as I could not stand his terrible physical labor but should die of it in a week, so he could not stand my physical idleness, but would grow fat and die.
  • And he does not want that.
  • Prince Andrew expressed his ideas so clearly and distinctly that it was evident he had reflected on this subject more than once, and he spoke readily and rapidly like a man who has not talked for a long time.
  • I had such moments myself not long ago, in Moscow and when traveling, but at such times I collapsed so that I don't live at all--everything seems hateful to me... myself most of all.
  • That is not cleanly," said Prince Andrew; "on the contrary one must try to make one's life as pleasant as possible.
  • I'm alive, that is not my fault, so I must live out my life as best I can without hurting others.
  • They could not understand that I have not the necessary qualifications for it--the kind of good-natured, fussy shallowness necessary for the position.
  • I have promised myself not to serve again in the active Russian army.
  • And I won't--not even if Bonaparte were here at Smolensk threatening Bald Hills--even then I wouldn't serve in the Russian army!
  • But he is growing old, and though not exactly cruel he has too energetic a character.
  • "Yes, but it is not as you imagine," Prince Andrew continued.
  • He did not reply.
  • So that's what I'm sorry for--human dignity, peace of mind, purity, and not the serfs' backs and foreheads, which, beat and shave as you may, always remain the same backs and foreheads.
  • You should not think so.
  • Why do I alone not see what you see?
  • If I see, clearly see, that ladder leading from plant to man, why should I suppose it breaks off at me and does not go farther and farther?
  • Prince Andrew did not reply.
  • We must live, we must love, and we must believe that we live not only today on this scrap of earth, but have lived and shall live forever, there, in the Whole, said Pierre, and he pointed to the sky.
  • It vanished as soon as he returned to the customary conditions of his life, but he knew that this feeling which he did not know how to develop existed within him.
  • They were not in the least abashed.
  • No... why not, my dear, why shouldn't I?
  • When I was in Kiev, Crazy Cyril says to me (he's one of God's own and goes barefoot summer and winter), he says, 'Why are you not going to the right place?
  • There was a general who did not believe, and said, 'The monks cheat,' and as soon as he'd said it he went blind.
  • * "Princess, on my word, I did not wish to offend her."
  • Oh, I really did not mean to hurt her feelings.
  • "How do you find Andrew?" she added hurriedly, not giving him time to reply to her affectionate words.
  • He has not a character like us women who, when we suffer, can weep away our sorrows.
  • Today he is cheerful and in good spirits, but that is the effect of your visit--he is not often like that.
  • Old women's nonsense--old women's nonsense! he repeated, but still he patted Pierre affectionately on the shoulder, and then went up to the table where Prince Andrew, evidently not wishing to join in the conversation, was looking over the papers his father had brought from town.
  • That charm was not expressed so much in his relations with him as with all his family and with the household.
  • It was very bitter, but they wandered about the fields seeking it and dug it out with their sabers and ate it, though they were ordered not to do so, as it was a noxious plant.
  • I ordered you not to let them eat that Mashka woot stuff!
  • He did not even trouble to find out where Denisov had gone.
  • Having got warm in his corner, he fell asleep and did not leave the hut till toward evening.
  • Denisov had not yet returned.
  • I shall answer for it and not you, and you'd better not buzz about here till you get hurt.
  • "Very well, then!" shouted the little officer, undaunted and not riding away.
  • If not, as the demand was booked against an infantry regiment, there will be a row and the affair may end badly.
  • Denisov could not speak and gasped for breath.
  • In answer to Rostov's renewed questions, Denisov said, laughing, that he thought he remembered that some other fellow had got mixed up in it, but that it was all nonsense and rubbish, and he did not in the least fear any kind of trial, and that if those scoundrels dared attack him he would give them an answer that they would not easily forget.
  • Perhaps at another time Denisov would not have left the regiment for so slight a wound, but now he took advantage of it to excuse himself from appearing at the staff and went into hospital.
  • In June the battle of Friedland was fought, in which the Pavlograds did not take part, and after that an armistice was proclaimed.
  • The assistant, however, did not confirm the doctor's words.
  • But, just because the assistant evidently did not want him to go in, Rostov entered the soldiers' ward.
  • He had not at all expected such a sight.
  • "Yes, your honor," the soldier replied complacently, and rolling his eyes more than ever he drew himself up still straighter, but did not move.
  • After all we're men, not dogs.
  • His face had the same swollen pallor as the faces of the other hospital patients, but it was not this that struck Rostov.
  • What struck him was that Denisov did not seem glad to see him, and smiled at him unnaturally.
  • He did not ask about the regiment, nor about the general state of affairs, and when Rostov spoke of these matters did not listen.
  • Rostov even noticed that Denisov did not like to be reminded of the regiment, or in general of that other free life which was going on outside the hospital.
  • Let them twy me, I'm not afwaid of anyone.
  • I've served the Tsar and my countwy honowably and have not stolen!
  • "It's certainly well written," said Tushin, "but that's not the point, Vasili Dmitrich," and he also turned to Rostov.
  • Haven't I said I'm not going to gwovel?
  • He did not finish, but gave a painfully unnatural smile.
  • At the moment the Emperors went into the pavilion he looked at his watch, and did not forget to look at it again when Alexander came out.
  • He had not only become known, but people had grown accustomed to him and accepted him.
  • Only recently, talking with one of Platov's Cossack officers, Rostov had argued that if Napoleon were taken prisoner he would be treated not as a sovereign, but as a criminal.
  • I should not have come, but I have business, he said coldly.
  • As if you could come at a wrong time! said Boris, and he led him into the room where the supper table was laid and introduced him to his guests, explaining that he was not a civilian, but an hussar officer, and an old friend of his.
  • Zhilinski evidently did not receive this new Russian person very willingly into his circle and did not speak to Rostov.
  • "Oh, no, not at all," said Boris.
  • When he and Boris were alone, Rostov felt for the first time that he could not look Boris in the face without a sense of awkwardness.
  • I think it would be best not to bring it before the Emperor, but to apply to the commander of the corps....
  • Rostov almost shouted, not looking Boris in the face.
  • He could not himself go to the general in attendance as he was in mufti and had come to Tilsit without permission to do so, and Boris, even had he wished to, could not have done so on the following day.
  • All is over between us, but I won't leave here without having done all I can for Denisov and certainly not without getting his letter to the Emperor.
  • And suddenly with a determination he himself did not expect, Rostov felt for the letter in his pocket and went straight to the house.
  • In the uniform of the Preobrazhensk regiment--white chamois-leather breeches and high boots-- and wearing a star Rostov did not know (it was that of the Legion d'honneur), the monarch came out into the porch, putting on his gloves and carrying his hat under his arm.
  • On approaching Alexander he raised his hat, and as he did so, Rostov, with his cavalryman's eye, could not help noticing that Napoleon did not sit well or firmly in the saddle.
  • Stop here! voices whispered to Lazarev who did not know where to go.
  • The members of his suite, guessing at once what he wanted, moved about and whispered as they passed something from one to another, and a page--the same one Rostov had seen the previous evening at Boris'--ran forward and, bowing respectfully over the outstretched hand and not keeping it waiting a moment, laid in it an Order on a red ribbon.
  • In his mind, a painful process was going on which he could not bring to a conclusion.
  • He feared to give way to his thoughts, yet could not get rid of them.
  • But Rostov did not listen to him.
  • "We are not diplomatic officials, we are soldiers and nothing more," he went on.
  • If we're punished, it means that we have deserved it, it's not for us to judge.
  • Our business is to do our duty, to fight and not to think!
  • "And to drink," said one of the officers, not wishing to quarrel.
  • He was not thinking of anything, but looked absent-mindedly and cheerfully from side to side.
  • But apparently the coachman's sympathy was not enough for Peter, and he turned on the box toward his master.
  • Are you not weary of that stupid, meaningless, constantly repeated fraud?
  • Look at those cramped dead firs, ever the same, and at me too, sticking out my broken and barked fingers just where they have grown, whether from my back or my sides: as they have grown so I stand, and I do not believe in your hopes and your lies.
  • During this journey he, as it were, considered his life afresh and arrived at his old conclusion, restful in its hopelessness: that it was not for him to begin anything anew--but that he must live out his life, content to do no harm, and not disturbing himself or desiring anything.
  • Suddenly, he did not know why, he felt a pang.
  • Not of the military regulations or of the arrangement of the Ryazan serfs' quitrents.
  • Prince Andrew, too, dared not stir, for fear of betraying his unintentional presence.
  • Next morning, having taken leave of no one but the count, and not waiting for the ladies to appear, Prince Andrew set off for home.
  • No, life is not over at thirty-one!
  • He could not now understand how he could ever even have doubted the necessity of taking an active share in life, just as a month before he had not understood how the idea of leaving the quiet country could ever enter his head.
  • He did not even remember how formerly, on the strength of similar wretched logical arguments, it had seemed obvious that he would be degrading himself if he now, after the lessons he had had in life, allowed himself to believe in the possibility of being useful and in the possibility of happiness or love.
  • She did not now say those former terrible words to him, but looked simply, merrily, and inquisitively at him.
  • The Emperor, though he met him twice, did not favor him with a single word.
  • He did not know Arakcheev personally, had never seen him, and all he had heard of him inspired him with but little respect for the man.
  • "I am not petitioning, your excellency," returned Prince Andrew quietly.
  • I am not petitioning about anything.
  • I do not approve of it, said Arakcheev, rising and taking a paper from his writing table.
  • "It was a small estate that brought in no profit," replied Prince Andrew, trying to extenuate his action so as not to irritate the old man uselessly.
  • Yes, that's a difficulty, as education is not at all general, but...
  • Count Kochubey did not finish.
  • Speranski did not shift his eyes from one face to another as people involuntarily do on entering a large company and was in no hurry to speak.
  • He did not say that the Emperor had kept him, and Prince Andrew noticed this affectation of modesty.
  • "No," said Prince Andrew, "my father did not wish me to take advantage of the privilege.
  • He did not like to agree with him in everything and felt a wish to contradict.
  • Speranski went on to say that honor, l'honneur, cannot be upheld by privileges harmful to the service; that honor, l'honneur, is either a negative concept of not doing what is blameworthy or it is a source of emulation in pursuit of commendation and rewards, which recognize it.
  • An institution upholding honor, the source of emulation, is one similar to the Legion d'honneur of the great Emperor Napoleon, not harmful but helpful to the success of the service, but not a class or court privilege.
  • "I do not dispute that, but it cannot be denied that court privileges have attained the same end," returned Prince Andrew.
  • He did nothing, did not even think or find time to think, but only talked, and talked successfully, of what he had thought while in the country.
  • Had Speranski sprung from the same class as himself and possessed the same breeding and traditions, Bolkonski would soon have discovered his weak, human, unheroic sides; but as it was, Speranski's strange and logical turn of mind inspired him with respect all the more because he did not quite understand him.
  • If he replied and argued, it was only because he wished to maintain his independence and not submit to Speranski's opinions entirely.
  • This was Speranski's cold, mirrorlike look, which did not allow one to penetrate to his soul, and his delicate white hands, which Prince Andrew involuntarily watched as one does watch the hands of those who possess power.
  • This mirrorlike gaze and those delicate hands irritated Prince Andrew, he knew not why.
  • It was evident that the thought could never occur to him which to Prince Andrew seemed so natural, namely, that it is after all impossible to express all one thinks; and that he had never felt the doubt, "Is not all I think and believe nonsense?"
  • That is why it is a sin for men like you, Prince, not to serve in these times!
  • Prince Andrew said that for that work an education in jurisprudence was needed which he did not possess.
  • He liked to dine and drink well, and though he considered it immoral and humiliating could not resist the temptations of the bachelor circles in which he moved.
  • Joseph Alexeevich was not in Petersburg--he had of late stood aside from the affairs of the Petersburg lodges, and lived almost entirely in Moscow.
  • Often after collecting alms, and reckoning up twenty to thirty rubles received for the most part in promises from a dozen members, of whom half were as well able to pay as himself, Pierre remembered the masonic vow in which each Brother promised to devote all his belongings to his neighbor, and doubts on which he tried not to dwell arose in his soul.
  • Pierre respected this class of Brothers to which the elder ones chiefly belonged, including, Pierre thought, Joseph Alexeevich himself, but he did not share their interests.
  • He did not think of doubting Freemasonry itself, but suspected that Russian Masonry had taken a wrong path and deviated from its original principles.
  • "Dear Brothers," he began, blushing and stammering, with a written speech in his hand, "it is not sufficient to observe our mysteries in the seclusion of our lodge--we must act--act!
  • This speech not only made a strong impression, but created excitement in the lodge.
  • Even those members who seemed to be on his side understood him in their own way with limitations and alterations he could not agree to, as what he always wanted most was to convey his thought to others just as he himself understood it.
  • Pierre did not answer him and asked briefly whether his proposal would be accepted.
  • He was told that it would not, and without waiting for the usual formalities he left the lodge and went home.
  • Pierre saw that there was a conspiracy against him and that they wanted to reunite him with his wife, and in the mood he then was, this was not even unpleasant to him.
  • "No one is right and no one is to blame; so she too is not to blame," he thought.
  • Had his wife come to him, he would not have turned her away.
  • Compared to what preoccupied him, was it not a matter of indifference whether he lived with his wife or not?
  • Illuminism is not a pure doctrine, just because it is attracted by social activity and puffed up by pride.
  • I knew that if I once let myself see her I should not have strength to go on refusing what she wanted.
  • In my perplexity I did not know whose aid and advice to seek.
  • She need not know how hard it was for me to see her again.
  • Napoleon himself had noticed her in the theater and said of her: "C'est un superbe animal." * Her success as a beautiful and elegant woman did not surprise Pierre, for she had become even handsomer than before.
  • Returned home for dinner and dined alone--the countess had many visitors I do not like.
  • That is why I should really like to save him from evil and lead him into the path of truth, but evil thoughts of him did not leave me.
  • I could not be eloquent, nor could I frankly mention my doubts to the Brothers and to the Grand Master.
  • I recollected myself and drove away that thought only when I found myself glowing with anger, but I did not sufficiently repent.
  • Suddenly a smallish dog seized my left thigh with its teeth and would not let go.
  • It seemed as if I chattered incessantly with other people and suddenly remembered that this could not please him, and I wished to come close to him and embrace him.
  • But as soon as I drew near I saw that his face had changed and grown young, and he was quietly telling me something about the teaching of our order, but so softly that I could not hear it.
  • He was telling me something, and I wished to show him my sensibility, and not listening to what he was saying I began picturing to myself the condition of my inner man and the grace of God sanctifying me.
  • To this he replied that one should not deprive a wife of one's embraces and gave me to understand that that was my duty.
  • And looking at those drawings I dreamed I felt that I was doing wrong, but could not tear myself away from them.
  • The Rostovs' monetary affairs had not improved during the two years they had spent in the country.
  • Though some skeptics smiled when told of Berg's merits, it could not be denied that he was a painstaking and brave officer, on excellent terms with his superiors, and a moral young man with a brilliant career before him and an assured position in society.
  • Berg's proposal was at first received with a perplexity that was not flattering to him.
  • "You see," said Berg to his comrade, whom he called "friend" only because he knew that everyone has friends, "you see, I have considered it all, and should not marry if I had not thought it all out or if it were in any way unsuitable.
  • Now the other sister, though they are the same family, is quite different-- an unpleasant character and has not the same intelligence.
  • He did not know at all how much he had, what his debts amounted to, or what dowry he could give Vera.
  • But Berg, smiling pleasantly, explained that if he did not know for certain how much Vera would have and did not receive at least part of the dowry in advance, he would have to break matters off.
  • Since then she had not seen him.
  • Before Sonya and her mother, if Boris happened to be mentioned, she spoke quite freely of that episode as of some childish, long-forgotten matter that was not worth mentioning.
  • Since Boris left Moscow in 1805 to join the army he had not seen the Rostovs.
  • "Nowadays old friends are not remembered," the countess would say when Boris was mentioned.
  • But he went with the firm intention of letting her and her parents feel that the childish relations between himself and Natasha could not be binding either on her or on him.
  • He did not stay more than ten minutes, then rose and took his leave.
  • It seemed to him that he ought to have an explanation with Natasha and tell her that the old times must be forgotten, that in spite of everything... she could not be his wife, that he had no means, and they would never let her marry him.
  • "Why not?" said Natasha, without changing her position.
  • It is not right, darling!
  • Natasha did not let her finish.
  • He was not always old.
  • He need not come so often....
  • Why not, if he likes to?
  • "Not to marry, but just so," she added.
  • Only not quite my taste--he is so narrow, like the dining-room clock....
  • She fell in love with Nicholas and does not wish to know anything more.
  • Even Mamma does not understand.
  • Police were stationed at the brightly lit entrance which was carpeted with red baize, and not only gendarmes but dozens of police officers and even the police master himself stood at the porch.
  • "That's not the way, that's not the way, Sonya!" cried Natasha turning her head and clutching with both hands at her hair which the maid who was dressing it had not time to release.
  • "Really, madam, it is not at all too long," said Mavra, crawling on her knees after her young lady.
  • "I'll arrange it," and she rushed forward so that the maids who were tacking up her skirt could not move fast enough and a piece of gauze was torn off.
  • Really it was not my fault!
  • Natasha had not had a moment free since early morning and had not once had time to think of what lay before her.
  • Natasha looked in the mirrors and could not distinguish her reflection from the others.
  • But see, those two, though not good-looking, are even more run after.
  • Everyone moved back, and the Emperor came smiling out of the drawing room leading his hostess by the hand but not keeping time to the music.
  • She was not concerned about the Emperor or any of those great people whom Peronskaya was pointing out--she had but one thought: Is it possible no one will ask me, that I shall not be among the first to dance?
  • Is it possible that not one of all these men will notice me?
  • They do not even seem to see me, or if they do they look as if they were saying, 'Ah, she's not the one I'm after, so it's not worth looking at her!'
  • She and the countess and Sonya were standing by themselves as in the depths of a forest amid that crowd of strangers, with no one interested in them and not wanted by anyone.
  • Prince Andrew with a lady passed by, evidently not recognizing them.
  • Berg and his wife, who were not dancing, came up to them.
  • She did not listen to or look at Vera, who was telling her something about her own green dress.
  • Natasha gazed at them and was ready to cry because it was not she who was dancing that first turn of the waltz.
  • Prince Andrew, in the white uniform of a cavalry colonel, wearing stockings and dancing shoes, stood looking animated and bright in the front row of the circle not far from the Rostovs.
  • Her slender bare arms and neck were not beautiful--compared to Helene's her shoulders looked thin and her bosom undeveloped.
  • Like all men who have grown up in society, Prince Andrew liked meeting someone there not of the conventional society stamp.
  • She was at that height of bliss when one becomes completely kind and good and does not believe in the possibility of evil, unhappiness, or sorrow.
  • Pierre smiled absent-mindedly, evidently not grasping what she said.
  • Next day Prince Andrew thought of the ball, but his mind did not dwell on it long.
  • The Sovereign plainly said that the Council and Senate are estates of the realm, he said that the government must rest not on authority but on secure bases.
  • It seemed to him that this was not Speranski but someone else.
  • At dinner the conversation did not cease for a moment and seemed to consist of the contents of a book of funny anecdotes.
  • Most of the anecdotes, if not relating to the state service, related to people in the service.
  • Prince Andrew did not laugh and feared that he would be a damper on the spirits of the company, but no one took any notice of his being out of harmony with the general mood.
  • He tried several times to join in the conversation, but his remarks were tossed aside each time like a cork thrown out of the water, and he could not jest with them.
  • Next day Prince Andrew called at a few houses he had not visited before, and among them at the Rostovs' with whom he had renewed acquaintance at the ball.
  • The old count's hospitality and good nature, which struck one especially in Petersburg as a pleasant surprise, were such that Prince Andrew could not refuse to stay to dinner.
  • She asked this and then became confused, feeling that she ought not to have asked it.
  • He went to bed from habit, but soon realized that he could not sleep.
  • Having lit his candle he sat up in bed, then got up, then lay down again not at all troubled by his sleeplessness: his soul was as fresh and joyful as if he had stepped out of a stuffy room into God's own fresh air.
  • Unfortunately she could not grant my request, but I hope, Count, I shall be more fortunate with you, he said with a smile.
  • Berg explained so clearly why he wanted to collect at his house a small but select company, and why this would give him pleasure, and why though he grudged spending money on cards or anything harmful, he was prepared to run into some expense for the sake of good society--that Pierre could not refuse, and promised to come.
  • Contrary to his habit of being late, Pierre on that day arrived at the Bergs' house, not at ten but at fifteen minutes to eight.
  • (Berg measured his life not by years but by promotions.)
  • Berg rose and embraced his wife carefully, so as not to crush her lace fichu for which he had paid a good price, kissing her straight on the lips.
  • They received Pierre in their small, new drawing-room, where it was impossible to sit down anywhere without disturbing its symmetry, neatness, and order; so it was quite comprehensible and not strange that Berg, having generously offered to disturb the symmetry of an armchair or of the sofa for his dear guest, but being apparently painfully undecided on the matter himself, eventually left the visitor to settle the question of selection.
  • Berg and Vera could not repress their smiles of satisfaction at the sight of all this movement in their drawing room, at the sound of the disconnected talk, the rustling of dresses, and the bowing and scraping.
  • She was silent, and not only less pretty than at the ball, but only redeemed from plainness by her look of gentle indifference to everything around.
  • They had not yet had a loud conversation among the men and a dispute about something important and clever.
  • She felt that he wanted to say something to her but could not bring himself to do so.
  • It was as if she feared this strange, unexpected happiness of meeting again the very man she had then chosen (she was firmly convinced she had done so) and of finding him, as it seemed, not indifferent to her.
  • Mamma, one need not be ashamed of his being a widower?
  • Prince Andrew, with a beaming, ecstatic expression of renewed life on his face, paused in front of Pierre and, not noticing his sad look, smiled at him with the egotism of joy.
  • And I am sure there will not be a happier man than you.
  • "I should not have believed anyone who told me that I was capable of such love," said Prince Andrew.
  • It is not at all the same feeling that I knew in the past.
  • I cannot help loving the light, it is not my fault.
  • He could not comprehend how anyone could wish to alter his life or introduce anything new into it, when his own life was already ending.
  • In the first place the marriage was not a brilliant one as regards birth, wealth, or rank.
  • Next day after her talk with her mother Natasha expected Bolkonski all day, but he did not come.
  • Pierre did not come either and Natasha, not knowing that Prince Andrew had gone to see his father, could not explain his absence to herself.
  • Natasha had no desire to go out anywhere and wandered from room to room like a shadow, idle and listless.
  • Her tears were those of an offended child who does not know why it is being punished.
  • She listened joyfully (as though she had not expected it) to the charm of the notes reverberating, filling the whole empty ballroom, and slowly dying away; and all at once she felt cheerful.
  • Things are nice as it is, she said to herself, and she began walking up and down the room, not stepping simply on the resounding parquet but treading with each step from the heel to the toe (she had on a new and favorite pair of shoes) and listening to the regular tap of the heel and creak of the toe as gladly as she had to the sounds of her own voice.
  • A footman wanted to come in to clear away something in the room but she would not let him, and having closed the door behind him continued her walk.
  • But however much they left her in peace she could not now be at peace, and immediately felt this.
  • Natasha was looking at the mirror, but did not see herself.
  • Again he glanced at her, and that glance convinced her that she was not mistaken.
  • My father, to whom I have told my plans, has made it an express condition of his consent that the wedding is not to take place for a year.
  • Prince Andrew held her hands, looked into her eyes, and did not find in his heart his former love for her.
  • The present feeling, though not so bright and poetic as the former, was stronger and more serious.
  • "No," she replied, but she had not understood his question.
  • Natasha did not hear him.
  • Prince Andrew did not reply, but his face expressed the impossibility of altering that decision.
  • If after six months she felt that she did not love him she would have full right to reject him.
  • He came every day to the Rostovs', but did not behave to Natasha as an affianced lover: he did not use the familiar thou, but said you to her, and kissed only her hand.
  • It was as if they had not known each other till now.
  • At first the family felt some constraint in intercourse with Prince Andrew; he seemed a man from another world, and for a long time Natasha trained the family to get used to him, proudly assuring them all that he only appeared to be different, but was really just like all of them, and that she was not afraid of him and no one else ought to be.
  • Prince Andrew blushed, as he often did now--Natasha particularly liked it in him--and said that his son would not live with them.
  • "Why not?" asked Natasha in a frightened tone.
  • What if what he seeks in me is not there?
  • Flushed and agitated she went about the house all that day, dry-eyed, occupied with most trivial matters as if not understanding what awaited her.
  • She did not even cry when, on taking leave, he kissed her hand for the last time.
  • Prince Andrew wants a son and not an old maid, he would say.
  • Religion, and religion alone, can--I will not say comfort us--but save us from despair.
  • Religion alone can explain to us what without its help man cannot comprehend: why, for what cause, kind and noble beings able to find happiness in life--not merely harming no one but necessary to the happiness of others--are called away to God, while cruel, useless, harmful persons, or such as are a burden to themselves and to others, are left living.
  • As it is, not only has she left us, and particularly Prince Andrew, with the purest regrets and memories, but probably she will there receive a place I dare not hope for myself.
  • But not to speak of her alone, that early and terrible death has had the most beneficent influence on me and on my brother in spite of all our grief.
  • Then, at the moment of our loss, these thoughts could not occur to me; I should then have dismissed them with horror, but now they are very clear and certain.
  • In spite of my wish to see you, I do not think so and do not want to do so.
  • He has realized, it seems to me, that life is not over for him.
  • I do not think my brother will ever marry again, and certainly not her; and this is why: first, I know that though he rarely speaks about the wife he has lost, the grief of that loss has gone too deep in his heart for him ever to decide to give her a successor and our little angel a stepmother.
  • Secondly because, as far as I know, that girl is not the kind of girl who could please Prince Andrew.
  • I do not think he would choose her for a wife, and frankly I do not wish it.
  • He asked his sister to forgive him for not having told her of his resolve when he had last visited Bald Hills, though he had spoken of it to his father.
  • "Besides," he wrote, "the matter was not then so definitely settled as it is now.
  • If the doctors did not keep me here at the spas I should be back in Russia, but as it is I have to postpone my return for three months.
  • The princess was about to reply, but her father would not let her speak and, raising his voice more and more, cried:
  • After this outburst the prince did not speak any more about the matter.
  • Prince Andrew had loved his wife, she died, but that was not enough: he wanted to bind his happiness to another woman.
  • Fallen man has retained a love of idleness, but the curse weighs on the race not only because we have to seek our bread in the sweat of our brows, but because our moral nature is such that we cannot be both idle and at ease.
  • She wrote that if he did not come and take matters in hand, their whole property would be sold by auction and they would all have to go begging.
  • The right thing now was, if not to retire from the service, at any rate to go home on leave.
  • His hussar comrades--not only those of his own regiment, but the whole brigade--gave Rostov a dinner to which the subscription was fifteen rubles a head, and at which there were two bands and two choirs of singers.
  • What was new in them was a certain uneasiness and occasional discord, which there used not to be, and which, as Nicholas soon found out, was due to the bad state of their affairs.
  • "You're not the same at all," he said.
  • Not at all as before.
  • She did not seem at all like a girl in love and parted from her affianced husband.
  • It always seemed to him that there was something not quite right about this intended marriage.
  • The conversation and the examination of the accounts with Mitenka did not last long.
  • I'm not my father!...
  • You were angry that he had not entered those 700 rubles.
  • But they were carried forward--and you did not look at the other page.
  • This scorn was not offensive to his master.
  • Daniel did not answer, but winked instead.
  • Though Daniel was not a big man, to see him in a room was like seeing a horse or a bear on the floor among the furniture and surroundings of human life.
  • Daniel himself felt this, and as usual stood just inside the door, trying to speak softly and not move, for fear of breaking something in the master's apartment, and he hastened to say all that was necessary so as to get from under that ceiling, out into the open under the sky once more.
  • But just as Daniel was about to go Natasha came in with rapid steps, not having done up her hair or finished dressing and with her old nurse's big shawl wrapped round her.
  • "Yes, we are going," replied Nicholas reluctantly, for today, as he intended to hunt seriously, he did not want to take Natasha and Petya.
  • It's not fair; you are going by yourself, are having the horses saddled and said nothing to us about it.
  • He cast down his eyes and hurried out as if it were none of his business, careful as he went not to inflict any accidental injury on the young lady.
  • Natasha, muffled up in shawls which did not hide her eager face and shining eyes, galloped up to them.
  • He did not like to combine frivolity with the serious business of hunting.
  • "In the first place, Trunila is not a 'dog,' but a harrier," thought Nicholas, and looked sternly at his sister, trying to make her feel the distance that ought to separate them at that moment.
  • "To search far..." repeated the count, evidently sorry Simon had not said more.
  • Simon did not finish, for on the still air he had distinctly caught the music of the hunt with only two or three hounds giving tongue.
  • The count, forgetting to smooth out the smile on his face, looked into the distance straight before him, down the narrow open space, holding the snuffbox in his hand but not taking any.
  • It is not to be!
  • The height of happiness was reached--and so simply, without warning, or noise, or display, that Rostov could not believe his eyes and remained in doubt for over a second.
  • They stood or lay not seeing the wolf or understanding the situation.
  • Nicholas did not hear his own cry nor feel that he was galloping, nor see the borzois, nor the ground over which he went: he saw only the wolf, who, increasing her speed, bounded on in the same direction along the hollow.
  • The wolf crouched, gnashed her teeth, and again rose and bounded forward, followed at the distance of a couple of feet by all the borzois, who did not get any closer to her.
  • Nicholas could already see not far in front of him the wood where the wolf would certainly escape should she reach it.
  • A long, yellowish young borzoi, one Nicholas did not know, from another leash, rushed impetuously at the wolf from in front and almost knocked her over.
  • But when he saw that the horsemen did not dismount and that the wolf shook herself and ran for safety, Daniel set his chestnut galloping, not at the wolf but straight toward the wood, just as Karay had run to cut the animal off.
  • He is not 'Uncle's' man.
  • One of his eyes was black, but he probably was not even aware of it.
  • Nicholas, not stopping to talk to the man, asked his sister and Petya to wait for him and rode to the spot where the enemy's, Ilagin's, hunting party was.
  • "Uncle," Rostov, and Ilagin kept stealthily glancing at one another's dogs, trying not to be observed by their companions and searching uneasily for rivals to their own borzois.
  • Or being upset because someone else's borzoi and not mine catches something.
  • All I care about is to enjoy seeing the chase, is it not so, Count?
  • "A full-grown one?" asked Ilagin as he approached the whip who had sighted the hare--and not without agitation he looked round and whistled to Erza.
  • The huntsman stood halfway up the knoll holding up his whip and the gentlefolk rode up to him at a footpace; the hounds that were far off on the horizon turned away from the hare, and the whips, but not the gentlefolk, also moved away.
  • The pack on leash rushed downhill in full cry after the hare, and from all sides the borzois that were not on leash darted after the hounds and the hare.
  • When he jumped up he did not run at once, but pricked his ears listening to the shouting and trampling that resounded from all sides at once.
  • He took a dozen bounds, not very quickly, letting the borzois gain on him, and, finally having chosen his direction and realized his danger, laid back his ears and rushed off headlong.
  • Again the beautiful Erza reached him, but when close to the hare's scut paused as if measuring the distance, so as not to make a mistake this time but seize his hind leg.
  • Erza did not hearken to his appeal.
  • "Uncle" himself twisted up the hare, threw it neatly and smartly across his horse's back as if by that gesture he meant to rebuke everybody, and, with an air of not wishing to speak to anyone, mounted his bay and rode off.
  • Well, I am like any other dog as long as it's not a question of coursing.
  • The house, with its bare, unplastered log walls, was not overclean--it did not seem that those living in it aimed at keeping it spotless--but neither was it noticeably neglected.
  • And Natasha felt that this costume, the very one she had regarded with surprise and amusement at Otradnoe, was just the right thing and not at all worse than a swallow-tail or frock coat.
  • I am not fit for it.
  • Not 'very good' it's simply delicious!
  • The balalayka was retuned several times and the same notes were thrummed again, but the listeners did not grow weary of it and wished to hear it again and again.
  • "Uncle" did not answer, but smiled.
  • He took the guitar a little above the fingerboard, arching his left elbow with a somewhat theatrical gesture, and, with a wink at Anisya Fedorovna, struck a single chord, pure and sonorous, and then quietly, smoothly, and confidently began playing in very slow time, not My Lady, but the well-known song: Came a maiden down the street.
  • It is as if he thought my Bolkonski would not approve of or understand our gaiety.
  • The count and countess did not know where they were and were very anxious, said one of the men.
  • He accompanied them on foot as far as the bridge that could not be crossed, so that they had to go round by the ford, and he sent huntsmen to ride in front with lanterns.
  • "Good-bye, dear niece," his voice called out of the darkness--not the voice Natasha had known previously, but the one that had sung As 'twas growing dark last night.
  • They could not see the horses, but only heard them splashing through the unseen mud.
  • Well, you see, first I thought that Rugay, the red hound, was like Uncle, and that if he were a man he would always keep Uncle near him, if not for his riding, then for his manner.
  • Yes, first I thought that we are driving along and imagining that we are going home, but that heaven knows where we are really going in the darkness, and that we shall arrive and suddenly find that we are not in Otradnoe, but in Fairyland.
  • Count Ilya Rostov had resigned the position of Marshal of the Nobility because it involved him in too much expense, but still his affairs did not improve.
  • They had not as many visitors as before, but the old habits of life without which the count and countess could not conceive of existence remained unchanged.
  • The count moved in his affairs as in a huge net, trying not to believe that he was entangled but becoming more and more so at every step, and feeling too feeble to break the meshes or to set to work carefully and patiently to disentangle them.
  • "No, you have not understood me," said his mother, not knowing how to justify herself.
  • You have not understood me, Nikolenka.
  • "No, you have not understood me, don't let us talk about it," she replied, wiping away her tears.
  • Because Sonya is poor I must not love her," he thought, "must not respond to her faithful, devoted love?
  • Nicholas did not go to Moscow, and the countess did not renew the conversation with him about marriage.
  • Though she blamed herself for it, she could not refrain from grumbling at and worrying Sonya, often pulling her up without reason, addressing her stiffly as "my dear," and using the formal "you" instead of the intimate "thou" in speaking to her.
  • Natasha was still as much in love with her betrothed, found the same comfort in that love, and was still as ready to throw herself into all the pleasures of life as before; but at the end of the fourth month of their separation she began to have fits of depression which she could not master.
  • Things were not cheerful in the Rostovs' home.
  • On her way past the butler's pantry she told them to set a samovar, though it was not at all the time for tea.
  • She could not see people unconcernedly, but had to send them on some errand.
  • "The island of Madagascar," she said, "Ma-da-gas-car," she repeated, articulating each syllable distinctly, and, not replying to Madame Schoss who asked her what she was saying, she went out of the room.
  • She sat awhile, wondering what the meaning of it all having happened before could be, and without solving this problem, or at all regretting not having done so, she again passed in fancy to the time when she was with him and he was looking at her with a lover's eyes.
  • The servants stood round the table--but Prince Andrew was not there and life was going on as before.
  • And to feel not exactly dull, but sad?
  • Once in the regiment I had not gone to some merrymaking where there was music... and suddenly I felt so depressed...
  • So they went through their memories, smiling with pleasure: not the sad memories of old age, but poetic, youthful ones--those impressions of one's most distant past in which dreams and realities blend--and they laughed with quiet enjoyment.
  • Sonya, as always, did not quite keep pace with them, though they shared the same reminiscences.
  • Not lower, who said we were lower?...
  • None of them, not even the middle-aged Dimmler, wanted to break off their conversation and quit that corner in the sitting room, but Natasha got up and Nicholas sat down at the clavichord.
  • She had said she did not want to sing, but it was long since she had sung, and long before she again sang, as she did that evening.
  • Nicholas did not take his eyes off his sister and drew breath in time with her.
  • Her maternal instinct told her that Natasha had too much of something, and that because of this she would not be happy.
  • "Idiot!" she screamed at her brother and, running to a chair, threw herself on it, sobbing so violently that she could not stop for a long time.
  • But the countess would not agree to his going; he had had a bad leg all these last days.
  • It was decided that the count must not go, but that if Louisa Ivanovna (Madame Schoss) would go with them, the young ladies might go to the Melyukovs', Sonya, generally so timid and shy, more urgently than anyone begging Louisa Ivanovna not to refuse.
  • "I think this used to be Natasha," thought Nicholas, "and that was Madame Schoss, but perhaps it's not, and this Circassian with the mustache I don't know, but I love her."
  • They did not answer but began to laugh.
  • That's not forbidden by his law.
  • Sometimes, as she looked at the strange but amusing capers cut by the dancers, who--having decided once for all that being disguised, no one would recognize them--were not at all shy, Pelageya Danilovna hid her face in her handkerchief, and her whole stout body shook with irrepressible, kindly, elderly laughter.
  • Well, why not, if you're not afraid?
  • Whether they were playing the ring and string game or the ruble game or talking as now, Nicholas did not leave Sonya's side, and gazed at her with quite new eyes.
  • "I'm not afraid of anything," said Sonya.
  • The light was so strong and the snow sparkled with so many stars that one did not wish to look up at the sky and the real stars were unnoticed.
  • She was only a couple of paces away when she saw him, and to her too he was not the Nicholas she had known and always slightly feared.
  • Oh, how funny you look! cried Nicholas, peering into her face and finding in his sister too something new, unusual, and bewitchingly tender that he had not seen in her before.
  • "Of course she will!" whispered Natasha, but did not finish... suddenly Sonya pushed away the glass she was holding and covered her eyes with her hand.
  • Sonya had not seen anything, she was just wanting to blink and to get up when she heard Natasha say, "Of course she will!"
  • She did not wish to disappoint either Dunyasha or Natasha, but it was hard to sit still.
  • Besides who can tell whether I saw anything or not? flashed through Sonya's mind.
  • After that, I could not make out what there was; something blue and red...
  • Nicholas, for the first time, felt that his mother was displeased with him and that, despite her love for him, she would not give way.
  • Nicholas replied that he could not go back on his word, and his father, sighing and evidently disconcerted, very soon became silent and went in to the countess.
  • The father and mother did not speak of the matter to their son again, but a few days later the countess sent for Sonya and, with a cruelty neither of them expected, reproached her niece for trying to catch Nicholas and for ingratitude.
  • Self- sacrifice was her most cherished idea but in this case she could not see what she ought to sacrifice, or for whom.
  • She could not help loving the countess and the whole Rostov family, but neither could she help loving Nicholas and knowing that his happiness depended on that love.
  • She was silent and sad and did not reply.
  • Natasha set to work to effect a reconciliation, and so far succeeded that Nicholas received a promise from his mother that Sonya should not be troubled, while he on his side promised not to undertake anything without his parents' knowledge.
  • Sonya was unhappy at the separation from Nicholas and still more so on account of the hostile tone the countess could not help adopting toward her.
  • She could not write, because she could not conceive the possibility of expressing sincerely in a letter even a thousandth part of what she expressed by voice, smile, and glance.
  • He could not have believed it!
  • Had he not at one time longed with all his heart to establish a republic in Russia; then himself to be a Napoleon; then to be a philosopher; and then a strategist and the conqueror of Napoleon?
  • Had he not seen the possibility of, and passionately desired, the regeneration of the sinful human race, and his own progress to the highest degree of perfection?
  • Had he not established schools and hospitals and liberated his serfs?
  • For a long time he could not reconcile himself to the idea that he was one of those same retired Moscow gentlemen-in-waiting he had so despised seven years before.
  • Sometimes he consoled himself with the thought that he was only living this life temporarily; but then he was shocked by the thought of how many, like himself, had entered that life and that club temporarily, with all their teeth and hair, and had only left it when not a single tooth or hair remained.
  • I have tried, and have always found that they too in the depths of their souls understand it as I do, and only try not to see it.
  • Only after emptying a bottle or two did he feel dimly that the terribly tangled skein of life which previously had terrified him was not as dreadful as he had thought.
  • Only not to see it, that dreadful it!
  • She did not go out into society; everyone knew that her father would not let her go anywhere without him, and his failing health prevented his going out himself, so that she was not invited to dinners and evening parties.
  • She did not finish.
  • Next day the prince did not say a word to his daughter, but she noticed that at dinner he gave orders that Mademoiselle Bourienne should be served first.
  • He was received in the best houses not merely as a doctor, but as an equal.
  • The prince is not very well: bile and rush of blood to the head.
  • Not a moment's peace in my own house!
  • Had he not told her, yes, told her to make a list, and not to admit anyone who was not on that list?
  • With her, he said, he could not have a moment's peace and could not die quietly.
  • But he could not restrain himself and with the virulence of which only one who loves is capable, evidently suffering himself, he shook his fists at her and screamed:
  • The prince's house did not belong to what is known as fashionable society, but his little circle--though not much talked about in town-- was one it was more flattering to be received in than any other.
  • Boris had realized this the week before when the commander-in-chief in his presence invited Rostopchin to dinner on St. Nicholas' Day, and Rostopchin had replied that he could not come:
  • Pierre looked at Rostopchin with naive astonishment, not understanding why he should be disturbed by the bad composition of the Note.
  • There in Petersburg they are always writing--not notes only but even new laws.
  • At the next review, they say, the Emperor did not once deign to address him.
  • The whole expression of his face told her that he had not forgotten the morning's talk, that his decision remained in force, and only the presence of visitors hindered his speaking of it to her now.
  • We ought not to fight either for or against Austria.
  • She did not even notice the special attentions and amiabilities shown her during dinner by Boris Drubetskoy, who was visiting them for the third time already.
  • She does not deign to be clever....
  • Boris had not succeeded in making a wealthy match in Petersburg, so with the same object in view he came to Moscow.
  • When they had last met on the old prince's name day, she had answered at random all his attempts to talk sentimentally, evidently not listening to what he was saying.
  • She was by now decidedly plain, but thought herself not merely as good-looking as before but even far more attractive.
  • "I can always arrange so as not to see her often," thought Boris.
  • She held herself as erect, told everyone her opinion as candidly, loudly, and bluntly as ever, and her whole bearing seemed a reproach to others for any weakness, passion, or temptation--the possibility of which she did not admit.
  • She had not yet gone to bed when the Rostovs arrived and the pulley of the hall door squeaked from the cold as it let in the Rostovs and their servants.
  • Bring them here, she said, pointing to the portmanteaus and not greeting anyone.
  • But we'll speak of that later on, she added, glancing at Sonya with a look that showed she did not want to speak of it in her presence.
  • You know not a day passes now without some new fashion....
  • Of course Prince Andrew is not a child and can shift without him, but it's not nice to enter a family against a father's will.
  • The count did not set out cheerfully on this visit, at heart he felt afraid.
  • He well remembered the last interview he had had with the old prince at the time of the enrollment, when in reply to an invitation to dinner he had had to listen to an angry reprimand for not having provided his full quota of men.
  • At last an old, cross looking footman came and announced to the Rostovs that the prince was not receiving, but that the princess begged them to walk up.
  • From the first glance Princess Mary did not like Natasha.
  • He did not mention this to his daughter, but Natasha noticed her father's nervousness and anxiety and felt mortified by it.
  • She did not like Princess Mary, whom she thought very plain, affected, and dry.
  • I did not know, madam.
  • God is my witness, I did not know you had honored us with a visit, and I came in such a costume only to see my daughter.
  • God is my witness, I didn't know-" he repeated, stressing the word "God" so unnaturally and so unpleasantly that Princess Mary stood with downcast eyes not daring to look either at her father or at Natasha.
  • God is my witness, I did not know, muttered the old man, and after looking Natasha over from head to foot he went out.
  • She paused, feeling that she was not telling the truth.
  • "I think, Princess, it is not convenient to speak of that now," she said with external dignity and coldness, though she felt the tears choking her.
  • Marya Dmitrievna, who knew how the prince had received the Rostovs, pretended not to notice how upset Natasha was and jested resolutely and loudly at table with the count and the other guests.
  • Natasha did not want to go, but could not refuse Marya Dmitrievna's kind offer which was intended expressly for her.
  • I would not be silly and afraid of things, I would simply embrace him, cling to him, and make him look at me with those searching inquiring eyes with which he has so often looked at me, and then I would make him laugh as he used to laugh.
  • No, I had better not think of him; not think of him but forget him, quite forget him for the present.
  • I can't bear this waiting and I shall cry in a minute! and she turned away from the glass, making an effort not to cry.
  • Natasha at that moment felt so softened and tender that it was not enough for her to love and know she was beloved, she wanted now, at once, to embrace the man she loved, to speak and hear from him words of love such as filled her heart.
  • A sensation she had not experienced for a long time--that of hundreds of eyes looking at her bare arms and neck--suddenly affected her both agreeably and disagreeably and called up a whole crowd of memories, desires and emotions associated with that feeling.
  • What right has he not to wish to receive me into his family?
  • Oh, better not think of it--not till he comes back! she told herself, and began looking at the faces, some strange and some familiar, in the stalls.
  • She could not follow the opera nor even listen to the music; she saw only the painted cardboard and the queerly dressed men and women who moved, spoke, and sang so strangely in that brilliant light.
  • And feeling the bright light that flooded the whole place and the warm air heated by the crowd, Natasha little by little began to pass into a state of intoxication she had not experienced for a long while.
  • She did not realize who and where she was, nor what was going on before her.
  • As she looked and thought, the strangest fancies unexpectedly and disconnectedly passed through her mind: the idea occurred to her of jumping onto the edge of the box and singing the air the actress was singing, then she wished to touch with her fan an old gentleman sitting not far from her, then to lean over to Helene and tickle her.
  • "Mais charmante!" said he, evidently referring to Natasha, who did not exactly hear his words but understood them from the movement of his lips.
  • The Rostovs had not seen him since their arrival.
  • He passed up to the front rows, not noticing anyone.
  • Almost smiling, he gazed straight into her eyes with such an enraptured caressing look that it seemed strange to be so near him, to look at him like that, to be so sure he admired her, and not to be acquainted with him.
  • They did not drag her away at once, but sang with her for a long time and then at last dragged her off, and behind the scenes something metallic was struck three times and everyone knelt down and sang a prayer.
  • How is it you're not ashamed to bury such pearls in the country?
  • She could say what she did not think--especially what was flattering--quite simply and naturally.
  • During the entr'acte a whiff of cold air came into Helene's box, the door opened, and Anatole entered, stooping and trying not to brush against anyone.
  • When she was not looking at him she felt that he was looking at her shoulders, and she involuntarily caught his eye so that he should look into hers rather than this.
  • But looking into his eyes she was frightened, realizing that there was not that barrier of modesty she had always felt between herself and other men.
  • She did not know how it was that within five minutes she had come to feel herself terribly near to this man.
  • Natasha kept turning to Helene and to her father, as if asking what it all meant, but Helene was engaged in conversation with a general and did not answer her look, and her father's eyes said nothing but what they always said: Having a good time?
  • At first I did not like it much, because what makes a town pleasant ce sont les jolies femmes, * isn't that so?
  • Natasha did not understand what he was saying any more than he did himself, but she felt that his incomprehensible words had an improper intention.
  • She did not know what to say and turned away as if she had not heard his remark.
  • Ought I to put it right? she asked herself, and she could not refrain from turning round.
  • All that was going on before her now seemed quite natural, but on the other hand all her previous thoughts of her betrothed, of Princess Mary, or of life in the country did not once recur to her mind and were as if belonging to a remote past.
  • She felt agitated and tormented, and the cause of this was Kuragin whom she could not help watching.
  • But he did not run after the unmarried girls, especially the rich heiresses who were most of them plain.
  • He believed this so firmly that others, looking at him, were persuaded of it too and did not refuse him either a leading place in society or money, which he borrowed from anyone and everyone and evidently would not repay.
  • He was not a gambler, at any rate he did not care about winning.
  • He was not vain.
  • He did not mind what people thought of him.
  • He was not mean, and did not refuse anyone who asked of him.
  • "She's first-rate, my dear fellow, but not for us," replied Dolokhov.
  • He had not arrived.
  • To her impatience and pining for him were now added the unpleasant recollection of her interview with Princess Mary and the old prince, and a fear and anxiety of which she did not understand the cause.
  • Natasha had not time to take off the bodice before the door opened and Countess Bezukhova, dressed in a purple velvet gown with a high collar, came into the room beaming with good-humored amiable smiles.
  • She did not cease chattering good-naturedly and gaily, continually praising Natasha's beauty.
  • If you love somebody, my charmer, that is not a reason to shut yourself up.
  • And why not enjoy myself? thought Natasha, gazing at Helene with wide-open, wondering eyes.
  • The count decided not to sit down to cards or let his girls out of his sight and to get away as soon as Mademoiselle George's performance was over.
  • The count wished to go home, but Helene entreated him not to spoil her improvised ball, and the Rostovs stayed on.
  • Natasha lifted her frightened eyes to him, but there was such confident tenderness in his affectionate look and smile that she could not, whilst looking at him, say what she had to say.
  • Anatole was not upset or pained by what she had said.
  • "Natalie, just a word, only one!" he kept repeating, evidently not knowing what to say and he repeated it till Helene came up to them.
  • After reaching home Natasha did not sleep all night.
  • It means that he is kind, noble, and splendid, and I could not help loving him.
  • He took it into his head to begin shouting, but I am not one to be shouted down.
  • He's crazy... he did not want to listen.
  • If the old man came round it would be all the better to visit him in Moscow or at Bald Hills later on; and if not, the wedding, against his wishes, could only be arranged at Otradnoe.
  • She's afraid you might think that she does not like you.
  • Natasha did not reply and went to her own room to read Princess Mary's letter.
  • Whatever her father's feelings might be, she begged Natasha to believe that she could not help loving her as the one chosen by her brother, for whose happiness she was ready to sacrifice everything.
  • "Do not think, however," she wrote, "that my father is ill-disposed toward you.
  • "Why could that not be as well?" she sometimes asked herself in complete bewilderment.
  • Then he went on to say that he knew her parents would not give her to him--for this there were secret reasons he could reveal only to her--but that if she loved him she need only say the word yes, and no human power could hinder their bliss.
  • As she read she glanced at the sleeping Natasha, trying to find in her face an explanation of what she was reading, but did not find it.
  • She could not do such a thing!
  • Natasha looked at Sonya with wide-open eyes as if she could not grasp the question.
  • It's not the same as before.
  • As soon as I saw him I felt he was my master and I his slave, and that I could not help loving him.
  • Natasha did not answer her questions.
  • Evidently this question presented itself to her mind for the first time and she did not know how to answer it.
  • At that party Natasha again met Anatole, and Sonya noticed that she spoke to him, trying not to be overheard, and that all through dinner she was more agitated than ever.
  • Natasha, how glad I am you're not angry with me!
  • Sonya did not succumb to the tender tone Natasha used toward her.
  • "Natasha," said she, "you asked me not to speak to you, and I haven't spoken, but now you yourself have begun.
  • It's not your business!
  • Natasha did not speak to Sonya again and avoided her.
  • Hard as it was for Sonya, she watched her friend and did not let her out of her sight.
  • She answered questions at random, began sentences she did not finish, and laughed at everything.
  • Natasha did not let her in.
  • If I don't sleep for three nights I'll not leave this passage and will hold her back by force and will and not let the family be disgraced, thought she.
  • "Yes, of course," returned Anatole, evidently not listening to Dolokhov and looking straight before him with a smile that did not leave his face.
  • I'm not joking, I'm talking sense.
  • Do you think I am not grateful?
  • Natasha lying on the sofa, her head hidden in her hands, and she did not stir.
  • Natasha did not change her position, but her whole body heaved with noiseless, convulsive sobs which choked her.
  • "Do you hear what I am saying or not?" she added.
  • Marya Dmitrievna went on admonishing her for some time, enjoining on her that it must all be kept from her father and assuring her that nobody would know anything about it if only Natasha herself would undertake to forget it all and not let anyone see that something had happened.
  • Natasha did not reply, nor did she sob any longer, but she grew cold and had a shivering fit.
  • But Natasha was not asleep; with pale face and fixed wide-open eyes she looked straight before her.
  • All that night she did not sleep or weep and did not speak to Sonya who got up and went to her several times.
  • Natasha had not left her room that morning.
  • She did not even get up to greet him.
  • In reply to the count's anxious inquiries as to why she was so dejected and whether anything had happened to her betrothed, she assured him that nothing had happened and asked him not to worry.
  • That Prince Andrew's deeply loved affianced wife--the same Natasha Rostova who used to be so charming--should give up Bolkonski for that fool Anatole who was already secretly married (as Pierre knew), and should be so in love with him as to agree to run away with him, was something Pierre could not conceive and could not imagine.
  • He could not reconcile the charming impression he had of Natasha, whom he had known from a child, with this new conception of her baseness, folly, and cruelty.
  • "They are all alike!" he said to himself, reflecting that he was not the only man unfortunate enough to be tied to a bad woman.
  • He did not know that Natasha's soul was overflowing with despair, shame, and humiliation, and that it was not her fault that her face happened to assume an expression of calm dignity and severity.
  • He could not marry--he is married!
  • Natasha is not quite well; she's in her room and would like to see you.
  • She did not smile or nod, but only gazed fixedly at him, and her look asked only one thing: was he a friend, or like the others an enemy in regard to Anatole?
  • As for Pierre, he evidently did not exist for her.
  • "Natalya Ilynichna," Pierre began, dropping his eyes with a feeling of pity for her and loathing for the thing he had to do, "whether it is true or not should make no difference to you, because..."
  • Then it is not true that he's married!
  • Pierre did not stay for dinner, but left the room and went away at once.
  • He was not at the ice hills, nor at the gypsies', nor at Komoneno's.
  • One man told him he had not come yet, and another that he was coming to dinner.
  • He paced through the ballroom, waited till everyone had come, and as Anatole had not turned up did not stay for dinner but drove home.
  • Pierre without greeting his wife whom he had not seen since his return-- at that moment she was more repulsive to him than ever--entered the drawing room and seeing Anatole went up to him.
  • "If you allow yourself in my drawing room..." whispered Helene, but Pierre did not reply and went out of the room.
  • "I don't know that and don't want to," he said, not looking at Pierre and with a slight tremor of his lower jaw, "but you have used such words to me--'mean' and so on--which as a man of honor I can't allow anyone to use."
  • Pierre saw the distracted count, and Sonya, who had a tear-stained face, but he could not see Natasha.
  • I know his pride will not let him express his feelings, but still he has taken it better, far better, than I expected.
  • She did not understand how he could ask such a question.
  • I do not, and never did, like Speranski personally, but I like justice!
  • "So Monsieur Kuragin has not honored Countess Rostova with his hand?" said Prince Andrew, and he snorted several times.
  • "He could not marry, for he was married already," said Pierre.
  • The room there has not been tidied up.
  • Natasha was standing in the middle of the drawing room, emaciated, with a pale set face, but not at all shamefaced as Pierre expected to find her.
  • Pierre sniffed as he looked at her, but did not speak.
  • She stopped and breathed still more quickly, but did not shed tears.
  • He did not know what to say.
  • Pierre did not know how to refer to Anatole and flushed at the thought of him--"did you love that bad man?"
  • He felt the tears trickle under his spectacles and hoped they would not be noticed.
  • We won't speak of it, my dear--I'll tell him everything; but one thing I beg of you, consider me your friend and if you want help, advice, or simply to open your heart to someone--not now, but when your mind is clearer think of me!
  • I am not worth it! exclaimed Natasha and turned to leave the room, but Pierre held her hand.
  • If I were not myself, but the handsomest, cleverest, and best man in the world, and were free, I would this moment ask on my knees for your hand and your love!
  • Surely not to the club or to pay calls?
  • Millions of men perpetrated against one another such innumerable crimes, frauds, treacheries, thefts, forgeries, issues of false money, burglaries, incendiarisms, and murders as in whole centuries are not recorded in the annals of all the law courts of the world, but which those who committed them did not at the time regard as being crimes.
  • To us, their descendants, who are not historians and are not carried away by the process of research and can therefore regard the event with unclouded common sense, an incalculable number of causes present themselves.
  • We are forced to fall back on fatalism as an explanation of irrational events (that is to say, events the reasonableness of which we do not understand).
  • * "To shed (or not to shed) the blood of his peoples."
  • The aide-de-camp replied that probably the Emperor would not be displeased at this excess of zeal.
  • They tried to make their way forward to the opposite bank and, though there was a ford one third of a mile away, were proud that they were swimming and drowning in this river under the eyes of the man who sat on the log and was not even looking at what they were doing.
  • Each of the three armies had its own commander-in-chief, but there was no supreme commander of all the forces, and the Emperor did not assume that responsibility himself.
  • He was meeting Helene in Vilna after not having seen her for a long time and did not recall the past, but as Helene was enjoying the favors of a very important personage and Boris had only recently married, they met as good friends of long standing.
  • Helene, not having a suitable partner, herself offered to dance the mazurka with Boris.
  • The Emperor was not dancing, he stood in the doorway, stopping now one pair and now another with gracious words which he alone knew how to utter.
  • Boris, fluttering as if he had not had time to withdraw, respectfully pressed close to the doorpost with bowed head.
  • I will not make peace as long as a single armed enemy remains in my country!
  • Balashev did not do so at once, but continued to advance along the road at a walking pace.
  • The colonel respectfully informed His Majesty of Balashev's mission, whose name he could not pronounce.
  • "Your Majesty," replied Balashev, "my master, the Emperor, does not desire war and as Your Majesty sees..." said Balashev, using the words Your Majesty at every opportunity, with the affectation unavoidable in frequently addressing one to whom the title was still a novelty.
  • He became still more absorbed in his task when the Russian general entered, and after glancing over his spectacles at Balashev's face, which was animated by the beauty of the morning and by his talk with Murat, he did not rise or even stir, but scowled still more and sneered malevolently.
  • "You are perfectly at liberty to treat me with respect or not," protested Balashev, "but permit me to observe that I have the honor to be adjutant general to His Majesty...."
  • It was plain that Balashev's personality did not interest him at all.
  • He said that the Emperor Alexander did not consider Kurakin's demand for his passports a sufficient cause for war; that Kurakin had acted on his own initiative and without his sovereign's assent, that the Emperor Alexander did not desire war, and had no relations with England.
  • Here Balashev hesitated: he remembered the words the Emperor Alexander had not written in his letter, but had specially inserted in the rescript to Saltykov and had told Balashev to repeat to Napoleon.
  • He could not utter them, though he wished to do so.
  • Have I not for eighteen months been doing everything to obtain it?
  • Such demands as to retreat beyond the Vistula and Oder may be made to a Prince of Baden, but not to me!
  • If you gave me Petersburg and Moscow I could not accept such conditions.
  • The Emperor Alexander, not I!
  • But Napoleon did not let him speak.
  • A sovereign should not be with the army unless he is a general! said Napoleon, evidently uttering these words as a direct challenge to the Emperor.
  • You have not two hundred thousand men, and I have three times that number.
  • Balashev, feeling it incumbent on him to reply, said that from the Russian side things did not appear in so gloomy a light.
  • Napoleon was silent, still looking derisively at him and evidently not listening to him.
  • He not only showed no sign of constraint or self-reproach on account of his outburst that morning, but, on the contrary, tried to reassure Balashev.
  • In the course of conversation he mentioned Moscow and questioned Balashev about the Russian capital, not merely as an interested traveler asks about a new city he intends to visit, but as if convinced that Balashev, as a Russian, must be flattered by his curiosity.
  • This reply of Balashev's, which hinted at the recent defeats of the French in Spain, was much appreciated when he related it at Alexander's court, but it was not much appreciated at Napoleon's dinner, where it passed unnoticed.
  • "If there is a point we don't see it, or it is not at all witty," their expressions seemed to say.
  • So little was his rejoinder appreciated that Napoleon did not notice it at all and naively asked Balashev through what towns the direct road from there to Moscow passed.
  • Strange, isn't it, General? he said, evidently not doubting that this remark would be agreeable to his hearer since it went to prove his, Napoleon's, superiority to Alexander.
  • That I do not... understand.
  • Has he not thought that I may do the same? and he turned inquiringly to Balashev, and evidently this thought turned him back on to the track of his morning's anger, which was still fresh in him.
  • Balashev bowed his head with an air indicating that he would like to make his bow and leave, and only listened because he could not help hearing what was said to him.
  • Again Napoleon brought out his snuffbox, paced several times up and down the room in silence, and then, suddenly and unexpectedly, went up to Balashev and with a slight smile, as confidently, quickly, and simply as if he were doing something not merely important but pleasing to Balashev, he raised his hand to the forty-year-old Russian general's face and, taking him by the ear, pulled it gently, smiling with his lips only.
  • Prince Andrew did not think it proper to write and challenge Kuragin.
  • Not only could he no longer think the thoughts that had first come to him as he lay gazing at the sky on the field of Austerlitz and had later enlarged upon with Pierre, and which had filled his solitude at Bogucharovo and then in Switzerland and Rome, but he even dreaded to recall them and the bright and boundless horizons they had revealed.
  • He alone did not obey the law of immutability in the enchanted, sleeping castle.
  • The old prince knew very well that he tormented his daughter and that her life was very hard, but he also knew that he could not help tormenting her and that she deserved it.
  • And he began explaining why he could not put up with his daughter's unreasonable character.
  • The old man at first stared fixedly at his son, and an unnatural smile disclosed the fresh gap between his teeth to which Prince Andrew could not get accustomed.
  • Let not a trace of you remain here!...
  • That day he did not see his father, who did not leave his room and admitted no one but Mademoiselle Bourienne and Tikhon, but asked several times whether his son had gone.
  • He thought not of this pretty child, his son whom he held on his knee, but of himself.
  • What meant still more to him was that he sought and did not find in himself the former tenderness for his son which he had hoped to reawaken by caressing the boy and taking him on his knee.
  • She understood that when speaking of "trash" he referred not only to Mademoiselle Bourienne, the cause of her misery, but also to the man who had ruined his own happiness.
  • Sorrow is sent by Him, not by men.
  • Men are His instruments, they are not to blame.
  • As there was not a single town or large village in the vicinity of the camp, the immense number of generals and courtiers accompanying the army were living in the best houses of the villages on both sides of the river, over a radius of six miles.
  • Anatole Kuragin, whom Prince Andrew had hoped to find with the army, was not there.
  • The Emperor was with the first army, but not as commander-in-chief.
  • In the orders issued it was stated, not that the Emperor would take command, but only that he would be with the army.
  • The Emperor, moreover, had with him not a commander-in-chief's staff but the imperial headquarters staff.
  • In attendance on him was the head of the imperial staff, Quartermaster General Prince Volkonski, as well as generals, imperial aides-de-camp, diplomatic officials, and a large number of foreigners, but not the army staff.
  • It was this: the Emperor did not assume the title of commander-in-chief, but disposed of all the armies; the men around him were his assistants.
  • The men of that party, remembering Suvorov, said that what one had to do was not to reason, or stick pins into maps, but to fight, beat the enemy, keep him out of Russia, and not let the army get discouraged.
  • Of a fourth opinion the most conspicuous representative was the Tsarevich, who could not forget his disillusionment at Austerlitz, where he had ridden out at the head of the Guards, in his casque and cavalry uniform as to a review, expecting to crush the French gallantly; but unexpectedly finding himself in the front line had narrowly escaped amid the general confusion.
  • The fifth party consisted of those who were adherents of Barclay de Tolly, not so much as a man but as minister of war and commander-in- chief.
  • Another who wished to gain some advantage would attract the Emperor's attention by loudly advocating the very thing the Emperor had hinted at the day before, and would dispute and shout at the council, beating his breast and challenging those who did not agree with him to duels, thereby proving that he was prepared to sacrifice himself for the common good.
  • It was not a council of war, but, as it were, a council to elucidate certain questions for the Emperor personally.
  • Prince Andrew did not catch what he said and would have passed on, but Chernyshev introduced him to Pfuel, remarking that Prince Andrew was just back from Turkey where the war had terminated so fortunately.
  • A Russian is self-assured just because he knows nothing and does not want to know anything, since he does not believe that anything can be known.
  • He said a few words to Prince Andrew and Chernyshev about the present war, with the air of a man who knows beforehand that all will go wrong, and who is not displeased that it should be so.
  • Prince Andrew's eyes were still following Pfuel out of the room when Count Bennigsen entered hurriedly, and nodding to Bolkonski, but not pausing, went into the study, giving instructions to his adjutant as he went.
  • Without heeding the end of the Italian's remarks, and as though not hearing them, the Emperor, recognizing Bolkonski, addressed him graciously.
  • General Armfeldt has proposed a splendid position with an exposed rear, or why not this Italian gentleman's attack--very fine, or a retreat, also good!
  • Paulucci, who did not know German, began questioning him in French.
  • Wolzogen took his place and continued to explain his views in French, every now and then turning to Pfuel and saying, "Is it not so, your excellency?"
  • Of all those present, evidently he alone was not seeking anything for himself, nursed no hatred against anyone, and only desired that the plan, formed on a theory arrived at by years of toil, should be carried out.
  • It is only because military men are invested with pomp and power and crowds of sychophants flatter power, attributing to it qualities of genius it does not possess.
  • Not only does a good army commander not need any special qualities, on the contrary he needs the absence of the highest and best human attributes--love, poetry, tenderness, and philosophic inquiring doubt.
  • Not only does a good army commander not need any special qualities, on the contrary he needs the absence of the highest and best human attributes--love, poetry, tenderness, and philosophic inquiring doubt.
  • The success of a military action depends not on them, but on the man in the ranks who shouts, 'We are lost!' or who shouts, 'Hurrah!'
  • At the review next day the Emperor asked Prince Andrew where he would like to serve, and Prince Andrew lost his standing in court circles forever by not asking to remain attached to the sovereign's person, but for permission to serve in the army.
  • On receiving this letter, Nicholas did not even make any attempt to get leave of absence or to retire from the army, but wrote to his parents that he was sorry Natasha was ill and her engagement broken off, and that he would do all he could to meet their wishes.
  • But now, at the commencement of the campaign, I should feel dishonored, not only in my comrades' eyes but in my own, if I preferred my own happiness to my love and duty to the Fatherland.
  • If the thought that things looked bad chanced to enter anyone's head, he tried to be as cheerful as befits a good soldier and not to think of the general trend of affairs, but only of the task nearest to hand.
  • Then came an order to retreat to Sventsyani and destroy any provisions they could not carry away with them.
  • And so he did not like Zdrzhinski's tale, nor did he like Zdrzhinski himself who, with his mustaches extending over his cheeks, bent low over the face of his hearer, as was his habit, and crowded Rostov in the narrow shanty.
  • But he did not express his thoughts, for in such matters, too, he had gained experience.
  • He knew that this tale redounded to the glory of our arms and so one had to pretend not to doubt it.
  • "I can't stand this any more," said Ilyin, noticing that Rostov did not relish Zdrzhinski's conversation.
  • The doctor, whether from lack of means or because he did not like to part from his young wife in the early days of their marriage, took her about with him wherever the hussar regiment went and his jealousy had become a standing joke among the hussar officers.
  • It is not the sugar I want, but only that your little hand should stir my tea.
  • "No, gentlemen, you have had your sleep, but I have not slept for two nights," replied the doctor, and he sat down morosely beside his wife, waiting for the game to end.
  • Seeing his gloomy face as he frowned at his wife, the officers grew still merrier, and some of them could not refrain from laughter, for which they hurriedly sought plausible pretexts.
  • When he had gone, taking his wife with him, and had settled down with her in their covered cart, the officers lay down in the tavern, covering themselves with their wet cloaks, but they did not sleep for a long time; now they exchanged remarks, recalling the doctor's uneasiness and his wife's delight, now they ran out into the porch and reported what was taking place in the covered trap.
  • When campaigning, Rostov allowed himself the indulgence of riding not a regimental but a Cossack horse.
  • To ride this horse was a pleasure to him, and he thought of the horse, of the morning, of the doctor's wife, but not once of the impending danger.
  • Formerly, when going into action, Rostov had felt afraid; now he had not the least feeling of fear.
  • As soon as the sun appeared in a clear strip of sky beneath the clouds, the wind fell, as if it dared not spoil the beauty of the summer morning after the storm; drops still continued to fall, but vertically now, and all was still.
  • The sounds, which he had not heard for so long, had an even more pleasurable and exhilarating effect on Rostov than the previous sounds of firing.
  • He felt instinctively that if the hussars struck at the French dragoons now, the latter could not withstand them, but if a charge was to be made it must be done now, at that very moment, or it would be too late.
  • Rostov himself did not know how or why he did it.
  • The bullets were whining and whistling so stimulatingly around him and his horse was so eager to go that he could not restrain himself.
  • The officer fell, not so much from the blow--which had but slightly cut his arm above the elbow--as from the shock to his horse and from fright.
  • His pale and mud-stained face--fair and young, with a dimple in the chin and light-blue eyes--was not an enemy's face at all suited to a battlefield, but a most ordinary, homelike face.
  • He hurriedly but vainly tried to get his foot out of the stirrup and did not remove his frightened blue eyes from Rostov's face.
  • On all sides, the hussars were busy with the dragoons; one was wounded, but though his face was bleeding, he would not give up his horse; another was perched up behind an hussar with his arms round him; a third was being helped by an hussar to mount his horse.
  • Something vague and confused, which he could not at all account for, had come over him with the capture of that officer and the blow he had dealt him.
  • No, that's not it.
  • She could not eat or sleep, grew visibly thinner, coughed, and, as the doctors made them feel, was in danger.
  • They could not think of anything but how to help her.
  • Doctors came to see her singly and in consultation, talked much in French, German, and Latin, blamed one another, and prescribed a great variety of medicines for all the diseases known to them, but the simple idea never occurred to any of them that they could not know the disease Natasha was suffering from, as no disease suffered by a live man can be known, for every living person has his own peculiarities and always has his own peculiar, personal, novel, complicated disease, unknown to medicine--not a disease of the lungs, liver, skin, heart, nerves, and so on mentioned in medical books, but a disease consisting of one of the innumerable combinations of the maladies of those organs.
  • This simple thought could not occur to the doctors (as it cannot occur to a wizard that he is unable to work his charms) because the business of their lives was to cure, and they received money for it and had spent the best years of their lives on that business.
  • And it was even pleasant to be able to show, by disregarding the orders, that she did not believe in medical treatment and did not value her life.
  • The doctors said that she could not get on without medical treatment, so they kept her in the stifling atmosphere of the town, and the Rostovs did not move to the country that summer of 1812.
  • She not merely avoided all external forms of pleasure--balls, promenades, concerts, and theaters--but she never laughed without a sound of tears in her laughter.
  • She could not sing.
  • What would she not have given to bring back even a single day of that time!
  • Her presentiment at the time had not deceived her--that that state of freedom and readiness for any enjoyment would not return again.
  • It comforted her to reflect that she was not better as she had formerly imagined, but worse, much worse, than anybody else in the world.
  • But this was not enough.
  • But she was not even grateful to him for it; nothing good on Pierre's part seemed to her to be an effort, it seemed so natural for him to be kind to everyone that there was no merit in his kindness.
  • All the Moscow notabilities, all the Rostovs' acquaintances, were at the Razumovskis' chapel, for, as if expecting something to happen, many wealthy families who usually left town for their country estates had not gone away that summer.
  • From habit she scrutinized the ladies' dresses, condemned the bearing of a lady standing close by who was not crossing herself properly but in a cramped manner, and again she thought with vexation that she was herself being judged and was judging others, and suddenly, at the sound of the service, she felt horrified at her own vileness, horrified that the former purity of her soul was again lost to her.
  • She included among her enemies the creditors and all who had business dealings with her father, and always at the thought of enemies and those who hated her she remembered Anatole who had done her so much harm--and though he did not hate her she gladly prayed for him as for an enemy.
  • Take me, take me! prayed Natasha, with impatient emotion in her heart, not crossing herself but letting her slender arms hang down as if expecting some invisible power at any moment to take her and deliver her from herself, from her regrets, desires, remorse, hopes, and sins.
  • Unexpectedly, in the middle of the service, and not in the usual order Natasha knew so well, the deacon brought out a small stool, the one he knelt on when praying on Trinity Sunday, and placed it before the doors of the sanctuary screen.
  • "Lord God of might, God of our salvation!" began the priest in that voice, clear, not grandiloquent but mild, in which only the Slav clergy read and which acts so irresistibly on a Russian heart.
  • "Wherefore?" which had come to him amid every occupation, was now replaced, not by another question or by a reply to the former question, but by her image.
  • But latterly, when more and more disquieting reports came from the seat of war and Natasha's health began to improve and she no longer aroused in him the former feeling of careful pity, an ever- increasing restlessness, which he could not explain, took possession of him.
  • He felt that the condition he was in could not continue long, that a catastrophe was coming which would change his whole life, and he impatiently sought everywhere for signs of that approaching catastrophe.
  • Once when making such calculations he wrote down his own name in French, Comte Pierre Besouhoff, but the sum of the numbers did not come right.
  • How, or by what means, he was connected with the great event foretold in the Apocalypse he did not know, but he did not doubt that connection for a moment.
  • His coachman did not even ask whether he was to wait.
  • He knew that she had not sung since her illness, and so the sound of her voice surprised and delighted him.
  • "I don't know myself," Natasha answered quickly, "but I should not like to do anything you disapproved of.
  • She spoke rapidly and did not notice how Pierre flushed at her words.
  • Will he not always have a bitter feeling toward me?
  • But she did not give him time to say them.
  • Pierre walked up and down the drawing room, not listening to what Petya was saying.
  • Pierre began feeling in his pockets for the papers, but could not find them.
  • I've told the countess she should not speak French so much.
  • It's not the time for it now.
  • Pierre had been silent and preoccupied all through dinner, seeming not to grasp what was said.
  • Pierre felt her eyes on him and tried not to look round.
  • In all these words she saw only that the danger threatening her son would not soon be over.
  • We ourselves will not delay to appear among our people in that Capital and in other parts of our realm for consultation, and for the direction of all our levies, both those now barring the enemy's path and those freshly formed to defeat him wherever he may appear.
  • It's not nonsense, Papa.
  • "Because I love you!" was what he wanted to say, but he did not say it, and only blushed till the tears came, and lowered his eyes.
  • He tried to smile but could not: his smile expressed suffering, and he silently kissed her hand and went out.
  • Pierre made up his mind not to go to the Rostovs' any more.
  • When he came in to tea, silent, morose, and with tear-stained face, everybody pretended not to notice anything.
  • One of the generals who drove past was an acquaintance of the Rostovs', and Petya thought of asking his help, but came to the conclusion that that would not be a manly thing to do.
  • There were people not only in the square, but everywhere--on the slopes and on the roofs.
  • The clerk several times used the word "plenary" (of the service), a word Petya did not understand.
  • All these conversations, especially the joking with the girls, were such as might have had a particular charm for Petya at his age, but they did not interest him now.
  • He did not know why, but he had to have a biscuit from the Tsar's hand and he felt that he must not give way.
  • He sprang forward and upset an old woman who was catching at a biscuit; the old woman did not consider herself defeated though she was lying on the ground--she grabbed at some biscuits but her hand did not reach them.
  • He did not go straight home from the Kremlin, but called on his friend Obolenski, who was fifteen and was also entering the regiment.
  • On returning home Petya announced resolutely and firmly that if he was not allowed to enter the service he would run away.
  • He was agitated; this extraordinary gathering not only of nobles but also of the merchant- class--les etats generaux (States-General)--evoked in him a whole series of ideas he had long laid aside but which were deeply graven in his soul: thoughts of the Contrat Social and the French Revolution.
  • Many voices shouted and talked at the same time, so that Count Rostov had not time to signify his approval of them all, and the group increased, dispersed, re-formed, and then moved with a hum of talk into the largest hall and to the big table.
  • Old Rostov could not tell his wife of what had passed without tears, and at once consented to Petya's request and went himself to enter his name.
  • And not only was Napoleon not afraid to extend his line, but he welcomed every step forward as a triumph and did not seek battle as eagerly as in former campaigns, but very lazily.
  • Our Emperor joined the army to encourage it to defend every inch of Russian soil and not to retreat.
  • But as Barclay did not inspire confidence his power was limited.
  • He left in order not to obstruct the commander-in-chief's undivided control of the army, and hoping that more decisive action would then be taken, but the command of the armies became still more confused and enfeebled.
  • I confess I do not want to.
  • This general, hating Barclay, rode to visit a friend of his own, a corps commander, and, having spent the day with him, returned to Barclay and condemned, as unsuitable from every point of view, the battleground he had not seen.
  • After that Princess Mary did not see her father for a whole week.
  • He was ill and did not leave his study.
  • Princess Mary noticed to her surprise that during this illness the old prince not only excluded her from his room, but did not admit Mademoiselle Bourienne either.
  • She feared for her brother who was in it, was horrified by and amazed at the strange cruelty that impels men to kill one another, but she did not understand the significance of this war, which seemed to her like all previous wars.
  • She could not have read the letter as she did not even know it had arrived.
  • These he put down beside him--not letting anyone read them at dinner.
  • I?... said the prince as if unpleasantly awakened, and not taking his eyes from the plan of the building.
  • Princess Mary saw Dessalles' embarrassed and astonished look fixed on her father, noticed his silence, and was struck by the fact that her father had forgotten his son's letter on the drawing-room table; but she was not only afraid to speak of it and ask Dessalles the reason of his confusion and silence, but was afraid even to think about it.
  • The instructions to Alpatych took over two hours and still the prince did not let him go.
  • He wished to sleep, but he knew he would not be able to and that most depressing thoughts came to him in bed.
  • That's not right! cried the prince, and himself pushed it a few inches from the corner and then closer in again.
  • He was not meditating, but only deferring the moment of making the effort to lift those legs up and turn over on the bed.
  • "No peace, damn them!" he muttered, angry he knew not with whom.
  • The same evening that the prince gave his instructions to Alpatych, Dessalles, having asked to see Princess Mary, told her that, as the prince was not very well and was taking no steps to secure his safety, though from Prince Andrew's letter it was evident that to remain at Bald Hills might be dangerous, he respectfully advised her to send a letter by Alpatych to the Provincial Governor at Smolensk, asking him to let her know the state of affairs and the extent of the danger to which Bald Hills was exposed.
  • As he went along he looked with pleasure at the year's splendid crop of corn, scrutinized the strips of ryefield which here and there were already being reaped, made his calculations as to the sowing and the harvest, and asked himself whether he had not forgotten any of the prince's orders.
  • As he approached Smolensk he heard the sounds of distant firing, but these did not impress him.
  • Everything not connected with the execution of the prince's orders did not interest and did not even exist for Alpatych.
  • We're not dogs, said the ex-captain of police, and looking round he noticed Alpatych.
  • But the Governor did not finish: a dusty perspiring officer ran into the room and began to say something in French.
  • At these words Alpatych nodded as if in approval, and not wishing to hear more went to the door of the room opposite the innkeeper's, where he had left his purchases.
  • Alpatych replied that the Governor had not told him anything definite.
  • We'd have to pay seven rubles a cartload to Dorogobuzh and I tell them they're not Christians to ask it!
  • The orders were not to let them in.
  • The people did not at once realize the meaning of this bombardment.
  • Ferapontov's wife, who till then had not ceased wailing under the shed, became quiet and with the baby in her arms went to the gate, listening to the sounds and looking in silence at the people.
  • The roar of guns, the whistling of projectiles, and the piteous moaning of the cook, which rose above the other sounds, did not cease for a moment.
  • Soldiers were passing in a constant stream along the street blocking it completely, so that Alpatych could not pass out and had to wait.
  • Seeing that his trap would not be able to move on for some time, Alpatych got down and turned into the side street to look at the fire.
  • "Well then," continued Prince Andrew to Alpatych, "report to them as I have told you"; and not replying a word to Berg who was now mute beside him, he touched his horse and rode down the side street.
  • But he was kind and gentle only to those of his regiment, to Timokhin and the like--people quite new to him, belonging to a different world and who could not know and understand his past.
  • Everything that reminded him of his past was repugnant to him, and so in his relations with that former circle he confined himself to trying to do his duty and not to be unfair.
  • Riding past the pond where there used always to be dozens of women chattering as they rinsed their linen or beat it with wooden beetles, Prince Andrew noticed that there was not a soul about and that the little washing wharf, torn from its place and half submerged, was floating on its side in the middle of the pond.
  • He was deaf and did not hear Prince Andrew ride up.
  • On seeing the young master, the elder one with frightened look clutched her younger companion by the hand and hid with her behind a birch tree, not stopping to pick up some green plums they had dropped.
  • He could not resist looking at them once more.
  • But not far from Bald Hills he again came out on the road and overtook his regiment at its halting place by the dam of a small pond.
  • "Flesh, bodies, cannon fodder!" he thought, and he looked at his own naked body and shuddered, not from cold but from a sense of disgust and horror he did not himself understand, aroused by the sight of that immense number of bodies splashing about in the dirty pond.
  • I swear to you on my honor that Napoleon was in such a fix as never before and might have lost half his army but could not have taken Smolensk.
  • With fifteen thousand men I held the enemy at bay for thirty-five hours and beat him; but he would not hold out even for fourteen hours.
  • It is disgraceful, a stain on our army, and as for him, he ought, it seems to me, not to live.
  • If he reports that our losses were great, it is not true; perhaps about four thousand, not more, and not even that; but even were they ten thousand, that's war!
  • He gave me his word he would not retreat, but suddenly sent instructions that he was retiring that night.
  • One man ought to be in command, and not two.
  • It is clear that the man who advocates the conclusion of a peace, and that the Minister should command the army, does not love our sovereign and desires the ruin of us all.
  • I am not merely civil to him but obey him like a corporal, though I am his senior.
  • Consider that on our retreat we have lost by fatigue and left in the hospital more than fifteen thousand men, and had we attacked this would not have happened.
  • In Helene's circle the war in general was regarded as a series of formal demonstrations which would very soon end in peace, and the view prevailed expressed by Bilibin--who now in Petersburg was quite at home in Helene's house, which every clever man was obliged to visit--that not by gunpowder but by those who invented it would matters be settled.
  • "I have talked and talked at the Assembly of the Nobility," Prince Vasili interrupted, "but they did not listen to me.
  • I told them his election as chief of the militia would not please the Emperor.
  • They did not listen to me.
  • The "man of great merit," despite his desire to obtain the post of director, could not refrain from reminding Prince Vasili of his former opinion.
  • I know for a fact that Kutuzov made it an absolute condition that the Tsarevich should not be with the army.
  • How much more complex than this is the game of war, which occurs under certain limits of time, and where it is not one will that manipulates lifeless objects, but everything results from innumerable conflicts of various wills!
  • "The Cossack, not knowing in what company he was, for Napoleon's plain appearance had nothing about it that would reveal to an Oriental mind the presence of a monarch, talked with extreme familiarity of the incidents of the war," says Thiers, narrating this episode.
  • But when Napoleon asked him whether the Russians thought they would beat Bonaparte or not, Lavrushka screwed up his eyes and considered.
  • In this question he saw subtle cunning, as men of his type see cunning in everything, so he frowned and did not answer immediately.
  • But if three days pass, then after that, well, then that same battle will not soon be over.
  • Napoleon did not smile, though he was evidently in high good humor, and he ordered these words to be repeated.
  • "As soon as Napoleon's interpreter had spoken," says Thiers, "the Cossack, seized by amazement, did not utter another word, but rode on, his eyes fixed on the conqueror whose fame had reached him across the steppes of the East.
  • Napoleon rode on, dreaming of the Moscow that so appealed to his imagination, and "the bird restored to its native fields" galloped to our outposts, inventing on the way all that had not taken place but that he meant to relate to his comrades.
  • What had really taken place he did not wish to relate because it seemed to him not worth telling.
  • Princess Mary was not in Moscow and out of danger as Prince Andrew supposed.
  • He ordered the militiamen to be called up from the villages and armed, and wrote a letter to the commander-in- chief informing him that he had resolved to remain at Bald Hills to the last extremity and to defend it, leaving to the commander-in-chief's discretion to take measures or not for the defense of Bald Hills, where one of Russia's oldest generals would be captured or killed, and he announced to his household that he would remain at Bald Hills.
  • Princess Mary, alarmed by her father's feverish and sleepless activity after his previous apathy, could not bring herself to leave him alone and for the first time in her life ventured to disobey him.
  • Trying to convict her, he told her she had worn him out, had caused his quarrel with his son, had harbored nasty suspicions of him, making it the object of her life to poison his existence, and he drove her from his study telling her that if she did not go away it was all the same to him.
  • He declared that he did not wish to remember her existence and warned her not to dare to let him see her.
  • The fact that he did not, as she had feared, order her to be carried away by force but only told her not to let him see her cheered Princess Mary.
  • She knew it was a proof that in the depth of his soul he was glad she was remaining at home and had not gone away.
  • She ran up to him and, in the play of the sunlight that fell in small round spots through the shade of the lime-tree avenue, could not be sure what change there was in his face.
  • The doctor said this restlessness did not mean anything and was due to physical causes; but Princess Mary thought he wished to tell her something, and the fact that her presence always increased his restlessness confirmed her opinion.
  • It was impossible for him to travel, it would not do to let him die on the road.
  • Would it not be better if the end did come, the very end?
  • Thoughts that had not entered her mind for years--thoughts of a life free from the fear of her father, and even the possibility of love and of family happiness--floated continually in her imagination like temptations of the devil.
  • She assumed an attitude of prayer, looked at the icons, repeated the words of a prayer, but she could not pray.
  • She could not sleep and several times went to the door and listened, wishing to enter but not deciding to do so.
  • Though he did not speak, Princess Mary saw and knew how unpleasant every sign of anxiety on his account was to him.
  • When she changed her position so that his left eye could see her face he calmed down, not taking his eyes off her for some seconds.
  • Then his lips and tongue moved, sounds came, and he began to speak, gazing timidly and imploringly at her, evidently afraid that she might not understand.
  • She could not understand them, but tried to guess what he was saying and inquiringly repeated the words he uttered.
  • "No, I did not sleep," said Princess Mary, shaking her head.
  • Princess Mary could not quite make out what he had said, but from his look it was clear that he had uttered a tender caressing word such as he had never used to her before.
  • She thought he was speaking of Russia, or Prince Andrew, of herself, of his grandson, or of his own death, and so she could not guess his words.
  • The doctor came out with an agitated face and said she could not enter.
  • "Let me alone; it's not true!" she cried angrily to him.
  • "No, he's not dead--it's impossible!" she told herself and approached him, and repressing the terror that seized her, she pressed her lips to his cheek.
  • As proof of this the peasant had brought from Visloukhovo a hundred rubles in notes (he did not know that they were false) paid to him in advance for hay.
  • He had told her that after the sixteenth he could not be responsible for what might happen.
  • Just as Dron was a model village Elder, so Alpatych had not managed the prince's estates for twenty years in vain.
  • His excellency Prince Andrew himself gave me orders to move all the people away and not leave them with the enemy, and there is an order from the Tsar about it too.
  • Alpatych did not insist further.
  • Having wrung a submissive "I understand" from Dron, Alpatych contented himself with that, though he not only doubted but felt almost certain that without the help of troops the carts would not be forthcoming.
  • In the village, outside the drink shop, another meeting was being held, which decided that the horses should be driven out into the woods and the carts should not be provided.
  • After her father's funeral Princess Mary shut herself up in her room and did not admit anyone.
  • She lay on the sofa with her face to the wall, fingering the buttons of the leather cushion and seeing nothing but that cushion, and her confused thoughts were centered on one subject--the irrevocability of death and her own spiritual baseness, which she had not suspected, but which had shown itself during her father's illness.
  • She wished to pray but did not dare to, dared not in her present state of mind address herself to God.
  • But she remembered too how he had changed of late toward Mademoiselle Bourienne and could not bear to see her, thereby showing how unjust were the reproaches Princess Mary had mentally addressed to her.
  • The princess heard her, not heeding her words but occasionally looking up at her and listening to the sound of her voice.
  • I understand that you could not, and cannot, think of yourself, but with my love for you I must do so....
  • Princess Mary did not answer.
  • She did not understand who was to go or where to.
  • Is it not all the same? she thought, and did not reply.
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne took from her reticule a proclamation (not printed on ordinary Russian paper) of General Rameau's, telling people not to leave their homes and that the French authorities would afford them proper protection.
  • "Dunyasha, send Alpatych, or Dronushka, or somebody to me!" she said, "and tell Mademoiselle Bourienne not to come to me," she added, hearing Mademoiselle Bourienne's voice.
  • For herself she did not care where she remained or what happened to her, but she felt herself the representative of her dead father and of Prince Andrew.
  • Dunyasha, the nurse, and the other maids could not say in how far Mademoiselle Bourienne's statement was correct.
  • Alpatych was not at home, he had gone to the police.
  • "Dronushka," she said, regarding as a sure friend this Dronushka who always used to bring a special kind of gingerbread from his visit to the fair at Vyazma every year and smilingly offer it to her, "Dronushka, now since our misfortune..." she began, but could not go on.
  • It's not a case of feeding horses--we may die of hunger ourselves!
  • It's not a case of carting.
  • Our prince did not order it to be sold.
  • We do not grudge them anything.
  • Princess Mary did not understand what he wanted of her or why he was asking to be discharged.
  • So many different eyes, old and young, were fixed on her, and there were so many different faces, that she could not distinguish any of them and, feeling that she must speak to them all at once, did not know how to do it.
  • I am giving you everything, my friends, and I beg you to take everything, all our grain, so that you may not suffer want!
  • She could not fathom whether it was curiosity, devotion, gratitude, or apprehension and distrust--but the expression on all the faces was identical.
  • "But why not?" asked the princess.
  • We are sorry for you, but we're not willing.
  • And again all the faces in that crowd bore an identical expression, though now it was certainly not an expression of curiosity or gratitude, but of angry resolve.
  • Again Princess Mary tried to catch someone's eye, but not a single eye in the crowd was turned to her; evidently they were all trying to avoid her look.
  • For a long time that night Princess Mary sat by the open window of her room hearing the sound of the peasants' voices that reached her from the village, but it was not of them she was thinking.
  • She felt that she could not understand them however much she might think about them.
  • With mournful pleasure she now lingered over these images, repelling with horror only the last one, the picture of his death, which she felt she could not contemplate even in imagination at this still and mystic hour of night.
  • She had not slept and had stolen downstairs on tiptoe, and going to the door of the conservatory where he slept that night had listened at the door.
  • Never will that moment return for him or for me when he might have said all he longed to say, and not Tikhon but I might have heard and understood him.
  • It was sad and painful for him to talk to Tikhon who did not understand him.
  • And not the face she had known ever since she could remember and had always seen at a distance, but the timid, feeble face she had seen for the first time quite closely, with all its wrinkles and details, when she stooped near to his mouth to catch what he said.
  • And the horror that had seized her when she touched him and convinced herself that that was not he, but something mysterious and horrible, seized her again.
  • "No, there's not much to be amused at here," said Rostov, and rode on a little way.
  • She could not grasp who he was and why he had come, or what was happening to her.
  • Alpatych at a gliding trot, only just managing not to run, kept up with him with difficulty.
  • He said the peasants were obdurate and that at the present moment it would be imprudent to "overresist" them without an armed force, and would it not be better first to send for the military?
  • I'm not against the commune, said Dron.
  • That's it--not against it!
  • Traitors! cried Rostov unmeaningly in a voice not his own, gripping Karp by the collar.
  • Bind him, Lavrushka! shouted Rostov, as if that order, too, could not possibly meet with any opposition.
  • Why, we've not done any harm!
  • I said then that it was not in order, voices were heard bickering with one another.
  • Unwilling to obtrude himself on the princess, Rostov did not go back to the house but remained in the village awaiting her departure.
  • If we had had only peasants to fight, we should not have let the enemy come so far, said he with a sense of shame and wishing to change the subject.
  • But the princess, if she did not again thank him in words, thanked him with the whole expression of her face, radiant with gratitude and tenderness.
  • She could not believe that there was nothing to thank him for.
  • His kind, honest eyes, with the tears rising in them when she herself had begun to cry as she spoke of her loss, did not leave her memory.
  • When she had taken leave of him and remained alone she suddenly felt her eyes filling with tears, and then not for the first time the strange question presented itself to her: did she love him?
  • On the rest of the way to Moscow, though the princess' position was not a cheerful one, Dunyasha, who went with her in the carriage, more than once noticed that her mistress leaned out of the window and smiled at something with an expression of mingled joy and sorrow.
  • Sometimes when she recalled his looks, his sympathy, and his words, happiness did not appear impossible to her.
  • Prince Andrew replied that he was not on his Serene Highness' staff but was himself a new arrival.
  • "I had the pleasure," replied Prince Andrew, "not only of taking part in the retreat but of losing in that retreat all I held dear--not to mention the estate and home of my birth--my father, who died of grief.
  • It's all vewy well--only not for those who get it in the neck.
  • This memory carried him sadly and sweetly back to those painful feelings of which he had not thought lately, but which still found place in his soul.
  • Of late he had received so many new and very serious impressions--such as the retreat from Smolensk, his visit to Bald Hills, and the recent news of his father's death--and had experienced so many emotions, that for a long time past those memories had not entered his mind, and now that they did, they did not act on him with nearly their former strength.
  • He pulled himself together, looked round, screwing up his eyes, glanced at Prince Andrew, and, evidently not recognizing him, moved with his waddling gait to the porch.
  • He embraced Prince Andrew, pressing him to his fat breast, and for some time did not let him go.
  • "Would not your Serene Highness like to come inside?" said the general on duty in a discontented voice, "the plans must be examined and several papers have to be signed."
  • But Kutuzov evidently did not wish to enter that room till he was disengaged.
  • It's not here that men are needed.
  • The regiments would not be what they are if the would-be advisers served there as you do.
  • It is not difficult to capture a fortress but it is difficult to win a campaign.
  • For that, not storming and attacking but patience and time are wanted.
  • "I'll tell you what to do," he continued, as Prince Andrew still did not reply: "I will tell you what to do, and what I do.
  • He will not bring in any plan of his own.
  • He will not hinder anything useful nor allow anything harmful.
  • Others did not like that tone and said it was stupid and vulgar.
  • * "Think it over; get into the barque, and take care not to make it a barque of Charon."
  • 'What pleasure is there to be' is not Russian!
  • I am going because... well, because everyone is going: and besides--I am not Joan of Arc or an Amazon.
  • A kindly old man but not up to much.
  • "There will be less panic and less gossip," ran the broadsheet "but I will stake my life on it that scoundrel will not enter Moscow."
  • He had not decided what it should mean when he heard the voice of the eldest princess at the door asking whether she might come in.
  • The princess was apparently vexed at not having anyone to be angry with.
  • Everything is quiet in the city and there is not the slightest danger.
  • Count Rostopchin writes that he will stake his life on it that the enemy will not enter Moscow.
  • Of his intimate friends only the Rostovs remained, but he did not go to see them.
  • The balloon was not yet ready, but Pierre learned that it was being constructed by the Emperor's desire.
  • Please impress upon Leppich to be very careful where he descends for the first time, that he may not make a mistake and fall into the enemy's hands.
  • Pierre pushed forward as fast as he could, and the farther he left Moscow behind and the deeper he plunged into that sea of troops the more was he overcome by restless agitation and a new and joyful feeling he had not experienced before.
  • Pierre could not say, and he did not try to determine for whom and for what he felt such particular delight in sacrificing everything.
  • He was not occupied with the question of what to sacrifice for; the fact of sacrificing in itself afforded him a new and joyous sensation.
  • On the twenty-fourth of August the battle of the Shevardino Redoubt was fought, on the twenty-fifth not a shot was fired by either side, and on the twenty-sixth the battle of Borodino itself took place.
  • There was not the least sense in it for either the French or the Russians.
  • The Russians did not seek out the best position but, on the contrary, during the retreat passed many positions better than Borodino.
  • Not only did the Russians not fortify the position on the field of Borodino to the left of, and at a right angle to, the highroad (that is, the position on which the battle took place), but never till the twenty- fifth of August, 1812, did they think that a battle might be fought there.
  • Not only did the Russians not fortify the position on the field of Borodino to the left of, and at a right angle to, the highroad (that is, the position on which the battle took place), but never till the twenty- fifth of August, 1812, did they think that a battle might be fought there.
  • This was shown first by the fact that there were no entrenchments there by the twenty fifth and that those begun on the twenty-fifth and twenty-sixth were not completed, and secondly, by the position of the Shevardino Redoubt.
  • The case was evidently this: a position was selected along the river Kolocha--which crosses the highroad not at a right angle but at an acute angle--so that the left flank was at Shevardino, the right flank near the village of Novoe, and the center at Borodino at the confluence of the rivers Kolocha and Voyna.
  • Napoleon, riding to Valuevo on the twenty-fourth, did not see (as the history books say he did) the position of the Russians from Utitsa to Borodino (he could not have seen that position because it did not exist), nor did he see an advanced post of the Russian army, but while pursuing the Russian rearguard he came upon the left flank of the Russian position--at the Shevardino Redoubt--and unexpectedly for the Russians moved his army across the Kolocha.
  • Had Napoleon not ridden out on the evening of the twenty-fourth to the Kolocha, and had he not then ordered an immediate attack on the redoubt but had begun the attack next morning, no one would have doubted that the Shevardino Redoubt was the left flank of our position, and the battle would have taken place where we expected it.
  • The battle of Borodino was not fought on a chosen and entrenched position with forces only slightly weaker than those of the enemy, but, as a result of the loss of the Shevardino Redoubt, the Russians fought the battle of Borodino on an open and almost unentrenched position, with forces only half as numerous as the French; that is to say, under conditions in which it was not merely unthinkable to fight for ten hours and secure an indecisive result, but unthinkable to keep an army even from complete disintegration and flight.
  • The sunshine from behind the hill did not penetrate into the cutting and there it was cold and damp, but above Pierre's head was the bright August sunshine and the bells sounded merrily.
  • Pierre was so deep in thought that he did not hear the question.
  • The third lay prone so that his face was not visible.
  • It's not the soldiers only, but I've seen peasants today, too....
  • Well, that's not my line.
  • The cavalry ride to battle and meet the wounded and do not for a moment think of what awaits them, but pass by, winking at the wounded.
  • The commander-in-chief was putting up there, but just when Pierre arrived he was not in and hardly any of the staff were there--they had gone to the church service.
  • An elderly sergeant who had approached the officer while he was giving these explanations had waited in silence for him to finish speaking, but at this point, evidently not liking the officer's remark, interrupted him.
  • The officer appeared abashed, as though he understood that one might think of how many men would be missing tomorrow but ought not to speak of it.
  • The singing did not sound loud under the open sky.
  • Standing among the crowd of peasants, Pierre recognized several acquaintances among these notables, but did not look at them--his whole attention was absorbed in watching the serious expression on the faces of the crowd of soldiers and militiamen who were all gazing eagerly at the icon.
  • When the service was over, Kutuzov stepped up to the icon, sank heavily to his knees, bowed to the ground, and for a long time tried vainly to rise, but could not do so on account of his weakness and weight.
  • It is not at all what Count Bennigsen intended.
  • Boris shrugged his shoulders, his Serene Highness would not have it, or someone persuaded him.
  • You see... but Boris did not finish, for at that moment Kaysarov, Kutuzov's adjutant, came up to Pierre.
  • Boris belonged to the latter and no one else, while showing servile respect to Kutuzov, could so create an impression that the old fellow was not much good and that Bennigsen managed everything.
  • After Kaysarov, others whom Pierre knew came up to him, and he had not time to reply to all the questions about Moscow that were showered upon him, or to listen to all that was told him.
  • The faces all expressed animation and apprehension, but it seemed to Pierre that the cause of the excitement shown in some of these faces lay chiefly in questions of personal success; his mind, however, was occupied by the different expression he saw on other faces--an expression that spoke not of personal matters but of the universal questions of life and death.
  • And should your Serene Highness require a man who will not spare his skin, please think of me....
  • Pierre looked at Dolokhov with a smile, not knowing what to say to him.
  • He did not know that it would become more memorable to him than any other spot on the plain of Borodino.
  • "On the contrary it's very interesting!" replied Pierre not quite truthfully.
  • In front of Tuchkov's troops was some high ground not occupied by troops.
  • Bennigsen did not know this and moved the troops forward according to his own ideas without mentioning the matter to the commander-in-chief.
  • What is the trial for, when he is not here and will never return?
  • He is not here!
  • I shall not exist...
  • That I should not exist...
  • Not being a military man I can't say I have understood it fully, but I understand the general position.
  • Why, when we were retreating from Sventsyani we dare not touch a stick or a wisp of hay or anything.
  • Timokhin looked about in confusion, not knowing what or how to answer such a question.
  • "Why, so as not to lay waste the country we were abandoning to the enemy," said Prince Andrew with venomous irony.
  • He could apparently not refrain from expressing the thoughts that had suddenly occurred to him.
  • If we had not said that till the evening, heaven knows what might not have happened.
  • The fact is that those men with whom you have ridden round the position not only do not help matters, but hinder.
  • 'It's not the day for that!' they say.
  • After they had gone Pierre approached Prince Andrew and was about to start a conversation when they heard the clatter of three horses' hoofs on the road not far from the shed, and looking in that direction Prince Andrew recognized Wolzogen and Clausewitz accompanied by a Cossack.
  • That's what I was saying to you-- those German gentlemen won't win the battle tomorrow but will only make all the mess they can, because they have nothing in their German heads but theories not worth an empty eggshell and haven't in their hearts the one thing needed tomorrow--that which Timokhin has.
  • "One thing I would do if I had the power," he began again, "I would not take prisoners.
  • Then there would not be war because Paul Ivanovich had offended Michael Ivanovich.
  • Then all these Westphalians and Hessians whom Napoleon is leading would not follow him into Russia, and we should not go to fight in Austria and Prussia without knowing why.
  • War is not courtesy but the most horrible thing in life; and we ought to understand that and not play at war.
  • It all lies in that: get rid of falsehood and let war be war and not a game.
  • Ah, well, it's not for long! he added.
  • "Whether we meet again or not..." and turning away hurriedly he entered the shed.
  • It was already dark, and Pierre could not make out whether the expression of Prince Andrew's face was angry or tender.
  • No, he does not want it!
  • On re-entering the shed Prince Andrew lay down on a rug, but he could not sleep.
  • I'm not telling it right; no, you don't understand, though he encouraged her by saying that he did understand, and he really had understood all she wanted to say.
  • "I not only understood her, but it was just that inner, spiritual force, that sincerity, that frankness of soul-- that very soul of hers which seemed to be fettered by her body--it was that soul I loved in her... loved so strongly and happily..." and suddenly he remembered how his love had ended.
  • He did not need anything of that kind.
  • He only saw in her a pretty and fresh young girl, with whom he did not deign to unite his fate.
  • Fabvier, not entering the tent, remained at the entrance talking to some generals of his acquaintance.
  • The Emperor Napoleon had not yet left his bedroom and was finishing his toilet.
  • But Napoleon had dressed and come out with such unexpected rapidity that he had not time to finish arranging the surprise.
  • Napoleon noticed at once what they were about and guessed that they were not ready.
  • Napoleon made ironic remarks during Fabvier's account, as if he had not expected that matters could go otherwise in his absence.
  • You surely did not expect to see that Asiatic capital.
  • Though it was not clear what the artist meant to express by depicting the so-called King of Rome spiking the earth with a stick, the allegory apparently seemed to Napoleon, as it had done to all who had seen it in Paris, quite clear and very pleasing.
  • Having sat still for a while he touched--himself not knowing why--the thick spot of paint representing the highest light in the portrait, rose, and recalled de Beausset and the officer on duty.
  • He ordered the portrait to be carried outside his tent, that the Old Guard, stationed round it, might not be deprived of the pleasure of seeing the King of Rome, the son and heir of their adored monarch.
  • That part of the line was not entrenched and in front of it the ground was more open and level than elsewhere.
  • It was evident to anyone, military or not, that it was here the French should attack.
  • Having listened to a suggestion from Davout, who was now called Prince d'Eckmuhl, to turn the Russian left wing, Napoleon said it should not be done, without explaining why not.
  • Not one of these was, or could be, carried out.
  • This could not be done and was not done, because Poniatowski, advancing on the village through the wood, met Tuchkov there barring his way, and could not and did not turn the Russian position.
  • General Campan's division did not seize the first fortification but was driven back, for on emerging from the wood it had to reform under grapeshot, of which Napoleon was unaware.
  • All this, like the other parts of the disposition, was not and could not be executed.
  • So not one of the orders in the disposition was, or could be, executed.
  • But this was not and could not be done, for during the whole battle Napoleon was so far away that, as appeared later, he could not know the course of the battle and not one of his orders during the fight could be executed.
  • The French soldiers went to kill and be killed at the battle of Borodino not because of Napoleon's orders but by their own volition.
  • So it was not because of Napoleon's commands that they killed their fellow men.
  • And it was not Napoleon who directed the course of the battle, for none of his orders were executed and during the battle he did not know what was going on before him.
  • So the way in which these people killed one another was not decided by Napoleon's will but occurred independently of him, in accord with the will of hundreds of thousands of people who took part in the common action.
  • The dispositions cited above are not at all worse, but are even better, than previous dispositions by which he had won victories.
  • These dispositions and orders only seem worse than previous ones because the battle of Borodino was the first Napoleon did not win.
  • He asked whether the Russians had not withdrawn, and was told that the enemy's fires were still in the same places.
  • He was not sleepy and it was still not nearly morning.
  • Do you remember at Braunau he commanded an army for three weeks and did not once mount a horse to inspect his entrenchments....
  • He did not feel sleepy.
  • The first shots had not yet ceased to reverberate before others rang out and yet more were heard mingling with and overtaking one another.
  • Kutuzov was saying to a general who stood beside him, not taking his eye from the battlefield.
  • He did not notice the sound of the bullets whistling from every side, or the projectiles that flew over him, did not see the enemy on the other side of the river, and for a long time did not notice the killed and wounded, though many fell near him.
  • He looked about him with a smile which did not leave his face.
  • Pierre did not find his groom and rode along the hollow with the adjutant to Raevski's Redoubt.
  • "No it's not that, but her action seems so jerky," said Pierre in a puzzled tone.
  • They did not meet again, and only much later did Pierre learn that he lost an arm that day.
  • Occasionally he rose and walked about the battery still with that same smile, trying not to obstruct the soldiers who were loading, hauling the guns, and continually running past him with bags and charges.
  • You must not be here.
  • They seemed not to have expected him to talk like anybody else, and the discovery that he did so delighted them.
  • But the men in the battery seemed not to notice this, and merry voices and jokes were heard on all sides.
  • Pierre did not look out at the battlefield and was not concerned to know what was happening there; he was entirely absorbed in watching this fire which burned ever more brightly and which he felt was flaming up in the same way in his own soul.
  • Pierre, who had not noticed these sounds before, now heard nothing else.
  • On the right of the battery soldiers shouting "Hurrah!" were running not forwards but backwards, it seemed to Pierre.
  • He halted irresolutely, not knowing whether to return or go on.
  • Pierre again went up onto the knoll where he had spent over an hour, and of that family circle which had received him as a member he did not find a single one.
  • There were many dead whom he did not know, but some he recognized.
  • The red-faced man was still twitching, but they did not carry him away.
  • Napoleon, standing on the knoll, looked through a field glass, and in its small circlet saw smoke and men, sometimes his own and sometimes Russians, but when he looked again with the naked eye, he could not tell where what he had seen was.
  • But not only was it impossible to make out what was happening from where he was standing down below, or from the knoll above on which some of his generals had taken their stand, but even from the fleches themselves--in which by this time there were now Russian and now French soldiers, alternately or together, dead, wounded, alive, frightened, or maddened-- even at those fleches themselves it was impossible to make out what was taking place.
  • There for several hours amid incessant cannon and musketry fire, now Russians were seen alone, now Frenchmen alone, now infantry, and now cavalry: they appeared, fired, fell, collided, not knowing what to do with one another, screamed, and ran back again.
  • The marshals and generals, who were nearer to the field of battle but, like Napoleon, did not take part in the actual fighting and only occasionally went within musket range, made their own arrangements without asking Napoleon and issued orders where and in what direction to fire and where cavalry should gallop and infantry should run.
  • In reality, however, all these movements forward and backward did not improve or alter the position of the troops.
  • "Reinforcements?" said Napoleon in a tone of stern surprise, looking at the adjutant--a handsome lad with long black curls arranged like Murat's own--as though he did not understand his words.
  • Napoleon did not notice that in regard to his army he was playing the part of a doctor who hinders by his medicines--a role he so justly understood and condemned.
  • Despite news of the capture of the fleches, Napoleon saw that this was not the same, not at all the same, as what had happened in his former battles.
  • He could not stop what was going on before him and around him and was supposed to be directed by him and to depend on him, and from its lack of success this affair, for the first time, seemed to him unnecessary and horrible.
  • "At eight hundred leagues from France, I will not have my Guard destroyed!" he said, and turning his horse rode back to Shevardino.
  • Kutuzov made a grimace and sent an order to Dokhturov to take over the command of the first army, and a request to the duke--whom he said he could not spare at such an important moment--to return to him.
  • Kutuzov ceased chewing and fixed an astonished gaze on Wolzogen, as if not understanding what was said to him.
  • I have not considered it right to conceal from your Serene Highness what I have seen.
  • Then you do not think, like some others, that we must retreat?
  • The tales passing from mouth to mouth at different ends of the army did not even resemble what Kutuzov had said, but the sense of his words spread everywhere because what he said was not the outcome of cunning calculations, but of a feeling that lay in the commander-in-chief's soul as in that of every Russian.
  • Order them not to crowd together.
  • I cannot, I do not wish to die.
  • He did not finish speaking.
  • Prince Andrew opened his eyes and for a long time could not make out what was going on around him.
  • There was something in this life I did not and do not understand.
  • One of the doctors came out of the tent in a bloodstained apron, holding a cigar between the thumb and little finger of one of his small bloodstained hands, so as not to smear it.
  • Prince Andrew could not make out distinctly what was in that tent.
  • Men were supporting him in their arms and offering him a glass of water, but his trembling, swollen lips could not grasp its rim.
  • Yes, that man is somehow closely and painfully connected with me, thought Prince Andrew, not yet clearly grasping what he saw before him.
  • At that moment he did not desire Moscow, or victory, or glory (what need had he for any more glory?).
  • "Sire?" asked the adjutant who had not heard the remark.
  • Even before he gave that order the thing he did not desire, and for which he gave the order only because he thought it was expected of him, was being done.
  • He could not disavow his actions, belauded as they were by half the world, and so he had to repudiate truth, goodness, and all humanity.
  • The cannon balls flew just as swiftly and cruelly from both sides, crushing human bodies, and that terrible work which was not done by the will of a man but at the will of Him who governs men and worlds continued.
  • The Russians did not make that effort because they were not attacking the French.
  • But the French did not make that effort.
  • It could not be.
  • Napoleon did not give his Guards, not because he did not want to, but because it could not be done.
  • All the generals, officers, and soldiers of the French army knew it could not be done, because the flagging spirit of the troops would not permit it.
  • It was not Napoleon alone who had experienced that nightmare feeling of the mighty arm being stricken powerless, but all the generals and soldiers of his army whether they had taken part in the battle or not, after all their experience of previous battles--when after one tenth of such efforts the enemy had fled--experienced a similar feeling of terror before an enemy who, after losing HALF his men, stood as threateningly at the end as at the beginning of the battle.
  • Not that sort of victory which is defined by the capture of pieces of material fastened to sticks, called standards, and of the ground on which the troops had stood and were standing, but a moral victory that convinces the enemy of the moral superiority of his opponent and of his own impotence was gained by the Russians at Borodino.
  • The French invaders, like an infuriated animal that has in its onslaught received a mortal wound, felt that they were perishing, but could not stop, any more than the Russian army, weaker by one half, could help swerving.
  • Absolute continuity of motion is not comprehensible to the human mind.
  • But the mind of man not only refuses to believe this explanation, but plainly says that this method of explanation is fallacious, because in it a weaker phenomenon is taken as the cause of a stronger.
  • But though I do not know what causes the cold winds to blow when the oak buds unfold, I cannot agree with the peasants that the unfolding of the oak buds is the cause of the cold wind, for the force of the wind is beyond the influence of the buds.
  • I see only a coincidence of occurrences such as happens with all the phenomena of life, and I see that however much and however carefully I observe the hands of the watch, and the valves and wheels of the engine, and the oak, I shall not discover the cause of the bells ringing, the engine moving, or of the winds of spring.
  • For five weeks after that there was not a single battle.
  • The French did not move.
  • He gave orders to prepare for a fresh conflict to finish the enemy and did this not to deceive anyone, but because he knew that the enemy was beaten, as everyone who had taken part in the battle knew it.
  • It was impossible not to retreat a day's march, and then in the same way it was impossible not to retreat another and a third day's march, and at last, on the first of September when the army drew near Moscow--despite the strength of the feeling that had arisen in all ranks--the force of circumstances compelled it to retire beyond Moscow.
  • For people accustomed to think that plans of campaign and battles are made by generals--as any one of us sitting over a map in his study may imagine how he would have arranged things in this or that battle--the questions present themselves: Why did Kutuzov during the retreat not do this or that?
  • Why did he not take up a position before reaching Fili?
  • Why did he not retire at once by the Kaluga road, abandoning Moscow? and so on.
  • People accustomed to think in that way forget, or do not know, the inevitable conditions which always limit the activities of any commander in chief.
  • The activity of a commander-in-chief does not at all resemble the activity we imagine to ourselves when we sit at ease in our studies examining some campaign on the map, with a certain number of troops on this and that side in a certain known locality, and begin our plans from some given moment.
  • But a commander in chief, especially at a difficult moment, has always before him not one proposal but dozens simultaneously.
  • Events and time do not wait.
  • "Give me your hand," said he and, turning it over so as to feel the pulse, added: "You are not well, my dear fellow.
  • Kutuzov could not yet admit the possibility of retreating beyond Moscow without a battle.
  • The commander in chief listened to what was being said and sometimes asked them to repeat their remarks, but did not himself take part in the conversations or express any opinion.
  • After hearing what was being said by one or other of these groups he generally turned away with an air of disappointment, as though they were not speaking of anything he wished to hear.
  • From all this talk he saw only one thing: that to defend Moscow was a physical impossibility in the full meaning of those words, that is to say, so utterly impossible that if any senseless commander were to give orders to fight, confusion would result but the battle would still not take place.
  • It would not take place because the commanders not merely all recognized the position to be impossible, but in their conversations were only discussing what would happen after its inevitable abandonment.
  • Bennigsen, who had chosen the position, warmly displayed his Russian patriotism (Kutuzov could not listen to this without wincing) by insisting that Moscow must be defended.
  • They waited for him from four till six o'clock and did not begin their deliberations all that time but talked in low tones of other matters.
  • She was nearest to him and saw how his face puckered; he seemed about to cry, but this did not last long.
  • Bennigsen did not yet consider his game lost.
  • Some of you will not agree with me.
  • "I did not expect this," said he to his adjutant Schneider when the latter came in late that night.
  • I did not expect this!
  • I did not think this would happen.
  • Every Russian might have predicted it, not by reasoning but by the feeling implanted in each of us and in our fathers.
  • They knew that it was for the army to fight, and that if it could not succeed it would not do to take young ladies and house serfs to the Three Hills quarter of Moscow to fight Napoleon, and that they must go away, sorry as they were to abandon their property to destruction.
  • What would have seemed difficult or even impossible to another woman did not cause the least embarrassment to Countess Bezukhova, who evidently deserved her reputation of being a very clever woman.
  • "Well, yes," said she, "it may be that he has other sentiments for me than those of a father, but that is not a reason for me to shut my door on him.
  • I am not a man, that I should repay kindness with ingratitude!
  • The prince was surprised that so simple an idea had not occurred to him, and he applied for advice to the holy brethren of the Society of Jesus, with whom he was on intimate terms.
  • All that was done around her and to her at this time, all the attention devoted to her by so many clever men and expressed in such pleasant, refined ways, and the state of dove-like purity she was now in (she wore only white dresses and white ribbons all that time) gave her pleasure, but her pleasure did not cause her for a moment to forget her aim.
  • He was delighted at the unexpected rapidity of his pupil's progress, but could not abandon the edifice of argument he had laboriously constructed.
  • "You are not taking me unawares, you know," said he.
  • Bilibin shrugged his shoulders, as much as to say that not even he could help in that difficulty.
  • She was continually tormented by jealousy of her daughter, and now that jealousy concerned a subject near to her own heart, she could not reconcile herself to the idea.
  • She is right, but how is it that we in our irrecoverable youth did not know it?
  • By rights I am a militia officer, but my men are not here.
  • "No, better not!" said another, inner voice.
  • There was not a room to be had at the inn, they were all occupied.
  • They, those strange men he had not previously known, stood out clearly and sharply from everyone else.
  • Yes, he died, and I did not know he was alive.
  • Pierre did not understand what his benefactor was saying, but he knew (the categories of thoughts were also quite distinct in his dream) that he was talking of goodness and the possibility of being what they were.
  • But though they were kindly they did not look at Pierre and did not know him.
  • But that's not what I want.
  • They do not talk, but act.
  • Man can be master of nothing while he fears death, but he who does not fear it possesses all.
  • If there were no suffering, man would not know his limitations, would not know himself.
  • No, not to unite.
  • His Serene Highness has passed through Mozhaysk in order to join up with the troops moving toward him and has taken up a strong position where the enemy will not soon attack him.
  • An ax will be useful, a hunting spear not bad, but a three-pronged fork will be best of all: a Frenchman is no heavier than a sheaf of rye.
  • "That's not he himself, that's the father of the fellow who wrote the proclamation," said the adjutant.
  • "Not at all," rejoined the adjutant in dismay.
  • 'No,' said he, 'I have not read any papers, I made it up myself.' 'If that's so, you're a traitor and I'll have you tried, and you'll be hanged!
  • But that's not the point.
  • "That is for me to know, but not for you to ask," shouted Rostopchin.
  • "If he is accused of circulating Napoleon's proclamation it is not proved that he did so," said Pierre without looking at Rostopchin, "and Vereshchagin..."
  • But I did not summon you to discuss my actions, but to give you advice--or an order if you prefer it.
  • And I will knock the nonsense out of anybody"-- but probably realizing that he was shouting at Bezukhov who so far was not guilty of anything, he added, taking Pierre's hand in a friendly manner, "We are on the eve of a public disaster and I haven't time to be polite to everybody who has business with me.
  • Pierre did not answer and left Rostopchin's room more sullen and angry than he had ever before shown himself.
  • Pierre did not understand and was not interested in any of these questions and only answered them in order to get rid of these people.
  • Petya could not return unless his regiment did so or unless he was transferred to another regiment on active service.
  • Nicholas was somewhere with the army and had not sent a word since his last letter, in which he had given a detailed account of his meeting with Princess Mary.
  • The countess did not sleep at night, or when she did fall asleep dreamed that she saw her sons lying dead.
  • Though Petya would remain in the service, this transfer would give the countess the consolation of seeing at least one of her sons under her wing, and she hoped to arrange matters for her Petya so as not to let him go again, but always get him appointed to places where he could not possibly take part in a battle.
  • The passionate tenderness with which his mother received him did not please the sixteen-year-old officer.
  • Owing to the count's customary carelessness nothing was ready for their departure by the twenty-eighth of August and the carts that were to come from their Ryazan and Moscow estates to remove their household belongings did not arrive till the thirtieth.
  • They laughed and were gay not because there was any reason to laugh, but because gaiety and mirth were in their hearts and so everything that happened was a cause for gaiety and laughter to them.
  • Petya was not at home, he had gone to visit a friend with whom he meant to obtain a transfer from the militia to the active army.
  • That's not the point.
  • I beg you not to indulge in trifles now, but to help to pack, and tomorrow we must go, go, go!...
  • With a woman's involuntary loving cunning she, who till then had not shown any alarm, said that she would die of fright if they did not leave that very night.
  • Sonya, owing to the count's contradictory orders, lost her head and did not know what to do.
  • But Natasha would not give in.
  • She turned everything out and began quickly repacking, deciding that the inferior Russian carpets and unnecessary crockery should not be taken at all.
  • Only the lid of the case containing the carpets would not shut down.
  • The count was not angry even when they told him that Natasha had countermanded an order of his, and the servants now came to her to ask whether a cart was sufficiently loaded, and whether it might be corded up.
  • But hard as they all worked till quite late that night, they could not get everything packed.
  • Having waited there for Rostopchin who did not turn up, they became convinced that Moscow would be surrendered, and then dispersed all about the town to the public houses and cookshops.
  • Not only were huge sums offered for the horses and carts, but on the previous evening and early in the morning of the first of September, orderlies and servants sent by wounded officers came to the Rostovs' and wounded men dragged themselves there from the Rostovs' and from neighboring houses where they were accommodated, entreating the servants to try to get them a lift out of Moscow.
  • The major-domo to whom these entreaties were addressed, though he was sorry for the wounded, resolutely refused, saying that he dare not even mention the matter to the count.
  • Thirty carts could not save all the wounded and in the general catastrophe one could not disregard oneself and one's own family.
  • On waking up that morning Count Ilya Rostov left his bedroom softly, so as not to wake the countess who had fallen asleep only toward morning, and came out to the porch in his lilac silk dressing gown.
  • The count went into the house with him, repeating his order not to refuse the wounded who asked for a lift.
  • 'Russia is not in Moscow, she lives in the hearts of her sons!'
  • She did not answer.
  • No, Mamma darling, it's not the thing.
  • The countess glanced at her daughter, saw her face full of shame for her mother, saw her agitation, and understood why her husband did not turn to look at her now, and she glanced round quite disconcerted.
  • Am I hindering anyone? she said, not surrendering at once.
  • It no longer seemed strange to them but on the contrary it seemed the only thing that could be done, just as a quarter of an hour before it had not seemed strange to anyone that the wounded should be left behind and the goods carted away but that had seemed the only thing to do.
  • The whole household, as if to atone for not having done it sooner, set eagerly to work at the new task of placing the wounded in the carts.
  • Many of the wounded asked them not to unload the carts but only to let them sit on the top of the things.
  • But the work of unloading, once started, could not be arrested.
  • It seemed not to matter whether all or only half the things were left behind.
  • Natasha was in a state of rapturous excitement such as she had not known for a long time.
  • Natasha was not in the room.
  • "Natasha does not know yet, but he is going with us," said Sonya.
  • Efim, the old coachman, who was the only one the countess trusted to drive her, sat perched up high on the box and did not so much as glance round at what was going on behind him.
  • She did not know who was in it, but each time she looked at the procession her eyes sought that caleche.
  • No, it's not he.
  • But the coachman could not stop, for from the Meshchanski Street came more carts and carriages, and the Rostovs were being shouted at to move on and not block the way.
  • Pierre, evidently engrossed in thought, could not at first understand him.
  • You are not like yourself....
  • When he woke up on the morning after his return to Moscow and his interview with Count Rostopchin, he could not for some time make out where he was and what was expected of him.
  • When he felt he was being looked at he behaved like an ostrich which hides its head in a bush in order not to be seen: he hung his head and quickening his pace went down the street.
  • More than two hours passed and Gerasim took the liberty of making a slight noise at the door to attract his attention, but Pierre did not hear him.
  • I beg you not to tell anyone who I am, and to do what I ask you.
  • From that point of view he gazed at the Oriental beauty he had not seen before.
  • I do not wish to utilize the fortunes of war to humiliate an honored monarch.
  • 'Boyars,' I will say to them, 'I do not desire war, I desire the peace and welfare of all my subjects.'
  • The faces of those who were not conferring together were pale and perturbed.
  • "But it's impossible..." declared the gentlemen of the suite, shrugging their shoulders but not venturing to utter the implied word--le ridicule...
  • The bees do not fly in the same way, the smell and the sound that meet the beekeeper are not the same.
  • They do not sting, but crawl away from danger.
  • The coup de theatre had not come off.
  • While the troops, dividing into two parts when passing around the Kremlin, were thronging the Moskva and the Stone bridges, a great many soldiers, taking advantage of the stoppage and congestion, turned back from the bridges and slipped stealthily and silently past the church of Vasili the Beatified and under the Borovitski gate, back up the hill to the Red Square where some instinct told them they could easily take things not belonging to them.
  • But the roll of the drums did not make the looting soldiers run in the direction of the drum as formerly, but made them, on the contrary, run farther away.
  • If you please, could not guards be placed if only to let us close the shop....
  • "It's not my business!" he exclaimed, and strode on quickly down one of the passages.
  • The huge courtyard of the Rostovs' house was littered with wisps of hay and with dung from the horses, and not a soul was to be seen there.
  • The young officer standing in the gateway, as if hesitating whether to enter or not, clicked his tongue.
  • Mavra Kuzminichna did not let him finish.
  • The officer did not decline, but took the note quietly and thanked her.
  • They were singing discordantly, arduously, and with great effort, evidently not because they wished to sing, but because they wanted to show they were drunk and on a spree.
  • Robbery is not permitted to anybody now a days! shouted the publican, picking up his cap.
  • The tall youth, not noticing the disappearance of his foe, waved his bare arm and went on talking incessantly, attracting general attention to himself.
  • "Your honor..." replied the shopman in the frieze coat, "your honor, in accord with the proclamation of his highest excellency the count, they desire to serve, not sparing their lives, and it is not any kind of riot, but as his highest excellence said..."
  • "The count has not left, he is here, and an order will be issued concerning you," said the superintendent of police.
  • This was not news to Rostopchin.
  • Why were the holy relics, the arms, ammunition, gunpowder, and stores of corn not removed?
  • Why were thousands of inhabitants deceived into believing that Moscow would not be given up--and thereby ruined?
  • Not only did it seem to him (as to all administrators) that he controlled the external actions of Moscow's inhabitants, but he also thought he controlled their mental attitude by means of his broadsheets and posters, written in a coarse tone which the people despise in their own class and do not understand from those in authority.
  • Not only did it seem to him (as to all administrators) that he controlled the external actions of Moscow's inhabitants, but he also thought he controlled their mental attitude by means of his broadsheets and posters, written in a coarse tone which the people despise in their own class and do not understand from those in authority.
  • Not I, of course.
  • They have horses, let them be off to Vladimir, and not leave them to the French.
  • Do you expect me to give you two battalions--which we have not got--for a convoy?
  • But Rostopchin did not look at him.
  • Hearing not so much the words as the angry tone of Rostopchin's voice, the crowd moaned and heaved forward, but again paused.
  • He did not finish what he wished to say.
  • "Ah!" cried Vereshchagin in meek surprise, looking round with a frightened glance as if not understanding why this was done to him.
  • What men!... and they say he's not the right one....
  • How not the right one?...
  • At the moment when Vereshchagin fell and the crowd closed in with savage yells and swayed about him, Rostopchin suddenly turned pale and, instead of going to the back entrance where his carriage awaited him, went with hurried steps and bent head, not knowing where and why, along the passage leading to the rooms on the ground floor.
  • The count's face was white and he could not control the feverish twitching of his lower jaw.
  • Many other victims have perished and are perishing for the public good--and he began thinking of his social duties to his family and to the city entrusted to him, and of himself--not himself as Theodore Vasilyevich Rostopchin (he fancied that Theodore Vasilyevich Rostopchin was sacrificing himself for the public good) but himself as governor, the representative of authority and of the Tsar.
  • The thought which tranquillized Rostopchin was not a new one.
  • To a man not swayed by passion that welfare is never certain, but he who commits such a crime always knows just where that welfare lies.
  • Not only did his reason not reproach him for what he had done, but he even found cause for self-satisfaction in having so successfully contrived to avail himself of a convenient opportunity to punish a criminal and at the same time pacify the mob.
  • Not only did his reason not reproach him for what he had done, but he even found cause for self-satisfaction in having so successfully contrived to avail himself of a convenient opportunity to punish a criminal and at the same time pacify the mob.
  • I could not let him go unpunished and so I have killed two birds with one stone: to appease the mob I gave them a victim and at the same time punished a miscreant.
  • Even now he felt clearly that the gory trace of that recollection would not pass with time, but that the terrible memory would, on the contrary, dwell in his heart ever more cruelly and painfully to the end of his life.
  • I need not have said them, he thought.
  • But I did not do it for my own sake.
  • Kutuzov looked at Rostopchin as if, not grasping what was said to him, he was trying to read something peculiar written at that moment on the face of the man addressing him.
  • Kutuzov slightly shook his head and not taking his penetrating gaze from Rostopchin's face muttered softly:
  • I shall not give up Moscow without a battle!
  • He's not bad! low voices could be heard saying.
  • The porter, listening in perplexity to the unfamiliar Polish accent and not realizing that the interpreter was speaking Russian, did not understand what was being said to him and slipped behind the others.
  • To all of them from the marshal to the least soldier, that place was not the Vozdvizhenka, Mokhavaya, or Kutafyev Street, nor the Troitsa Gate (places familiar in Moscow), but a new battlefield which would probably prove sanguinary.
  • "Clear that away!" was all that was said of them, and they were thrown over the parapet and removed later on that they might not stink.
  • No masters of the houses being found anywhere, the French were not billeted on the inhabitants as is usual in towns but lived in it as in a camp.
  • Ten minutes after each regiment had entered a Moscow district, not a soldier or officer was left.
  • In reality, however, it was not, and could not be, possible to explain the burning of Moscow by making any individual, or any group of people, responsible for it.
  • Moscow was set on fire by the soldiers' pipes, kitchens, and campfires, and by the carelessness of enemy soldiers occupying houses they did not own.
  • Moscow was burned by its inhabitants, it is true, but by those who had abandoned it and not by those who remained in it.
  • Moscow when occupied by the enemy did not remain intact like Berlin, Vienna, and other towns, simply because its inhabitants abandoned it and did not welcome the French with bread and salt, nor bring them the keys of the city.
  • He did not know how or when this thought had taken such possession of him, but he remembered nothing of the past, understood nothing of the present, and all he saw and heard appeared to him like a dream.
  • Next day, with the sole idea of not sparing himself and not lagging in any way behind them, Pierre went to the Three Hills gate.
  • But when he returned to the house convinced that Moscow would not be defended, he suddenly felt that what before had seemed to him merely a possibility had now become absolutely necessary and inevitable.
  • If he were now to leave Moscow like everyone else, his flight from home, the peasant coat, the pistol, and his announcement to the Rostovs that he would remain in Moscow would all become not merely meaningless but contemptible and ridiculous, and to this Pierre was very sensitive.
  • In his fancy he did not clearly picture to himself either the striking of the blow or the death of Napoleon, but with extraordinary vividness and melancholy enjoyment imagined his own destruction and heroic endurance.
  • 'It is not I but the hand of Providence that punishes thee,' I shall say, thought he, imagining what he would say when killing Napoleon.
  • Am I not right, sir?
  • That's not right, sir.
  • But the French entered and still Pierre did not retire--an irresistible curiosity kept him there.
  • "Master, not here--don't understand... me, you..." said Gerasim, trying to render his words more comprehensible by contorting them.
  • Still smiling, the French officer spread out his hands before Gerasim's nose, intimating that he did not understand him either, and moved, limping, to the door at which Pierre was standing.
  • "You are not wounded?" he asked.
  • "I think not," answered the Frenchman, feeling himself over.
  • He is an unfortunate madman who did not know what he was doing.
  • "We French are merciful after victory, but we do not pardon traitors," he added, with a look of gloomy dignity and a fine energetic gesture.
  • Pierre continued, in French, to persuade the officer not to hold that drunken imbecile to account.
  • Even if Pierre were not a Frenchman, having once received that loftiest of human appellations he could not renounce it, said the officer's look and tone.
  • In reply to his last question Pierre again explained who Makar Alexeevich was and how just before their arrival that drunken imbecile had seized the loaded pistol which they had not had time to recover from him, and begged the officer to let the deed go unpunished.
  • When the French officer went into the room with Pierre the latter again thought it his duty to assure him that he was not French and wished to go away, but the officer would not hear of it.
  • He was so very polite, amiable, good-natured, and genuinely grateful to Pierre for saving his life that Pierre had not the heart to refuse, and sat down with him in the parlor--the first room they entered.
  • That's not my business.
  • Here is one I got at Wagram" (he touched his side) "and a second at Smolensk"--he showed a scar on his cheek--"and this leg which as you see does not want to march, I got that on the seventh at the great battle of la Moskowa.
  • I pity those who did not see it.
  • "Would not the French ladies leave Paris if the Russians entered it?" asked Pierre.
  • I could not resist the sight of the grandeur and glory with which he has covered France.
  • This difficulty had arisen chiefly because the hussars did not understand what was said to them in French.
  • The German who knew little French, answered the two first questions by giving the names of his regiment and of his commanding officer, but in reply to the third question which he did not understand said, introducing broken French into his own German, that he was the quartermaster of the regiment and his commander had ordered him to occupy all the houses one after another.
  • Painful as that was it was not that which tormented Pierre at the moment.
  • Pierre still considered that it would be a useful and worthy action to slay the evildoer, but now he felt that he would not do it.
  • He did not know why, but he felt a foreboding that he would not carry out his intention.
  • A strange feeling of weakness tied him to the spot; he wished to get up and go away, but could not do so.
  • Pierre did not answer, but looked cordially into the Frenchman's eyes whose expression of sympathy was pleasing to him.
  • It was plain that l'amour which the Frenchman was so fond of was not that low and simple kind that Pierre had once felt for his wife, nor was it the romantic love stimulated by himself that he experienced for Natasha.
  • At the time of that meeting it had not produced an effect upon him--he had not even once recalled it.
  • Afterwards when he had received a name and wealth he dared not think of her because he loved her too well, placing her far above everything in the world, and especially therefore above himself.
  • The captain made a gesture signifying that even if he did not understand it he begged Pierre to continue.
  • Whether it was the wine he had drunk, or an impulse of frankness, or the thought that this man did not, and never would, know any of those who played a part in his story, or whether it was all these things together, something loosened Pierre's tongue.
  • More than anything else in Pierre's story the captain was impressed by the fact that Pierre was very rich, had two mansions in Moscow, and that he had abandoned everything and not left the city, but remained there concealing his name and station.
  • But that's not Mytishchi, it's farther away.
  • Sonya and Madame Schoss, who had not yet undressed, went out with him.
  • But Natasha looked at her as if not understanding what was said to her and again fixed her eyes on the corner of the stove.
  • And as if in order not to offend Sonya and to get rid of her, she turned her face to the window, looked out in such a way that it was evident that she could not see anything, and again settled down in her former attitude.
  • The countess knew this, but what it might be she did not know, and this alarmed and tormented her.
  • Natasha knew it was not Prince Andrew who was moaning.
  • For a long time Natasha listened attentively to the sounds that reached her from inside and outside the room and did not move.
  • Natasha did not answer.
  • Natasha did not move, though her little bare foot, thrust out from under the quilt, was growing cold on the bare floor.
  • She did not know why she had to, she knew the meeting would be painful, but felt the more convinced that it was necessary.
  • He was dissatisfied because he knew by experience that if his patient did not die now, he would do so a little later with greater suffering.
  • I have not got one.
  • His mind was not in a normal state.
  • But Prince Andrew's mind was not in a normal state in that respect.
  • I experienced that feeling of love which is the very essence of the soul and does not require an object.
  • And he vividly pictured to himself Natasha, not as he had done in the past with nothing but her charms which gave him delight, but for the first time picturing to himself her soul.
  • In that world some structure was still being erected and did not fall, something was still stretching out, and the candle with its red halo was still burning, and the same shirtlike sphinx lay near the door; but besides all this something creaked, there was a whiff of fresh air, and a new white sphinx appeared, standing at the door.
  • Prince Andrew wished to return to that former world of pure thought, but he could not, and delirium drew him back into its domain.
  • He realized that it was the real living Natasha, and he was not surprised but quietly happy.
  • But Prince Andrew did not see that, he saw her shining eyes which were beautiful.
  • Though with the intimacy now established between the wounded man and Natasha the thought occurred that should he recover their former engagement would be renewed, no one--least of all Natasha and Prince Andrew--spoke of this: the unsettled question of life and death, which hung not only over Bolkonski but over all Russia, shut out all other considerations.
  • "Am I not too late?" he thought.
  • But it then occurred to him for the first time that he certainly could not carry the weapon in his hand through the streets.
  • He could not carry it unnoticed in his belt or under his arm.
  • Now and then he met Russians with anxious and timid faces, and Frenchmen with an air not of the city but of the camp, walking in the middle of the streets.
  • Besides his height and stoutness, and the strange morose look of suffering in his face and whole figure, the Russians stared at Pierre because they could not make out to what class he could belong.
  • At the gate of one house three Frenchmen, who were explaining something to some Russians who did not understand them, stopped Pierre asking if he did not know French.
  • But he was not destined to bring his mood safely to his destination.
  • Though he heard and saw nothing around him he found his way by instinct and did not go wrong in the side streets that led to the Povarskoy.
  • But Pierre, though he felt that something unusual was happening around him, did not realize that he was approaching the fire.
  • The youngest child, a boy of about seven, who wore an overcoat and an immense cap evidently not his own, was crying in his old nurse's arms.
  • But he made an effort not to throw the child down and ran with her to the large house.
  • He did not find the civil servant or his wife where he had left them.
  • But Pierre was not listening to the woman.
  • The beautiful Armenian still sat motionless and in the same attitude, with her long lashes drooping as if she did not see or feel what the soldier was doing to her.
  • Pierre looked around him with bloodshot eyes and did not reply.
  • "He does not look like a common man," said the interpreter, after a searching look at Pierre.
  • I will not tell you who I am.
  • We belong to different camps, but that does not prevent my esteeming her as she deserves.
  • "It may turn out very well," he thought, "but if not, they'll know how to arrange matters."
  • Kutuzov wrote that the Russians had not retreated a step, that the French losses were much heavier than ours, and that he was writing in haste from the field of battle before collecting full information.
  • This messenger was Michaud, a Frenchman who did not know Russian, but who was quoique etranger, russe de coeur et d'ame, * as he said of himself.
  • The Emperor listened in silence, not looking at Michaud.
  • Did you not notice discouragement?...
  • Colonel Michaud, do not forget what I say to you here, perhaps we may recall it with pleasure someday...
  • I have learned to know him, and he will not deceive me any more....
  • But it was not really so.
  • It appears so to us because we see only the general historic interest of that time and do not see all the personal human interests that people had.
  • With the naive conviction of young men in a merry mood that other men's wives were created for them, Rostov did not leave the lady's side and treated her husband in a friendly and conspiratorial style, as if, without speaking of it, they knew how capitally Nicholas and the lady would get on together.
  • The husband, however, did not seem to share that conviction and tried to behave morosely with Rostov.
  • After a few words about Princess Mary and her late father, whom Malvintseva had evidently not liked, and having asked what Nicholas knew of Prince Andrew, who also was evidently no favorite of hers, the important old lady dismissed Nicholas after repeating her invitation to come to see her.
  • When he had parted from Malvintseva Nicholas wished to return to the dancing, but the governor's little wife placed her plump hand on his sleeve and, saying that she wanted to have a talk with him, led him to her sitting room, from which those who were there immediately withdrew so as not to be in her way.
  • And she is not at all so plain, either.
  • "Not at all," replied Nicholas as if offended at the idea.
  • Well then, remember, this is not a joke!
  • "Oh no, we are good friends with him," said Nicholas in the simplicity of his heart; it did not enter his head that a pastime so pleasant to himself might not be pleasant to someone else.
  • Nicholas suddenly felt a desire and need to tell his most intimate thoughts (which he would not have told to his mother, his sister, or his friend) to this woman who was almost a stranger.
  • The day after her party the governor's wife came to see Malvintseva and, after discussing her plan with the aunt, remarked that though under present circumstances a formal betrothal was, of course, not to be thought of, all the same the young people might be brought together and could get to know one another.
  • Herself a consummate coquette, she could not have maneuvered better on meeting a man she wished to attract.
  • She did not talk about her brother, diverting the conversation as soon as her aunt mentioned Andrew.
  • Nicholas blushed and was confused when people spoke to him about the princess (as she did when he was mentioned) and even when he thought of her, but in her presence he felt quite at ease, and said not at all what he had prepared, but what, quite appropriately, occurred to him at the moment.
  • But he also knew (or rather felt at the bottom of his heart) that by resigning himself now to the force of circumstances and to those who were guiding him, he was not only doing nothing wrong, but was doing something very important--more important than anything he had ever done in his life.
  • Princess Mary, having learned of her brother's wound only from the Gazette and having no definite news of him, prepared (so Nicholas heard, he had not seen her again himself) to set off in search of Prince Andrew.
  • Nicholas immediately recognized Princess Mary not so much by the profile he saw under her bonnet as by the feeling of solicitude, timidity, and pity that immediately overcame him.
  • As had occurred before when she was present, Nicholas went up to her without waiting to be prompted by the governor's wife and not asking himself whether or not it was right and proper to address her here in church, and told her he had heard of her trouble and sympathized with his whole soul.
  • The princess looked at him, not grasping what he was saying, but cheered by the expression of regretful sympathy on his face.
  • That evening Nicholas did not go out, but stayed at home to settle some accounts with the horse dealers.
  • When he met her again in Voronezh the impression she made on him was not merely pleasing but powerful.
  • He was, however, preparing to go away and it had not entered his head to regret that he was thus depriving himself of chances of meeting her.
  • In men Rostov could not bear to see the expression of a higher spiritual life (that was why he did not like Prince Andrew) and he referred to it contemptuously as philosophy and dreaminess, but in Princess Mary that very sorrow which revealed the depth of a whole spiritual world foreign to him was an irresistible attraction.
  • Why am I not free?
  • But no, he could not imagine that.
  • Besides, I don't love her--not as I should.
  • Yes, prayer can move mountains, but one must have faith and not pray as Natasha and I used to as children, that the snow might turn into sugar-- and then run out into the yard to see whether it had done so.
  • Softened by memories of Princess Mary he began to pray as he had not done for a long time.
  • "No, it's not possible!" he cried aloud.
  • I shall not be at peace till you promise me this.
  • Sonya burst into hysterical tears and replied through her sobs that she would do anything and was prepared for anything, but gave no actual promise and could not bring herself to decide to do what was demanded of her.
  • But when she heard of Prince Andrew's presence in their house, despite her sincere pity for him and for Natasha, she was seized by a joyful and superstitious feeling that God did not intend her to be separated from Nicholas.
  • She knew that being thrown together again under such terrible circumstances they would again fall in love with one another, and that Nicholas would then not be able to marry Princess Mary as they would be within the prohibited degrees of affinity.
  • Not noticing the monk, who had risen to greet her and was drawing back the wide sleeve on his right arm, she went up to Sonya and took her hand.
  • Sonya was not less agitated than her friend by the latter's fear and grief and by her own personal feelings which she shared with no one.
  • She not only remembered what she had then said--that he turned to look at her and smiled and was covered with something red--but was firmly convinced that she had then seen and said that he was covered with a pink quilt and that his eyes were closed.
  • As soon as Pierre began to say anything that did not fit in with that aim, the channel was removed and the water could flow to waste.
  • They interrupted him, for this was not to the point.
  • Again they interrupted him: they had not asked where he was going, but why he was found near the fire?
  • Again he replied that he could not answer it.
  • He did not then realize the significance of the burning of Moscow, and looked at the fires with horror.
  • What marshal this was, Pierre could not learn from the soldiers.
  • This officer, probably someone on the staff, was holding a paper in his hand, and called over all the Russians there, naming Pierre as "the man who does not give his name."
  • Pierre gazed at the ruins and did not recognize districts he had known well.
  • Here and there he could see churches that had not been burned.
  • The Kremlin, which was not destroyed, gleamed white in the distance with its towers and the belfry of Ivan the Great.
  • Pierre felt himself to be an insignificant chip fallen among the wheels of a machine whose action he did not understand but which was working well.
  • He and the other prisoners were taken to the right side of the Virgin's Field, to a large white house with an immense garden not far from the convent.
  • Pierre went close up to him, but Davout, evidently consulting a paper that lay before him, did not look up.
  • To him Davout was not merely a French general, but a man notorious for his cruelty.
  • Looking at his cold face, as he sat like a stern schoolmaster who was prepared to wait awhile for an answer, Pierre felt that every instant of delay might cost him his life; but he did not know what to say.
  • He did not venture to repeat what he had said at his first examination, yet to disclose his rank and position was dangerous and embarrassing.
  • "He is a Russian spy," Davout interrupted, addressing another general who was present, but whom Pierre had not noticed.
  • I am a militia officer and have not quitted Moscow.
  • What proof have I that you are not lying?
  • "Monseigneur!" exclaimed Pierre, not in an offended but in a pleading voice.
  • "You are not what you say," returned Davout.
  • But where they were to take him Pierre did not know: back to the coach house or to the place of execution his companions had pointed out to him as they crossed the Virgin's Field.
  • "Yes, of course!" replied Davout, but what this "yes" meant, Pierre did not know.
  • Pierre could not afterwards remember how he went, whether it was far, or in which direction.
  • Not the men on the commission that had first examined him--not one of them wished to or, evidently, could have done it.
  • Not the men on the commission that had first examined him--not one of them wished to or, evidently, could have done it.
  • It was not Davout, who had looked at him in so human a way.
  • The crowd consisted of a few Russians and many of Napoleon's soldiers who were not on duty--Germans, Italians, and Frenchmen, in a variety of uniforms.
  • There was a stir in the ranks of the soldiers and it was evident that they were all hurrying--not as men hurry to do something they understand, but as people hurry to finish a necessary but unpleasant and incomprehensible task.
  • They could not believe it because they alone knew what their life meant to them, and so they neither understood nor believed that it could be taken from them.
  • When they began to blindfold him he himself adjusted the knot which hurt the back of his head; then when they propped him against the bloodstained post, he leaned back and, not being comfortable in that position, straightened himself, adjusted his feet, and leaned back again more comfortably.
  • Pierre did not take his eyes from him and did not miss his slightest movement.
  • Probably a word of command was given and was followed by the reports of eight muskets; but try as he would Pierre could not afterwards remember having heard the slightest sound of the shots.
  • But Pierre did not understand him and remained near the post, and no one drove him away.
  • He heard what they said, but did not understand the meaning of the words and made no kind of deduction from or application of them.
  • But now he felt that the universe had crumbled before his eyes and only meaningless ruins remained, and this not by any fault of his own.
  • He felt that it was not in his power to regain faith in the meaning of life.
  • This man was doing something to his legs in the darkness, and though Pierre could not see his face he felt that the man continually glanced at him.
  • Pierre had not eaten all day and the smell of the potatoes seemed extremely pleasant to him.
  • How can one see all this and not feel sad?
  • "I say things happen not as we plan but as God judges," he replied, thinking that he was repeating what he had said before, and immediately continued:
  • "But it's all the same now," Pierre could not help saying.
  • But we are always judging, 'that's not well--that's not right!'
  • He did not himself know his age and was quite unable to determine it.
  • But his brilliantly white, strong teeth which showed in two unbroken semicircles when he laughed--as he often did--were all sound and good, there was not a gray hair in his beard or on his head, and his whole body gave an impression of suppleness and especially of firmness and endurance.
  • His physical strength and agility during the first days of his imprisonment were such that he seemed not to know what fatigue and sickness meant.
  • He could do everything, not very well but not badly.
  • He did not sing like a trained singer who knows he is listened to, but like the birds, evidently giving vent to the sounds in the same way that one stretches oneself or walks about to get rid of stiffness, and the sounds were always high-pitched, mournful, delicate, and almost feminine, and his face at such times was very serious.
  • Karataev had no attachments, friendships, or love, as Pierre understood them, but loved and lived affectionately with everything life brought him in contact with, particularly with man--not any particular man, but those with whom he happened to be.
  • He loved his dog, his comrades, the French, and Pierre who was his neighbor, but Pierre felt that in spite of Karataev's affectionate tenderness for him (by which he unconsciously gave Pierre's spiritual life its due) he would not have grieved for a moment at parting from him.
  • When he began to speak he seemed not to know how he would conclude.
  • Sometimes Pierre, struck by the meaning of his words, would ask him to repeat them, but Platon could never recall what he had said a moment before, just as he never could repeat to Pierre the words of his favorite song: native and birch tree and my heart is sick occurred in it, but when spoken and not sung, no meaning could be got out of it.
  • He did not, and could not, understand the meaning of words apart from their context.
  • He could not understand the value or significance of any word or deed taken separately.
  • When Princess Mary heard from Nicholas that her brother was with the Rostovs at Yaroslavl she at once prepared to go there, in spite of her aunt's efforts to dissuade her--and not merely to go herself but to take her nephew with her.
  • Whether it were difficult or easy, possible or impossible, she did not ask and did not want to know: it was her duty, not only to herself, to be near her brother who was perhaps dying, but to do everything possible to take his son to him, and so she prepared to set off.
  • That she had not heard from Prince Andrew himself, Princess Mary attributed to his being too weak to write or to his considering the long journey too hard and too dangerous for her and his son.
  • Not by a single word had Nicholas alluded to the fact that Prince Andrew's relations with Natasha might, if he recovered, be renewed, but Princess Mary saw by his face that he knew and thought of this.
  • "I have found out everything, your excellency: the Rostovs are staying at the merchant Bronnikov's house, in the Square not far from here, right above the Volga," said the courier.
  • Princess Mary looked at him with frightened inquiry, not understanding why he did not reply to what she chiefly wanted to know: how was her brother?
  • What "still the same" might mean Princess Mary did not ask, but with an unnoticed glance at little seven-year-old Nicholas, who was sitting in front of her looking with pleasure at the town, she bowed her head and did not raise it again till the heavy coach, rumbling, shaking and swaying, came to a stop.
  • "The doctor says that he is not in danger," said the countess, but as she spoke she raised her eyes with a sigh, and her gesture conveyed a contradiction of her words.
  • She knew it to be necessary, and though it was hard for her she was not vexed with these people.
  • Natasha was gazing at her, but seemed afraid and in doubt whether to say all she knew or not; she seemed to feel that before those luminous eyes which penetrated into the very depths of her heart, it was impossible not to tell the whole truth which she saw.
  • But she still hoped, and asked, in words she herself did not trust:
  • Then fever set in, but the doctor had said the fever was not very serious.
  • No, it's not that, but worse.
  • She was sure he would speak soft, tender words to her such as her father had uttered before his death, and that she would not be able to bear it and would burst into sobs in his presence.
  • In the deep gaze that seemed to look not outwards but inwards there was an almost hostile expression as he slowly regarded his sister and Natasha.
  • Had he screamed in agony, that scream would not have struck such horror into Princess Mary's heart as the tone of his voice.
  • He was silent, and she did not know what to say.
  • Princess Mary heard him and did not understand how he could say such a thing.
  • Had he expected to live he could not have said those words in that offensively cold tone.
  • If he had not known that he was dying, how could he have failed to pity her and how could he speak like that in her presence?
  • Prince Andrew did not notice that she called his sister Mary, and only after calling her so in his presence did Natasha notice it herself.
  • It was plain that he was making an effort to listen, but could not do so.
  • Natasha, who felt her glance, did not look at her.
  • When little Nicholas was brought into Prince Andrew's room he looked at his father with frightened eyes, but did not cry, because no one else was crying.
  • Prince Andrew kissed him and evidently did not know what to say to him.
  • She did not speak any more to Natasha of hopes of saving his life.
  • Not only did Prince Andrew know he would die, but he felt that he was dying and was already half dead.
  • To love everything and everybody and always to sacrifice oneself for love meant not to love anyone, not to live this earthly life.
  • Recalling the moment at the ambulance station when he had seen Kuragin, he could not now regain the feeling he then had, but was tormented by the question whether Kuragin was alive.
  • And he dared not inquire.
  • "Can it or can it not be?" he now thought as he looked at her and listened to the light click of the steel needles.
  • You are not asleep?
  • Natasha felt happy and agitated, but at once remembered that this would not do and that he had to be quiet.
  • "But you have not slept," she said, repressing her joy.
  • She set herself a task on her stocking and resolved not to turn round till it was finished.
  • He did not sleep long and suddenly awoke with a start and in a cold perspiration.
  • Something was lacking in them, they were not clear, they were too one-sidedly personal and brain-spun.
  • Everything depended on whether he was, or was not, in time to lock it.
  • He went, and tried to hurry, but his legs refused to move and he knew he would not be in time to lock the door though he painfully strained all his powers.
  • Something not human--death--was breaking in through that door, and had to be kept out.
  • He did not answer and looked at her strangely, not understanding.
  • And compared to the duration of life it did not seem to him slower than an awakening from sleep compared to the duration of a dream.
  • Both Princess Mary and Natasha, who did not leave him, felt this.
  • They felt that they could not express in words what they understood.
  • She closed them but did not kiss them, but clung to that which reminded her most nearly of him--his body.
  • But we need only penetrate to the essence of any historic event--which lies in the activity of the general mass of men who take part in it--to be convinced that the will of the historic hero does not control the actions of the mass but is itself continually controlled.
  • If the position of the Russian army really began to improve from the time of that march, it does not at all follow that the march was the cause of it.
  • That flank march might not only have failed to give any advantage to the Russian army, but might in other circumstances have led to its destruction.
  • What would have happened had Moscow not burned down?
  • If Murat had not lost sight of the Russians?
  • If Napoleon had not remained inactive?
  • If instead of imagining to ourselves commanders of genius leading the Russian army, we picture that army without any leaders, it could not have done anything but make a return movement toward Moscow, describing an arc in the direction where most provisions were to be found and where the country was richest.
  • Kutuzov's merit lay, not in any strategic maneuver of genius, as it is called, but in the fact that he alone understood the significance of what had happened.
  • The beast wounded at Borodino was lying where the fleeing hunter had left him; but whether he was still alive, whether he was strong and merely lying low, the hunter did not know.
  • In view of all this information, when the enemy has scattered his forces in large detachments, and with Napoleon and his Guards in Moscow, is it possible that the enemy's forces confronting you are so considerable as not to allow of your taking the offensive?
  • That readiness will not weaken in me, but I and Russia have a right to expect from you all the zeal, firmness, and success which your intellect, military talent, and the courage of the troops you command justify us in expecting.
  • If I did not know you I should think you did not want what you are asking for.
  • As in the Austerlitz dispositions, it was written--though not in German this time:
  • These sounds made his spirits rise, but at the same time he was afraid that he would be blamed for not having executed sooner the important order entrusted to him.
  • He was in a state of physical suffering as if from corporal punishment, and could not avoid expressing it by cries of anger and distress.
  • His wrath, once expended, did not return, and blinking feebly he listened to excuses and self-justifications (Ermolov did not come to see him till the next day) and to the insistence of Bennigsen, Konovnitsyn, and Toll that the movement that had miscarried should be executed next day.
  • The ground was damp but not muddy, and the troops advanced noiselessly, only occasionally a jingling of the artillery could be faintly heard.
  • Some columns, supposing they had reached their destination, halted, piled arms, and settled down on the cold ground, but the majority marched all night and arrived at places where they evidently should not have been.
  • When Grekov returned, Count Orlov-Denisov, excited both by the abandoned attempt and by vainly awaiting the infantry columns that still did not appear, as well as by the proximity of the enemy, resolved to advance.
  • All this had to be dealt with, the prisoners and guns secured, the booty divided--not without some shouting and even a little fighting among themselves--and it was on this that the Cossacks all busied themselves.
  • The French, not being farther pursued, began to recover themselves: they formed into detachments and began firing.
  • Meantime, according to the dispositions which said that "the First Column will march" and so on, the infantry of the belated columns, commanded by Bennigsen and directed by Toll, had started in due order and, as always happens, had got somewhere, but not to their appointed places.
  • And they did indeed get somewhere, though not to their right places; a few eventually even got to their right place, but too late to be of any use and only in time to be fired at.
  • "I prefer not to take lessons from anyone, but I can die with my men as well as anybody," he said, and advanced with a single division.
  • He did not advance.
  • If not, the Guards will not so much as see a little smoke.
  • Kutuzov did not reply, but when they reported to him that Murat's troops were in retreat he ordered an advance, though at every hundred paces he halted for three quarters of an hour.
  • "That's how everything is done with us, all topsy-turvy!" said the Russian officers and generals after the Tarutino battle, letting it be understood that some fool there is doing things all wrong but that we ourselves should not have done so, just as people speak today.
  • But people who talk like that either do not know what they are talking about or deliberately deceive themselves.
  • The battle of Tarutino obviously did not attain the aim Toll had in view--to lead the troops into action in the order prescribed by the dispositions; nor that which Count Orlov-Denisov may have had in view-- to take Murat prisoner; nor the result of immediately destroying the whole corps, which Bennigsen and others may have had in view; nor the aim of the officer who wished to go into action to distinguish himself; nor that of the Cossack who wanted more booty than he got, and so on.
  • The Russian army, only half the strength of the French, does not make a single attempt to attack for a whole month.
  • He not merely did nothing of the kind, but on the contrary he used his power to select the most foolish and ruinous of all the courses open to him.
  • The historians quite falsely represent Napoleon's faculties as having weakened in Moscow, and do so only because the results did not justify his actions.
  • We have paid for the right to look at the matter plainly and simply, and we will not abandon that right.
  • He did not lose sight either of the welfare of his army or of the doings of the enemy, or of the welfare of the people of Russia, or of the direction of affairs in Paris, or of diplomatic considerations concerning the terms of the anticipated peace.
  • But when not on duty they will only wear a red ribbon round the left arm.
  • Lay your respect and confidence at his feet and do not delay to unite with us!
  • As to the theaters for the entertainment of the people and the troops, these did not meet with success either.
  • Even philanthropy did not have the desired effect.
  • Not only was the paper money valueless which Napoleon so graciously distributed to the unfortunate, but even silver lost its value in relation to gold.
  • But it did not go away.
  • Its lack of a master, a name, or even of a breed or any definite color did not seem to trouble the blue-gray dog in the least.
  • The other day if it had not been for you that affair would have ended ill.
  • "You see, dear man, this is not a sewing shop, and I had no proper tools; and, as they say, one needs a tool even to kill a louse," said Platon with one of his round smiles, obviously pleased with his work.
  • Pierre saw that Platon did not want to understand what the Frenchman was saying, and he looked on without interfering.
  • People said they were not Christians, but they too have souls.
  • His anger with his wife and anxiety that his name should not be smirched now seemed not merely trivial but even amusing.
  • What did it matter to anybody, and especially to him, whether or not they found out that their prisoner's name was Count Bezukhov?
  • And this not only stayed with him during the whole of his imprisonment, but even grew in strength as the hardships of his position increased.
  • The sick soldier, Sokolov, pale and thin with dark shadows round his eyes, alone sat in his place barefoot and not dressed.
  • It was evidently not so much his sufferings that caused him to moan (he had dysentery) as his fear and grief at being left alone.
  • You know, Sokolov, they are not all going away!
  • He did not again go to the sick man, nor turn to look at him, but stood frowning by the door of the hut.
  • "What now?" the officer asked with a cold look as if not recognizing Pierre.
  • Isn't the road wide enough? said he, turning to a man behind him who was not pushing him at all.
  • There's not half of it left.
  • A woman with a baby, and not bad-looking either!
  • Pierre did not see the people as individuals but saw their movement.
  • It was not till nearly evening that the officer commanding the escort collected his men and with shouts and quarrels forced his way in among the baggage trains, and the prisoners, hemmed in on all sides, emerged onto the Kaluga road.
  • To the noncommissioned officer's excuse that the prisoner was ill and could not walk, the officer replied that the order was to shoot those who lagged behind.
  • Pierre felt that that fatal force which had crushed him during the executions, but which he had not felt during his imprisonment, now again controlled his existence.
  • The evening was ending, but the night had not yet come.
  • Pierre turned back, not to his companions by the campfire, but to an unharnessed cart where there was nobody.
  • And he said aloud to himself: The soldier did not let me pass.
  • In the early days of October another envoy came to Kutuzov with a letter from Napoleon proposing peace and falsely dated from Moscow, though Napoleon was already not far from Kutuzov on the old Kaluga road.
  • Kutuzov did not consider any offensive necessary.
  • At Austerlitz he remained last at the Augezd dam, rallying the regiments, saving what was possible when all were flying and perishing and not a single general was left in the rear guard.
  • It is natural for a man who does not understand the workings of a machine to imagine that a shaving that has fallen into it by chance and is interfering with its action and tossing about in it is its most important part.
  • The man who does not understand the construction of the machine cannot conceive that the small connecting cogwheel which revolves quietly is one of the most essential parts of the machine, and not the shaving which merely harms and hinders the working.
  • Dokhturov was unwilling to undertake any action, as it was not clear to him now what he ought to do.
  • Napoleon is at Forminsk, said Bolkhovitinov, unable to see in the dark who was speaking but guessing by the voice that it was not Konovnitsyn.
  • (Konovnitsyn did not stir.)
  • He did not consider or ask himself whether the news was good or bad.
  • That did not interest him.
  • He regarded the whole business of the war not with his intelligence or his reason but by something else.
  • There was within him a deep unexpressed conviction that all would be well, but that one must not trust to this and still less speak about it, but must only attend to one's own work.
  • Kutuzov like all old people did not sleep much at night.
  • He knew that an apple should not be plucked while it is green.
  • Like an experienced sportsman he knew that the beast was wounded, and wounded as only the whole strength of Russia could have wounded it, but whether it was mortally wounded or not was still an undecided question.
  • But that's not what is needed now.
  • The undecided question as to whether the wound inflicted at Borodino was mortal or not had hung over Kutuzov's head for a whole month.
  • But these were only suppositions, which seemed important to the younger men but not to Kutuzov.
  • That army could not recover anywhere.
  • So it came about that at the council at Malo-Yaroslavets, when the generals pretending to confer together expressed various opinions, all mouths were closed by the opinion uttered by the simple-minded soldier Mouton who, speaking last, said what they all felt: that the one thing needful was to get away as quickly as possible; and no one, not even Napoleon, could say anything against that truth which they all recognized.
  • If the Cossacks did not capture Napoleon then, what saved him was the very thing that was destroying the French army, the booty on which the Cossacks fell.
  • That Napoleon agreed with Mouton, and that the army retreated, does not prove that Napoleon caused it to retreat, but that the forces which influenced the whole army and directed it along the Mozhaysk (that is, the Smolensk) road acted simultaneously on him also.
  • So both those who knew and those who did not know deceived themselves, and pushed on to Smolensk as to a promised land.
  • Each of them desired nothing more than to give himself up as a prisoner to escape from all this horror and misery; but on the one hand the force of this common attraction to Smolensk, their goal, drew each of them in the same direction; on the other hand an army corps could not surrender to a company, and though the French availed themselves of every convenient opportunity to detach themselves and to surrender on the slightest decent pretext, such pretexts did not always occur.
  • Their very numbers and their crowded and swift movement deprived them of that possibility and rendered it not only difficult but impossible for the Russians to stop this movement, to which the French were directing all their energies.
  • He could not tell them what we say now: Why fight, why block the road, losing our own men and inhumanly slaughtering unfortunate wretches?
  • Ermolov, Miloradovich, Platov, and others in proximity to the French near Vyazma could not resist their desire to cut off and break up two French corps, and by way of reporting their intention to Kutuzov they sent him a blank sheet of paper in an envelope.
  • After the burning of Smolensk a war began which did not follow any previous traditions of war.
  • But such a war does not fit in under any rule and is directly opposed to a well-known rule of tactics which is accepted as infallible.
  • Military science, seeing in history innumerable instances of the fact that the size of any army does not coincide with its strength and that small detachments defeat larger ones, obscurely admits the existence of this unknown factor and tries to discover it--now in a geometric formation, now in the equipment employed, now, and most usually, in the genius of the commanders.
  • But the assignment of these various meanings to the factor does not yield results which accord with the historic facts.
  • That unknown quantity is the spirit of the army, that is to say, the greater or lesser readiness to fight and face danger felt by all the men composing an army, quite independently of whether they are, or are not, fighting under the command of a genius, in two--or three-line formation, with cudgels or with rifles that repeat thirty times a minute.
  • This equation does not give us the value of the unknown factor but gives us a ratio between two unknowns.
  • The small bands that had started their activities long before and had already observed the French closely considered things possible which the commanders of the big detachments did not dare to contemplate.
  • That morning, Cossacks of Denisov's party had seized and carried off into the forest two wagons loaded with cavalry saddles, which had stuck in the mud not far from Mikulino where the forest ran close to the road.
  • Denisov had two hundred, and Dolokhov might have as many more, but the disparity of numbers did not deter Denisov.
  • The men sat huddled up trying not to stir, so as to warm the water that had trickled to their bodies and not admit the fresh cold water that was leaking in under their seats, their knees, and at the back of their necks.
  • But it is not presupposable that it is the lieutenant colonel himself, said the esaul, who was fond of using words the Cossacks did not know.
  • Please excuse its not being quite dry.
  • On reaching a large oak tree that had not yet shed its leaves, he stopped and beckoned mysteriously to them with his hand.
  • In the village, in the house, in the garden, by the well, by the pond, over all the rising ground, and all along the road uphill from the bridge leading to the village, not more than five hundred yards away, crowds of men could be seen through the shimmering mist.
  • "Bwing the prisoner here," said Denisov in a low voice, not taking his eyes off the French.
  • Petya, rapidly turning his head, looked now at the drummer boy, now at Denisov, now at the esaul, and now at the French in the village and along the road, trying not to miss anything of importance.
  • "Whether Dolokhov comes or not, we must seize it, eh?" said Denisov with a merry sparkle in his eyes.
  • But the firing and shouting did not relate to them.
  • "Oh, yes," said Petya, nodding at the first words Denisov uttered as if he understood it all, though he really did not understand anything of it.
  • Tikhon did not like riding, and always went on foot, never lagging behind the cavalry.
  • He felt it necessary to hold his head higher, to brace himself, and to question the esaul with an air of importance about tomorrow's undertaking, that he might not be unworthy of the company in which he found himself.
  • He was highly delighted with what he saw and experienced in the army, but at the same time it always seemed to him that the really heroic exploits were being performed just where he did not happen to be.
  • In the twilight saddled horses could be seen, and Cossacks and hussars who had rigged up rough shelters in the glade and were kindling glowing fires in a hollow of the forest where the French could not see the smoke.
  • And not waiting for a reply he answered his own question: You see I was told to find out--well, I am finding out....
  • He tried to remember whether he had not done anything else that was foolish.
  • There were many things Petya wanted to say to the drummer boy, but did not dare to.
  • The arrival of Dolokhov diverted Petya's attention from the drummer boy, to whom Denisov had had some mutton and vodka given, and whom he had had dressed in a Russian coat so that he might be kept with their band and not sent away with the other prisoners.
  • Petya had heard in the army many stories of Dolokhov's extraordinary bravery and of his cruelty to the French, so from the moment he entered the hut Petya did not take his eyes from him, but braced himself up more and more and held his head high, that he might not be unworthy even of such company.
  • And I say boldly that I have not a single man's life on my conscience.
  • Why, I've not said anything!
  • So isn't it all the same not to send them?
  • That's not the point.
  • I'm not going to discuss the matter.
  • I do not wish to take it on my conscience.
  • Only not by my fault!
  • Who has told them not to capture me these twenty times over?
  • But above all Denisov must not dare to imagine that I'll obey him and that he can order me about.
  • And to all Denisov's persuasions, Petya replied that he too was accustomed to do everything accurately and not just anyhow, and that he never considered personal danger.
  • "Mot d'ordre," repeated the sentinel, barring the way and not replying.
  • Dolokhov replied that they were not hungry and must push on farther that night.
  • That officer did not take his eyes from Dolokhov and again asked to what regiment he belonged.
  • Dolokhov, as if he had not heard the question, did not reply, but lighting a short French pipe which he took from his pocket began asking the officer in how far the road before them was safe from Cossacks.
  • Dolokhov remarked that the Cossacks were a danger only to stragglers such as his companion and himself, "but probably they would not dare to attack large detachments?" he added inquiringly.
  • No one replied a word to Dolokhov's laughter, and a French officer whom they could not see (he lay wrapped in a greatcoat) rose and whispered something to a companion.
  • "Will they bring our horses or not?" thought Petya, instinctively drawing nearer to Dolokhov.
  • Petya wished to say "Good night" but could not utter a word.
  • Dolokhov was a long time mounting his horse which would not stand still, then he rode out of the yard at a footpace.
  • Petya rode beside him, longing to look round to see whether or not the French were running after them, but not daring to.
  • Coming out onto the road Dolokhov did not ride back across the open country, but through the village.
  • But Petya did not let go of him and Dolokhov saw through the gloom that Petya was bending toward him and wanted to kiss him.
  • And then I am used to not sleeping before a battle.
  • Not all the Cossacks and hussars were asleep; here and there, amid the sounds of falling drops and the munching of the horses near by, could be heard low voices which seemed to be whispering.
  • And Petya gave the Cossack a detailed account not only of his ride but also of his object, and why he considered it better to risk his life than to act "just anyhow."
  • Perhaps he was really sitting on a wagon, but it might very well be that he was not sitting on a wagon but on a terribly high tower from which, if he fell, he would have to fall for a whole day or a whole month, or go on falling and never reach the bottom.
  • And what was played was a fugue--though Petya had not the least conception of what a fugue is.
  • With a solemn triumphal march there mingled a song, the drip from the trees, and the hissing of the saber, "Ozheg-zheg-zheg..." and again the horses jostled one another and neighed, not disturbing the choir but joining in it.
  • Petya did not know how long this lasted: he enjoyed himself all the time, wondered at his enjoyment and regretted that there was no one to share it.
  • "I ask one thing of you," he said sternly, "to obey me and not shove yourself forward anywhere."
  • He did not say another word to Petya but rode in silence all the way.
  • At the first sound of trampling hoofs and shouting, Petya lashed his horse and loosening his rein galloped forward, not heeding Denisov who shouted at him.
  • Denisov did not reply; he rode up to Petya, dismounted, and with trembling hands turned toward himself the bloodstained, mud-bespattered face which had already gone white.
  • Not one of those dismounted cavalrymen who had marched in front of the prisoners was left; they had all disappeared.
  • They understood that the saddles and Junot's spoon might be of some use, but that cold and hungry soldiers should have to stand and guard equally cold and hungry Russians who froze and lagged behind on the road (in which case the order was to shoot them) was not merely incomprehensible but revolting.
  • Pierre did not know why, but since Karataev had begun to grow weaker it had cost him an effort to go near him.
  • When he did so and heard the subdued moaning with which Karataev generally lay down at the halting places, and when he smelled the odor emanating from him which was now stronger than before, Pierre moved farther away and did not think about him.
  • While imprisoned in the shed Pierre had learned not with his intellect but with his whole being, by life itself, that man is created for happiness, that happiness is within him, in the satisfaction of simple human needs, and that all unhappiness arises not from privation but from superfluity.
  • However, he did not look at them now, but thought of other things.
  • He did not see and did not hear how they shot the prisoners who lagged behind, though more than a hundred perished in that way.
  • He did not think of Karataev who grew weaker every day and evidently would soon have to share that fate.
  • His feeling of pity for this man frightened him and he wished to go away, but there was no other fire, and Pierre sat down, trying not to look at Platon.
  • But I have not killed anyone or taken anything that was not mine, but have only helped my poorer brothers.
  • And Pierre's soul was dimly but joyfully filled not by the story itself but by its mysterious significance: by the rapturous joy that lit up Karataev's face as he told it, and the mystic significance of that joy.
  • But Pierre was not sufficiently sure of himself.
  • He made as if he did not notice that look and moved hastily away.
  • Pierre did not look round again but went limping up the hill.
  • How is it I did not know it before?
  • "And Plat-" he began, but did not finish.
  • For a long time he could not understand what was happening to him.
  • Pierre sobbed as he sat among them and could not utter a word.
  • From Moscow to Vyazma the French army of seventy-three thousand men not reckoning the Guards (who did nothing during the whole war but pillage) was reduced to thirty-six thousand, though not more than five thousand had fallen in battle.
  • But these orders and reports were only on paper, nothing in them was acted upon for they could not be carried out, and though they entitled one another Majesties, Highnesses, or Cousins, they all felt that they were miserable wretches who had done much evil for which they had now to pay.
  • Owing to the rapidity of the French flight and the Russian pursuit and the consequent exhaustion of the horses, the chief means of approximately ascertaining the enemy's position--by cavalry scouting-- was not available.
  • Besides, as a result of the frequent and rapid change of position by each army, even what information was obtained could not be delivered in time.
  • Expecting the enemy from behind and not in front, the French separated in their flight and spread out over a distance of twenty-four hours.
  • The others who could do so drove away too, leaving those who could not to surrender or die.
  • Grand is good, not grand is bad.
  • And Napoleon, escaping home in a warm fur coat and leaving to perish those who were not merely his comrades but were (in his opinion) men he had brought there, feels que c'est grand, *(2) and his soul is tranquil.
  • And it occurs to no one that to admit a greatness not commensurable with the standard of right and wrong is merely to admit one's own nothingness and immeasurable meanness.
  • What Russian, reading the account of the last part of the campaign of 1812, has not experienced an uncomfortable feeling of regret, dissatisfaction, and perplexity?
  • Who has not asked himself how it is that the French were not all captured or destroyed when our three armies surrounded them in superior numbers, when the disordered French, hungry and freezing, surrendered in crowds, and when (as the historians relate) the aim of the Russians was to stop the French, to cut them off, and capture them all?
  • How was it that the Russian army, which when numerically weaker than the French had given battle at Borodino, did not achieve its purpose when it had surrounded the French on three sides and when its aim was to capture them?
  • Can the French be so enormously superior to us that when we had surrounded them with superior forces we could not beat them?
  • History (or what is called by that name) replying to these questions says that this occurred because Kutuzov and Tormasov and Chichagov, and this man and that man, did not execute such and such maneuvers...
  • But why did they not execute those maneuvers?
  • And why if they were guilty of not carrying out a prearranged plan were they not tried and punished?
  • But even if we admitted that Kutuzov, Chichagov, and others were the cause of the Russian failures, it is still incomprehensible why, the position of the Russian army being what it was at Krasnoe and at the Berezina (in both cases we had superior forces), the French army with its marshals, kings, and Emperor was not captured, if that was what the Russians aimed at.
  • The explanation of this strange fact given by Russian military historians (to the effect that Kutuzov hindered an attack) is unfounded, for we know that he could not restrain the troops from attacking at Vyazma and Tarutino.
  • If the aim of the Russians consisted in cutting off and capturing Napoleon and his marshals--and that aim was not merely frustrated but all attempts to attain it were most shamefully baffled--then this last period of the campaign is quite rightly considered by the French to be a series of victories, and quite wrongly considered victorious by Russian historians.
  • But not even that could be said for those who drew up this project, for it was not they who had suffered from the trampled beds.
  • It was impossible first because--as experience shows that a three-mile movement of columns on a battlefield never coincides with the plans--the probability of Chichagov, Kutuzov, and Wittgenstein effecting a junction on time at an appointed place was so remote as to be tantamount to impossibility, as in fact thought Kutuzov, who when he received the plan remarked that diversions planned over great distances do not yield the desired results.
  • One can cut off a slice of bread, but not an army.
  • But the French troops quite rightly did not consider that this suited them, since death by hunger and cold awaited them in flight or captivity alike.
  • To them the words of Miloradovich seem very interesting, and so do their surmises and the rewards this or that general received; but the question of those fifty thousand men who were left in hospitals and in graves does not even interest them, for it does not come within the range of their investigation.
  • It could not exist because it was senseless and unattainable.
  • That aim was attained in the first place of itself, as the French ran away, and so it was only necessary not to stop their flight.
  • Drooping in spirit and closing their eyes before the menacing cloud of death that overhung them, they dared not look life in the face.
  • Life did not stand still and it was necessary to live.
  • She was gazing where she knew him to be; but she could not imagine him otherwise than as he had been here.
  • I did not say what I meant.
  • No, he did not and never will know it.
  • She stopped him and said: Terrible for you, but not for me!
  • She heard Dunyasha's words about Peter Ilynich and a misfortune, but did not grasp them.
  • It's not true... it's not true...
  • Go away, all of you; it's not true!
  • She did not let go of her mother but struggled tenderly with her, demanded a pillow and hot water, and unfastened and tore open her mother's dress.
  • Natasha, you would not deceive me?
  • Natasha did not remember how that day passed nor that night, nor the next day and night.
  • She did not sleep and did not leave her mother.
  • Her persevering and patient love seemed completely to surround the countess every moment, not explaining or consoling, but recalling her to life.
  • The mother's wounded spirit could not heal.
  • She did not think of applying submission and self-abnegation to her own life, for she was accustomed to seek other joys, but she understood and loved in another those previously incomprehensible virtues.
  • She did not know and would not have believed it, but beneath the layer of slime that covered her soul and seemed to her impenetrable, delicate young shoots of grass were already sprouting, which taking root would so cover with their living verdure the grief that weighed her down that it would soon no longer be seen or noticed.
  • To that end Kutuzov's activity was directed during the whole campaign from Moscow to Vilna--not casually or intermittently but so consistently that he never once deviated from it.
  • Prince Eugene of Wurttemberg fired from a hill over the French crowds that were running past, and demanded reinforcements which did not arrive.
  • Miloradovich, who said he did not want to know anything about the commissariat affairs of his detachment, and could never be found when he was wanted--that chevalier sans peur et sans reproche * as he styled himself--who was fond of parleys with the French, sent envoys demanding their surrender, wasted time, and did not do what he was ordered to do.
  • Not only did his contemporaries, carried away by their passions, talk in this way, but posterity and history have acclaimed Napoleon as grand, while Kutuzov is described by foreigners as a crafty, dissolute, weak old courtier, and by Russians as something indefinite--a sort of puppet useful only because he had a Russian name.
  • When Count Rostopchin at the Yauza bridge galloped up to Kutuzov with personal reproaches for having caused the destruction of Moscow, and said: "How was it you promised not to abandon Moscow without a battle?"
  • Kutuzov replied: "And I shall not abandon Moscow without a battle," though Moscow was then already abandoned.
  • Not merely in these cases but continually did that old man--who by experience of life had reached the conviction that thoughts and the words serving as their expression are not what move people--use quite meaningless words that happened to enter his head.
  • Not merely in these cases but continually did that old man--who by experience of life had reached the conviction that thoughts and the words serving as their expression are not what move people--use quite meaningless words that happened to enter his head.
  • But that man, so heedless of his words, did not once during the whole time of his activity utter one word inconsistent with the single aim toward which he moved throughout the whole war.
  • Obviously in spite of himself, in very diverse circumstances, he repeatedly expressed his real thoughts with the bitter conviction that he would not be understood.
  • He alone said that the loss of Moscow is not the loss of Russia.
  • He alone during the whole retreat insisted that battles, which were useless then, should not be fought, and that a new war should not be begun nor the frontiers of Russia crossed.
  • And only that feeling placed him on that highest human pedestal from which he, the commander-in-chief, devoted all his powers not to slaying and destroying men but to saving and showing pity on them.
  • Kutuzov seemed preoccupied and did not listen to what the general was saying.
  • The victory is complete and Russia will not forget you!
  • Fetch some more wood! shouted a red-haired and red-faced man, screwing up his eyes and blinking because of the smoke but not moving back from the fire.
  • "What a lot of those Frenchies were taken today, and the fact is that not one of them had what you might call real boots on," said a soldier, starting a new theme.
  • If it had been from the cold, ours would not have rotted either.
  • But theirs,' he says, 'are white as paper and not so much smell as a whiff of gunpowder.'
  • They came up to the fire, hoarsely uttering something in a language our soldiers did not understand.
  • When Morel had drunk some vodka and finished his bowl of porridge he suddenly became unnaturally merry and chattered incessantly to the soldiers, who could not understand him.
  • A Russian officer who had come up to the fire sent to ask his colonel whether he would not take a French officer into his hut to warm him, and when the messenger returned and said that the colonel wished the officer to be brought to him, Ramballe was told to go.
  • He rose and tried to walk, but staggered and would have fallen had not a soldier standing by held him up.
  • This was shown not so much by the arrangements it made for crossing as by what took place at the bridges.
  • When the bridges broke down, unarmed soldiers, people from Moscow and women with children who were with the French transport, all--carried on by vis inertiae-- pressed forward into boats and into the ice-covered water and did not, surrender.
  • The French did not need to be informed of the fact that half the prisoners--with whom the Russians did not know what to do- -perished of cold and hunger despite their captors' desire to save them; they felt that it could not be otherwise.
  • It was impossible to take bread and clothes from our hungry and indispensable soldiers to give to the French who, though not harmful, or hated, or guilty, were simply unnecessary.
  • And all he said--that it was necessary to await provisions, or that the men had no boots--was so simple, while what they proposed was so complicated and clever, that it was evident that he was old and stupid and that they, though not in power, were commanders of genius.
  • And he understood this not merely from the attitude of the court.
  • Kutuzov seemed not to understand what was expected of him.
  • The Emperor's displeasure with Kutuzov was specially increased at Vilna by the fact that Kutuzov evidently could not or would not understand the importance of the coming campaign.
  • When on the following morning the Emperor said to the officers assembled about him: "You have not only saved Russia, you have saved Europe!" they all understood that the war was not ended.
  • Kutuzov alone would not see this and openly expressed his opinion that no fresh war could improve the position or add to the glory of Russia, but could only spoil and lower the glorious position that Russia had gained.
  • Kutuzov did not understand what Europe, the balance of power, or Napoleon meant.
  • He could not understand it.
  • As generally happens, Pierre did not feel the full effects of the physical privation and strain he had suffered as prisoner until after they were over.
  • All this at the time seemed merely strange to Pierre: he felt he could not grasp its significance.
  • That search for the aim of life had not merely disappeared temporarily--he felt that it no longer existed for him and could not present itself again.
  • He could not see an aim, for he now had faith--not faith in any kind of rule, or words, or ideas, but faith in an ever-living, ever-manifest God.
  • He had equipped himself with a mental telescope and looked into remote space, where petty worldliness hiding itself in misty distance had seemed to him great and infinite merely because it was not clearly seen.
  • To that question, "What for?" a simple answer was now always ready in his soul: "Because there is a God, that God without whose will not one hair falls from a man's head."
  • As before he was absent-minded and seemed occupied not with what was before his eyes but with something special of his own.
  • The difference between his former and present self was that formerly when he did not grasp what lay before him or was said to him, he had puckered his forehead painfully as if vainly seeking to distinguish something at a distance.
  • At present he still forgot what was said to him and still did not see what was before his eyes, but he now looked with a scarcely perceptible and seemingly ironic smile at what was before him and listened to what was said, though evidently seeing and hearing something quite different.
  • Pierre did not in any way seek her approval, he merely studied her with interest.
  • The most cunning man could not have crept into her confidence more successfully, evoking memories of the best times of her youth and showing sympathy with them.
  • "Yes, he is a very, very kind man when he is not under the influence of bad people but of people such as myself," thought she.
  • Terenty, when he had helped him undress and wished him good night, often lingered with his master's boots in his hands and clothes over his arm, to see whether he would not start a talk.
  • "It's a pleasure to talk to a man like that; he is not like our provincials," he would say.
  • You, who have suffered so from the French, do not even feel animosity toward them.
  • "To give or not to give?" he had asked himself.
  • There was now within him a judge who by some rule unknown to him decided what should or should not be done.
  • He was as indifferent as heretofore to money matters, but now he felt certain of what ought and what ought not to be done.
  • Why this was necessary he did not know, but he knew for certain that it was necessary.
  • He felt himself not only free from social obligations but also from that feeling which, it seemed to him, he had aroused in himself.
  • Is it possible that the meaning of life was not disclosed to him before he died? thought Pierre.
  • He glanced once at the companion's face, saw her attentive and kindly gaze fixed on him, and, as often happens when one is talking, felt somehow that this companion in the black dress was a good, kind, excellent creature who would not hinder his conversing freely with Princess Mary.
  • Do you really not recognize her?
  • Pierre had failed to notice Natasha because he did not at all expect to see her there, but he had failed to recognize her because the change in her since he last saw her was immense.
  • She had grown thin and pale, but that was not what made her unrecognizable; she was unrecognizable at the moment he entered because on that face whose eyes had always shone with a suppressed smile of the joy of life, now when he first entered and glanced at her there was not the least shadow of a smile: only her eyes were kindly attentive and sadly interrogative.
  • Pierre's confusion was not reflected by any confusion on Natasha's part, but only by the pleasure that just perceptibly lit up her whole face.
  • He did not purposely say things to please her, but whatever he was saying he regarded from her standpoint.
  • With all his soul he had always sought one thing--to be perfectly good--so he could not be afraid of death.
  • The faults he had--if he had any--were not of his making.
  • I did not dare to ask about him.
  • I had no idea and could not imagine what state he was in, all I wanted was to see him and be with him, she said, trembling, and breathing quickly.
  • As he listened he did not think of Prince Andrew, nor of death, nor of what she was telling.
  • Pierre gazed at the door through which she had disappeared and did not understand why he suddenly felt all alone in the world.
  • He wished to take leave of Princess Mary, but she would not let him go.
  • "What I have certainly gained is freedom," he began seriously, but did not continue, noticing that this theme was too egotistic.
  • "Tell me, you did not know of the countess' death when you decided to remain in Moscow?" asked Princess Mary and immediately blushed, noticing that her question, following his mention of freedom, ascribed to his words a meaning he had perhaps not intended.
  • We were not an exemplary couple," he added quickly, glancing at Natasha and noticing on her face curiosity as to how he would speak of his wife, "but her death shocked me terribly.
  • Pierre suddenly flushed crimson and for a long time tried not to look at Natasha.
  • Not only did I never see him but I heard nothing about him--I was in much lower company!
  • It was clear that she understood not only what he said but also what he wished to, but could not, express in words.
  • Then a patrol arrived and all the men--all those who were not looting, that is--were arrested, and I among them.
  • When he spoke of the execution he wanted to pass over the horrible details, but Natasha insisted that he should not omit anything.
  • "It's not true, not true!" cried Pierre.
  • I am not to blame for being alive and wishing to live--nor you either.
  • Princess Mary did not express her opinion of Pierre nor did Natasha speak of him.
  • Natasha suddenly said with a mischievous smile such as Princess Mary had not seen on her face for a long time, he has somehow grown so clean, smooth, and fresh--as if he had just come out of a Russian bath; do you understand?
  • Well, Savelich, do you still not wish to accept your freedom?
  • Better not say anything to her either.
  • And they actually say he is not honest and takes bribes.
  • Pierre noticed this but could not go.
  • He felt uneasy and embarrassed, but sat on because he simply could not get up and take his leave.
  • "No, I am not going," Pierre replied hastily, in a surprised tone and as though offended.
  • I will call round in case you have any commissions for me, said he, standing before Princess Mary and turning red, but not taking his departure.
  • I know I am not worthy of her, I know it's impossible to speak of it now.
  • No, not that, I don't, I can't...
  • Tell me what I am to do, dear princess! he added after a pause, and touched her hand as she did not reply.
  • She was going to say that to speak of love was impossible, but she stopped because she had seen by the sudden change in Natasha two days before that she would not only not be hurt if Pierre spoke of his love, but that it was the very thing she wished for.
  • When on saying good-by he took her thin, slender hand, he could not help holding it a little longer in his own.
  • He did not repeat to himself with a sickening feeling of shame the words he had spoken, or say: "Oh, why did I not say that?" and, "Whatever made me say 'Je vous aime'?"
  • There was now not a shadow of doubt in his mind as to whether what he had undertaken was right or wrong.
  • Am I not too conceited and self-confident?
  • The whole meaning of life--not for him alone but for the whole world--seemed to him centered in his love and the possibility of being loved by her.
  • When dealing with the affairs and papers of his dead wife, her memory aroused in him no feeling but pity that she had not known the bliss he now knew.
  • "I may have appeared strange and queer then," he thought, "but I was not so mad as I seemed.
  • Pierre's insanity consisted in not waiting, as he used to do, to discover personal attributes which he termed "good qualities" in people before loving them; his heart was now overflowing with love, and by loving people without cause he discovered indubitable causes for loving them.
  • She no longer complained of her position, did not say a word about the past, and no longer feared to make happy plans for the future.
  • But when she was with Natasha she was not vexed with her and did not reproach her.
  • Natasha gave herself up so fully and frankly to this new feeling that she did not try to hide the fact that she was no longer sad, but bright and cheerful.
  • Natasha, I have asked you not to speak of that.
  • The sea of history was not driven spasmodically from shore to shore as previously.
  • Historic figures were not borne by the waves from one shore to another as before.
  • If that activity displeases somebody, this is only because it does not agree with his limited understanding of what is good.
  • Why did it happen in this and not in some other way?
  • I do not know why a certain event occurs; I think that I cannot know it; so I do not try to know it and I talk about chance.
  • I see a force producing effects beyond the scope of ordinary human agencies; I do not understand why this occurs and I talk of genius.
  • Even if they do not know for what purpose they are fattened, they will at least know that all that happened to the ram did not happen accidentally, and will no longer need the conceptions of chance or genius.
  • His attempts to avoid his predestined path are unsuccessful: he is not received into the Russian service, and the appointment he seeks in Turkey comes to nothing.
  • Owing to various diplomatic considerations the Russian armies--just those which might have destroyed his prestige--do not appear upon the scene till he is no longer there.
  • The enemy's fleet, which subsequently did not let a single boat pass, allows his entire army to elude it.
  • The plague does not touch him.
  • But the once proud and shrewd rulers of France, feeling that their part is played out, are even more bewildered than he, and do not say the words they should have said to destroy him and retain their power.
  • Chance forms the characters of the rulers of France, who submit to him; chance forms the character of Paul I of Russia who recognizes his government; chance contrives a plot against him which not only fails to harm him but confirms his power.
  • It is not Napoleon who prepares himself for the accomplishment of his role, so much as all those round him who prepare him to take on himself the whole responsibility for what is happening and has to happen.
  • There is no step, no crime or petty fraud he commits, which in the mouths of those around him is not at once represented as a great deed.
  • Not only is he great, but so are his ancestors, his brothers, his stepsons, and his brothers-in-law.
  • The invaders flee, turn back, flee again, and all the chances are now not for Napoleon but always against him.
  • But the wave they feel to be rising does not come from the quarter they expect.
  • Do you now see that it was not he but I who moved you?
  • During the national war he was inactive because he was not needed.
  • Not unto us, not unto us, but unto Thy Name!...
  • Not unto us, not unto us, but unto Thy Name!...
  • But the ultimate purpose of the bee is not exhausted by the first, the second, or any of the processes the human mind can discern.
  • He realized from the first that he would not get up again, despite the doctor's encouragement.
  • And which of us has not weaknesses of his own?
  • Nicholas was allowed no respite and no peace, and those who had seemed to pity the old man--the cause of their losses (if they were losses)--now remorselessly pursued the young heir who had voluntarily undertaken the debts and was obviously not guilty of contracting them.
  • Not one of the plans Nicholas tried succeeded; the estate was sold by auction for half its value, and half the debts still remained unpaid.
  • But instead of being greeted with pleasure as she had expected, at his first glance at her his face assumed a cold, stiff, proud expression she had not seen on it before.
  • Nicholas did not reply and tried to avoid speaking of the princess any more.
  • Not at all, Mamma.
  • But she could not pacify herself with these reflections; a feeling akin to remorse troubled her when she thought of her visit.
  • With Mademoiselle Bourienne's help the princess had maintained the conversation very well, but at the very last moment, just when he rose, she was so tired of talking of what did not interest her, and her mind was so full of the question why she alone was granted so little happiness in life, that in a fit of absent-mindedness she sat still, her luminous eyes gazing fixedly before her, not noticing that he had risen.
  • Nicholas glanced at her and, wishing to appear not to notice her abstraction, made some remark to Mademoiselle Bourienne and then again looked at the princess.
  • But this is not at all an interesting or cheerful subject.
  • "I had come so near to you... and to all your family that I thought you would not consider my sympathy misplaced, but I was mistaken," and suddenly her voice trembled.
  • No, it was not only that gay, kind, and frank look, not only that handsome exterior, that I loved in him.
  • Yes, were it not for that...
  • Nicholas was a plain farmer: he did not like innovations, especially the English ones then coming into vogue.
  • He always had before his mind's eye the estate as a whole and not any particular part of it.
  • The chief thing in his eyes was not the nitrogen in the soil, nor the oxygen in the air, nor manures, nor special plows, but that most important agent by which nitrogen, oxygen, manure, and plow were made effective-- the peasant laborer.
  • The peasant seemed to him not merely a tool, but also a judge of farming and an end in himself.
  • He did not allow himself either to be hard on or punish a man, or to make things easy for or reward anyone, merely because he felt inclined to do so.
  • He could not have said by what standard he judged what he should or should not do, but the standard was quite firm and definite in his own mind.
  • Often, speaking with vexation of some failure or irregularity, he would say: "What can one do with our Russian peasants?" and imagined that he could not bear them.
  • Countess Mary was jealous of this passion of her husband's and regretted that she could not share it; but she could not understand the joys and vexations he derived from that world, to her so remote and alien.
  • She did not understand why he spoke with such admiration and delight of the farming of the thrifty and well- to-do peasant Matthew Ermishin, who with his family had carted corn all night; or of the fact that his (Nicholas') sheaves were already stacked before anyone else had his harvest in.
  • She felt he had a world apart, which he loved passionately and which had laws she had not fathomed.
  • Sometimes when, trying to understand him, she spoke of the good work he was doing for his serfs, he would be vexed and reply: Not in the least; it never entered my head and I wouldn't do that for their good!
  • What I want is that our children should not have to go begging.
  • Of course he was not to be trifled with either--in a word, he was a real master!
  • If he had told me he was drunk and did not see...
  • He understood what she was weeping about, but could not in his heart at once agree with her that what he had regarded from childhood as quite an everyday event was wrong.
  • Among the gentry of the province Nicholas was respected but not liked.
  • He did not concern himself with the interests of his own class, and consequently some thought him proud and others thought him stupid.
  • She could not find fault with Sonya in any way and tried to be fond of her, but often felt ill-will toward her which she could not overcome.
  • 'To him that hath shall be given, and from him that hath not shall be taken away.'
  • She is one that hath not; why, I don't know.
  • It really seemed that Sonya did not feel her position trying, and had grown quite reconciled to her lot as a sterile flower.
  • She seemed to be fond not so much of individuals as of the family as a whole.
  • Like a cat, she had attached herself not to the people but to the home.
  • "Then I'm not mistaken," thought Countess Mary.
  • She knew her remarks sounded unnatural, but could not refrain from asking some more questions.
  • Thanks to Denisov the conversation at table soon became general and lively, and she did not talk to her husband.
  • "Perhaps he is not asleep; I'll have an explanation with him," she said to herself.
  • She did not notice him.
  • I only came in to look and did not notice... forgive me...
  • "I did not notice him following me," she said timidly.
  • It is not beauty that endears, it's love that makes us see beauty.
  • I'm not like that myself, but I understand.
  • So you're not angry with me?
  • He did not ask if she was ready to listen to him.
  • He did not care.
  • I try not to show...
  • Now her face and body were often all that one saw, and her soul was not visible at all.
  • These questions, then as now, existed only for those who see nothing in marriage but the pleasure married people get from one another, that is, only the beginnings of marriage and not its whole significance, which lies in the family.
  • Discussions and questions of that kind, which are like the question of how to get the greatest gratification from one's dinner, did not then and do not now exist for those for whom the purpose of a dinner is the nourishment it affords; and the purpose of marriage is the family.
  • If the purpose of marriage is the family, the person who wishes to have many wives or husbands may perhaps obtain much pleasure, but in that case will not have a family.
  • If the purpose of food is nourishment and the purpose of marriage is the family, the whole question resolves itself into not eating more than one can digest, and not having more wives or husbands than are needed for the family--that is, one wife or one husband.
  • And she not only saw no need of any other or better husband, but as all the powers of her soul were intent on serving that husband and family, she could not imagine and saw no interest in imagining how it would be if things were different.
  • Natasha did not care for society in general, but prized the more the society of her relatives--Countess Mary, and her brother, her mother, and Sonya.
  • Their way of life and place of residence, their acquaintances and ties, Natasha's occupations, the children's upbringing, were all selected not merely with regard to Pierre's expressed wishes, but to what Natasha from the thoughts he expressed in conversation supposed his wishes to be.
  • But only what was really good in him was reflected in his wife, all that was not quite good was rejected.
  • And this was not the result of logical reasoning but was a direct and mysterious reflection.
  • The blood rushed to Natasha's face and her feet involuntarily moved, but she could not jump up and run out.
  • "He's come!" she exclaimed as she ran past, and Denisov felt that he too was delighted that Pierre, whom he did not much care for, had returned.
  • He wanted to smile but dared not even think of doing so.
  • I could not, on my honor.
  • I wonder you're not ashamed!
  • "Come, come!" she said, not letting go of his arm.
  • Only not for this...
  • He did not want to be an hussar or a Knight of St. George like his uncle Nicholas; he wanted to be learned, wise, and kind like Pierre.
  • He did not miss a single word he uttered, and would afterwards, with Dessalles or by himself, recall and reconsider the meaning of everything Pierre had said.
  • But the father whom the boy did not remember appeared to him a divinity who could not be pictured, and of whom he never thought without a swelling heart and tears of sadness and rapture.
  • The grown-up members of the family, not to mention his wife, were pleased to have back a friend whose presence made life run more smoothly and peacefully.
  • He felt that his way of life had now been settled once for all till death and that to change it was not in his power, and so that way of life proved economical.
  • Only you need not have bought me this, she added, unable to suppress a smile as she gazed admiringly at a gold comb set with pearls, of a kind then just coming into fashion.
  • She ate, drank, slept, or kept awake, but did not live.
  • Another pretext would be her snuff, which would seem too dry or too damp or not rubbed fine enough.
  • But those glances expressed something more: they said that she had played her part in life, that what they now saw was not her whole self, that we must all become like her, and that they were glad to yield to her, to restrain themselves for this once precious being formerly as full of life as themselves, but now so much to be pitied.
  • The countess had long wished for such a box, but as she did not want to cry just then she glanced indifferently at the portrait and gave her attention chiefly to the box for cards.
  • Denisov, not being a member of the family, did not understand Pierre's caution and being, as a malcontent, much interested in what was occurring in Petersburg, kept urging Pierre to tell them about what had happened in the Semenovsk regiment, then about Arakcheev, and then about the Bible Society.
  • Countess Mary sat down doing woolwork; Natasha did not take her eyes off her husband.
  • "Why this," began Pierre, not sitting down but pacing the room, sometimes stopping short, gesticulating, and lisping: "the position in Petersburg is this: the Emperor does not look into anything.
  • He has abandoned himself altogether to this mysticism (Pierre could not tolerate mysticism in anyone now).
  • That is not enough, I told them.
  • What I say is widen the scope of our society, let the mot d'ordre be not virtue alone but independence and action as well!
  • The society need not be secret if the government allows it.
  • Not merely is it not hostile to government, but it is a society of true conservatives--a society of gentlemen in the full meaning of that word.
  • Not merely is it not hostile to government, but it is a society of true conservatives--a society of gentlemen in the full meaning of that word.
  • Did the Tugendbund which saved Europe" (they did not then venture to suggest that Russia had saved Europe) "do any harm?
  • It is not at all what you suppose; but that is what the German Tugendbund was, and what I am proposing.
  • The conversation at supper was not about politics or societies, but turned on the subject Nicholas liked best--recollections of 1812.
  • She was afraid that what she was writing would not be understood or approved by her husband.
  • Then I took the matter in hand: I left him alone and began with nurse's help to get the other children up, telling him that I did not love him.
  • For a long time he was silent, as if astonished, then he jumped out of bed, ran to me in his shirt, and sobbed so that I could not calm him for a long time.
  • They were for the most part quite insignificant trifles, but did not seem so to the mother or to the father either, now that he read this diary about his children for the first time.
  • There could be no doubt not only of his approval but also of his admiration for his wife.
  • Perhaps it need not be done so pedantically, thought Nicholas, or even done at all, but this untiring, continual spiritual effort of which the sole aim was the children's moral welfare delighted him.
  • He was proud of her intelligence and goodness, recognized his own insignificance beside her in the spiritual world, and rejoiced all the more that she with such a soul not only belonged to him but was part of himself.
  • A pity you were not there--what would you have said?
  • Of course he is right there," said Countess Mary, "but he forgets that we have other duties nearer to us, duties indicated to us by God Himself, and that though we might expose ourselves to risks we must not risk our children."
  • A fine lad, a fine lad! repeated Nicholas, who at heart was not fond of Nicholas Bolkonski but was always anxious to recognize that he was a fine lad.
  • "Still, I am not the same as his own mother," said Countess Mary.
  • I feel I am not the same and it troubles me.
  • What business was it of mine when I married and was so deep in debt that I was threatened with prison, and had a mother who could not see or understand it?
  • No, but I know I must work to comfort my mother, to repay you, and not to leave the children such beggars as I was.
  • Countess Mary wanted to tell him that man does not live by bread alone and that he attached too much importance to these matters.
  • But she knew she must not say this and that it would be useless to do so.
  • But she had to force herself to attend, for what he was saying did not interest her at all.
  • She looked at him and did not think, but felt, about something different.
  • She did not compare them with him, but compared her feeling for them with her feeling for him, and felt with regret that there was something lacking in her feeling for young Nicholas.
  • This simultaneous discussion of many topics did not prevent a clear understanding but on the contrary was the surest sign that they fully understood one another.
  • Nicholas has the weakness of never agreeing with anything not generally accepted.
  • "For instance, he is collecting a library and has made it a rule not to buy a new book till he has read what he had already bought--Sismondi and Rousseau and Montesquieu," he added with a smile.
  • Nicholas says we ought not to think.
  • Pierre was not at all surprised at this question.
  • "No, he would not have approved," said Pierre, after reflection.
  • No, it's not that.
  • Yes, of course- he did not finish because their eyes meeting said the rest.
  • If only you did not go away!
  • (The boy was afraid of the dark and they could not cure him of it.)
  • Why should not the same sort of thing happen to me?
  • It would seem that having rejected the belief of the ancients in man's subjection to the Deity and in a predetermined aim toward which nations are led, modern history should study not the manifestations of power but the causes that produce it.
  • But modern history has not done this.
  • The Allies defeated Napoleon, entered Paris, forced Napoleon to abdicate, and sent him to the island of Elba, not depriving him of the title of Emperor and showing him every respect, though five years before and one year later they all regarded him as an outlaw and a brigand.
  • All that may be so and mankind is ready to agree with it, but it is not what was asked.
  • As soon as historians of different nationalities and tendencies begin to describe the same event, the replies they give immediately lose all meaning, for this force is understood by them all not only differently but often in quite contradictory ways.
  • They do not recognize it as a power inherent in heroes and rulers, but as the resultant of a multiplicity of variously directed forces.
  • In describing a war or the subjugation of a people, a general historian looks for the cause of the event not in the power of one man, but in the interaction of many persons connected with the event.
  • This curious contradiction is not accidental.
  • Not only does it occur at every step, but the universal historians' accounts are all made up of a chain of such contradictions.
  • The historian evidently decomposes Alexander's power into the components: Talleyrand, Chateaubriand, and the rest--but the sum of the components, that is, the interactions of Chateaubriand, Talleyrand, Madame de Stael, and the others, evidently does not equal the resultant, namely the phenomenon of millions of Frenchmen submitting to the Bourbons.
  • That Chateaubriand, Madame de Stael, and others spoke certain words to one another only affected their mutual relations but does not account for the submission of millions.
  • The historians of culture are quite consistent in regard to their progenitors, the writers of universal histories, for if historical events may be explained by the fact that certain persons treated one another in such and such ways, why not explain them by the fact that such and such people wrote such and such books?
  • But not to speak of the intrinsic quality of histories of this kind (which may possibly even be of use to someone for something) the histories of culture, to which all general histories tend more and more to approximate, are significant from the fact that after seriously and minutely examining various religious, philosophic, and political doctrines as causes of events, as soon as they have to describe an actual historic event such as the campaign of 1812 for instance, they involuntarily describe it as resulting from an exercise of power--and say plainly that that was the result of Napoleon's will.
  • The man who explains the movement of the locomotive by the smoke that is carried back has noticed that the wheels do not supply an explanation and has taken the first sign that occurs to him and in his turn has offered that as an explanation.
  • As gold is gold only if it is serviceable not merely for exchange but also for use, so universal historians will be valuable only when they can reply to history's essential question: what is power?
  • But as soon as we do not admit that, it becomes essential to determine what is this power of one man over others.
  • This power cannot be based on the predominance of moral strength, for, not to mention heroes such as Napoleon about whose moral qualities opinions differ widely, history shows us that neither a Louis XI nor a Metternich, who ruled over millions of people, had any particular moral qualities, but on the contrary were generally morally weaker than any of the millions they ruled over.
  • If not, then why was Napoleon I?
  • But what this program consists in these historians do not say, or if they do they continually contradict one another.
  • But why did it not react on Louis XIV or on Louis XV--why should it react just on Louis XVI?
  • But in that case, if the force that moves nations lies not in the historic leaders but in the nations themselves, what significance have those leaders?
  • The history of the Godfreys and the Minnesingers can evidently not cover the life of the peoples.
  • If we unite both these kinds of history, as is done by the newest historians, we shall have the history of monarchs and writers, but not the history of the life of the peoples.
  • If the animals leading the herd change, this happens because the collective will of all the animals is transferred from one leader to another, according to whether the animal is or is not leading them in the direction selected by the whole herd.
  • That is, power is power: in other words, power is a word the meaning of which we do not understand.
  • And experience tells us that power is not merely a word but an actually existing phenomenon.
  • Not to speak of the fact that no description of the collective activity of men can do without the conception of power, the existence of power is proved both by history and by observing contemporary events.
  • The historians, in accord with the old habit of acknowledging divine intervention in human affairs, want to see the cause of events in the expression of the will of someone endowed with power, but that supposition is not confirmed either by reason or by experience.
  • On the other hand, even if we admitted that words could be the cause of events, history shows that the expression of the will of historical personages does not in most cases produce any effect, that is to say, their commands are often not executed, and sometimes the very opposite of what they order occurs.
  • To explain the conditions of that relationship we must first establish a conception of the expression of will, referring it to man and not to the Deity.
  • If the Deity issues a command, expresses His will, as ancient history tells us, the expression of that will is independent of time and is not caused by anything, for the Divinity is not controlled by an event.
  • Only the expression of the will of the Deity, not dependent on time, can relate to a whole series of events occurring over a period of years or centuries, and only the Deity, independent of everything, can by His sole will determine the direction of humanity's movement; but man acts in time and himself takes part in what occurs.
  • Napoleon could not have commanded an invasion of Russia and never did so.
  • But to know what can and what cannot be executed is impossible, not only in the case of Napoleon's invasion of Russia in which millions participated, but even in the simplest event, for in either case millions of obstacles may arise to prevent its execution.
  • Amid a long series of unexecuted orders of Napoleon's one series, for the campaign of 1812, was carried out--not because those orders differed in any way from the other, unexecuted orders but because they coincided with the course of events that led the French army into Russia; just as in stencil work this or that figure comes out not because the color was laid on from this side or in that way, but because it was laid on from all sides over the figure cut in the stencil.
  • To understand in what this dependence consists it is necessary to reinstate another omitted condition of every command proceeding not from the Deity but from a man, which is, that the man who gives the command himself takes part in the event.
  • The man who worked most with his hands could not think so much about what he was doing, or reflect on or command what would result from the common activity; while the man who commanded more would evidently work less with his hands on account of his greater verbal activity.
  • With the present complex forms of political and social life in Europe can any event that is not prescribed, decreed, or ordered by monarchs, ministers, parliaments, or newspapers be imagined?
  • Wherever the ship may go, the rush of water which neither directs nor increases its movement foams ahead of it, and at a distance seems to us not merely to move of itself but to govern the ship's movement also.
  • Were it not free it could not be limited.
  • A man's will seems to him to be limited just because he is not conscious of it except as free.
  • You say: I am not free.
  • But learning just as certainly that his will is subject to laws, he does not and cannot believe this.
  • He feels that however impossible it may be, it is so, for without this conception of freedom not only would he be unable to understand life, but he would be unable to live for a single moment.
  • He could not live, because all man's efforts, all his impulses to life, are only efforts to increase freedom.
  • They do not see that the role of the natural sciences in this matter is merely to serve as an instrument for the illumination of one side of it.
  • The subject for history is not man's will itself but our presentation of it.
  • A sinking man who clutches at another and drowns him; or a hungry mother exhausted by feeding her baby, who steals some food; or a man trained to discipline who on duty at the word of command kills a defenseless man-- seem less guilty, that is, less free and more subject to the law of necessity, to one who knows the circumstances in which these people were placed, and more free to one who does not know that the man was himself drowning, that the mother was hungry, that the soldier was in the ranks, and so on.
  • When we do not at all understand the cause of an action, whether a crime, a good action, or even one that is simply nonmoral, we ascribe a greater amount of freedom to it.
  • For if I examine an action committed a second ago I must still recognize it as not being free, for it is irrevocably linked to the moment at which it was committed.
  • To convince myself of this I do not lift it the next moment.
  • But I am not now abstaining from doing so at the first moment when I asked the question.
  • That I did not lift my arm a moment later does not prove that I could have abstained from lifting it then.
  • And since I could make only one movement at that single moment of time, it could not have been any other.
  • But even if--imagining a man quite exempt from all influences, examining only his momentary action in the present, unevoked by any cause--we were to admit so infinitely small a remainder of inevitability as equaled zero, we should even then not have arrived at the conception of complete freedom in man, for a being uninfluenced by the external world, standing outside of time and independent of cause, is no longer a man.
  • Freedom not limited by anything is the essence of life, in man's consciousness.
  • The recognition of man's free will as something capable of influencing historical events, that is, as not subject to laws, is the same for history as the recognition of a free force moving the heavenly bodies would be for astronomy.
  • If any single action is due to free will, then not a single historical law can exist, nor any conception of historical events.
  • From the standpoint from which the science of history now regards its subject on the path it now follows, seeking the causes of events in man's freewill, a scientific enunciation of those laws is impossible, for however man's free will may be restricted, as soon as we recognize it as a force not subject to law, the existence of law becomes impossible.
  • And if history has for its object the study of the movement of the nations and of humanity and not the narration of episodes in the lives of individuals, it too, setting aside the conception of cause, should seek the laws common to all the inseparably interconnected infinitesimal elements of free will.
  • From the time the law of Copernicus was discovered and proved, the mere recognition of the fact that it was not the sun but the earth that moves sufficed to destroy the whole cosmography of the ancients.
  • To be fair, his father hadn't made things any better by offering money to Alex and not his sister.
  • "It's not a big deal," Carmen said, and launched into another subject.
  • On the other hand, the dream was in her head, not his.
  • Assured that it had not, she turned back to him.
  • Or not at all.
  • I know it still galls you that he was willing to help pay for your college education, but not Katie's.
  • "I suppose not," he finally said as he spooned mashed potatoes into his plate.
  • Hope that you'll start accepting me as your husband - your mate; not just a lover.
  • Maybe not, but it would have made a difference if I had known how you felt.
  • In spite of her decision not to, she glanced out the window.
  • If their meeting today was any indication, this visit was going to be interesting - if not uncomfortable.
  • It was a hacienda, not a ranch, and Señor Medena was the patrón.
  • You could wear a feed sack at a formal dinner and not look underdressed.
  • I don't want her to wake up in a strange room and not be able to find us.
  • He didn't have the chest of a body builder, nor did he have the six-pack abs.
  • The muscles on his chest and arms were not well defined.
  • The idea of making love in a strange bedroom was disturbing enough, but with only a door between them and the children, locked or not, it didn't feel right.
  • Never had she seen Alex so hostile - not even with Josh.
  • This new baby... it will not be too much?
  • Not even a year had passed since the stabbing, but he had been doing well.
  • We would not let him get on the horse with Destiny.
  • The men did not know of the wound.
  • But I have said they did not know you had a wound.
  • I will tell her you ask that I not punish her.
  • You will not call me father?
  • "I'm not your only child," Alex said stubbornly.
  • You're not like him, and I'm glad.
  • Not because she wanted the money, but because it might become an issue.
  • "Not for me," Carmen said instantly, and then blushed.
  • Felipa, do not be long.
  • "Not a very pretty one," he answered, as if a little ashamed.
  • He was not going very fast, but on his flanks specks of foam began to appear and at times he would tremble like a leaf.
  • The top of the buggy caught the air like a parachute or an umbrella filled with wind, and held them back so that they floated downward with a gentle motion that was not so very disagreeable to bear.
  • These they could not see, but they could feel them pelting the buggy top, and Jim screamed almost like a human being when a stone overtook him and struck his boney body.
  • How long this state of things continued Dorothy could not even guess, she was so greatly bewildered.
  • All this was so terrible and unreal that he could not understand it at all, and so had good reason to be afraid.
  • "Of course not," said Dorothy.
  • Yes; there was land below them; and not so very far away, either.
  • "Oh, I'm not so sure of that," replied the girl.
  • Animals ought not to talk.
  • But not a sound had broken the stillness since the strangers had arrived, except that of their own voices.
  • He was not a very large man, but was well formed and had a beautiful face--calm and serene as the face of a fine portrait.
  • His clothing fitted his form snugly and was gorgeously colored in brilliant shades of green, which varied as the sunbeams touched them but was not wholly influenced by the solar rays.
  • "Look out!" cried Dorothy, who noticed that the beautiful man did not look where he was going; "be careful, or you'll fall off!"
  • But he did not wish the little girl to think him a coward, so he advanced slowly to the edge of the roof.
  • It is your affair, not mine.
  • I had let so much gas out of my balloon that I could not rise again, and in a few minutes the earth closed over my head.
  • He began making queer signs and passes toward the Wizard; but the little man did not watch him long.
  • If they give me plenty of it I'll not complain about its color.
  • Do not all people grow upon bushes where you came from, on the outside of the earth?
  • Not that I ever hear of.
  • There were no stairs in their houses, because they did not need them, but on a level surface they generally walked just as we do.
  • "Our people do not acquire their real life until they leave their bushes," said the Prince.
  • The words of the cold and moist vegetable Prince were not very comforting, and as he spoke them he turned away and left the enclosure.
  • She was not at all heavy, so the Wizard and Dorothy managed to lift her gently to the ground.
  • "I did not know that you were ripe," answered the Prince, in a low voice.
  • They did not bother to cross the bridges over the brooks, but when they came to a stream they stepped high and walked in the air to the other side.
  • Fishes are not animals, and they are as cold and moist as the vegetables themselves.
  • "Don't worry," Dorothy murmured, soothingly, "I'll not let the kitten hurt you."
  • "And they have no hearts; so they can't love anyone – not even themselves," declared the boy.
  • He picked it up, but could not see what he held.
  • "Ha, ha!" chuckled the old cab-horse; "they're not 'Gurgles,' little maid; they're Gargoyles."
  • We must not be late.
  • But all along, they believed they would ultimately prevail—and not just win the war, but also do something epic that would change the course of history for all time.
  • These happy days did not last long.
  • The doctor thought I could not live.
  • We commonly do not remember that it is, after all, always the first person that is speaking.
  • We're going to have a baby, not a sin.
  • "Not now," she whispered.
  • "Not quite," said he, finally.
  • "Probably not," declared the Wizard, nodding.
  • "That is a matter I have not quite decided upon," was the reply.
  • Why not let them live?
  • "They do not belong here," returned the Prince.
  • But during the first nineteen months of my life I had caught glimpses of broad, green fields, a luminous sky, trees and flowers which the darkness that followed could not wholly blot out.
  • All were surprised to find that he was not with them.
  • There was great rejoicing in the family that morning, but no one, not even the doctor, knew that I should never see or hear again.
  • Scarcity was the new watchword as the focus turned to all the problems of the future, not all the possibilities.
  • They used to hang in long festoons from our porch, filling the whole air with their fragrance, untainted by any earthy smell; and in the early morning, washed in the dew, they felt so soft, so pure, I could not help wondering if they did not resemble the asphodels of God's garden.
  • I do not remember when I first realized that I was different from other people; but I knew it before my teacher came to me.
  • I had noticed that my mother and my friends did not use signs as I did when they wanted anything done, but talked with their mouths.
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