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His Sentence Examples

  • The little man gave a bow to the silent throng that had watched him, and then the Prince said, in his cold, calm voice:
  • Then a little man jumped out of the basket, took off his tall hat, and bowed very gracefully to the crowd of Mangaboos around him.
  • Nurturing was in his personality.
  • As they continued toward the house, he cleared his throat.
  • Alex gently turned her around and took her into his arms.
  • Lowering his head, his lips touched hers.
  • Would you like to read his speech?
  • The man with the star regarded her with his calm, expressionless eyes.
  • Why should they eat their sixty acres, when man is condemned to eat only his peck of dirt?
  • She stopped and gazed up at his face.
  • To be fair, his father hadn't made things any better by offering money to Alex and not his sister.
  • He laughed at that, and his laugh was merry and frank.
  • "Second," Katie cut in, "His father's family has been in this country longer than yours."
  • His somber gaze met hers and then drifted to her lips.
  • Apparently his greatest concern was the fact that his mother was married to his adoptive father at the time he was conceived.
  • His tail was short and scraggly, and his harness had been broken in many places and fastened together again with cords and bits of wire.
  • Instead, he drew a leathern case from his pocket and took from it several sharp knives, which he joined together, one after another, until they made a long sword.
  • Pierre pushed his way into the middle of the group, listened, and convinced himself that the man was indeed a liberal, but of views quite different from his own.
  • She glanced up at his face, but it gave no clue of his mood.
  • Taking her in his arms, he held her close for a moment and then planted a kiss on her forehead.
  • Alex had been the one who helped her see them as true family, and yet he was having issues accepting his own father.
  • I didn't ask about his family tree.
  • But then, she hadn't approved of his drinking or the way he treated Lori either.
  • "But Jim knows his business all right--don't you, Jim?" patting the long nose of the animal.
  • He leaped from his horse.
  • "We will all arise, every one of us will go, for our father the Tsar!" he shouted, rolling his bloodshot eyes.
  • At that moment Count Rostopchin with his protruding chin and alert eyes, wearing the uniform of a general with sash over his shoulder, entered the room, stepping briskly to the front of the crowd of gentry.
  • He pulled her into his arms again.
  • Later, she lay in bed, tucked warmly under the covers as his boots clicked away from her on the hardwood floor - down the hall and into the den.
  • He glanced at his watch and swallowed before answering.
  • Alex swung around, his eyes twinkling with humor and that cute dimple teasing his cheek.
  • She could count his ribs easily where they showed through the skin of his body, and his head was long and seemed altogether too big for him, as if it did not fit.
  • His tail was short and scraggly, and his harness had been broken in many places and fastened together again with cords and bits of wire.
  • "Yes," she answered, looking gravely at his tousled hair and blinking gray eyes.
  • Dorothy thought he just wiggled one of his drooping ears, but that was all.
  • Immediately the Prince and all of his people flocked out of the hall into the street, that they might see what was about to happen.
  • The Wizard reached out, caught the wee creature in his hand, and holding its head between one thumb and finger and its tail between the other thumb and finger he pulled it apart, each of the two parts becoming a whole and separate piglet in an instant.
  • The naval officer spoke in a particularly sonorous, musical, and aristocratic baritone voice, pleasantly swallowing his r's and generally slurring his consonants: the voice of a man calling out to his servant, Heah!
  • "I think that before discussing these questions," Pierre continued, "we should ask the Emperor--most respectfully ask His Majesty--to let us know the number of our troops and the position in which our army and our forces now are, and then..."
  • With a sudden expression of malevolence on his aged face, Adraksin shouted at Pierre:
  • He felt that his words, apart from what meaning they conveyed, were less audible than the sound of his opponent's voice.
  • Pierre wished to say that he was ready to sacrifice his money, his serfs, or himself, only one ought to know the state of affairs in order to be able to improve it, but he was unable to speak.
  • Many voices shouted and talked at the same time, so that Count Rostov had not time to signify his approval of them all, and the group increased, dispersed, re-formed, and then moved with a hum of talk into the largest hall and to the big table.
  • I work for Uncle Bill on his ranch, and he pays me six dollars a month and my board.
  • The boy flicked the big, boney horse with his whip and looked thoughtful.
  • Jim's ears were standing erect upon his head and every muscle of his big body was tense as he trotted toward home.
  • The boy was startled and his eyes were big.
  • Dorothy had a green streak through the center of her face where the blue and yellow lights came together, and her appearance seemed to add to his fright.
  • Jim the horse had seen these spires, also, and his ears stood straight up with fear, while Dorothy and Zeb held their breaths in suspense.
  • "I can't see that it's wrong," remarked Jim, in his gruff tones.
  • His clothing fitted his form snugly and was gorgeously colored in brilliant shades of green, which varied as the sunbeams touched them but was not wholly influenced by the solar rays.
  • His clothing fitted his form snugly and was gorgeously colored in brilliant shades of green, which varied as the sunbeams touched them but was not wholly influenced by the solar rays.
  • Dorothy kept hold of his hand and followed him, and soon they were both walking through the air, with the kitten frisking beside them.
  • So, with a snort and a neigh and a whisk of his short tail he trotted off the roof into the air and at once began floating downward to the street.
  • But Dorothy, seeing his perplexity, answered:
  • The boy took his seat beside her and said: "Gid-dap Jim."
  • There was even a thorn upon the tip of his nose and he looked so funny that Dorothy laughed when she saw him.
  • Dorothy and Zeb jumped out of the buggy and ran after them, but the Sorcerer remained calmly in his throne.
  • He was quite an old little man and his head was long and entirely bald.
  • "Nonsense!" said the little man, turning red--although just then a ray of violet sunlight was on his round face.
  • There sat the thorny Sorcerer in his chair of state, and when the Wizard saw him he began to laugh, uttering comical little chuckles.
  • "Very clever," said the Wizard, nodding his head as if pleased.
  • "My name is Gwig," said the Sorcerer, turning his heartless, cruel eyes upon his rival.
  • No one did, because the Mangaboos did not wear hats, and Zeb had lost his, somehow, in his flight through the air.
  • He took off his hat and held it upside down, shaking it briskly.
  • This the Wizard placed underneath his hat and made a mystic sign above it.
  • When he removed his hat the last piglet had disappeared entirely.
  • When they passed over a field of grass Jim immediately stretched down his head and began to nibble.
  • Slowly he took the shining star from his own brow and placed it upon that of the Princess.
  • The little man felt carefully in his pocket and pulled out the tiny piglets, setting them upon the grass one by one, where they ran around and nibbled the tender blades.
  • "Dear me!" murmured the Wizard, looking at his pets in astonishment.
  • Then the Wizard bent a pin for a hook and took a long piece of string from his pocket for a fish-line.
  • The cab-horse, who was browsing near, lifted his head with a sigh.
  • The little man, having had a good sleep, felt rested and refreshed, and looking through the glass partition of the room he saw Zeb sitting up on his bench and yawning.
  • Then he jointed together the blades of his sword and balanced it very skillfully upon the end of his nose.
  • Just then his eye fell upon the lanterns and the can of kerosene oil which Zeb had brought from the car of his balloon, and he got a clever idea from those commonplace things.
  • The cab-horse, who never slept long at a time, sat upon his haunches and watched the tiny piglets and the kitten with much approval.
  • An instant later he suddenly backed toward the crowd of Mangaboos and kicked out his hind legs as hard as he could.
  • A dozen of them smashed together and tumbled to the ground, and seeing his success Jim kicked again and again, charging into the vegetable crowd, knocking them in all directions and sending the others scattering to escape his iron heels.
  • The Wizard carried his satchel, which was quite heavy, and Zeb carried the two lanterns and the oil can.
  • "That's the way I feel about it," remarked Zeb, rubbing his wounds.
  • Noticing that the light was growing dim he picked up his nine piglets, patted each one lovingly on its fat little head, and placed them carefully in his inside pocket.
  • So he carried the lantern back for quite a distance, while Dorothy and the Wizard followed at his side.
  • Jim hastened his lagging steps at this assurance of a quick relief from the dark passage.
  • The little man shook his bald head.
  • Several squeals and grunts were instantly heard at his feet, but the Wizard could not discover a single piglet.
  • "No! he can kick pretty hard with his heels, and bite a little; but Jim can't 'zactly fight," she replied.
  • But they were in great numbers, and the Champion could not shout much because he had to save his breath for fighting.
  • The Wizard got out his sword at once, and Zeb grabbed the horse-whip.
  • "Thank you!" cried the Wizard, joyfully, and at once rubbed a leaf upon the soles of Dorothy's shoes and then upon his own.
  • He had nearly finished this last task when a low growling was suddenly heard and the horse began to jump around and kick viciously with his heels.
  • "Run for the river!" shouted the Wizard, and Jim quickly freed himself from his unseen tormenters by a few vicious kicks and then obeyed.
  • As the little Wizard turned to follow them he felt a hot breath against his cheek and heard a low, fierce growl.
  • The third time that he thrust out the weapon there was a loud roar and a fall, and suddenly at his feet appeared the form of a great red bear, which was nearly as big as the horse and much stronger and fiercer.
  • The Wizard opened his satchel and got out some sticking-plaster with which he mended the cuts Jim had received from the claws of the bears.
  • His boney legs moved so fast they could scarcely be seen, and the Wizard clung fast to the seat and yelled "Whoa!" at the top of his voice.
  • His boney legs moved so fast they could scarcely be seen, and the Wizard clung fast to the seat and yelled "Whoa!" at the top of his voice.
  • The light was dim, and soon they mounted into total darkness, so that the Wizard was obliged to get out his lanterns to light the way.
  • The old horse panted a little, and had to stop often to get his breath.
  • He was a very old man, bent nearly double; but the queerest thing about him was his white hair and beard.
  • But the travellers were obliged to rest, and while they were sitting on the rocky floor the Wizard felt in his pocket and brought out the nine tiny piglets.
  • To his delight they were now plainly visible, which proved that they had passed beyond the influence of the magical Valley of Voe.
  • "And that's just what I shall do if you don't let those little balls of pork alone," said Jim, glaring at the kitten with his round, big eyes.
  • The Wizard now put the nine tiny ones back into his pocket and the journey was resumed.
  • Jim, who was in advance, saw the last stair before him and stuck his head above the rocky sides of the stairway.
  • "Let's go down again!" he said, in his hoarse voice.
  • He got his satchel from the buggy and, opening it, took out two deadly looking revolvers that made the children shrink back in alarm just to look at.
  • But Jim was ready for them, and when he saw them coming he turned his heels toward them and began kicking out as hard as he could.
  • Crack! crash! bang! went his iron-shod hoofs against the wooden bodies of the Gargoyles, and they were battered right and left with such force that they scattered like straws in the wind.
  • Don't you remember how the Champion escaped them by shouting his battle-cry?
  • The Wizard raised one of his revolvers and fired into the throng of his enemies, and the shot resounded like a clap of thunder in that silent place.
  • Then, having tied the wooden creature securely, the boy buckled the strap and tossed his prisoner into the buggy.
  • "But only for a time," replied the Wizard, shaking his head gloomily.
  • "I'll use the king," said the boy, and pulled his prisoner out of the buggy.
  • "Do you see that big rock standing on the hillside yonder?" he continued, pointing with his finger.
  • "No you can't," remarked Jim, with a twinkle in his round eyes.
  • However, the Wizard went once more to his satchel--which seemed to contain a surprising variety of odds and ends--and brought out a spool of strong wire, by means of which they managed to fasten four of the wings to Jim's harness, two near his head and two near his tail.
  • Dorothy was a little anxious about the success of their trip, for the way Jim arched his long neck and spread out his bony legs as he fluttered and floundered through the air was enough to make anybody nervous.
  • Then he poured over them all the kerosene oil that was left in his oil-can, and lighting a match set fire to the pile.
  • "That will prove a barrier for some time to come," said the little man, smiling pleasantly all over his wrinkled face at the success of their stratagem.
  • Hearing these words our friends turned in the direction of the sound, and the Wizard held his lanterns so that their light would flood one of the little pockets in the rock.
  • "Of course; when it is four o'clock," she replied, with a laugh at his startled expression.
  • "I'm afraid I don't know the Hungry Tiger and Billina," said the Wizard, shaking his head.
  • The little man looked at his watch--a big silver one that he carried in his vest pocket.
  • The cab-horse gave a nervous start and Zeb began to rub his eyes to make sure he was not asleep.
  • The little man looked at her closely and then took both the maiden's hands in his and shook them cordially.
  • His fame had not been forgotten in the Land of Oz, by any means.
  • "Where is Dorothy?" enquired Zeb, anxiously, as he left the buggy and stood beside his friend the little Wizard.
  • He had seen considerable of life in the cities in his younger days, and knew that this regal palace was no place for him.
  • He knew the way to it, and a servant followed him, carrying his satchel.
  • Then the Wizard entered, and his presence relieved the boy's embarrassment.
  • "He shall amuse us with his tricks tomorrow," said the Princess.
  • "How are your brains?" enquired the little humbug, as he grasped the soft, stuffed hands of his old friend.
  • And now the Tin Woodman arrived, his body most beautifully nickle-plated, so that it shone splendidly in the brilliant light of the room.
  • Jim accepted it as a mere detail, and at his command the attendants gave his coat a good rubbing, combed his mane and tail, and washed his hoofs and fetlocks.
  • Then they told him dinner would be served directly and he replied that they could not serve it too quickly to suit his convenience.
  • Then the servants heaped a lot of rugs upon the floor and the old horse slept on the softest bed he had ever known in his life.
  • Jim's eyes stuck out as much as those of the Sawhorse, and he stared at the creature with his ears erect and his long head drawn back until it rested against his arched neck.
  • To be called beautiful was a novelty in his experience.
  • And this is the Hungry Tiger, the terror of the jungle, who longs to devour fat babies but is prevented by his conscience from doing so.
  • Hearing these words Jim resolved to conquer his alarm.
  • In the forest he would be thought ungainly, because his face is stretched out and his neck is uselessly long.
  • His joints, I notice, are swollen and overgrown, and he lacks flesh and is old in years.
  • Jim and the buggy followed, the old cab-horse being driven by Zeb while the Wizard stood up on the seat and bowed his bald head right and left in answer to the cheers of the people, who crowded thick about him.
  • The first thing the little humbug did was to produce a tiny white piglet from underneath his hat and pretend to pull it apart, making two.
  • This act he repeated until all of the nine tiny piglets were visible, and they were so glad to get out of his pocket that they ran around in a very lively manner.
  • They applauded all his tricks and at the end of the performance begged him earnestly not to go away again and leave them.
  • But although the Munchkin was hardly tall enough to come to Zeb's shoulder he was so strong and clever that he laid the boy three times on his back with apparent ease.
  • The Wizard, when he returned to his own room, was exceedingly thoughtful.
  • He drew from his inside pocket one of the eight tiny piglets that were remaining and continued:
  • "I refuse to be free," cried the kitten, in a sharp voice, "unless the Wizard can do his trick with eight piglets.
  • There was no way to get the creature out without breaking the vase, so the Tin Woodman smashed it with his axe and set the little prisoner free.
  • Zeb also wanted to see his home, and although he did not find anyone morning for him, the sight of Hugson's Ranch in the picture made him long to get back there.
  • Then Zeb brought out Jim, all harnessed to the buggy, and took his seat.
  • He gave a start and rubbed his eyes.
  • Jim was trotting along the well-known road, shaking his ears and whisking his tail with a contented motion.
  • His shoes were covered with mud; he had torn his coat on the thorny tree.
  • He leaped into the saddle, and away he dashed with his officers close behind him.
  • With one hand the little boy clung to his sister's arm, and with the other he held his primer.
  • "Well, I know what that is," he said to himself; and he wrote the word _turnip_ on his slate.
  • Before the half hour was ended he had written a very neat composition on his slate.
  • Some people said that they were what Henry Longfellow wrote on his slate that day at school.
  • Mr. Finney and his wife Both sat down to sup; And they ate, and they ate, They ate the turnip up.
  • On the day that he was seven years old, his mother gave him a few pennies.
  • "You may buy something, if you wish," said his mother.
  • His mother shook her head and said: No, Benjamin.
  • He heard the pennies jingle in his pocket.
  • He held them in his hand, and showed them to the boy.
  • One of his brothers asked to see the whistle.
  • "You might have bought half a dozen such whistles with the money I gave you," said his mother.
  • "Never mind, my child," said his mother, very kindly.
  • His life was such that no man could ever say, "Ben Franklin has wronged me."
  • His father and grandfather and great-grandfather had all been shepherds.
  • It was his business to take care of the sheep which belonged to a rich landholder by the Ettrick Water.
  • He would drive them from place to place as his master wished.
  • Sometimes he would take care of the whole flock while the shepherd was resting or eating his dinner.
  • The shepherd and his dog could not keep them together.
  • With his lighted lantern in his hand, he went up and down the rough hills calling for his lambs.
  • At last James Hogg said, "It's of no use; all we can do is to go home and tell the master that we have lost his whole flock."
  • While watching his flocks, he spent much of his time in reading.
  • He loved poetry and soon began to write poems of his own.
  • Many of his poems are still read and loved by children as well as by grown up men and women.
  • Then he ordered his treasurer to pay the poet five hundred pieces of gold; for, indeed, the poem which he had recited was wonderfully fine.
  • Then he called his wisest men together and asked them, "Is it really true that the first people in the world were Egyptians?"
  • He gave these to a shepherd and ordered him to bring them up among his sheep, far from the homes of men.
  • He took the children far away to a green valley where his flocks were feeding.
  • He covered his face and wept.
  • The caliph wished you to amuse him with pleasant thoughts, and you have filled his mind with melancholy.
  • The king had sent them there to make the people obey his unjust laws.
  • He was ready to serve his country in any way that he could.
  • One day a friend of his who lived in Boston came to see him.
  • "I will do all that I can," said his friend.
  • He walked up and down the river bank, leading his horse behind him; but he kept his eyes turned always toward the dim, dark spot which he knew was the old North Church.
  • He spoke to his horse.
  • He put his foot in the stirrup.
  • Like a bird let loose, his horse leaped forward.
  • At every farmhouse and every village he repeated his call.
  • In France there once lived a famous man who was known as the Marquis de Lafayette. When he was a little boy his mother called him Gilbert.
  • His home was in the country not far from a great forest.
  • Often, when he was a little lad, he took long walks among the trees with his mother.
  • "Shall we take a walk this morning?" asked his mother.
  • His mother smiled, for she felt quite sure that there was no danger.
  • Gilbert looked up from his play and saw that his mother was very deeply interested in her book.
  • His breath came fast.
  • He planted his feet firmly and made ready to spring.
  • He leaped from his hiding place and clasped it round its neck.
  • Gilbert was soon on his feet again.
  • He hurried back to the pathway, and then ran to his mother.
  • Tears were in his eyes; but he tried to look brave.
  • His lips quivered and he began to cry.
  • "Never mind, my dear," said his mother.
  • His name is remembered in our country as that of a brave and noble man.
  • Then he tied a rope around his waist and said to his friends, Take hold of the other end, boys.
  • He got down on his hands and knees and crawled into the cave.
  • Putnam gave the rope a quick jerk and his friends pulled him out in great haste.
  • They feared that the wolf was upon him; but he wished only to get his gun.
  • He raised his gun and fired at the great beast.
  • When his friends heard the gun they pulled the rope quickly and drew him out.
  • Putnam loaded his gun again.
  • Putnam stayed in the cave so long that his friends began to be alarmed.
  • The smith went on with his work.
  • King Richard rode hither and thither, cheering his men and fighting his foes.
  • His enemy, Henry, who wished to be king, was pressing him hard.
  • Far away, at the other side of the field, King Richard saw his men falling back.
  • Without his help they would soon be beaten.
  • So he spurred his horse to ride to their aid.
  • The horse stumbled, and his rider was thrown heavily to the ground.
  • The king looked, and saw that his soldiers were beaten, and that the battle was everywhere going against him.
  • He waved his sword in the air.
  • His soldiers were intent on saving themselves.
  • Instead of a trunk for his clothing, he carried a pair of saddlebags.
  • Instead of sitting at his ease in a parlor car, he went jolting along through mud and mire, exposed to wind and weather.
  • He was riding very slowly, and both he and his horse were bespattered with mud.
  • He was dressed plainly, and, with his reddish-brown hair and mud-bespattered face, looked like a hard- working countryman just in from the backwoods.
  • Now the landlord prided himself upon keeping a first-class hotel, and he feared that his guests would not like the rough-looking traveler.
  • Then, taking out his purse, he offered the Dean a shilling.
  • The lesson in manners was not forgotten; for, always after that, the man was very polite when he brought his presents.
  • And the Dean also took the hint; for he always remembered to give the man a "tip" for his trouble.
  • His older brothers were quite willing that he should go to sea.
  • His uncle had written her a letter saying:
  • But George had made up his mind to go.
  • The little chest that held his clothing had been carried down to the bank.
  • George saw the tears in his mother's eyes.
  • He has been called the Father of his Country.
  • As he came nearer he saw that the boy held a charred stick in his hand, with which he was drawing something on a flat rock.
  • The lad was so much interested in his work that he did not see the stranger.
  • He jumped to his feet and looked up at the kind gentleman.
  • His pictures were known and admired in every city of Italy.
  • Bondone was surprised when Cimabue offered to take his little boy to Florence and teach him to be a great painter.
  • But Cimabue only praised him for his great skill.
  • This made him very proud of his skill.
  • When he hung this painting outside of his door, some birds flew down and tried to carry the cherries away.
  • One day King Solomon was sitting on his throne, and his great men were standing around him.
  • He stroked his chin.
  • He bit his lips.
  • The king moved uneasily on his golden throne.
  • His officers and great men shook their heads.
  • He remembered that close by his window there was a climbing vine filled with beautiful sweet flowers.
  • His father and mother were Quakers, and they did not think it was right to spend money for such things.
  • So she told Benjamin to stay in the house and take care of his baby sister till she came back.
  • Then he thought what a pretty picture might be made of his sister's sweet face and little hands.
  • He did not even hear his mother's footsteps as she came into the room.
  • When Benjamin's father came home, his mother showed him the picture.
  • Then he handed it back to his wife and said:--
  • He put his hands on the lad's head and said:--
  • When Andrew Jackson was a little boy he lived with his mother in South Carolina.
  • "I am going to help drive those red-coated British out of the country," he said to his mother.
  • Then, without another word, he mounted his brother's little farm horse and rode away.
  • He drew his sword to hit the boy with its flat side.
  • Andrew threw out his hand and received an ugly gash across the knuckles.
  • He was not strong enough to work on the farm like his brothers; but he loved books and study.
  • He soon learned all that his teacher could teach; for he was bright and quick, and had a good memory.
  • His father hoped that Daniel would grow up to be a wise and famous man.
  • Daniel and his father would ride there on horseback.
  • "Young Dan Webster," answered his father.
  • They scarcely noticed the sidesaddle; they noticed only the boy's dark eyes and his strong, noble face.
  • Yet there was something in his manner and voice that caused everybody to admire him.
  • He was in trouble because his scholars would not study.
  • Whenever his back was turned, they were sure to begin whispering to one another.
  • Within less than two minutes, Billy saw Mary Green whispering, and she had to take his place.
  • Mary looked around and saw Samuel Miller asking his neighbor for a pencil, and Samuel was called.
  • They knew that the master would be as good as his word.
  • Suddenly, to his great joy he saw little Lucy Martin lean over her desk and whisper to the girl in front of her.
  • He wished to escape the punishment, and so he called out, "Lucy Martin!" and went proudly to his seat.
  • The boys looked at her and wondered if the master would really be as good as his word.
  • Then, one morning, Alfred went into his mother's room with a smiling, joyous face.
  • His mother unlocked her cabinet and took the precious volume from its place of safe keeping.
  • "How wonderful!" said his mother.
  • But his mother kissed him and gave him the beautiful book.
  • At first his mother tried to answer all his questions.
  • "Read, and you will know," said his mother.
  • He was noted for his great knowledge, the most of which he had obtained from books.
  • Although his father was a king, Cyrus was brought up like the son of a common man.
  • He knew how to work with his hands.
  • When Cyrus was twelve years old he went with his mother to Media to visit his grandfather.
  • Cyrus was so tall and strong and handsome that his grandfather was very proud of him.
  • Another portion he gave to an old servant who waited upon his grandfather.
  • And the rest he divided among the young women who took care of his mother.
  • The king also wondered why this man, who was his favorite, should be so slighted.
  • He saw that Cyrus had a will of his own, and this pleased him very much.
  • You would hardly have known the young prince when the time came for him to appear before his grandfather.
  • He carried a white napkin upon his arm, and held the cup of wine very daintily with three of his fingers.
  • His manners were perfect.
  • "Bravo! bravo!" cried his mother, her eyes sparkling with pride.
  • "You have done well" said his grandfather.
  • "Then why didn't you do it?" asked his mother.
  • He drinks to quench his thirst, and that is all.
  • When Cyrus became a man, he succeeded his father as king of Persia; he also succeeded his grandfather Astyages as king of Media.
  • He was a very wise and powerful ruler, and he made his country the greatest of any that was then known.
  • The two boys saw him and ran to fetch his shoes.
  • It is the man who rose to go out, and two young princes contended for the honor of giving him his shoes but at last agreed that each should offer him one.
  • Always love it, said his mother.
  • When Otanes was twelve years old, his parents wished to send him to a distant city to study in a famous school that was there.
  • Be always brave and truthful, said his father.
  • Despise that which is base, said his mother.
  • "Well, boy, what have you got?" asked one of the robbers, as he pulled Otanes from his horse.
  • Otanes, in time, became one of the famous men of his country.
  • He led his armies through many countries.
  • He led the great king to his palace and begged that he would dine with him.
  • There was no place where he could set his foot to climb out.
  • For three days he lay in his strange prison.
  • But soon the way became too narrow for his body to pass through.
  • He lived two hundred years ago, and was famous for his courage in defending his country.
  • He called to one of his officers and bade him sit down and write a short order for him.
  • He dropped the pen and sprang to his feet.
  • Coriolanus made his way to the city of Antium, [Footnote: Antium (_pro._ an'shi um).] which was not far from Rome.
  • Soon, at the head of a very great army, he marched toward the city which had once been his home.
  • Coriolanus pitched his camp quite near to the city.
  • His army was the greatest that the Romans had ever seen.
  • His mother and his wife are still there.
  • His mother and his wife are still there.
  • His heart will be hard indeed if he can refuse his mother and his wife.
  • His heart will be hard indeed if he can refuse his mother and his wife.
  • So, leading his little children by the hand, they went out to meet Coriolanus.
  • Coriolanus was in his tent.
  • When he saw his mother and his wife and his children, he was filled with joy.
  • For a long time his mother pleaded with him.
  • For a long time his wife begged him to be merciful.
  • His little children clung to his knees and spoke loving words to him.
  • His little children clung to his knees and spoke loving words to him.
  • Then he commanded his army to march back to the city of Antium.
  • Rome was saved; but Coriolanus could never return to his home, his mother, his wife and children.
  • The king of Corinth was his friend.
  • The people of Corinth never grew tired of praising his sweet music.
  • One summer he went over the sea to Italy; for his name was well known there, and many people wished to hear him sing.
  • He visited several cities, and in each place he was well paid for his music.
  • Arion dressed himself in his finest clothing.
  • He took his stand on the forward deck, while the robber sailors stood in a half circle before him, anxious to listen to his song.
  • He touched his lyre and began to play the accompaniment.
  • And now they would have spared him; but he was true to his promise,-- as soon as the song was finished, he threw himself headlong into the sea.
  • The sailors divided his money among themselves; and the ship sailed on.
  • In a short time they reached Corinth in safety, and the king sent an officer to bring the captain and his men to the palace.
  • He has a mind to spend the rest of his life in that country.
  • Old story-tellers say that he alighted on the back of a large fish, called a dolphin, which had been charmed by his music and was swimming near the ship.
  • Then, full of joy, the musician hastened to Corinth, not stopping even to change his dress.
  • He told his wonderful story to the king; but the king would not believe him.
  • His name was Francis, and because of his goodness, all men now call him St. Francis.
  • His name was Francis, and because of his goodness, all men now call him St. Francis.
  • He spoke of the birds as his little brothers of the air, and he could never bear to see them harmed.
  • They were so tame that they sat on the shoulders of St. Francis and ate from his hand.
  • So, do not be ungrateful, but sing His praises and thank Him for his goodness toward you.
  • So, do not be ungrateful, but sing His praises and thank Him for his goodness toward you.
  • They spread their wings and opened their mouths to show that they understood his words.
  • His face was white, but very homely.
  • His large eyes were bright and snappy.
  • When Aesop was about twenty years old his master lost a great deal of money and was obliged to sell his slaves.
  • But he threw it upon his shoulders and seemed well satisfied.
  • "Aesop is a wise fellow," said his master.
  • So each one boasted of his skill in doing some sort of labor.
  • This answer pleased the rich man so well that he bought Aesop at once, and took him to his home on the island of Samos.
  • In Samos the little slave soon became known for his wisdom and courage.
  • His master was so much pleased with him that he gave him his freedom.
  • His master was so much pleased with him that he gave him his freedom.
  • Many great men were glad to call him their friend, and even kings asked his advice and were amused by his fables.
  • Then up from his seat rose Abraham Davenport.
  • His voice was clear and strong, and all knew that he, at least, was not afraid.
  • His words put courage into every heart.
  • Then with his strong face aglow in their feeble light, he made a speech in favor of a law to help poor fishermen.
  • A fine supper was prepared, and the innkeeper himself waited upon his guest.
  • But his surly guest said scarcely a word.
  • In the morning a good breakfast was served, and then Mr. Randolph made ready to start on his journey.
  • He called for his bill and paid it.
  • His horse was led to the door, and a servant helped him to mount it.
  • He turned his horse and rode away.
  • He had not gone farther than to the end of the innkeeper's field, when to his surprise he found that the road forked.
  • He went far out of his way and lost much time, all on account of his surliness.
  • He was a member of Congress for many years, and was noted for his odd manners and strong self- will.
  • He was often making trouble among his neighbors.
  • Once his ship was sailing in the great Pacific Ocean, It was four hundred miles from the coast of South America.
  • Then, to his great joy, a ship came near and anchored in the little harbor.
  • He made himself known, and the captain willingly agreed to carry him back to his own country.
  • When he reached Scotland everybody was eager to hear him tell of his adventures, and he soon found himself famous.
  • Many boys and indeed many girls have read his story.
  • As he grew up, his father wished him to learn a trade.
  • His mother said to him: A sailor's life is a hard life.
  • So, when he was eighteen years old, he ran away from his pleasant home and went to sea.
  • He soon found that his mother's words were true.
  • He was glad to go back to England to see his home and his friends once more.
  • There, sitting in his chair, was Carl, fast asleep.
  • The poor child was so tired after his night's work that he could not keep awake.
  • He took ten gold pieces from his table and wrapped them in the little letter.
  • He put his hand in his pocket, and was surprised to find the gold pieces wrapped in his mother's letter.
  • Then his eyes overflowed with tears, and he fell on his knees before the king.
  • He had fought a battle with his enemies, the English.
  • His little army had been beaten and scattered.
  • Many of his best friends had been killed or captured.
  • The king himself was obliged to hide in the wild woods while his foes hunted for him with hounds.
  • Sometimes his enemies were very close upon him.
  • He forgot his hunger; he forgot his weariness.
  • He began to ask about his enemies who had been hunting him.
  • "I saw two hundred of them in the village below us," said one of his officers.
  • But at last his army was beaten; his men were scattered; and Tamerlane fled alone from the field of battle.
  • His foes were looking for him.
  • One day he was lying under a tree, thinking of his misfortunes.
  • He was dressed plainly, his coat was worn, and his hat was dingy.
  • On his arm he carried a small basket.
  • He wished to teach you that no man should feel himself too fine to carry his own packages.
  • That is his way.
  • They sat in a heavy flat-bottomed boat, each holding a long, crooked rod in his hands and eagerly waiting for "a bite."
  • His aunt laughed and said, "Well, I hope that you will succeed."
  • He took something like an oarlock from his pocket and fastened it to the stern of the boat; then with a paddle which worked in this oarlock one of the boys could guide the boat while the other turned the paddle wheels.
  • "I wonder why we didn't think of something like that long ago," said his father.
  • When Robert Fulton became a man, he did not forget his experiment with the old fishing boat.
  • The merchant put the gold in a bag of purple silk which he tied to his belt underneath his long cloak.
  • He turned quickly and saw an eagle rising into the air with his moneybag in its claws.
  • The great bird was high in the air and flying towards the far-off mountains with all his money.
  • The poor man could do nothing but dress himself and go sorrowing on his way.
  • Then the merchant told him how the eagle had flown away with his money.
  • The next morning the caliph called ten of his officers before him.
  • A year ago he was so poor that he had scarcely clothes for his back.
  • His children were crying for food.
  • Both he and his family dressed well; they had plenty to eat; he had even bought a horse to help him carry his produce to market.
  • The gardener put his hand under his cloak and drew out the very bag that the merchant had lost.
  • At sight of his lost treasure, the merchant began to dance and shout for joy.
  • Some large bird has stolen it from his palace.
  • But, as I came to your palace this morning, I kept saying to myself, 'When our lord Al Mansour learns just how it was that I borrowed the gold, I have no doubt that in his kindness of heart he will forgive me the debt.'
  • Then he rewarded the gardener with ten more pieces for his honesty.
  • Then the chief cook began his song.
  • After him the other men were called, one by one; and each in turn sang his favorite song.
  • The woodman sang of the wild forest; the plowman sang of the fields; the shepherd sang of his sheep; and those who listened forgot about the storm and the cold weather.
  • But in the corner, almost hidden from his fellows, one poor man was sitting who did not enjoy the singing.
  • Inside of the great kitchen, beside the fire, the men were shouting and laughing; for the blacksmith had finished his song, and it was very pleasing.
  • But when they looked, they saw that his seat was vacant.
  • In his safe, warm place in the straw, Caedmon soon fell asleep.
  • The singing in the kitchen was ended, the fire had burned low, and each man had gone to his place.
  • His eyes were dazzled by it.
  • Then Caedmon, with only the cows as his hearers, opened his mouth and began to sing.
  • All through the night he sat among the abbey cows, and sang his wonderful song.
  • At length, others of the servants heard him, and were entranced by his wonderful song.
  • It was the wish of his father and mother that every day of his life should be a day of perfect happiness.
  • He had never gone beyond the beautiful gardens that surrounded his father's palace.
  • Everything that was evil or disagreeable had been carefully kept out of his sight.
  • His parents and friends begged him not to go.
  • But when they saw that his mind was set on going, they said no more.
  • The next morning, Gautama sat in his carriage and rode out from the palace into one of the streets of the city.
  • "Who is that man?" asked Gautama, "and why is his face so pinched and his hair so white?
  • Why do his legs tremble under him as he walks, leaning upon a stick?
  • He seems weak, and his eyes are dull.
  • His face is white, and he seems very weak.
  • One night he left the beautiful palace which his father had given to him and went out into the world to do good and to help his fellow men.
  • He might be seen every day with a bag of charcoal on his back, carrying it to some of his customers.
  • Sometimes he carried three or four bags to the palace where the little king of France lived with his mother.
  • The next minute they heard his voice at the door: Be quick, boys, and stir the fire.
  • They did so, and as the flames lighted up the room, they saw their father enter with a child in his arms.
  • Then she saw that the child's face was very pale and that he neither opened his eyes nor moved.
  • "What a beautiful child!" said the mother, as she hurried to do his bidding.
  • His beautiful clothes were soaked with water, and his fine white collar and ruffles were soiled and dripping.
  • His beautiful clothes were soaked with water, and his fine white collar and ruffles were soiled and dripping.
  • The color came back to his cheeks.
  • He opened his eyes and looked around at the small, plain room and at the poor people standing near him.
  • "Hush, Jacquot," said his wife, kindly.
  • His eyes closed and he was soon fast asleep.
  • The two boys stood at his knees, and his wife sat at his side.
  • Then I thought of our own warm little house, and how snug we could make him until he came to his senses again.
  • The charcoal man and his wife listened to this little dispute, and said nothing.
  • This charcoal man, whom I know very well, ran past me with a child in his arms.
  • "Here!" cried the child himself, darting out from his hiding place.
  • He had just noticed that the king was wearing poor Charlot's Sunday suit instead of his own.
  • Towards evening he told his men to ride home by the main road while he went by another way that was somewhat longer.
  • All the other men will take off their hats, but the king will keep his on.
  • Do you mean that the one with his hat on will be the king?
  • So they carried the tripod to the governor, and each told his story.
  • So, with his own hands he carried the golden tripod to the little house where Thales lived.
  • So the governor called two of his trusted officers and told them to carry the tripod to Priene and offer it to Bias.
  • The people of his country had made him their king; but as soon as he had made good laws for them he gave up his crown.
  • One of his mottoes was this: "Whatever you do, do it well."
  • The messengers found him in his house talking to his friends and teaching them wisdom.
  • There everybody was talking about King Cleobulus and his wonderful wisdom.
  • "Educate the children," he said; and for that reason his name is remembered to this day.
  • He lives in Corinth, [Footnote: Cor'inth.] and his name is Periander. [Footnote: Per i an'der.] Carry the precious gift to him.
  • Some had heard of his great learning, and others had heard of his selfishness and cruelty.
  • Strangers admired him for his wisdom.
  • His own people despised him for his wickedness.
  • His own people despised him for his wickedness.
  • They had never heard of Chilon, for his name was hardly known outside of his own country.
  • But when they came into Lacedaemon, they heard his praises on every side.
  • They learned that Chilon was a very quiet man, that he never spoke about himself, and that he spent all his time in trying to make his country great and strong and happy.
  • All the people whom they saw spoke in praise of his wisdom.
  • They lived more than two thousand years ago, and each one helped to make his country famous.
  • Where every Da Vinci can paint his Mona Lisa and every Dante can write his Inferno.
  • After the war, in 1947, Jonas Salk was offered his own laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.
  • And then we come to Greece, the home of Hippocrates, the "Father of Modern Medicine," who left us not just the oath that bears his name but also a corpus of roughly sixty medical texts based on his teaching.
  • Hippocrates was remarkable not only as a surgeon but also because he systematized medicine in his spare time.
  • (The use of such practices continued into the scientific age: While Jenner was inoculating people with his new smallpox vaccine, doctors were draining half a gallon of blood from George Washington for his sore throat, a procedure that hastened his death.
  • For instance, have you ever seen one of those people on TV who is turning one hundred and says he ate bacon every day of his life?
  • It is safe to say that the man with seventeen puppies is creating more happiness by giving one each to sixteen friends than he is forgoing by his loss of puppies.
  • And it doesn't matter that the person who paints the pencils doesn't know how the paint is made, for his job is to paint them.
  • I doubted that, as Feynman was precise in his usage of words.
  • He had died by the time I read that passage in one of his books, so I couldn't write him, as is my normal practice when an author's words puzzle me.
  • No one threw his shoe into the air conditioner, I assure you.)
  • His job is to push a button if he sees anything suspicious.
  • But Chad merely stopped selling his labor to the employer for that price.
  • He still has his labor to sell and can go get a new job.
  • Who do you think makes more money: the person who hauls bricks on his back or the person who operates the forklift that moves the bricks?
  • (Karel Capek, an acclaimed Czech playwright, coined the word to describe the mechanized workers in his play.)
  • But I know of no one who would want to have a conversation with a computer program pretending to be his dog.
  • No one should decide what someone else should value or spend his money on.
  • He worked to apply a means test, pared the rolls back, then died; the rolls swelled again, and his successor again tried to bring them in line, but it was hard.
  • Like a TV star that doesn't scale back his expenses after his show is cancelled, these benefits expand, not contract, during periods of economic decline, for two main reasons.
  • No student of history would argue this point, regardless of his or her politics.
  • Bill Gates could make his billions because computers, with the right software, could vastly increase productivity.
  • But in describing that job spectrum, I never said anything about his absolute ability—I said only that he was at the bottom of the list relative to others.
  • But sadly, other people don't think his work is any good.
  • In fact, let's say his own mother considered donating the portrait he painted of her to Goodwill but decided not to because "the poor have enough problems already."
  • After touring the United States for more than nine months in the 1830s, Alexis de Tocqueville returned to his native France and penned the two-volume Democracy in America.
  • And he used his decades of dominance on the national scene, as well as his fantastic oratorical ability, to advance that belief and essentially invent the Democratic Party we know today.
  • At one point, Tiger Woods got a dime for every box of Wheaties cereal with his photo on it, while the farmer was paid only a nickel for the wheat in that same box—and the farmer still made a profit.
  • To pay for his college education, Borlaug would periodically put his education on hold to find work.
  • This was a guy from a small town in Iowa who failed his 1933 entrance exam to the University of Minnesota.
  • How long will it be before the driver controls them remotely from his office?
  • A neighboring farmer and cat-lover, William Ross, perhaps hearing a distinct "ka-ching" in his head, got one of the kittens and teamed up with a geneticist and began a careful breeding program.
  • Napoleon Bonaparte made a comment along these lines when he stated, "Man is entitled by birthright to a share of the Earth's produce sufficient to fill the needs of his existence."
  • It was his view that "the attainment of human rights in the fullest sense cannot be achieved so long as hundreds of millions of poverty-stricken people lack the basic necessities for life."
  • Inspired by the Chinese effort, he, too, tried to increase the agricultural production of his country by emptying the cities and sending everyone to work on the farms under brutal conditions.
  • Before his death, Pol Pot conceded that his regime certainly killed people, but ''to say that millions died is too much.''
  • If you knew someone who was a good business partner, was fun to hang out with, but let one of his children starve to death so that he could enjoy a higher standard of living, what would be your opinion of this person?
  • The Bulgarian king Samuel was so stricken by the sight of his mighty army staggering back home that he suffered a stroke and died two days later.
  • Eventually Spartacus and many of his followers were killed and six thousand of his fellow rebelling slaves were crucified, a slow and agonizing form of death.
  • In 106, the Roman Emperor Trajan celebrated his defeat over the Dacians by ordering 123 consecutive days of gladiatorial games in the Roman Coliseum.
  • The end of "Off with his head."
  • The idea that a person can be a political prisoner, jailed for his beliefs about government, politics, or politicians, is ancient but happily fading.
  • At a farmers' market I recently visited, one vendor boasted that all his chickens "retained their dignity throughout their life."
  • But I get his point.)
  • Early in his presidency, in a 1953 address that would become known as his "Cross of Iron" speech, he declared, "Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed.
  • (Of course, when a king proves himself through battle, he is not risking his life but the lives of thousands of his subjects.
  • They expected the king to choose one border or another, not create his own compromise border.
  • Come what may, the nationalist will stick by his country.
  • Nearly four hundred years after his death, Shakespeare's works are read and studied around the globe.
  • His plays run in every major city in the English-speaking world, and Hollywood makes movies of them—good movies!
  • All these things are the same today as they were in Shakespeare's time, and because of that, his stories are still very relevant to us.
  • In Othello is a character named Iago, an evil man who never does anything illegal himself but is always planting ideas in other people's minds, to get them to do his dirty work.
  • Macbeth is the story of a ruthless wife, Lady Macbeth, who persuades her husband to murder the king and take his throne.
  • Augustine describes a day when he saw his mentor, Ambrose, looking intently at an open book.
  • Augustine said this could not be the case because he could neither hear Ambrose nor see his lips moving.
  • Augustine records that this idea blew his mind (or words to that effect).
  • Processing aurally was familiar to Augustine while reading silently was revelatory, so noteworthy that he wrote it in his autobiography.
  • My earliest distinct recollection of my father is making my way through great drifts of newspapers to his side and finding him alone, holding a sheet of paper before his face.
  • I imitated this action, even wearing his spectacles, thinking they might help solve the mystery.
  • My father was most loving and indulgent, devoted to his home, seldom leaving us, except in the hunting season.
  • His hospitality was great, almost to a fault, and he seldom came home without bringing a guest.
  • Then he went to live in the leafy pool at the end of the garden, where he made the summer nights musical with his quaint love-song.
  • Every morning after breakfast I prepared his bath, made his cage clean and sweet, filled his cups with fresh seed and water from the well-house, and hung a spray of chickweed in his swing.
  • One morning I left the cage on the window-seat while I went to fetch water for his bath.
  • Among the many friends I made in Boston were Mr. William Endicott and his daughter.
  • I felt of him and thought it very strange that he should carry his house on his back.
  • This feat pleased me highly, as his body was very heavy, and it took all my strength to drag him half a mile.
  • I called him Black Beauty, as I had just read the book, and he resembled his namesake in every way, from his glossy black coat to the white star on his forehead.
  • I spent many of my happiest hours on his back.
  • The earth seemed benumbed by his icy touch, and the very spirits of the trees had withdrawn to their roots, and there, curled up in the dark, lay fast asleep.
  • One who reads or talks to me spells with his hand, using the single-hand manual alphabet generally employed by the deaf.
  • My eyes fill with tears now as I think how my mother pressed me close to her, speechless and trembling with delight, taking in every syllable that I spoke, while little Mildred seized my free hand and kissed it and danced, and my father expressed his pride and affection in a big silence.
  • Accordingly I copied the story and sent it to him for his birthday.
  • He believed, or at least suspected, that Miss Sullivan and I had deliberately stolen the bright thoughts of another and imposed them on him to win his admiration.
  • The young writer, as Stevenson has said, instinctively tries to copy whatever seems most admirable, and he shifts his admiration with astonishing versatility.
  • Mr. Anagnos states that he cast his vote with those who were favourable to me.
  • Then he evidently retracted his favourable judgment, why I do not know.
  • Dr. Bell went everywhere with us and in his own delightful way described to me the objects of greatest interest.
  • I learned for the first time to know an author, to recognize his style as I recognize the clasp of a friend's hand.
  • Only those who knew and loved him best can understand what his friendship meant to me.
  • So long as we felt his loving presence and knew that he took a watchful interest in our work, fraught with so many difficulties, we could not be discouraged.
  • His going away left a vacancy in our lives that has never been filled.
  • I wondered more and more, while Burke's masterly speech rolled on in mighty surges of eloquence, how it was that King George and his ministers could have turned a deaf ear to his warning prophecy of our victory and their humiliation.
  • I rejoiced over all his successes, I shut my eyes to his faults, and wondered, not that he had them, but that they had not crushed or dwarfed his soul.
  • Each candidate was known, not by his name, but by a number.
  • Mr. Gilman at first agreed to this; but when my tasks had become somewhat perplexing, he insisted that I was overworked, and that I should remain at his school three years longer.
  • I did not like his plan, for I wished to enter college with my class.
  • Miss Sullivan interpreted his instruction.
  • Give a brief account of Huss and his work.
  • In desperation you seize the budget and dump everything out, and there in a corner is your man, serenely brooding on his own private thought, unconscious of the catastrophe which he has brought upon you.
  • God can dumbness keep While Sin creeps grinning through His house of Time.
  • Virgil is serene and lovely like a marble Apollo in the moonlight; Homer is a beautiful, animated youth in the full sunlight with the wind in his hair.
  • Although she did not think I should understand, she began to spell into my hand the story of Joseph and his brothers.
  • She knows her life is in his hands; there is no one to protect her from his wrath.
  • But, with all my love for Shakespeare, it is often weary work to read all the meanings into his lines which critics and commentators have given them.
  • When he speaks, it is not to impress others, but because his heart would burst if he did not find an outlet for the thoughts that burn in his soul.
  • I admire Victor Hugo – I appreciate his genius, his brilliancy, his romanticism; though he is not one of my literary passions.
  • I like Scott for his freshness, dash and large honesty.
  • There is a tradition that under this tree King Philip, the heroic Indian chief, gazed his last on earth and sky.
  • In imagination I can hear Homer singing, as with unsteady, hesitating steps he gropes his way from camp to camp--singing of life, of love, of war, of the splendid achievements of a noble race.
  • After the play Miss Sullivan took me to see him behind the scenes, and I felt of his curious garb and his flowing hair and beard.
  • Mr. Jefferson let me touch his face so that I could imagine how he looked on waking from that strange sleep of twenty years, and he showed me how poor old Rip staggered to his feet.
  • Then they rose to fight the duel, and I followed the swift thrusts and parries of the swords and the waverings of poor Bob as his courage oozed out at his finger ends.
  • Then the great actor gave his coat a hitch and his mouth a twitch, and in an instant I was in the village of Falling Water and felt Schneider's shaggy head against my knee.
  • As a child I loved to sit on his knee and clasp his great hand with one of mine, while Miss Sullivan spelled into the other his beautiful words about God and the spiritual world.
  • My spirit could not reach up to his, but he gave me a real sense of joy in life, and I never left him without carrying away a fine thought that grew in beauty and depth of meaning as I grew.
  • I knew Mr. Henry Drummond, and the memory of his strong, warm hand-clasp is like a benediction.
  • He knew so much and was so genial that it was impossible to feel dull in his presence.
  • He made me sit in his armchair, while he brought different interesting things for me to examine, and at his request I recited "The Chambered Nautilus," which was then my favorite poem.
  • One beautiful summer day, not long after my meeting with Dr. Holmes, Miss Sullivan and I visited Whittier in his quiet home on the Merrimac.
  • His gentle courtesy and quaint speech won my heart.
  • He had a book of his poems in raised print from which I read "In School Days."
  • Then I asked many questions about the poem, and read his answers by placing my fingers on his lips.
  • What he has taught we have seen beautifully expressed in his own life--love of country, kindness to the least of his brethren, and a sincere desire to live upward and onward.
  • Here in Dr. Bell's laboratory, or in the fields on the shore of the great Bras d'Or, I have spent many delightful hours listening to what he had to tell me about his experiments, and helping him fly kites by means of which he expects to discover the laws that shall govern the future air-ship.
  • His dominating passion is his love for children.
  • His dominating passion is his love for children.
  • He is never quite so happy as when he has a little deaf child in his arms.
  • One does not need to read "A Boy I Knew" to understand him--the most generous, sweet-natured boy I ever knew, a good friend in all sorts of weather, who traces the footprints of love in the life of dogs as well as in that of his fellowmen.
  • Mr. Hutton introduced me to many of his literary friends, greatest of whom are Mr. William Dean Howells and Mark Twain.
  • I also knew Mr. Charles Dudley Warner, the most delightful of story-tellers and the most beloved friend, whose sympathy was so broad that it may be truly said of him, he loved all living things and his neighbour as himself.
  • I was like little Ascanius, who followed with unequal steps the heroic strides of Aeneas on his march toward mighty destinies.
  • This reminds me that Dr. Hale used to give a personal touch to his letters to me by pricking his signature in braille.
  • I read from Mark Twain's lips one or two of his good stories.
  • He has his own way of thinking, saying and doing everything.
  • I feel the twinkle of his eye in his handshake.
  • "Uncle Morrie" of the next letter is Mr. Morrison Heady, of Normandy, Kentucky, who lost his sight and hearing when he was a boy.
  • When Capt. Baker gets well he will take me in his big ship to Africa.
  • I read pretty stories in the book you sent me, about Charles and his boat, and Arthur and his dream, and Rosa and the sheep.
  • Many years ago there lived in England many good people, but the king and his friends were not kind and gentle and patient with good people, because the king did not like to have the people disobey him.
  • His name was Peregrine White.
  • My puppy has had his supper and gone to bed.
  • One sits on the twig of a tree, just beneath our window, and he fills the air with his glad songs.
  • Then I will take his soft chubby hand in mine, and go out in the bright sunshine with him.
  • His wings are as long as my arm, and his bill is as long as my foot.
  • His wings are as long as my arm, and his bill is as long as my foot.
  • One carried me in his arms so that my feet would not touch the water.
  • Tell her to shake him, and then he will blow his trumpet.
  • How did God tell people that his home was in heaven?
  • And the more we love the more near we are to God and His Love.
  • And Jesus, who is His Son, but is nearer to Him than all of us His other Children, came into the world on purpose to tell us all about our Father's Love.
  • At first I was very sorry when I found that the sun had hidden his shining face behind dull clouds, but afterwards I thought why he did it, and then I was happy.
  • The sun knows that you like to see the world covered with beautiful white snow and so he kept back all his brightness, and let the little crystals form in the sky.
  • Then the sun will appear in all his radiance and fill the world with light.
  • His mother was dead and his father was too poor to take care of him.
  • His mother was dead and his father was too poor to take care of him.
  • His name is Tommy, and he is five years old.
  • His parents are too poor to pay to have the little fellow sent to school; so, instead of giving me a dog, the gentlemen are going to help make Tommy's life as bright and joyous as mine.
  • He cannot imagine how very, very happy he will be when he can tell us his thoughts, and we can tell him how we have loved him so long.
  • It is very beautiful to think that you can tell so many people of the heavenly Father's tender love for all His children even when they are not gentle and noble as He wishes them to be.
  • I hope that good people will continue to work for Tommy until his fund is completed, and education has brought light and music into his little life.
  • I am sure his heart was always full of music, and in God's beautiful world he must have heard love's sweet replying.
  • I hope our kind friend Dr. Ellis will come too, and take Tom in his arms.
  • It is evident that something has displeased his Majesty but I cannot imagine what it can be.
  • Perhaps the Old Sea God as he lay asleep upon the shore, heard the soft music of growing things--the stir of life in the earth's bosom, and his stormy heart was angry, because he knew that his and Winter's reign was almost at an end.
  • His name is Eumer.
  • His name is Phillips Brooks.
  • I suppose he has been too busy to write to his little friend.
  • I do try not to mourn his death too sadly.
  • His beautiful word-pictures made us feel as if we were sitting in the shadow of San Marco, dreaming, or sailing upon the moonlit canal....
  • He invited me to visit his museum in Salem the next time I go to Boston.
  • We also met Mr. Rogers... who kindly left his carriage to bring us home.
  • We also met Mr. and Mrs. Terry, Miss Terry's brother and his wife.
  • How noble and kingly the King was, especially in his misfortunes!
  • The last act affected us most deeply, and we all wept, wondering how the executioner could have the heart to tear the King from his loving wife's arms.
  • Mr. Burroughs told me about his home near the Hudson, and what a happy place it must be!
  • Teacher has read me his lively stories about his boyhood, and I enjoyed them greatly.
  • Our friend, Mr. Alden, the editor of Harper's was there, and of course we enjoyed his society very much....
  • You must tell Mr. Howells when you see him, that we are living in his house....
  • It is like a beautiful maiden, who always lived in a palace, surrounded by a magnificent court; while the "Iliad" is like a splendid youth, who has had the earth for his playground.
  • I have his "Jungle-Book" in raised print, and what a splendid, refreshing book it is!
  • Cicero is splendid, but his orations are very difficult to translate.
  • Perhaps, if you would send a copy of this to the head of the Cambridge School, it might enlighten his mind on a few subjects, on which he seems to be in total darkness just now....
  • His people must have wondered at his unusual deliberation.
  • His people must have wondered at his unusual deliberation.
  • I have worn it only once, but then I felt that Solomon in all his glory was not to be compared with me!
  • This little boy could speak two or three languages before he lost his hearing through sickness, and he is now only about five years old.
  • Dr. Bell told me many interesting things about his work.
  • But every one who has met her has given his best ideas to her and she has taken them.
  • The deaf person with sight looks at the fingers of his companion, but it is also possible to feel them.
  • It is now sixty-five years since Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe knew that he had made his way through Laura Bridgman's fingers to her intelligence.
  • The names of Laura Bridgman and Helen Keller will always be linked together, and it is necessary to understand what Dr. Howe did for his pupil before one comes to an account of Miss Sullivan's work.
  • Laura Bridgman was born at Hanover, New Hampshire, December 21, 1829; so she was almost eight years old when Dr. Howe began his experiments with her.
  • Science and faith together led him to try to make his way into the soul which he believed was born in Laura Bridgman as in every other human being.
  • His plan was to teach Laura by means of raised types.
  • His success convinced him that language can be conveyed through type to the mind of the blind-deaf child, who, before education, is in the state of the baby who has not learned to prattle; indeed, is in a much worse state, for the brain has grown in years without natural nourishment.
  • After Laura's education had progressed for two months with the use only of raised letters, Dr. Howe sent one of his teachers to learn the manual alphabet from a deaf-mute.
  • After the first year or two Dr. Howe did not teach Laura Bridgman himself, but gave her over to other teachers, who under his direction carried on the work of teaching her language.
  • He never forgot to keep his records of Laura Bridgman in the fashion of one who works in a laboratory.
  • When she first wrote from Tuscumbia to Mr. Michael Anagnos, Dr. Howes son-in-law and his successor as Director of the Perkins Institution, about her work with her pupil, the Boston papers began at once to publish exaggerated accounts of Helen Keller.
  • As Mr. Anagnos was the head of a great institution, what he said had much more effect than the facts in Miss Sullivan's account on which he based his statements.
  • It was Dr. Howe who, by his work with Laura Bridgman, made Miss Sullivan's work possible: but it was Miss Sullivan who discovered the way to teach language to the deaf-blind.
  • Mr. Wilson, a teacher at Florence, and a friend of the Kellers', studied at Harvard the summer before and went to the Perkins Institution to learn if anything could be done for his friend's child.
  • Her father looks in at us morning and evening as he goes to and from his office, and sees her contentedly stringing her beads or making horizontal lines on her sewing-card, and exclaims, "How quiet she is!"
  • When he succeeded in forming it to suit her, she patted him on his woolly head so vigorously that I thought some of his slips were intentional.
  • Her father objected and said that no child of his should be deprived of his food on any account.
  • BUT LONG BEFORE HE UTTERS HIS FIRST WORD, HE UNDERSTANDS WHAT IS SAID TO HIM.
  • Let him go and come freely, let him touch real things and combine his impressions for himself, instead of sitting indoors at a little round table, while a sweet-voiced teacher suggests that he build a stone wall with his wooden blocks, or make a rainbow out of strips of coloured paper, or plant straw trees in bead flower-pots.
  • If she could see and hear, I suppose she would get rid of her superfluous energy in ways which would not, perhaps, tax her brain so much, although I suspect that the ordinary child takes his play pretty seriously.
  • The little fellow who whirls his "New York Flyer" round the nursery, making "horseshoe curves" undreamed of by less imaginative engineers, is concentrating his whole soul on his toy locomotive.
  • One of the girls taught her to dance the polka, and a little boy showed her his rabbits and spelled their names for her.
  • The keeper of the bears made one big black fellow stand on his hind legs and hold out his great paw to us, which Helen shook politely.
  • She was greatly delighted with the monkeys and kept her hand on the star performer while he went through his tricks, and laughed heartily when he took off his hat to the audience.
  • One of the leopards licked her hands, and the man in charge of the giraffes lifted her up in his arms so that she could feel their ears and see how tall they were.
  • One little chap, about seven, was persuaded to learn the letters, and he spelled his name for Helen.
  • She was delighted, and showed her joy, by hugging and kissing him, much to his embarrassment.
  • She placed them in a chair, resisting all temptation to look at them until every child had received his gifts.
  • But his silence was more eloquent than words.
  • I appreciate the kind things Mr. Anagnos has said about Helen and me; but his extravagant way of saying them rubs me the wrong way.
  • Dr. Hale claims kinship with Helen, and seems very proud of his little cousin.
  • Thornton goes to school and gets his face dirty.
  • He put her answer down in his note book.
  • He gave her his watch to play with; but that didn't keep her still.
  • We lunched with Mr. Thayer (your former pastor) and his wife.
  • If his experiences and observations hadn't led him to the concepts, SMALL, LARGE, GOOD, BAD, SWEET, SOUR, he would have nothing to attach the word-tags to.
  • It is not the word, but the capacity to experience the sensation that counts in his education.
  • The animal groaned with pain, and Helen, perceiving his groans, was filled with pity.
  • Her father wrote to her last summer that the birds and bees were eating all his grapes.
  • PERHAPS his name was Joe.
  • But PERHAPS his mother sent him to a store to buy something for dinner.
  • I SUPPOSE he was going to take it to his mother.
  • Little boy did love his calf.
  • The next lines are still more idiomatic, "When Suetonius left the country, they fell upon his troops and retook the island of Anglesea."
  • I have already told her in simple language of the beautiful and helpful life of Jesus, and of His cruel death.
  • When she referred to our conversation again, it was to ask, "Why did not Jesus go away, so that His enemies could not find Him?"
  • When told that Jesus walked on the sea to meet His disciples, she said, decidedly, "It does not mean WALKED, it means SWAM."
  • I believe every child has hidden away somewhere in his being noble capacities which may be quickened and developed if we go about it in the right way; but we shall never properly develop the higher natures of our little ones while we continue to fill their minds with the so-called rudiments.
  • The attitude of the child toward his books should be that of unconscious receptivity.
  • Books are the storehouse of language, and any child, whether deaf or not, if he has his attention attracted in any way to printed pages, must learn.
  • She recognized that others used their lips; she "saw" her father reading a paper and when he laid it down she sat in his chair and held the paper before her face.
  • Any teacher of composition knows that he can bring his pupils to the point of writing without errors in syntax or in the choice of words.
  • When Dr. Bell said this he was arguing his own case.
  • As we went in she repeated these words, 'Out of the cloud-folds of his garments Winter shakes the snow.'
  • In one of his letters, speaking of how God in every way tells us of His love, he says, "I think he writes it even upon the walls of the great house of nature which we live in, that he is our Father."
  • In one of his letters, speaking of how God in every way tells us of His love, he says, "I think he writes it even upon the walls of the great house of nature which we live in, that he is our Father."
  • His love and care are written all over the walls of nature.
  • She closes this letter with, "I must go to bed, for Morpheus has touched my eyelids with his golden wand."
  • Helen wrote a little letter, and, enclosing the manuscript, forwarded both by mail to Mr. Anagnos for his birthday.
  • This story, "Frost Fairies," appeared in a book written by Miss Margaret T. Canby, entitled "Birdie and his Fairy Friends."
  • As he came in sight of the rose-bushes that grew near the side of the house, he suddenly clapped his hands, and with a little shout of joy stopped to look at them; they were all covered with lovely rosebuds.
  • The Frost Fairies [From "Birdie and his Fairy Friends"] by Margaret T. Canby
  • But his most wonderful work is the painting of the trees, which look, after his task is done, as if they were covered with the brightest layers of gold and rubies; and are beautiful enough to comfort us for the flight of summer.
  • Well, one day King Frost was trying to think of some good that he could do with his treasure; and suddenly he concluded to send some of it to his kind neighbour, Santa Claus, to buy presents of food and clothing for the poor, that they might not suffer so much when King Winter went near their homes.
  • So he called together his merry little fairies, and showing them a number of jars and vases filled with gold and precious stones, told them to carry those carefully to the palace of Santa Claus, and give them to him with the compliments of King Frost.
  • "He will know how to make good use of the treasure," added Jack Frost; then he told the fairies not to loiter by the way, but to do his bidding quickly.
  • Their fears were well founded, for their long absence had alarmed the king, and he had started out to look for his tardy servants, and just as they were all hidden, he came along slowly, looking on all sides for the fairies.
  • Then the fairies thanked him for his forgiveness, and promised to work very hard to please him; and the good-natured king took them all up in his arms, and carried them safely home to his palace.
  • The old King will welcome you kindly, for he loves children, and it is his chief delight to give them pleasure.
  • You must know that King Frost, like all other kings, has great treasures of gold and precious stones; but as he is a generous old monarch, he endeavours to make a right use of his riches.
  • So he called together the merry little fairies of his household and, showing them the jars and vases containing his treasures, he bade them carry them to the palace of Santa Claus as quickly as they could.
  • Their fears were well founded, for their long absence had alarmed the King, and he mounted North Wind and went out in search of his tardy couriers.
  • Their pleasure banished the anger from King Frost's heart and the frown from his brow, and he, too, began to admire the painted trees.
  • Of the sources of his vocabulary he is, for the most part, as unaware as he is of the moment when he ate the food which makes a bit of his thumbnail.
  • Let him get language and he gets the very stuff that language is made of, the thought and the experience of his race.
  • The deaf child who has only the sign language of De l'Epee is an intellectual Philip Nolan, an alien from all races, and his thoughts are not the thoughts of an Englishman, or a Frenchman, or a Spaniard.
  • The most precious, the most wonderful of His gifts was still mine.
  • If they would only expend the same amount of energy loving their fellow men, the devil would die in his own tracks of ennui.
  • Without a touch of remorse you drive the father from his land, clasping to his bosom his household gods and his half-naked children.
  • I rode a fiery hunter--I can feel the impatient toss of his head now and the quiver that ran through him at the first roar of the cannon.
  • His highest duty to fodder and water his horses!
  • It is true, I never assisted the sun materially in his rising, but, doubt not, it was of the last importance only to be present at it.
  • Let him who has work to do recollect that the object of clothing is, first, to retain the vital heat, and secondly, in this state of society, to cover nakedness, and he may judge how much of any necessary or important work may be accomplished without adding to his wardrobe.
  • I have heard of a dog that barked at every stranger who approached his master's premises with clothes on, but was easily quieted by a naked thief.
  • Old shoes will serve a hero longer than they have served his valet--if a hero ever has a valet--bare feet are older than shoes, and he can make them do.
  • Let Harlequin be taken with a fit of the colic and his trappings will have to serve that mood too.
  • The man who has actually paid for his farm with labor on it is so rare that every neighbor can point to him.
  • To get his shoestrings he speculates in herds of cattle.
  • With consummate skill he has set his trap with a hair spring to catch comfort and independence, and then, as he turned away, got his own leg into it.
  • And when the farmer has got his house, he may not be the richer but the poorer for it, and it be the house that has got him.
  • And if the civilized man's pursuits are no worthier than the savage's, if he is employed the greater part of his life in obtaining gross necessaries and comforts merely, why should he have a better dwelling than the former?
  • Or what if I were to allow--would it not be a singular allowance?--that our furniture should be more complex than the Arab's, in proportion as we are morally and intellectually his superiors!
  • When he was refreshed with food and sleep, he contemplated his journey again.
  • The owner of the axe, as he released his hold on it, said that it was the apple of his eye; but I returned it sharper than I received it.
  • At six I passed him and his family on the road.
  • No man was ever more honored in the character of his raisers than I. They are destined, I trust, to assist at the raising of loftier structures one day.
  • There is some of the same fitness in a man's building his own house that there is in a bird's building its own nest.
  • All very well perhaps from his point of view, but only a little better than the common dilettantism.
  • What reasonable man ever supposed that ornaments were something outward and in the skin merely--that the tortoise got his spotted shell, or the shell-fish its mother-o'-pearl tints, by such a contract as the inhabitants of Broadway their Trinity Church?
  • But a man has no more to do with the style of architecture of his house than a tortoise with that of its shell: nor need the soldier be so idle as to try to paint the precise color of his virtue on his standard.
  • This man seemed to me to lean over the cornice, and timidly whisper his half truth to the rude occupants who really knew it better than he.
  • It would signify somewhat, if, in any earnest sense, he slanted them and daubed it; but the spirit having departed out of the tenant, it is of a piece with constructing his own coffin--the architecture of the grave--and "carpenter" is but another name for "coffin-maker."
  • One man says, in his despair or indifference to life, take up a handful of the earth at your feet, and paint your house that color.
  • Is he thinking of his last and narrow house?
  • Tuition, for instance, is an important item in the term bill, while for the far more valuable education which he gets by associating with the most cultivated of his contemporaries no charge is made.
  • The student who secures his coveted leisure and retirement by systematically shirking any labor necessary to man obtains but an ignoble and unprofitable leisure, defrauding himself of the experience which alone can make leisure fruitful.
  • Which would be most likely to cut his fingers?...
  • Man does some of his part of the exchange work in his six weeks of haying, and it is no boy's play.
  • However, I should never have broken a horse or bull and taken him to board for any work he might do for me, for fear I should become a horseman or a herdsman merely; and if society seems to be the gainer by so doing, are we certain that what is one man's gain is not another's loss, and that the stable-boy has equal cause with his master to be satisfied?
  • Mr. Balcom, a promising young architect, designs it on the back of his Vitruvius, with hard pencil and ruler, and the job is let out to Dobson & Sons, stonecutters.
  • In cold weather it was no little amusement to bake several small loaves of this in succession, tending and turning them as carefully as an Egyptian his hatching eggs.
  • Every New Englander might easily raise all his own breadstuffs in this land of rye and Indian corn, and not depend on distant and fluctuating markets for them.
  • For the most part the farmer gives to his cattle and hogs the grain of his own producing, and buys flour, which is at least no more wholesome, at a greater cost, at the store.
  • What man but a philosopher would not be ashamed to see his furniture packed in a cart and going up country exposed to the light of heaven and the eyes of men, a beggarly account of empty boxes?
  • It is the same as if all these traps were buckled to a man's belt, and he could not move over the rough country where our lines are cast without dragging them--dragging his trap.
  • He was a lucky fox that left his tail in the trap.
  • The muskrat will gnaw his third leg off to be free.
  • No wonder man has lost his elasticity.
  • I think that the man is at a dead set who has got through a knot-hole or gateway where his sledge load of furniture cannot follow him.
  • The laborer's day ends with the going down of the sun, and he is then free to devote himself to his chosen pursuit, independent of his labor; but his employer, who speculates from month to month, has no respite from one end of the year to the other.
  • It is not necessary that a man should earn his living by the sweat of his brow, unless he sweats easier than I do.
  • It is by a mathematical point only that we are wise, as the sailor or the fugitive slave keeps the polestar in his eye; but that is sufficient guidance for all our life.
  • I heard it proposed lately that two young men should travel together over the world, the one without money, earning his means as he went, before the mast and behind the plow, the other carrying a bill of exchange in his pocket.
  • Howard was no doubt an exceedingly kind and worthy man in his way, and has his reward; but, comparatively speaking, what are a hundred Howards to us, if their philanthropy do not help us in our best estate, when we are most worthy to be helped?
  • It is partly his taste, and not merely his misfortune.
  • I do not value chiefly a man's uprightness and benevolence, which are, as it were, his stem and leaves.
  • The philanthropist too often surrounds mankind with the remembrance of his own castoff griefs as an atmosphere, and calls it sympathy.
  • If anything ail a man, so that he does not perform his functions, if he have a pain in his bowels even--for that is the seat of sympathy--he forthwith sets about reforming--the world.
  • I believe that what so saddens the reformer is not his sympathy with his fellows in distress, but, though he be the holiest son of God, is his private ail.
  • The nearest that I came to actual possession was when I bought the Hollowell place, and had begun to sort my seeds, and collected materials with which to make a wheelbarrow to carry it on or off with; but before the owner gave me a deed of it, his wife--every man has such a wife--changed her mind and wished to keep it, and he offered me ten dollars to release him.
  • I was in haste to buy it, before the proprietor finished getting out some rocks, cutting down the hollow apple trees, and grubbing up some young birches which had sprung up in the pasture, or, in short, had made any more of his improvements.
  • What should we think of the shepherd's life if his flocks always wandered to higher pastures than his thoughts?
  • Every man is tasked to make his life, even in its details, worthy of the contemplation of his most elevated and critical hour.
  • An honest man has hardly need to count more than his ten fingers, or in extreme cases he may add his ten toes, and lump the rest.
  • And when they run over a man that is walking in his sleep, a supernumerary sleeper in the wrong position, and wake him up, they suddenly stop the cars, and make a hue and cry about it, as if this were an exception.
  • Hardly a man takes a half-hour's nap after dinner, but when he wakes he holds up his head and asks, "What's the news?" as if the rest of mankind had stood his sentinels.
  • "Pray tell me anything new that has happened to a man anywhere on this globe"--and he reads it over his coffee and rolls, that a man has had his eyes gouged out this morning on the Wachito River; never dreaming the while that he lives in the dark unfathomed mammoth cave of this world, and has but the rudiment of an eye himself.
  • The penny-post is, commonly, an institution through which you seriously offer a man that penny for his thoughts which is so often safely offered in jest.
  • Kieou-he-yu (great dignitary of the state of Wei) sent a man to Khoung-tseu to know his news.
  • The messenger answered with respect: My master desires to diminish the number of his faults, but he cannot come to the end of them.
  • One of his father's ministers having discovered him, revealed to him what he was, and the misconception of his character was removed, and he knew himself to be a prince.
  • If he should give us an account of the realities he beheld there, we should not recognize the place in his description.
  • I kept Homer's Iliad on my table through the summer, though I looked at his page only now and then.
  • They have no cause of their own to plead, but while they enlighten and sustain the reader his common sense will not refuse them.
  • I know a woodchopper, of middle age, who takes a French paper, not for news as he says, for he is above that, but to "keep himself in practice," he being a Canadian by birth; and when I ask him what he considers the best thing he can do in this world, he says, beside this, to keep up and add to his English.
  • Or shall I hear the name of Plato and never read his book?
  • As if Plato were my townsman and I never saw him--my next neighbor and I never heard him speak or attended to the wisdom of his words.
  • A man must find his occasions in himself, it is true.
  • The natural day is very calm, and will hardly reprove his indolence.
  • Nor is there any man so independent on his farm that he can say them nay.
  • If the snow lies deep, they strap on his snowshoes, and, with the giant plow, plow a furrow from the mountains to the seaboard, in which the cars, like a following drill-barrow, sprinkle all the restless men and floating merchandise in the country for seed.
  • Or perchance, at evening, I hear him in his stable blowing off the superfluous energy of the day, that he may calm his nerves and cool his liver and brain for a few hours of iron slumber.
  • Here is a hogshead of molasses or of brandy directed to John Smith, Cuttingsville, Vermont, some trader among the Green Mountains, who imports for the farmers near his clearing, and now perchance stands over his bulkhead and thinks of the last arrivals on the coast, how they may affect the price for him, telling his customers this moment, as he has told them twenty times before this morning, that he expects some by the next train of prime quality.
  • When the old bell-wether at the head rattles his bell, the mountains do indeed skip like rams and the little hills like lambs.
  • No wonder that man added this bird to his tame stock--to say nothing of the eggs and drumsticks.
  • Who would not be early to rise, and rise earlier and earlier every successive day of his life, till he became unspeakably healthy, wealthy, and wise?
  • His health is ever good, his lungs are sound, his spirits never flag.
  • His health is ever good, his lungs are sound, his spirits never flag.
  • Even the sailor on the Atlantic and Pacific is awakened by his voice; but its shrill sound never roused me from my slumbers.
  • An old-fashioned man would have lost his senses or died of ennui before this.
  • Nay, I was frequently notified of the passage of a traveller along the highway sixty rods off by the scent of his pipe.
  • What sort of space is that which separates a man from his fellows and makes him solitary?
  • And so I went home to my bed, and left him to pick his way through the darkness and the mud to Brighton--or Bright-town--which place he would reach some time in the morning.
  • The value of a man is not in his skin, that we should touch him.
  • The bullet of your thought must have overcome its lateral and ricochet motion and fallen into its last and steady course before it reaches the ear of the hearer, else it may plow out again through the side of his head.
  • When the night arrived, to quote their own words--He laid us on the bed with himself and his wife, they at the one end and we at the other, it being only planks laid a foot from the ground and a thin mat upon them.
  • He has a great bundle of white oak bark under his arm for a sick man, gathered this Sunday morning.
  • To him Homer was a great writer, though what his writing was about he did not know.
  • He was about twenty-eight years old, and had left Canada and his father's house a dozen years before to work in the States, and earn money to buy a farm with at last, perhaps in his native country.
  • He came along early, crossing my bean-field, though without anxiety or haste to get to his work, such as Yankees exhibit.
  • He didn't care if he only earned his board.
  • Frequently he would leave his dinner in the bushes, when his dog had caught a woodchuck by the way, and go back a mile and a half to dress it and leave it in the cellar of the house where he boarded, after deliberating first for half an hour whether he could not sink it in the pond safely till nightfall--loving to dwell long upon these themes.
  • He was a skilful chopper, and indulged in some flourishes and ornaments in his art.
  • He cut his trees level and close to the ground, that the sprouts which came up afterward might be more vigorous and a sled might slide over the stumps; and instead of leaving a whole tree to support his corded wood, he would pare it away to a slender stake or splinter which you could break off with your hand at last.
  • Sometimes I saw him at his work in the woods, felling trees, and he would greet me with a laugh of inexpressible satisfaction, and a salutation in Canadian French, though he spoke English as well.
  • In the winter he had a fire by which at noon he warmed his coffee in a kettle; and as he sat on a log to eat his dinner the chickadees would sometimes come round and alight on his arm and peck at the potato in his fingers; and he said that he "liked to have the little fellers about him."
  • I sometimes found the name of his native parish handsomely written in the snow by the highway, with the proper French accent, and knew that he had passed.
  • I asked him if he ever wished to write his thoughts.
  • A townsman told me that when he met him sauntering through the village in his small close-fitting cap, and whistling to himself, he reminded him of a prince in disguise.
  • If an ox were his property, and he wished to get needles and thread at the store, he thought it would be inconvenient and impossible soon to go on mortgaging some portion of the creature each time to that amount.
  • One man, perhaps, if he has got enough, will be satisfied to sit all day with his back to the fire and his belly to the table, by George!
  • If I suggested any improvement in his mode of life, he merely answered, without expressing any regret, that it was too late.
  • Many a traveller came out of his way to see me and the inside of my house, and, as an excuse for calling, asked for a glass of water.
  • These were his words.
  • And there he was to prove the truth of his words.
  • It was the only open and cultivated field for a great distance on either side of the road, so they made the most of it; and sometimes the man in the field heard more of travellers' gossip and comment than was meant for his ear: "Beans so late! peas so late!"--for I continued to plant when others had begun to hoe--the ministerial husbandman had not suspected it.
  • The hawk is aerial brother of the wave which he sails over and surveys, those his perfect air-inflated wings answering to the elemental unfledged pinions of the sea.
  • That's Roman wormwood--that's pigweed--that's sorrel--that's piper-grass--have at him, chop him up, turn his roots upward to the sun, don't let him have a fibre in the shade, if you do he'll turn himself t' other side up and be as green as a leek in two days.
  • Many a lusty crest--waving Hector, that towered a whole foot above his crowding comrades, fell before my weapon and rolled in the dust.
  • But why should not the New Englander try new adventures, and not lay so much stress on his grain, his potato and grass crop, and his orchards--raise other crops than these?
  • They all reflect and absorb his rays alike, and the former make but a small part of the glorious picture which he beholds in his daily course.
  • In his view the earth is all equally cultivated like a garden.
  • For the most part I escaped wonderfully from these dangers, either by proceeding at once boldly and without deliberation to the goal, as is recommended to those who run the gauntlet, or by keeping my thoughts on high things, like Orpheus, who, "loudly singing the praises of the gods to his lyre, drowned the voices of the Sirens, and kept out of danger."
  • In our most trivial walks, we are constantly, though unconsciously, steering like pilots by certain well-known beacons and headlands, and if we go beyond our usual course we still carry in our minds the bearing of some neighboring cape; and not till we are completely lost, or turned round--for a man needs only to be turned round once with his eyes shut in this world to be lost--do we appreciate the vastness and strangeness of nature.
  • Once in a while we sat together on the pond, he at one end of the boat, and I at the other; but not many words passed between us, for he had grown deaf in his later years, but he occasionally hummed a psalm, which harmonized well enough with my philosophy.
  • Whoever camps for a week in summer by the shore of a pond, needs only bury a pail of water a few feet deep in the shade of his camp to be independent of the luxury of ice.
  • It is earth's eye; looking into which the beholder measures the depth of his own nature.
  • He used to make a cable for his anchor of strips of hickory bark tied together.
  • That devilish Iron Horse, whose ear-rending neigh is heard throughout the town, has muddied the Boiling Spring with his foot, and he it is that has browsed off all the woods on Walden shore, that Trojan horse, with a thousand men in his belly, introduced by mercenary Greeks!
  • He rounded this water with his hand, deepened and clarified it in his thought, and in his will bequeathed it to Concord.
  • The engineer does not forget at night, or his nature does not, that he has beheld this vision of serenity and purity once at least during the day.
  • It did not turn his mill, and it was no privilege to him to behold it.
  • He sawed a channel in the ice toward the shore, and hauled it over and along and out on to the ice with oxen; but, before he had gone far in his work, he was surprised to find that it was wrong end upward, with the stumps of the branches pointing down, and the small end firmly fastened in the sandy bottom.
  • He had some of it in his shed then.
  • His father, eighty years old, could not remember when it was not there.
  • How much fairer than the pool before the farmer's door, in which his ducks swim!
  • I had sat there many times of old before the ship was built that floated his family to America.
  • A man will not need to study history to find out what is best for his own culture.
  • If he and his family would live simply, they might all go a-huckleberrying in the summer for their amusement.
  • But he, poor man, disturbed only a couple of fins while I was catching a fair string, and he said it was his luck; but when we changed seats in the boat luck changed seats too.
  • Almost every New England boy among my contemporaries shouldered a fowling-piece between the ages of ten and fourteen; and his hunting and fishing grounds were not limited, like the preserves of an English nobleman, but were more boundless even than those of a savage.
  • This is the tidbit which tempts his insectivorous fate.
  • No man ever followed his genius till it misled him.
  • Who has not sometimes derived an inexpressible satisfaction from his food in which appetite had no share?
  • A puritan may go to his brown-bread crust with as gross an appetite as ever an alderman to his turtle.
  • Every man is the builder of a temple, called his body, to the god he worships, after a style purely his own, nor can he get off by hammering marble instead.
  • John Farmer sat at his door one September evening, after a hard day's work, his mind still running on his labor more or less.
  • Having bathed, he sat down to re-create his intellectual man.
  • It was a rather cool evening, and some of his neighbors were apprehending a frost.
  • He had not attended to the train of his thoughts long when he heard some one playing on a flute, and that sound harmonized with his mood.
  • It was no more than the scurf of his skin, which was constantly shuffled off.
  • But the notes of the flute came home to his ears out of a different sphere from that he worked in, and suggested work for certain faculties which slumbered in him.
  • And oh, the housekeeping! to keep bright the devil's door-knobs, and scour his tubs this bright day!
  • Why has man just these species of animals for his neighbors; as if nothing but a mouse could have filled this crevice?
  • Or perchance he was some Achilles, who had nourished his wrath apart, and had now come to avenge or rescue his Patroclus.
  • In the fall the loon (Colymbus glacialis) came, as usual, to moult and bathe in the pond, making the woods ring with his wild laughter before I had risen.
  • At rumor of his arrival all the Mill-dam sportsmen are on the alert, in gigs and on foot, two by two and three by three, with patent rifles and conical balls and spy-glasses.
  • But now the kind October wind rises, rustling the leaves and rippling the surface of the water, so that no loon can be heard or seen, though his foes sweep the pond with spy-glasses, and make the woods resound with their discharges.
  • It was surprising how quickly he made up his mind and put his resolve into execution.
  • While he was thinking one thing in his brain, I was endeavoring to divine his thought in mine.
  • Suddenly your adversary's checker disappears beneath the board, and the problem is to place yours nearest to where his will appear again.
  • How surprised must the fishes be to see this ungainly visitor from another sphere speeding his way amid their schools!
  • Yet he appeared to know his course as surely under water as on the surface, and swam much faster there.
  • I found that it was as well for me to rest on my oars and wait his reappearing as to endeavor to calculate where he would rise; for again and again, when I was straining my eyes over the surface one way, I would suddenly be startled by his unearthly laugh behind me.
  • Did not his white breast enough betray him?
  • It was surprising to see how serenely he sailed off with unruffled breast when he came to the surface, doing all the work with his webbed feet beneath.
  • I concluded that he laughed in derision of my efforts, confident of his own resources.
  • His white breast, the stillness of the air, and the smoothness of the water were all against him.
  • He brought his own knife, though I had two, and we used to scour them by thrusting them into the earth.
  • Cato says, the master of a family (patremfamilias) must have in his rustic villa "cellam oleariam, vinariam, dolia multa, uti lubeat caritatem expectare, et rei, et virtuti, et gloriae erit," that is, "an oil and wine cellar, many casks, so that it may be pleasant to expect hard times; it will be for his advantage, and virtue, and glory."
  • Nowadays the host does not admit you to his hearth, but has got the mason to build one for yourself somewhere in his alley, and hospitality is the art of keeping you at the greatest distance.
  • His bread and meat are sweet.
  • Every man looks at his wood-pile with a kind of affection.
  • The laborer, looking into it at evening, purifies his thoughts of the dross and earthiness which they have accumulated during the day.
  • Though mainly but a humble route to neighboring villages, or for the woodman's team, it once amused the traveller more than now by its variety, and lingered longer in his memory.
  • East of my bean-field, across the road, lived Cato Ingraham, slave of Duncan Ingraham, Esquire, gentleman, of Concord village, who built his slave a house, and gave him permission to live in Walden Woods;--Cato, not Uticensis, but Concordiensis.
  • There are a few who remember his little patch among the walnuts, which he let grow up till he should be old and need them; but a younger and whiter speculator got them at last.
  • Not long since I read his epitaph in the old Lincoln burying-ground, a little on one side, near the unmarked graves of some British grenadiers who fell in the retreat from Concord--where he is styled "Sippio Brister"--Scipio Africanus he had some title to be called--"a man of color," as if he were discolored.
  • It chanced that I walked that way across the fields the following night, about the same hour, and hearing a low moaning at this spot, I drew near in the dark, and discovered the only survivor of the family that I know, the heir of both its virtues and its vices, who alone was interested in this burning, lying on his stomach and looking over the cellar wall at the still smouldering cinders beneath, muttering to himself, as is his wont.
  • Farther in the woods than any of these, where the road approaches nearest to the pond, Wyman the potter squatted, and furnished his townsmen with earthenware, and left descendants to succeed him.
  • One day in midsummer, when I was hoeing, a man who was carrying a load of pottery to market stopped his horse against my field and inquired concerning Wyman the younger.
  • If he had lived I should have made him fight his battles over again.
  • His trade here was that of a ditcher.
  • He wore a greatcoat in midsummer, being affected with the trembling delirium, and his face was the color of carmine.
  • Before his house was pulled down, when his comrades avoided it as "an unlucky castle," I visited it.
  • There lay his old clothes curled up by use, as if they were himself, upon his raised plank bed.
  • His pipe lay broken on the hearth.
  • The skin of a woodchuck was freshly stretched upon the back of the house, a trophy of his last Waterloo; but no warm cap or mittens would he want more.
  • When I made most noise he would stretch out his neck, and erect his neck feathers, and open his eyes wide; but their lids soon fell again, and he began to nod.
  • I too felt a slumberous influence after watching him half an hour, as he sat thus with his eyes half open, like a cat, winged brother of the cat.
  • Sometimes, notwithstanding the snow, when I returned from my walk at evening I crossed the deep tracks of a woodchopper leading from my door, and found his pile of whittlings on the hearth, and my house filled with the odor of his pipe.
  • His business calls him out at all hours, even when doctors sleep.
  • One of the last of the philosophers--Connecticut gave him to the world--he peddled first her wares, afterwards, as he declares, his brains.
  • These he peddles still, prompting God and disgracing man, bearing for fruit his brain only, like the nut its kernel.
  • His words and attitude always suppose a better state of things than other men are acquainted with, and he will be the last man to be disappointed as the ages revolve.
  • But though comparatively disregarded now, when his day comes, laws unsuspected by most will take effect, and masters of families and rulers will come to him for advice.
  • With his hospitable intellect he embraces children, beggars, insane, and scholars, and entertains the thought of all, adding to it commonly some breadth and elegance.
  • A blue-robed man, whose fittest roof is the overarching sky which reflects his serenity.
  • There was one other with whom I had "solid seasons," long to be remembered, at his house in the village, and who looked in upon me from time to time; but I had no more for society there.
  • The Vishnu Purana says, "The house-holder is to remain at eventide in his courtyard as long as it takes to milk a cow, or longer if he pleases, to await the arrival of a guest."
  • They tell me that if the fox would remain in the bosom of the frozen earth he would be safe, or if he would run in a straight line away no foxhound could overtake him; but, having left his pursuers far behind, he stops to rest and listen till they come up, and when he runs he circles round to his old haunts, where the hunters await him.
  • Sometimes, however, he will run upon a wall many rods, and then leap off far to one side, and he appears to know that water will not retain his scent.
  • But I fear that he was not the wiser for all I told him, for every time I attempted to answer his questions he interrupted me by asking, "What do you do here?"
  • The hunter still kept his place and listened to the hounds.
  • One man still preserves the horns of the last deer that was killed in this vicinity, and another has told me the particulars of the hunt in which his uncle was engaged.
  • The latter raises the moss and bark gently with his knife in search of insects; the former lays open logs to their core with his axe, and moss and bark fly far and wide.
  • He gets his living by barking trees.
  • A factory-owner, hearing what depth I had found, thought that it could not be true, for, judging from his acquaintance with dams, sand would not lie at so steep an angle.
  • Such a rule of the two diameters not only guides us toward the sun in the system and the heart in man, but draws lines through the length and breadth of the aggregate of a man's particular daily behaviors and waves of life into his coves and inlets, and where they intersect will be the height or depth of his character.
  • It may be that he lays up no treasures in this world which will cool his summer drink in the next.
  • They said that a gentleman farmer, who was behind the scenes, wanted to double his money, which, as I understood, amounted to half a million already; but in order to cover each one of his dollars with another, he took off the only coat, ay, the skin itself, of Walden Pond in the midst of a hard winter.
  • Perhaps I shall hear a solitary loon laugh as he dives and plumes himself, or shall see a lonely fisher in his boat, like a floating leaf, beholding his form reflected in the waves, where lately a hundred men securely labored.
  • I meet his servant come to draw water for his master, and our buckets as it were grate together in the same well.
  • It took a short siesta at noon, and boomed once more toward night, as the sun was withdrawing his influence.
  • Not seeing any ducks, he hid his boat on the north or back side of an island in the pond, and then concealed himself in the bushes on the south side, to await them.
  • At length the sun's rays have attained the right angle, and warm winds blow up mist and rain and melt the snowbanks, and the sun, dispersing the mist, smiles on a checkered landscape of russet and white smoking with incense, through which the traveller picks his way from islet to islet, cheered by the music of a thousand tinkling rills and rivulets whose veins are filled with the blood of winter which they are bearing off.
  • Why the jailer does not leave open his prison doors--why the judge does not dismis his case--why the preacher does not dismiss his congregation!
  • The wild goose is more of a cosmopolite than we; he breaks his fast in Canada, takes a luncheon in the Ohio, and plumes himself for the night in a southern bayou.
  • Is Franklin the only man who is lost, that his wife should be so earnest to find him?
  • I learned this, at least, by my experiment: that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
  • Let every one mind his own business, and endeavor to be what he was made.
  • If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer.
  • Shall he turn his spring into summer?
  • One day it came into his mind to make a staff.
  • He proceeded instantly to the forest for wood, being resolved that it should not be made of unsuitable material; and as he searched for and rejected stick after stick, his friends gradually deserted him, for they grew old in their works and died, but he grew not older by a moment.
  • The material was pure, and his art was pure; how could the result be other than wonderful?
  • His companion's prayer is forgotten.
  • God is only the president of the day, and Webster is his orator.
  • I called on the king, but he made me wait in his hall, and conducted like a man incapacitated for hospitality.
  • His manners were truly regal.
  • It is the good Adam contemplating his own virtue.
  • Who does not feel his faith in a resurrection and immortality strengthened by hearing of this?
  • It has not the vitality and force of a single living man; for a single man can bend it to his will.
  • Let every man make known what kind of government would command his respect, and that will be one step toward obtaining it.
  • But he that would save his life, in such a case, shall lose it.
  • But no: I find that the respectable man, so called, has immediately drifted from his position, and despairs of his country, when his country has more reason to despair of him.
  • Oh for a man who is a man, and, as my neighbor says, has a bone in his back which you cannot pass your hand through!
  • It is not a man's duty, as a matter of course, to devote himself to the eradication of any, even the most enormous wrong; he may still properly have other concerns to engage him; but it is his duty, at least, to wash his hands of it, and, if he gives it no thought longer, not to give it practically his support.
  • I must get off him first, that he may pursue his contemplations too.
  • Absolutely speaking, the more money, the less virtue; for money comes between a man and his objects, and obtains them for him; and it was certainly no great virtue to obtain it.
  • Thus his moral ground is taken from under his feet.
  • The best thing a man can do for his culture when he is rich is to endeavor to carry out those schemes which he entertained when he was poor.
  • As near as I could discover, he had probably gone to bed in a barn when drunk, and smoked his pipe there; and so a barn was burnt.
  • It was formerly the custom in our village, when a poor debtor came out of jail, for his acquaintances to salute him, looking through their fingers, which were crossed to represent the grating of a jail window, "How do ye do?"
  • If they pay the tax from a mistaken interest in the individual taxed, to save his property, or prevent his going to jail, it is because they have not considered wisely how far they let their private feelings interfere with the public good.
  • His words are wisdom to those legislators who contemplate no essential reform in the existing government; but for thinkers, and those who legislate for all time, he never once glances at the subject.
  • I know of those whose serene and wise speculations on this theme would soon reveal the limits of his mind's range and hospitality.
  • His leaders are the men of '87.
  • The prince bowed to signify his respect and gratitude.
  • With his head bent, and his big feet spread apart, he began explaining his reasons for thinking the abbe's plan chimerical.
  • "Madame, I doubt my ability before such an audience," said he, smilingly inclining his head.
  • His eyes, nose, and mouth all seemed puckered into a vacant, wearied grimace, and his arms and legs always fell into unnatural positions.
  • His eyes, nose, and mouth all seemed puckered into a vacant, wearied grimace, and his arms and legs always fell into unnatural positions.
  • "Why no, my dear fellow," said the astonished narrator, shrugging his shoulders.
  • The vicomte told his tale very neatly.
  • Pierre had managed to start a conversation with the abbe about the balance of power, and the latter, evidently interested by the young man's simple-minded eagerness, was explaining his pet theory.
  • Everything about him, from his weary, bored expression to his quiet, measured step, offered a most striking contrast to his quiet, little wife.
  • He turned away from her with a grimace that distorted his handsome face, kissed Anna Pavlovna's hand, and screwing up his eyes scanned the whole company.
  • Prince Andrew screwed up his eyes and turned away.
  • Pierre, who from the moment Prince Andrew entered the room had watched him with glad, affectionate eyes, now came up and took his arm.
  • May I? he added in a low voice so as not to disturb the vicomte who was continuing his story.
  • He wished to say something more, but at that moment Prince Vasili and his daughter got up to go and the two young men rose to let them pass.
  • She knew his father to be a connection of Prince Vasili's.
  • Prince Vasili knew this, and having once realized that if he asked on behalf of all who begged of him, he would soon be unable to ask for himself, he became chary of using his influence.
  • You don't know how Kutuzov is pestered since his appointment as Commander in Chief.
  • "Papa," said his beautiful daughter in the same tone as before, "we shall be late."
  • And sighing disdainfully, he again changed his position.
  • He shrugged his shoulders and spread out his hands.
  • It was evident that he did not like the vicomte and was aiming his remarks at him, though without looking at him.
  • "Capital!" said Prince Hippolyte in English, and began slapping his knee with the palm of his hand.
  • The vicomte merely shrugged his shoulders.
  • Pierre looked solemnly at his audience over his spectacles and continued.
  • But Pierre continued his speech without heeding her.
  • The vicomte who was meeting him for the first time saw clearly that this young Jacobin was not so terrible as his words suggested.
  • Besides, in the actions of a statesman one has to distinguish between his acts as a private person, as a general, and as an emperor.
  • Prince Andrew, who had evidently wished to tone down the awkwardness of Pierre's remarks, rose and made a sign to his wife that it was time to go.
  • And Prince Hippolyte began to tell his story in such Russian as a Frenchman would speak after spending about a year in Russia.
  • Everyone waited, so emphatically and eagerly did he demand their attention to his story.
  • Here Prince Hippolyte paused, evidently collecting his ideas with difficulty.
  • All his absent-mindedness and inability to enter a room and converse in it was, however, redeemed by his kindly, simple, and modest expression.
  • Prince Andrew had gone out into the hall, and, turning his shoulders to the footman who was helping him on with his cloak, listened indifferently to his wife's chatter with Prince Hippolyte who had also come into the hall.
  • Prince Hippolyte stood close to the pretty, pregnant princess, and stared fixedly at her through his eyeglass.
  • Prince Hippolyte approached the little princess and, bending his face close to her, began to whisper something.
  • "Are you ready?" he asked his wife, looking past her.
  • "Princesse, au revoir," cried he, stumbling with his tongue as well as with his feet.
  • The princess, picking up her dress, was taking her seat in the dark carriage, her husband was adjusting his saber; Prince Hippolyte, under pretense of helping, was in everyone's way.
  • Hippolyte spluttered again, and amid his laughter said, And you were saying that the Russian ladies are not equal to the French?
  • Pierre reaching the house first went into Prince Andrew's study like one quite at home, and from habit immediately lay down on the sofa, took from the shelf the first book that came to his hand (it was Caesar's Commentaries), and resting on his elbow, began reading it in the middle.
  • She will be quite ill now, said Prince Andrew, as he entered the study, rubbing his small white hands.
  • Pierre turned his whole body, making the sofa creak.
  • He lifted his eager face to Prince Andrew, smiled, and waved his hand.
  • Pierre sat up on the sofa, with his legs tucked under him.
  • When he returned to Moscow his father dismissed the abbe and said to the young man, Now go to Petersburg, look round, and choose your profession.
  • Pierre rubbed his forehead.
  • Prince Andrew only shrugged his shoulders at Pierre's childish words.
  • "If no one fought except on his own conviction, there would be no wars," he said.
  • Prince Andrew shook himself as if waking up, and his face assumed the look it had had in Anna Pavlovna's drawing room.
  • Pierre removed his feet from the sofa.
  • Pierre looked at his friend and, noticing that he did not like the conversation, gave no reply.
  • Oh, don't speak of his going, don't!
  • Just for a whim of his own, goodness only knows why, he leaves me and locks me up alone in the country.
  • "I still can't understand what you are afraid of," said Prince Andrew slowly, not taking his eyes off his wife.
  • Prince Andrew rose, shrugged his shoulders, and walked about the room.
  • Pierre looked over his spectacles with naive surprise, now at him and now at her, moved as if about to rise too, but changed his mind.
  • "Lise!" said Prince Andrew dryly, raising his voice to the pitch which indicates that patience is exhausted.
  • Pierre continually glanced at Prince Andrew; Prince Andrew rubbed his forehead with his small hand.
  • But what's the good?... and he waved his arm.
  • Pierre took off his spectacles, which made his face seem different and the good-natured expression still more apparent, and gazed at his friend in amazement.
  • Every muscle of his thin face was now quivering with nervous excitement; his eyes, in which the fire of life had seemed extinguished, now flashed with brilliant light.
  • He was free, he had nothing but his aim to consider, and he reached it.
  • He did not finish his sentence, but his tone showed how highly he thought of his friend and how much he expected of him in the future.
  • Pierre was always astonished at Prince Andrew's calm manner of treating everybody, his extraordinary memory, his extensive reading (he had read everything, knew everything, and had an opinion about everything), but above all at his capacity for work and study.
  • Let us talk about you, he added after a silence, smiling at his reassuring thoughts.
  • "But what is there to say about me?" said Pierre, his face relaxing into a careless, merry smile.
  • "What would you have, my dear fellow?" answered Pierre, shrugging his shoulders.
  • Pierre was staying at Prince Vasili Kuragin's and sharing the dissipated life of his son Anatole, the son whom they were planning to reform by marrying him to Prince Andrew's sister.
  • It was past one o'clock when Pierre left his friend.
  • But he immediately recalled his promise to Prince Andrew not to go there.
  • Pierre often indulged in reflections of this sort, nullifying all his decisions and intentions.
  • Pierre threw off his cloak and entered the first room, in which were the remains of supper.
  • "Jacob, bring a bottle!" shouted the host, a tall, handsome fellow who stood in the midst of the group, without a coat, and with his fine linen shirt unfastened in front.
  • Pierre drank one glass after another, looking from under his brows at the tipsy guests who were again crowding round the window, and listening to their chatter.
  • Anatole kept on refilling Pierre's glass while explaining that Dolokhov was betting with Stevens, an English naval officer, that he would drink a bottle of rum sitting on the outer ledge of the third floor window with his legs hanging out.
  • Like all infantry officers he wore no mustache, so that his mouth, the most striking feature of his face, was clearly seen.
  • However much he drank, he never lost his clearheadedness.
  • Anatole with his swaggering air strode up to the window.
  • Dolokhov, the bottle of rum still in his hand, jumped onto the window sill.
  • Anatole turned to the Englishman and taking him by one of the buttons of his coat and looking down at him--the Englishman was short--began repeating the terms of the wager to him in English.
  • The lad jumped awkwardly back into the room, tripping over his spurs.
  • Placing the bottle on the window sill where he could reach it easily, Dolokhov climbed carefully and slowly through the window and lowered his legs.
  • Dolokhov's back in his white shirt, and his curly head, were lit up from both sides.
  • Dolokhov turned round and, again holding on with both hands, arranged himself on his seat.
  • "If anyone comes meddling again," said he, emitting the words separately through his thin compressed lips, "I will throw him down there.
  • Saying this he again turned round, dropped his hands, took the bottle and lifted it to his lips, threw back his head, and raised his free hand to balance himself.
  • One of the footmen who had stooped to pick up some broken glass remained in that position without taking his eyes from the window and from Dolokhov's back.
  • The Englishman looked on sideways, pursing up his lips.
  • The man who had wished to stop the affair ran to a corner of the room and threw himself on a sofa with his face to the wall.
  • Pierre hid his face, from which a faint smile forgot to fade though his features now expressed horror and fear.
  • Pierre took his hands from his eyes.
  • Suddenly Dolokhov made a backward movement with his spine, and his arm trembled nervously; this was sufficient to cause his whole body to slip as he sat on the sloping ledge.
  • As he began slipping down, his head and arm wavered still more with the strain.
  • Pierre again covered his eyes and thought he would never open them again.
  • The Englishman took out his purse and began counting out the money.
  • They seized him by his arms; but he was so strong that everyone who touched him was sent flying.
  • And he caught the bear, took it in his arms, lifted it from the ground, and began dancing round the room with it.
  • The Guards had already left Petersburg on the tenth of August, and her son, who had remained in Moscow for his equipment, was to join them on the march to Radzivilov.
  • "Marya Lvovna Karagina and her daughter!" announced the countess' gigantic footman in his bass voice, entering the drawing room.
  • The conversation was on the chief topic of the day: the illness of the wealthy and celebrated beau of Catherine's day, Count Bezukhov, and about his illegitimate son Pierre, the one who had behaved so improperly at Anna Pavlovna's reception.
  • He is in such bad health, and now this vexation about his son is enough to kill him!
  • "He chose his friends badly," interposed Anna Mikhaylovna.
  • Anatole Kuragin's father managed somehow to get his son's affair hushed up, but even he was ordered out of Petersburg.
  • And there was the bear swimming about with the policeman on his back!
  • This is all that his foreign education has done for him!
  • I hope that here in Moscow no one will receive him, in spite of his money.
  • His children are all illegitimate.
  • He has lost count of his children, but this Pierre was his favorite.
  • And as he waved his arms to impersonate the policeman, his portly form again shook with a deep ringing laugh, the laugh of one who always eats well and, in particular, drinks well.
  • The count jumped up and, swaying from side to side, spread his arms wide and threw them round the little girl who had run in.
  • Boris was tall and fair, and his calm and handsome face had regular, delicate features.
  • Dark hairs were already showing on his upper lip, and his whole face expressed impetuosity and enthusiasm.
  • Boris on the contrary at once found his footing, and related quietly and humorously how he had known that doll Mimi when she was still quite a young lady, before her nose was broken; how she had aged during the five years he had known her, and how her head had cracked right across the skull.
  • Do you want the carriage? he asked his mother with a smile.
  • "Yes, yes, go and tell them to get it ready," she answered, returning his smile.
  • "Ah yes, my dear," said the count, addressing the visitor and pointing to Nicholas, "his friend Boris has become an officer, and so for friendship's sake he is leaving the university and me, his old father, and entering the military service, my dear.
  • It can't be helped! said the count, shrugging his shoulders and speaking playfully of a matter that evidently distressed him.
  • "I have already told you, Papa," said his son, "that if you don't wish to let me go, I'll stay.
  • In the midst of his talk he glanced round at her.
  • She was already growing impatient, and stamped her foot, ready to cry at his not coming at once, when she heard the young man's discreet steps approaching neither quickly nor slowly.
  • Boris paused in the middle of the room, looked round, brushed a little dust from the sleeve of his uniform, and going up to a mirror examined his handsome face.
  • She caught the young officer by his cuffs, and a look of solemnity and fear appeared on her flushed face.
  • Suddenly she jumped up onto a tub to be higher than he, embraced him so that both her slender bare arms clasped him above his neck, and, tossing back her hair, kissed him full on the lips.
  • She took his arm and with a happy face went with him into the adjoining sitting room.
  • "In a minute, in a minute," he said, dipping his pen.
  • It's all the Club and his easygoing nature.
  • His position has not turned his head at all.
  • His position has not turned his head at all.
  • But, Nataly, you know my love for my son: I would do anything for his happiness!
  • "I often think, though, perhaps it's a sin," said the princess, "that here lives Count Cyril Vladimirovich Bezukhov so rich, all alone... that tremendous fortune... and what is his life worth?
  • "My dear!" exclaimed his mother imploringly, again laying her hand on his arm as if that touch might soothe or rouse him.
  • Boris said no more, but looked inquiringly at his mother without taking off his cloak.
  • The son, lowering his eyes, followed her quietly.
  • "Prince, humanum est errare, * but..." replied the doctor, swallowing his r's, and pronouncing the Latin words with a French accent.
  • The son noticed that an expression of profound sorrow suddenly clouded his mother's face, and he smiled slightly.
  • Are you here on leave? he went on in his usual tone of indifference.
  • "I know, I know," answered Prince Vasili in his monotonous voice.
  • And I should so like to thank Uncle once for all his kindness to me and Boris.
  • He is his godson, she added, her tone suggesting that this fact ought to give Prince Vasili much satisfaction.
  • She bent her head and continued in a whisper: Has he performed his final duty, Prince?
  • Consider that the welfare of his soul is at stake.
  • He shrugged his shoulders.
  • He had now been for some days in Moscow and was staying as usual at his father's house.
  • The count is suffering physically and mentally, and apparently you have done your best to increase his mental sufferings.
  • Olga, go and see whether Uncle's beef tea is ready--it is almost time, she added, giving Pierre to understand that they were busy, and busy making his father comfortable, while evidently he, Pierre, was only busy causing him annoyance.
  • "England is done for," said he, scowling and pointing his finger at someone unseen.
  • But before Pierre--who at that moment imagined himself to be Napoleon in person and to have just effected the dangerous crossing of the Straits of Dover and captured London--could pronounce Pitt's sentence, he saw a well-built and handsome young officer entering his room.
  • He had left Moscow when Boris was a boy of fourteen, and had quite forgotten him, but in his usual impulsive and hearty way he took Boris by the hand with a friendly smile.
  • Then you are his son, Ilya?
  • Rostov, the father, is Ilya, and his son is Nicholas.
  • Pierre shook his head and arms as if attacked by mosquitoes or bees.
  • "We here in Moscow are more occupied with dinner parties and scandal than with politics," said he in his quiet ironical tone.
  • Pierre smiled in his good-natured way as if afraid for his companion's sake that the latter might say something he would afterwards regret.
  • Everybody is wondering to whom the count will leave his fortune, though he may perhaps outlive us all, as I sincerely hope he will...
  • "And it must seem to you," said Boris flushing slightly, but not changing his tone or attitude, "it must seem to you that everyone is trying to get something out of the rich man?"
  • For a long time Pierre could not understand, but when he did, he jumped up from the sofa, seized Boris under the elbow in his quick, clumsy way, and, blushing far more than Boris, began to speak with a feeling of mingled shame and vexation.
  • Pierre, in order to make Boris' better acquaintance, promised to come to dinner, and warmly pressing his hand looked affectionately over his spectacles into Boris' eyes.
  • After he had gone Pierre continued pacing up and down the room for a long time, no longer piercing an imaginary foe with his imaginary sword, but smiling at the remembrance of that pleasant, intelligent, and resolute young man.
  • As often happens in early youth, especially to one who leads a lonely life, he felt an unaccountable tenderness for this young man and made up his mind that they would be friends.
  • I can't think why his nieces put it off.
  • "I don't understand, Mamma--what is his attitude to Pierre?" asked the son.
  • The count came waddling in to see his wife with a rather guilty look as usual.
  • He sat down by his wife, his elbows on his knees and his hands ruffling his gray hair.
  • What's that mess? she said, pointing to his waistcoat.
  • "Oh, little countess!"... and the count began bustling to get out his pocketbook.
  • This is for Boris from me, for his outfit.
  • The count took the gentlemen into his study and showed them his choice collection of Turkish pipes.
  • He seemed to be condescending to his companion.
  • The latter, a fresh, rosy officer of the Guards, irreproachably washed, brushed, and buttoned, held his pipe in the middle of his mouth and with red lips gently inhaled the smoke, letting it escape from his handsome mouth in rings.
  • His favorite occupation when not playing boston, a card game he was very fond of, was that of listener, especially when he succeeded in setting two loquacious talkers at one another.
  • "Well, then, old chap, mon tres honorable Alphonse Karlovich," said Shinshin, laughing ironically and mixing the most ordinary Russian expressions with the choicest French phrases--which was a peculiarity of his speech.
  • His conversation always related entirely to himself; he would remain calm and silent when the talk related to any topic that had no direct bearing on himself.
  • But all he said was so prettily sedate, and the naivete of his youthful egotism was so obvious, that he disarmed his hearers.
  • "Well, my boy, you'll get along wherever you go--foot or horse--that I'll warrant," said Shinshin, patting him on the shoulder and taking his feet off the sofa.
  • The count, by his guests, went into the drawing room.
  • The latter understood that she was being asked to entertain this young man, and sitting down beside him she began to speak about his father; but he answered her, as he had the countess, only in monosyllables.
  • Pierre approached, looking at her in a childlike way through his spectacles.
  • His father lies on his deathbed and he amuses himself setting a policeman astride a bear!
  • His father lies on his deathbed and he amuses himself setting a policeman astride a bear!
  • Berg gave his arm to Vera.
  • From behind the crystal decanters and fruit vases, the count kept glancing at his wife and her tall cap with its light-blue ribbons, and busily filled his neighbors' glasses, not neglecting his own.
  • The countess in turn, without omitting her duties as hostess, threw significant glances from behind the pineapples at her husband whose face and bald head seemed by their redness to contrast more than usual with his gray hair.
  • Boris was telling his new friend Pierre who the guests were and exchanging glances with Natasha, who was sitting opposite.
  • Of the four crystal glasses engraved with the count's monogram that stood before his plate, Pierre held out one at random and drank with enjoyment, gazing with ever- increasing amiability at the other guests.
  • The German tutor was trying to remember all the dishes, wines, and kinds of dessert, in order to send a full description of the dinner to his people in Germany; and he felt greatly offended when the butler with a bottle wrapped in a napkin passed him by.
  • "Connaissez-vous le Proverbe: * 'Jerome, Jerome, do not roam, but turn spindles at home!'?" said Shinshin, puckering his brows and smiling.
  • "What you said just now was splendid!" said his partner Julie.
  • The count, holding his cards fanwise, kept himself with difficulty from dropping into his usual after-dinner nap, and laughed at everything.
  • "Nicholas is going away in a week's time, his... papers... have come... he told me himself... but still I should not cry," and she showed a paper she held in her hand--with the verses Nicholas had written, "still, I should not cry, but you can't... no one can understand... what a soul he has!"
  • There's Uncle Shinshin's brother has married his first cousin.
  • And lowering his big arm he offered it to the slender little girl.
  • While the couples were arranging themselves and the musicians tuning up, Pierre sat down with his little partner.
  • This was the count's favorite dance, which he had danced in his youth.
  • But his partner could not and did not want to dance well.
  • When the Military Governor had gone, Prince Vasili sat down all alone on a chair in the ballroom, crossing one leg high over the other, leaning his elbow on his knee and covering his face with his hand.
  • "The limits of human life... are fixed and may not be o'erpassed," said an old priest to a lady who had taken a seat beside him and was listening naively to his words.
  • "Ah, madam, it is a great sacrament," replied the priest, passing his hand over the thin grizzled strands of hair combed back across his bald head.
  • The second princess had just come from the sickroom with her eyes red from weeping and sat down beside Dr. Lorrain, who was sitting in a graceful pose under a portrait of Catherine, leaning his elbow on a table.
  • Has he taken his medicine?
  • The doctor glanced at his watch.
  • "And who will inherit his wealth?" he added in a whisper.
  • Lorrain, pursing up his lips, waved a severely negative finger before his nose.
  • "Well, my dear?" said Prince Vasili, taking her hand and bending it downwards as was his habit.
  • Prince Vasili said no more and his cheeks began to twitch nervously, now on one side, now on the other, giving his face an unpleasant expression which was never to be seen on it in a drawing room.
  • His eyes too seemed strange; at one moment they looked impudently sly and at the next glanced round in alarm.
  • The count," pointing to his portrait, "definitely demanded that he should be called."
  • "Yes, yes, of course," interrupted Prince Vasili impatiently, rubbing his bald head and angrily pulling back toward him the little table that he had pushed away.
  • But... in short, the fact is... you know yourself that last winter the count made a will by which he left all his property, not to us his direct heirs, but to Pierre.
  • Do you understand that in consideration of the count's services, his request would be granted?...
  • "And this is gratitude--this is recognition for those who have sacrificed everything for his sake!" she cried.
  • "Do you or do you not know where that will is?" insisted Prince Vasili, his cheeks twitching more than ever.
  • Our duty, my dear, is to rectify his mistake, to ease his last moments by not letting him commit this injustice, and not to let him die feeling that he is rendering unhappy those who...
  • You understand that my sole desire is conscientiously to carry out his wishes; that is my only reason for being here.
  • As the wheels rolled softly over the straw beneath the windows, Anna Mikhaylovna, having turned with words of comfort to her companion, realized that he was asleep in his corner and woke him up.
  • Rousing himself, Pierre followed Anna Mikhaylovna out of the carriage, and only then began to think of the interview with his dying father which awaited him.
  • "Ah, my friend!" she said, touching his arm as she had done her son's when speaking to him that afternoon, "believe me I suffer no less than you do, but be a man!"
  • "But really, hadn't I better go away?" he asked, looking kindly at her over his spectacles.
  • I will look after your interests, said she in reply to his look, and went still faster along the passage.
  • Pierre could not make out what it was all about, and still less what "watching over his interests" meant, but he decided that all these things had to be.
  • All became silent and turned to look at the pale tear-worn Anna Mikhaylovna as she entered, and at the big stout figure of Pierre who, hanging his head, meekly followed her.
  • The doctor cast a rapid glance upwards and silently shrugged his shoulders.
  • Pierre, having made up his mind to obey his monitress implicitly, moved toward the sofa she had indicated.
  • He was wearing his long coat with three stars on his breast.
  • He seemed to have grown thinner since the morning; his eyes seemed larger than usual when he glanced round and noticed Pierre.
  • He went up to him, took his hand (a thing he never used to do), and drew it downwards as if wishing to ascertain whether it was firmly fixed on.
  • He could not walk well on tiptoe and his whole body jerked at each step.
  • He lay just under the icons; his large thick hands outside the quilt.
  • His face wore a calm look of piety and resignation to the will of God.
  • Pierre paid no more attention to this occurrence than to the rest of what went on, having made up his mind once for all that what he saw happening around him that evening was in some way essential.
  • He lay with his head propped high on the pillows.
  • His hands were symmetrically placed on the green silk quilt, the palms downward.
  • Pierre hesitated, not knowing what to do, and glanced inquiringly at his guide.
  • Pierre, carefully stretching his neck so as not to touch the quilt, followed her suggestion and pressed his lips to the large boned, fleshy hand.
  • Pierre obediently sat down, his eyes asking if he were doing right.
  • While the count was being turned over, one of his arms fell back helplessly and he made a fruitless effort to pull it forward.
  • The sick man was turned on to his side with his face to the wall.
  • As soon as they saw Pierre and his companion they became silent, and Pierre thought he saw the princess hide something as she whispered:
  • To Pierre he said nothing, merely giving his arm a sympathetic squeeze below the shoulder.
  • He looked inquiringly at his monitress and saw that she was again going on tiptoe to the reception room where they had left Prince Vasili and the eldest princess.
  • Worldly conversation at a moment when his soul is already prepared...
  • His cheeks, which were so flabby that they looked heavier below, were twitching violently; but he wore the air of a man little concerned in what the two ladies were saying.
  • All I know is that his real will is in his writing table, and this is a paper he has forgotten....
  • Prince Vasili bent his head and spread out his hands.
  • He staggered to the sofa on which Pierre was sitting and dropped onto it, covering his face with his hand.
  • Pierre noticed that he was pale and that his jaw quivered and shook as if in an ague.
  • "Ah, my friend!" said he, taking Pierre by the elbow; and there was in his voice a sincerity and weakness Pierre had never observed in it before.
  • She kissed the young man on his forehead, wetting him with her tears.
  • Pierre looked at her over his spectacles.
  • She led him into the dark drawing room and Pierre was glad no one could see his face.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna left him, and when she returned he was fast asleep with his head on his arm.
  • She said the count had died as she would herself wish to die, that his end was not only touching but edifying.
  • It uplifts the soul to see such men as the old count and his worthy son, said she.
  • At Bald Hills, Prince Nicholas Andreevich Bolkonski's estate, the arrival of young Prince Andrew and his wife was daily expected, but this expectation did not upset the regular routine of life in the old prince's household.
  • He was himself always occupied: writing his memoirs, solving problems in higher mathematics, turning snuffboxes on a lathe, working in the garden, or superintending the building that was always going on at his estate.
  • As regularity is a prime condition facilitating activity, regularity in his household was carried to the highest point of exactitude.
  • With those about him, from his daughter to his serfs, the prince was sharp and invariably exacting, so that without being a hardhearted man he inspired such fear and respect as few hardhearted men would have aroused.
  • The prince was working at the lathe and after glancing round continued his work.
  • After a few more turns of the lathe he removed his foot from the pedal, wiped his chisel, dropped it into a leather pouch attached to the lathe, and, approaching the table, summoned his daughter.
  • He took the exercise book containing lessons in geometry written by himself and drew up a chair with his foot.
  • "For tomorrow!" said he, quickly finding the page and making a scratch from one paragraph to another with his hard nail.
  • "The third, I said the third!" cried the prince abruptly, pushing the letter away, and leaning his elbows on the table he drew toward him the exercise book containing geometrical figures.
  • "Well, madam," he began, stooping over the book close to his daughter and placing an arm on the back of the chair on which she sat, so that she felt herself surrounded on all sides by the acrid scent of old age and tobacco, which she had known so long.
  • "Well now, isn't she a fool!" shouted the prince, pushing the book aside and turning sharply away; but rising immediately, he paced up and down, lightly touched his daughter's hair and sat down again.
  • Our dear Emperor has left Petersburg and it is thought intends to expose his precious person to the chances of war.
  • God grant that the Corsican monster who is destroying the peace of Europe may be overthrown by the angel whom it has pleased the Almighty, in His goodness, to give us as sovereign!
  • I will confess to you, dear Mary, that in spite of his extreme youth his departure for the army was a great grief to me.
  • The chief news, about which all Moscow gossips, is the death of old Count Bezukhov, and his inheritance.
  • He says the count was the last representative but one of the great century, and that it is his own turn now, but that he will do all he can to let his turn come as late as possible.
  • As to his inheritance and the part played by Prince Vasili, it is very sad for both.
  • I have had a letter from my brother, who announces his speedy arrival at Bald Hills with his wife.
  • Adieu, dear and kind friend; may our divine Saviour and His most Holy Mother keep you in their holy and all-powerful care!
  • The gray-haired valet was sitting drowsily listening to the snoring of the prince, who was in his large study.
  • Prince Andrew got out of the carriage, helped his little wife to alight, and let her pass into the house before him.
  • Prince Andrew apparently knew this as well as Tikhon; he looked at his watch as if to ascertain whether his father's habits had changed since he was at home last, and, having assured himself that they had not, he turned to his wife.
  • "You've grown older, Tikhon," he said in passing to the old man, who kissed his hand.
  • When Prince Andrew went in the two princesses, who had only met once before for a short time at his wedding, were in each other's arms warmly pressing their lips to whatever place they happened to touch.
  • Prince Andrew shrugged his shoulders and frowned, as lovers of music do when they hear a false note.
  • Prince Andrew and his sister, hand in hand, kissed one another, and he told her she was still the same crybaby as ever.
  • When the twenty minutes had elapsed and the time had come for the old prince to get up, Tikhon came to call the young prince to his father.
  • The old man made a departure from his usual routine in honor of his son's arrival: he gave orders to admit him to his apartments while he dressed for dinner.
  • The old prince always dressed in old-fashioned style, wearing an antique coat and powdered hair; and when Prince Andrew entered his father's dressing room (not with the contemptuous look and manner he wore in drawing rooms, but with the animated face with which he talked to Pierre), the old man was sitting on a large leather-covered chair, wrapped in a powdering mantle, entrusting his head to Tikhon.
  • Wants to vanquish Buonaparte? said the old man, shaking his powdered head as much as the tail, which Tikhon was holding fast to plait, would allow.
  • You at least must tackle him properly, or else if he goes on like this he'll soon have us, too, for his subjects!
  • And he held out his cheek.
  • The old man was in a good temper after his nap before dinner.
  • Prince Andrew went up and kissed his father on the spot indicated to him.
  • He made no reply on his father's favorite topic-- making fun of the military men of the day, and more particularly of Bonaparte.
  • "Yes, Father, I have come to you and brought my wife who is pregnant," said Prince Andrew, following every movement of his father's face with an eager and respectful look.
  • "Thank God," said his son smiling.
  • Well, go on," he continued, returning to his hobby; "tell me how the Germans have taught you to fight Bonaparte by this new science you call 'strategy.'"
  • "Nonsense, nonsense!" cried the old man, shaking his pigtail to see whether it was firmly plaited, and grasping his by the hand.
  • What about Austria? said he, rising from his chair and pacing up and down the room followed by Tikhon, who ran after him, handing him different articles of clothing.
  • Prince Andrew, seeing that his father insisted, began--at first reluctantly, but gradually with more and more animation, and from habit changing unconsciously from Russian to French as he went on--to explain the plan of operation for the coming campaign.
  • His son only smiled.
  • Napoleon has also formed his plan by now, not worse than this one.
  • At the appointed hour the prince, powdered and shaven, entered the dining room.
  • The prince, who generally kept very strictly to social distinctions and rarely admitted even important government officials to his table, had unexpectedly selected Michael Ivanovich (who always went into a corner to blow his nose on his checked handkerchief) to illustrate the theory that all men are equals, and had more than once impressed on his daughter that Michael Ivanovich was "not a whit worse than you or I."
  • Prince Andrew, looking again at that genealogical tree, shook his head, laughing as a man laughs who looks at a portrait so characteristic of the original as to be amusing.
  • "Everyone has his Achilles' heel," continued Prince Andrew.
  • Fancy, with his powerful mind, indulging in such nonsense!
  • The prince walked in quickly and jauntily as was his wont, as if intentionally contrasting the briskness of his manners with the strict formality of his house.
  • The prince stood still; his lively glittering eyes from under their thick, bushy eyebrows sternly scanned all present and rested on the little princess.
  • "I'm glad, glad, to see you," he said, looking attentively into her eyes, and then quickly went to his place and sat down.
  • He indicated a place beside him to his daughter-in-law.
  • "Ho, ho!" said the old man, casting his eyes on her rounded figure.
  • He laughed in his usual dry, cold, unpleasant way, with his lips only and not with his eyes.
  • The little princess did not, or did not wish to, hear his words.
  • "He is a great tactician!" said the prince to his son, pointing to the architect.
  • Prince Andrew gaily bore with his father's ridicule of the new men, and drew him on and listened to him with evident pleasure.
  • And he jerked away his plate, which Tikhon briskly caught.
  • The prince again laughed his frigid laugh.
  • Buonaparte was born with a silver spoon in his mouth.
  • He made his reputation fighting them.
  • And the prince began explaining all the blunders which, according to him, Bonaparte had made in his campaigns and even in politics.
  • His son made no rejoinder, but it was evident that whatever arguments were presented he was as little able as his father to change his opinion.
  • His son made no rejoinder, but it was evident that whatever arguments were presented he was as little able as his father to change his opinion.
  • "You think I'm an old man and don't understand the present state of affairs?" concluded his father.
  • Come now, where has this great commander of yours shown his skill? he concluded.
  • The old prince, not altering his routine, retired as usual after dinner.
  • Only those things he always kept with him remained in his room; a small box, a large canteen fitted with silver plate, two Turkish pistols and a saber--a present from his father who had brought it from the siege of Ochakov.
  • With his hands behind him he paced briskly from corner to corner of the room, looking straight before him and thoughtfully shaking his head.
  • She smiled as she uttered his pet name, "Andrusha."
  • Prince Andrew was silent, but the princess noticed the ironical and contemptuous look that showed itself on his face.
  • Prince Andrew smiled as he looked at his sister, as we smile at those we think we thoroughly understand.
  • "He always was rather harsh; and now I should think he's getting very trying," said Prince Andrew, apparently speaking lightly of their father in order to puzzle or test his sister.
  • Her brother shook his head incredulously.
  • I don't understand how a man of his immense intellect can fail to see what is as clear as day, and can go so far astray.
  • Father's father, our grandfather, wore it in all his wars.
  • There was a look of tenderness, for he was touched, but also a gleam of irony on his face.
  • Prince Andrew felt sorry for his sister.
  • As he said this he rose, went to his sister, and, stooping, kissed her forehead.
  • His fine eyes lit up with a thoughtful, kindly, and unaccustomed brightness, but he was looking not at his sister but over her head toward the darkness of the open doorway.
  • His fine eyes lit up with a thoughtful, kindly, and unaccustomed brightness, but he was looking not at his sister but over her head toward the darkness of the open doorway.
  • Petrushka!" he called to his valet: "Come here, take these away.
  • On the way to his sister's room, in the passage which connected one wing with the other, Prince Andrew met Mademoiselle Bourienne smiling sweetly.
  • Prince Andrew looked sternly at her and an expression of anger suddenly came over his face.
  • When he reached his sister's room his wife was already awake and her merry voice, hurrying one word after another, came through the open door.
  • This very sentence about Countess Zubova and this same laugh Prince Andrew had already heard from his wife in the presence of others some five times.
  • When Prince Andrew entered the study the old man in his old-age spectacles and white dressing gown, in which he received no one but his son, sat at the table writing.
  • "Kiss me here," and he touched his cheek: "Thanks, thanks!"
  • And he went on writing, so that his quill spluttered and squeaked.
  • The old prince stopped writing and, as if not understanding, fixed his stern eyes on his son.
  • He signed with a flourish and suddenly turning to his son began to laugh.
  • He seized his son by the hand with small bony fingers, shook it, looked straight into his son's face with keen eyes which seemed to see through him, and again laughed his frigid laugh.
  • The old man continued to fold and seal his letter, snatching up and throwing down the wax, the seal, and the paper, with his accustomed rapidity.
  • Andrew did not speak; he was both pleased and displeased that his father understood him.
  • The old man got up and gave the letter to his son.
  • He spoke so rapidly that he did not finish half his words, but his son was accustomed to understand him.
  • He led him to the desk, raised the lid, drew out a drawer, and took out an exercise book filled with his bold, tall, close handwriting.
  • Andrew did not tell his father that he would no doubt live a long time yet.
  • He gave his son his hand to kiss, and embraced him.
  • The old man's sharp eyes were fixed straight on his son's.
  • Go! he suddenly shouted in a loud, angry voice, opening his door.
  • "Well!" he said, turning to his wife.
  • She screamed and fell unconscious on his shoulder.
  • "Adieu, Mary," said he gently to his sister, taking her by the hand and kissing her, and then he left the room with rapid steps.
  • Princess Mary, supporting her sister-in-law, still looked with her beautiful eyes full of tears at the door through which Prince Andrew had gone and made the sign of the cross in his direction.
  • From the study, like pistol shots, came the frequent sound of the old man angrily blowing his nose.
  • That's all right! said he; and looking angrily at the unconscious little princess, he shook his head reprovingly and slammed the door.
  • He had the air of a man happily performing one of the most solemn duties of his life.
  • He walked about in front of the line and at every step pulled himself up, slightly arching his back.
  • A member of the Hofkriegsrath from Vienna had come to Kutuzov the day before with proposals and demands for him to join up with the army of the Archduke Ferdinand and Mack, and Kutuzov, not considering this junction advisable, meant, among other arguments in support of his view, to show the Austrian general the wretched state in which the troops arrived from Russia.
  • On hearing this the regimental commander hung his head, silently shrugged his shoulders, and spread out his arms with a choleric gesture.
  • The regimental commander walked with his jerky steps to the front of the regiment and examined it from a distance.
  • When the eager but misrepeated words had reached their destination in a cry of: "The general to the third company," the missing officer appeared from behind his company and, though he was a middle-aged man and not in the habit of running, trotted awkwardly stumbling on his toes toward the general.
  • Spots appeared on his nose, the redness of which was evidently due to intemperance, and his mouth twitched nervously.
  • The general looked the captain up and down as he came up panting, slackening his pace as he approached.
  • What is this? shouted the regimental commander, thrusting forward his jaw and pointing at a soldier in the ranks of the third company in a greatcoat of bluish cloth, which contrasted with the others.
  • And the commander, turning to look at the adjutant, directed his jerky steps down the line.
  • Having snapped at an officer for an unpolished badge, at another because his line was not straight, he reached the third company.
  • Your leg? shouted the commander with a tone of suffering in his voice, while there were still five men between him and Dolokhov with his bluish-gray uniform.
  • Dolokhov slowly straightened his bent knee, looking straight with his clear, insolent eyes in the general's face.
  • Change his coat... the ras... he did not finish.
  • The general became silent, angrily pulling down his tight scarf.
  • Looking at their boots he several times shook his head sadly, pointing them out to the Austrian general with an expression which seemed to say that he was not blaming anyone, but could not help noticing what a bad state of things it was.
  • Behind Kutuzov, at a distance that allowed every softly spoken word to be heard, followed some twenty men of his suite.
  • Beside him was his comrade Nesvitski, a tall staff officer, extremely stout, with a kindly, smiling, handsome face and moist eyes.
  • His suite, not having expected this, involuntarily came closer to him.
  • The hussar at that moment noticed the face of the red-nosed captain and his drawn-in stomach, and mimicked his expression and pose with such exactitude that Nesvitski could not help laughing.
  • The officer evidently had complete control of his face, and while Kutuzov was turning managed to make a grimace and then assume a most serious, deferential, and innocent expression.
  • The shapely figure of the fair-haired soldier, with his clear blue eyes, stepped forward from the ranks, went up to the commander in chief, and presented arms.
  • "One thing I ask of your excellency," Dolokhov said in his firm, ringing, deliberate voice.
  • I ask an opportunity to atone for my fault and prove my devotion to His Majesty the Emperor and to Russia!
  • And he held out his hand to the captain.
  • "As far as the service goes he is quite punctilious, your excellency; but his character..." said Timokhin.
  • "And what about his character?" asked the regimental commander.
  • "I will, your excellency," said Timokhin, showing by his smile that he understood his commander's wish.
  • The regimental commander sought out Dolokhov in the ranks and, reining in his horse, said to him:
  • Dolokhov looked round but did not say anything, nor did the mocking smile on his lips change.
  • A drummer, their leader, turned round facing the singers, and flourishing his arm, began a long-drawn-out soldiers' song, commencing with the words: "Morning dawned, the sun was rising," and concluding: "On then, brothers, on to glory, led by Father Kamenski."
  • Having jerked out these last words as soldiers do and waved his arms as if flinging something to the ground, the drummer--a lean, handsome soldier of forty--looked sternly at the singers and screwed up his eyes.
  • "Oh, my bower new...!" chimed in twenty voices, and the castanet player, in spite of the burden of his equipment, rushed out to the front and, walking backwards before the company, jerked his shoulders and flourished his castanets as if threatening someone.
  • Kutuzov and his suite were returning to the town.
  • The commander-in-chief made a sign that the men should continue to march at ease, and he and all his suite showed pleasure at the sound of the singing and the sight of the dancing soldier and the gay and smartly marching men.
  • "My dear fellow, how are you?" said he through the singing, making his horse keep pace with the company.
  • Zherkov touched his horse with the spurs; it pranced excitedly from foot to foot uncertain with which to start, then settled down, galloped past the company, and overtook the carriage, still keeping time to the song.
  • On returning from the review, Kutuzov took the Austrian general into his private room and, calling his adjutant, asked for some papers relating to the condition of the troops on their arrival, and the letters that had come from the Archduke Ferdinand, who was in command of the advanced army.
  • It was evident that Kutuzov himself listened with pleasure to his own voice.
  • Also, as we are masters of Ulm, we cannot be deprived of the advantage of commanding both sides of the Danube, so that should the enemy not cross the Lech, we can cross the Danube, throw ourselves on his line of communications, recross the river lower down, and frustrate his intention should he try to direct his whole force against our faithful ally.
  • Here are two letters from Count Nostitz and here is one from His Highness the Archduke Ferdinand and here are these," he said, handing him several papers, "make a neat memorandum in French out of all this, showing all the news we have had of the movements of the Austrian army, and then give it to his excellency."
  • Here are two letters from Count Nostitz and here is one from His Highness the Archduke Ferdinand and here are these," he said, handing him several papers, "make a neat memorandum in French out of all this, showing all the news we have had of the movements of the Austrian army, and then give it to his excellency."
  • In the expression of his face, in his movements, in his walk, scarcely a trace was left of his former affected languor and indolence.
  • His face expressed more satisfaction with himself and those around him, his smile and glance were brighter and more attractive.
  • His face expressed more satisfaction with himself and those around him, his smile and glance were brighter and more attractive.
  • From Vienna Kutuzov wrote to his old comrade, Prince Andrew's father.
  • Your son bids fair to become an officer distinguished by his industry, firmness, and expedition.
  • On Kutuzov's staff, among his fellow officers and in the army generally, Prince Andrew had, as he had had in Petersburg society, two quite opposite reputations.
  • But among these people Prince Andrew knew how to take his stand so that they respected and even feared him.
  • Coming out of Kutuzov's room into the waiting room with the papers in his hand Prince Andrew came up to his comrade, the aide-de-camp on duty, Kozlovski, who was sitting at the window with a book.
  • Prince Andrew shrugged his shoulders.
  • But at that instant a tall Austrian general in a greatcoat, with the order of Maria Theresa on his neck and a black bandage round his head, who had evidently just arrived, entered quickly, slamming the door.
  • "The commander-in-chief is engaged," said Kozlovski, going hurriedly up to the unknown general and blocking his way to the door.
  • The general's face clouded, his lips quivered and trembled.
  • Then he lifted his head, stretched his neck as if he intended to say something, but immediately, with affected indifference, began to hum to himself, producing a queer sound which immediately broke off.
  • The general with the bandaged head bent forward as though running away from some danger, and, making long, quick strides with his thin legs, went up to Kutuzov.
  • Then wrinkles ran over his face like a wave and his forehead became smooth again, he bowed his head respectfully, closed his eyes, silently let Mack enter his room before him, and closed the door himself behind him.
  • When he saw Mack and heard the details of his disaster he understood that half the campaign was lost, understood all the difficulties of the Russian army's position, and vividly imagined what awaited it and the part he would have to play.
  • He feared that Bonaparte's genius might outweigh all the courage of the Russian troops, and at the same time could not admit the idea of his hero being disgraced.
  • Excited and irritated by these thoughts Prince Andrew went toward his room to write to his father, to whom he wrote every day.
  • He bowed his head and scraped first with one foot and then with the other, awkwardly, like a child at a dancing lesson.
  • He screwed up his eyes showing that he was listening.
  • Nesvitski with a laugh threw his arms round Prince Andrew, but Bolkonski, turning still paler, pushed him away with an angry look and turned to Zherkov.
  • The nervous irritation aroused by the appearance of Mack, the news of his defeat, and the thought of what lay before the Russian army found vent in anger at Zherkov's untimely jest.
  • "What's the matter?" exclaimed Prince Andrew standing still in his excitement.
  • Quarante mille hommes massacres et l'armee de nos allies detruite, et vous trouvez la le mot pour rire, * he said, as if strengthening his views by this French sentence.
  • "Yes, your excellency," answered the Ukrainian gaily, tossing his head.
  • It was evident that the cadet was liberal with his tips and that it paid to serve him.
  • Rostov patted the horse's neck and then his flank, and lingered for a moment.
  • His landlord, who in a waistcoat and a pointed cap, pitchfork in hand, was clearing manure from the cowhouse, looked out, and his face immediately brightened on seeing Rostov.
  • His landlord, who in a waistcoat and a pointed cap, pitchfork in hand, was clearing manure from the cowhouse, looked out, and his face immediately brightened on seeing Rostov.
  • The German laughed, came out of the cowshed, pulled off his cap, and waving it above his head cried:
  • Rostov waved his cap above his head like the German and cried laughing, "Und vivat die ganze Welt!"
  • He wore an unfastened cloak, wide breeches hanging down in creases, and a crumpled shako on the back of his head.
  • He came up to the porch gloomily, hanging his head.
  • I lost yesterday like a damned fool! cried Denisov, not pronouncing his r's.
  • Puckering up his face though smiling, and showing his short strong teeth, he began with stubby fingers of both hands to ruffle up his thick tangled black hair.
  • (an officer nicknamed "the rat") he said, rubbing his forehead and whole face with both hands.
  • He took the lighted pipe that was offered to him, gripped it in his fist, and tapped it on the floor, making the sparks fly, while he continued to shout.
  • Then he remained silent for a while, and all at once looked cheerfully with his glittering, black eyes at Rostov.
  • The lieutenant never looked the man he was speaking to straight in the face; his eyes continually wandered from one object to another.
  • On seeing Rostov, Denisov screwed up his face and pointing over his shoulder with his thumb to the room where Telyanin was sitting, he frowned and gave a shudder of disgust.
  • Rostov shrugged his shoulders as much as to say: "Nor do I, but what's one to do?" and, having given his order, he returned to Telyanin.
  • Telyanin was sitting in the same indolent pose in which Rostov had left him, rubbing his small white hands.
  • The lieutenant explained how to rivet the hoof and went away to his own quarters.
  • Denisov was sitting there scratching with his pen on a sheet of paper.
  • He leaned his elbows on the table with his pen in his hand and, evidently glad of a chance to say quicker in words what he wanted to write, told Rostov the contents of his letter.
  • Rostov felt Denisov's gaze fixed on him, raised his eyes, and instantly dropped them again.
  • All the blood which had seemed congested somewhere below his throat rushed to his face and eyes.
  • Rostov, his eyes avoiding Denisov, began buttoning his coat, buckled on his saber, and put on his cap.
  • "I must have that purse, I tell you," shouted Denisov, shaking his orderly by the shoulders and knocking him against the wall.
  • "Denisov, let him alone, I know who has taken it," said Rostov, going toward the door without raising his eyes.
  • Denisov paused, thought a moment, and, evidently understanding what Rostov hinted at, seized his arm.
  • "Nonsense!" he cried, and the veins on his forehead and neck stood out like cords.
  • But Rostov pulled away his arm and, with as much anger as though Denisov were his worst enemy, firmly fixed his eyes directly on his face.
  • "Ah, you've come here too, young man!" he said, smiling and raising his eyebrows.
  • When Telyanin had finished his lunch he took out of his pocket a double purse and, drawing its rings aside with his small, white, turned-up fingers, drew out a gold imperial, and lifting his eyebrows gave it to the waiter.
  • Rostov took the purse in his hand, examined it and the money in it, and looked at Telyanin.
  • The lieutenant was looking about in his usual way and suddenly seemed to grow very merry.
  • He stretched out his hand to take hold of the purse.
  • "Well, young man?" he said with a sigh, and from under his lifted brows he glanced into Rostov's eyes.
  • "Heaven only knows what the people here may imagine," muttered Telyanin, taking up his cap and moving toward a small empty room.
  • Every muscle of Telyanin's pale, terrified face began to quiver, his eyes still shifted from side to side but with a downward look not rising to Rostov's face, and his sobs were audible.
  • But at the door he stopped and then retraced his steps.
  • "And I tell you, Rostov, that you must apologize to the colonel!" said a tall, grizzly-haired staff captain, with enormous mustaches and many wrinkles on his large features, to Rostov who was crimson with excitement.
  • He may keep me on duty every day, or may place me under arrest, but no one can make me apologize, because if he, as commander of this regiment, thinks it beneath his dignity to give me satisfaction, then...
  • "You just wait a moment, my dear fellow, and listen," interrupted the staff captain in his deep bass, calmly stroking his long mustache.
  • Ask Denisov whether it is not out of the question for a cadet to demand satisfaction of his regimental commander?
  • Denisov sat gloomily biting his mustache and listening to the conversation, evidently with no wish to take part in it.
  • He answered the staff captain's question by a disapproving shake of his head.
  • Denisov remained silent and did not move, but occasionally looked with his glittering black eyes at Rostov.
  • "Come, that's right, Count!" cried the staff captain, turning round and clapping Rostov on the shoulder with his big hand.
  • "That's better, Count," said the staff captain, beginning to address Rostov by his title, as if in recognition of his confession.
  • Mack has surrendered with his whole army.
  • Among the field guns on the brow of the hill the general in command of the rearguard stood with a staff officer, scanning the country through his fieldglass.
  • "No, but what I should like," added he, munching a pie in his moist-lipped handsome mouth, "would be to slip in over there."
  • Meanwhile the staff officer standing in front pointed out something to the general, who looked through his field glass.
  • "Yes, so it is, so it is," said the general angrily, lowering the field glass and shrugging his shoulders, "so it is!
  • Halfway across stood Prince Nesvitski, who had alighted from his horse and whose big body was jammed against the railings.
  • "What a fine fellow you are, friend!" said the Cossack to a convoy soldier with a wagon, who was pressing onto the infantrymen who were crowded together close to his wheels and his horses.
  • But the convoyman took no notice of the word "general" and shouted at the soldiers who were blocking his way.
  • Sometimes through the monotonous waves of men, like a fleck of white foam on the waves of the Enns, an officer, in a cloak and with a type of face different from that of the men, squeezed his way along; sometimes like a chip of wood whirling in the river, an hussar on foot, an orderly, or a townsman was carried through the waves of infantry; and sometimes like a log floating down the river, an officers' or company's baggage wagon, piled high, leather covered, and hemmed in on all sides, moved across the bridge.
  • "And then, old fellow, he gives him one in the teeth with the butt end of his gun..." a soldier whose greatcoat was well tucked up said gaily, with a wide swing of his arm.
  • The German closed his eyes, signifying that he did not understand.
  • Nesvitski like the rest of the men on the bridge did not take his eyes off the women till they had passed.
  • With great difficulty he managed to get to his horse, and shouting continually he moved on.
  • Nesvitski looked round and saw, some fifteen paces away but separated by the living mass of moving infantry, Vaska Denisov, red and shaggy, with his cap on the back of his black head and a cloak hanging jauntily over his shoulder.
  • "The squadwon can't pass," shouted Vaska Denisov, showing his white teeth fiercely and spurring his black thoroughbred Arab, which twitched its ears as the bayonets touched it, and snorted, spurting white foam from his bit, tramping the planks of the bridge with his hoofs, and apparently ready to jump over the railings had his rider let him.
  • I'll hack you with my saber! he shouted, actually drawing his saber from its scabbard and flourishing it.
  • The imposing figure of Nesvitski followed by his Cossack, and the determination of Denisov who flourished his sword and shouted frantically, had such an effect that they managed to squeeze through to the farther side of the bridge and stopped the infantry.
  • Carelessly holding in his stallion that was neighing and pawing the ground, eager to rejoin its fellows, he watched his squadron draw nearer.
  • Then the clang of hoofs, as of several horses galloping, resounded on the planks of the bridge, and the squadron, officers in front and men four abreast, spread across the bridge and began to emerge on his side of it.
  • Your fine cords would soon get a bit rubbed, said an infantryman, wiping the mud off his face with his sleeve.
  • You'd look fine, said a corporal, chaffing a thin little soldier who bent under the weight of his knapsack.
  • But despite himself, on his face too that same indication of something new and stern showed round the mouth.
  • Look at me, cried Denisov who, unable to keep still on one spot, kept turning his horse in front of the squadron.
  • The black, hairy, snub-nosed face of Vaska Denisov, and his whole short sturdy figure with the sinewy hairy hand and stumpy fingers in which he held the hilt of his naked saber, looked just as it usually did, especially toward evening when he had emptied his second bottle; he was only redder than usual.
  • With his shaggy head thrown back like birds when they drink, pressing his spurs mercilessly into the sides of his good horse, Bedouin, and sitting as though falling backwards in the saddle, he galloped to the other flank of the squadron and shouted in a hoarse voice to the men to look to their pistols.
  • The staff captain on his broad-backed, steady mare came at a walk to meet him.
  • His face with its long mustache was serious as always, only his eyes were brighter than usual.
  • His face with its long mustache was serious as always, only his eyes were brighter than usual.
  • "Attack indeed!" said the colonel in a bored voice, puckering up his face as if driving off a troublesome fly.
  • It seemed to Rostov that Bogdanich was only pretending not to notice him, and that his whole aim now was to test the cadet's courage, so he drew himself up and looked around him merrily; then it seemed to him that Bogdanich rode so near in order to show him his courage.
  • Next he thought that his enemy would send the squadron on a desperate attack just to punish him--Rostov.
  • After his dismissal from headquarters Zherkov had not remained in the regiment, saying he was not such a fool as to slave at the front when he could get more rewards by doing nothing on the staff, and had succeeded in attaching himself as an orderly officer to Prince Bagration.
  • He now came to his former chief with an order from the commander of the rear guard.
  • After him the stout Nesvitski came galloping up on a Cossack horse that could scarcely carry his weight.
  • "Colonel," interrupted the officer of the suite, "You must be quick or the enemy will bring up his guns to use grapeshot."
  • His heart contracted and the blood rushed to his face.
  • His heart contracted and the blood rushed to his face.
  • He was afraid of falling behind the hussars, so much afraid that his heart stood still.
  • His hand trembled as he gave his horse into an orderly's charge, and he felt the blood rush to his heart with a thud.
  • His hand trembled as he gave his horse into an orderly's charge, and he felt the blood rush to his heart with a thud.
  • Rostov did not think what this call for stretchers meant; he ran on, trying only to be ahead of the others; but just at the bridge, not looking at the ground, he came on some sticky, trodden mud, stumbled, and fell on his hands.
  • "At boss zides, Captain," he heard the voice of the colonel, who, having ridden ahead, had pulled up his horse near the bridge, with a triumphant, cheerful face.
  • Rostov wiping his muddy hands on his breeches looked at his enemy and was about to run on, thinking that the farther he went to the front the better.
  • Come back, Cadet! he cried angrily; and turning to Denisov, who, showing off his courage, had ridden on to the planks of the bridge:
  • "Oh, every bullet has its billet," answered Vaska Denisov, turning in his saddle.
  • Rostov, absorbed by his relations with Bogdanich, had paused on the bridge not knowing what to do.
  • So you've smelt powdah! shouted Vaska Denisov just above his ear.
  • Austrian troops that had escaped capture at Ulm and had joined Kutuzov at Braunau now separated from the Russian army, and Kutuzov was left with only his own weak and exhausted forces.
  • On the twenty-eighth of October Kutuzov with his army crossed to the left bank of the Danube and took up a position for the first time with the river between himself and the main body of the French.
  • His horse had been wounded under him and his own arm slightly grazed by a bullet.
  • His horse had been wounded under him and his own arm slightly grazed by a bullet.
  • Despite his apparently delicate build Prince Andrew could endure physical fatigue far better than many very muscular men, and on the night of the battle, having arrived at Krems excited but not weary, with dispatches from Dokhturov to Kutuzov, he was sent immediately with a special dispatch to Brunn.
  • Reviewing his impressions of the recent battle, picturing pleasantly to himself the impression his news of a victory would create, or recalling the send-off given him by the commander-in-chief and his fellow officers, Prince Andrew was galloping along in a post chaise enjoying the feelings of a man who has at length begun to attain a long-desired happiness.
  • As soon as he closed his eyes his ears seemed filled with the rattle of the wheels and the sensation of victory.
  • He again recalled all the details of the victory and his own calm courage during the battle, and feeling reassured he dozed off....
  • Prince Andrew took out his purse and gave the soldier three gold pieces.
  • Despite his rapid journey and sleepless night, Prince Andrew when he drove up to the palace felt even more vigorous and alert than he had done the day before.
  • Only his eyes gleamed feverishly and his thoughts followed one another with extraordinary clearness and rapidity.
  • The adjutant by his elaborate courtesy appeared to wish to ward off any attempt at familiarity on the part of the Russian messenger.
  • His fertile mind instantly suggested to him a point of view which gave him a right to despise the adjutant and the minister.
  • He went on reading to the end, without raising his eyes at the opening of the door and the sound of footsteps.
  • "Take this and deliver it," said he to his adjutant, handing him the papers and still taking no notice of the special messenger.
  • The minister drew the remaining papers together, arranged them evenly, and then raised his head.
  • He had an intellectual and distinctive head, but the instant he turned to Prince Andrew the firm, intelligent expression on his face changed in a way evidently deliberate and habitual to him.
  • His Majesty will no doubt wish to see you, but not today.
  • The stupid smile, which had left his face while he was speaking, reappeared.
  • His Majesty will probably desire to see you, he added, bowing his head.
  • His Majesty will probably desire to see you, he added, bowing his head.
  • The whole tenor of his thoughts instantaneously changed; the battle seemed the memory of a remote event long past.
  • Prince Andrew stayed at Brunn with Bilibin, a Russian acquaintance of his in the diplomatic service.
  • Besides it was pleasant, after his reception by the Austrians, to speak if not in Russian (for they were speaking French) at least with a Russian who would, he supposed, share the general Russian antipathy to the Austrians which was then particularly strong.
  • He was one of those, who, liking work, knew how to do it, and despite his indolence would sometimes spend a whole night at his writing table.
  • He worked well whatever the import of his work.
  • Bilibin's services were valued not only for what he wrote, but also for his skill in dealing and conversing with those in the highest spheres.
  • His conversation was always sprinkled with wittily original, finished phrases of general interest.
  • These sayings were prepared in the inner laboratory of his mind in a portable form as if intentionally, so that insignificant society people might carry them from drawing room to drawing room.
  • His thin, worn, sallow face was covered with deep wrinkles, which always looked as clean and well washed as the tips of one's fingers after a Russian bath.
  • The movement of these wrinkles formed the principal play of expression on his face.
  • Now his forehead would pucker into deep folds and his eyebrows were lifted, then his eyebrows would descend and deep wrinkles would crease his cheeks.
  • His small, deep-set eyes always twinkled and looked out straight.
  • Bolkonski, very modestly without once mentioning himself, described the engagement and his reception by the Minister of War.
  • Bilibin smiled and the wrinkles on his face disappeared.
  • You with all your forces fall on the unfortunate Mortier and his one division, and even then Mortier slips through your fingers!
  • So don't be surprised if not only the Minister of War but also his Most August Majesty the Emperor and King Francis is not much delighted by your victory.
  • Even I, a poor secretary of the Russian Embassy, do not feel any need in token of my joy to give my Franz a thaler, or let him go with his Liebchen to the Prater...
  • He looked straight at Prince Andrew and suddenly unwrinkled his forehead.
  • After the fatigues and impressions of the journey, his reception, and especially after having dined, Bolkonski felt that he could not take in the full significance of the words he heard.
  • "Really I don't care about that, I don't care at all," said Prince Andrew, beginning to understand that his news of the battle before Krems was really of small importance in view of such events as the fall of Austria's capital.
  • Prince Andrew suddenly exclaimed, clenching his small hand and striking the table with it, "and what luck the man has!"
  • "Buonaparte?" said Bilibin inquiringly, puckering up his forehead to indicate that he was about to say something witty.
  • "If we live we shall see," replied Bilibin, his face again becoming smooth as a sign that the conversation was at an end.
  • Recalling his recent impressions, the first thought that came into his mind was that today he had to be presented to the Emperor Francis; he remembered the Minister of War, the polite Austrian adjutant, Bilibin, and last night's conversation.
  • Having dressed for his attendance at court in full parade uniform, which he had not worn for a long time, he went into Bilibin's study fresh, animated, and handsome, with his hand bandaged.
  • "La femme est la compagne de l'homme," * announced Prince Hippolyte, and began looking through a lorgnette at his elevated legs.
  • Kuragin is exquisite when he discusses politics--you should see his gravity!
  • He sat down beside Hippolyte and wrinkling his forehead began talking to him about politics.
  • Besides, unless His Majesty the Emperor derogates from the principle of our alliance...
  • "Demosthenes, I know thee by the pebble thou secretest in thy golden mouth!" said Bilibin, and the mop of hair on his head moved with satisfaction.
  • He was evidently distressed, and breathed painfully, but could not restrain the wild laughter that convulsed his usually impassive features.
  • "We must let him see Amelie, she's exquisite!" said one of "ours," kissing his finger tips.
  • "I shall scarcely be able to avail myself of your hospitality, gentlemen, it is already time for me to go," replied Prince Andrew looking at his watch.
  • "I cannot inform Your Majesty at what o'clock the battle began at the front, but at Durrenstein, where I was, our attack began after five in the afternoon," replied Bolkonski growing more animated and expecting that he would have a chance to give a reliable account, which he had ready in his mind, of all he knew and had seen.
  • Yesterday's adjutant reproached him for not having stayed at the palace, and offered him his own house.
  • He did not know whom to answer, and for a few seconds collected his thoughts.
  • Between four and five in the afternoon, having made all his calls, he was returning to Bilibin's house thinking out a letter to his father about the battle and his visit to Brunn.
  • His usually calm face showed excitement.
  • Bolkonski shrugged his shoulders.
  • But what is best of all," he went on, his excitement subsiding under the delightful interest of his own story, "is that the sergeant in charge of the cannon which was to give the signal to fire the mines and blow up the bridge, this sergeant, seeing that the French troops were running onto the bridge, was about to fire, but Lannes stayed his hand.
  • The sergeant, who was evidently wiser than his general, goes up to Auersperg and says: 'Prince, you are being deceived, here are the French!'
  • Prince Auersperg feels his dignity at stake and orders the sergeant to be arrested.
  • "Where are you off to?" he said suddenly to Prince Andrew who had risen and was going toward his room.
  • And Prince Andrew after giving directions about his departure went to his room.
  • And in proof of the conclusiveness of his opinion all the wrinkles vanished from his face.
  • You are faced by one of two things," and the skin over his left temple puckered, "either you will not reach your regiment before peace is concluded, or you will share defeat and disgrace with Kutuzov's whole army."
  • Prince Andrew took a horse and a Cossack from a Cossack commander, and hungry and weary, making his way past the baggage wagons, rode in search of the commander-in-chief and of his own luggage.
  • Prince Andrew rode up and was just putting his question to a soldier when his attention was diverted by the desperate shrieks of the woman in the vehicle.
  • "Let them pass, I tell you!" repeated Prince Andrew, compressing his lips.
  • He saw that his championship of the doctor's wife in her queer trap might expose him to what he dreaded more than anything in the world--to ridicule; but his instinct urged him on.
  • Before the officer finished his sentence Prince Andrew, his face distorted with fury, rode up to him and raised his riding whip.
  • The officer flourished his arm and hastily rode away.
  • On reaching the village he dismounted and went to the nearest house, intending to rest if but for a moment, eat something, and try to sort out the stinging and tormenting thoughts that confused his mind.
  • Nesvitski, moving his moist lips as he chewed something, and flourishing his arm, called him to enter.
  • He had just remembered his recent encounter with the doctor's wife and the convoy officer.
  • Passing by Kutuzov's carriage and the exhausted saddle horses of his suite, with their Cossacks who were talking loudly together, Prince Andrew entered the passage.
  • In the passage little Kozlovski was squatting on his heels in front of a clerk.
  • Just as he was going to open it the sounds ceased, the door opened, and Kutuzov with his eagle nose and puffy face appeared in the doorway.
  • Prince Andrew stood right in front of Kutuzov but the expression of the commander in chief's one sound eye showed him to be so preoccupied with thoughts and anxieties as to be oblivious of his presence.
  • He looked straight at his adjutant's face without recognizing him.
  • His face suddenly softened and tears came into his eyes.
  • His face suddenly softened and tears came into his eyes.
  • With his left hand he drew Bagration toward him, and with his right, on which he wore a ring, he made the sign of the cross over him with a gesture evidently habitual, offering his puffy cheek, but Bagration kissed him on the neck instead.
  • Kutuzov repeated and went toward his carriage.
  • "If a tenth part of his detachment returns I shall thank God," he added as if speaking to himself.
  • Prince Andrew glanced at Kutuzov's face only a foot distant from him and involuntarily noticed the carefully washed seams of the scar near his temple, where an Ismail bullet had pierced his skull, and the empty eye socket.
  • There was not a trace of agitation on his face.
  • If Kutuzov decided to remain at Krems, Napoleon's army of one hundred and fifty thousand men would cut him off completely and surround his exhausted army of forty thousand, and he would find himself in the position of Mack at Ulm.
  • If Kutuzov decided to retreat along the road from Krems to Olmutz, to unite with the troops arriving from Russia, he risked being forestalled on that road by the French who had crossed the Vienna bridge, and encumbered by his baggage and transport, having to accept battle on the march against an enemy three times as strong, who would hem him in from two sides.
  • But to forestall the French with his whole army was impossible.
  • Bagration was to make this march without resting, and to halt facing Vienna with Znaim to his rear, and if he succeeded in forestalling the French he was to delay them as long as possible.
  • Kutuzov himself with all his transport took the road to Znaim.
  • Marching thirty miles that stormy night across roadless hills, with his hungry, ill-shod soldiers, and losing a third of his men as stragglers by the way, Bagration came out on the Vienna-Znaim road at Hollabrunn a few hours ahead of the French who were approaching Hollabrunn from Vienna.
  • Kutuzov with his transport had still to march for some days before he could reach Znaim.
  • Bagration replied that he was not authorized either to accept or refuse a truce and sent his adjutant to Kutuzov to report the offer he had received.
  • Bonaparte himself, not trusting to his generals, moved with all the Guards to the field of battle, afraid of letting a ready victim escape, and Bagration's four thousand men merrily lighted campfires, dried and warmed themselves, cooked their porridge for the first time for three days, and not one of them knew or imagined what was in store for him.
  • Between three and four o'clock in the afternoon Prince Andrew, who had persisted in his request to Kutuzov, arrived at Grunth and reported himself to Bagration.
  • "If he is one of the ordinary little staff dandies sent to earn a medal he can get his reward just as well in the rearguard, but if he wishes to stay with me, let him... he'll be of use here if he's a brave officer," thought Bagration.
  • Prince Andrew, without replying, asked the prince's permission to ride round the position to see the disposition of the forces, so as to know his bearings should he be sent to execute an order.
  • The officer on duty was a handsome, elegantly dressed man with a diamond ring on his forefinger.
  • The prince gave orders that no one should leave his post.
  • Now you, Captain, and he turned to a thin, dirty little artillery officer who without his boots (he had given them to the canteen keeper to dry), in only his stockings, rose when they entered, smiling not altogether comfortably.
  • Prince Andrew smiled involuntarily as he looked at the artillery officer Tushin, who silent and smiling, shifting from one stockinged foot to the other, glanced inquiringly with his large, intelligent, kindly eyes from Prince Andrew to the staff officer.
  • "The soldiers say it feels easier without boots," said Captain Tushin smiling shyly in his uncomfortable position, evidently wishing to adopt a jocular tone.
  • But before he had finished he felt that his jest was unacceptable and had not come off.
  • "Kindly return to your posts," said the staff officer trying to preserve his gravity.
  • It's in charge of the queer fellow we saw without his boots.
  • The soldiers in their greatcoats were ranged in lines, the sergeants major and company officers were counting the men, poking the last man in each section in the ribs and telling him to hold his hand up.
  • It's a shame for a soldier to steal; a soldier must be honest, honorable, and brave, but if he robs his fellows there is no honor in him, he's a scoundrel.
  • A young officer with a bewildered and pained expression on his face stepped away from the man and looked round inquiringly at the adjutant as he rode by.
  • Dolokhov had come from the left flank where their regiment was stationed, with his captain.
  • And Dolokhov swore at him in coarse soldier's Russian and shouldering his musket walked away.
  • Having ridden round the whole line from right flank to left, Prince Andrew made his way up to the battery from which the staff officer had told him the whole field could be seen.
  • Before the guns an artillery sentry was pacing up and down; he stood at attention when the officer arrived, but at a sign resumed his measured, monotonous pacing.
  • Prince Andrew took out his notebook and, leaning on the cannon, sketched a plan of the position.
  • His idea was, first, to concentrate all the artillery in the center, and secondly, to withdraw the cavalry to the other side of the dip.
  • "Why," thought Prince Andrew, "that's the captain who stood up in the sutler's hut without his boots."
  • Mounting his horse again Prince Andrew lingered with the battery, looking at the puff from the gun that had sent the ball.
  • His eyes ran rapidly over the wide space, but he only saw that the hitherto motionless masses of the French now swayed and that there really was a battery to their left.
  • Prince Andrew turned his horse and galloped back to Grunth to find Prince Bagration.
  • Lemarrois had just arrived at a gallop with Bonaparte's stern letter, and Murat, humiliated and anxious to expiate his fault, had at once moved his forces to attack the center and outflank both the Russian wings, hoping before evening and before the arrival of the Emperor to crush the contemptible detachment that stood before him.
  • Here it is! thought Prince Andrew, feeling the blood rush to his heart.
  • Prince Andrew stopped, waiting for him to come up; Prince Bagration reined in his horse and recognizing Prince Andrew nodded to him.
  • Prince Andrew, out of breath with his rapid ride, spoke quickly.
  • However, he put his horse to a trot in the direction of Tushin's battery.
  • "He wants to see a battle," said Zherkov to Bolkonski, pointing to the accountant, "but he feels a pain in the pit of his stomach already."
  • Prince Bagration screwed up his eyes, looked round, and, seeing the cause of the confusion, turned away with indifference, as if to say, "Is it worth while noticing trifles?"
  • He reined in his horse with the care of a skillful rider and, slightly bending over, disengaged his saber which had caught in his cloak.
  • Prince Andrew remembered the story of Suvorov giving his saber to Bagration in Italy, and the recollection was particularly pleasant at that moment.
  • As he approached, a ringing shot issued from it deafening him and his suite, and in the smoke that suddenly surrounded the gun they could see the gunners who had seized it straining to roll it quickly back to its former position.
  • A huge, broad-shouldered gunner, Number One, holding a mop, his legs far apart, sprang to the wheel; while Number Two with a trembling hand placed a charge in the cannon's mouth.
  • The short, round- shouldered Captain Tushin, stumbling over the tail of the gun carriage, moved forward and, not noticing the general, looked out shading his eyes with his small hand.
  • "Lift it two lines more and it will be just right," cried he in a feeble voice to which he tried to impart a dashing note, ill-suited to his weak figure.
  • No one had given Tushin orders where and at what to fire, but after consulting his sergeant major, Zakharchenko, for whom he had great respect, he had decided that it would be a good thing to set fire to the village.
  • Prince Bagration turned to the officer and with his dull eyes looked at him in silence.
  • Prince Bagration bowed his head in sign of assent and approval.
  • Prince Andrew listened attentively to Bagration's colloquies with the commanding officers and the orders he gave them and, to his surprise, found that no orders were really given, but that Prince Bagration tried to make it appear that everything done by necessity, by accident, or by the will of subordinate commanders was done, if not by his direct command, at least in accord with his intentions.
  • Prince Andrew noticed, however, that though what happened was due to chance and was independent of the commander's will, owing to the tact Bagration showed, his presence was very valuable.
  • Officers who approached him with disturbed countenances became calm; soldiers and officers greeted him gaily, grew more cheerful in his presence, and were evidently anxious to display their courage before him.
  • All he knew was that at the commencement of the action balls and shells began flying all over his regiment and hitting men and that afterwards someone had shouted "Cavalry!" and our men had begun firing.
  • Prince Bagration bowed his head as a sign that this was exactly what he had desired and expected.
  • Turning to his adjutant he ordered him to bring down the two battalions of the Sixth Chasseurs whom they had just passed.
  • He spoke as if those bullets could not kill him, and his half-closed eyes gave still more persuasiveness to his words.
  • He carried close to his leg a narrow unsheathed sword (small, curved, and not like a real weapon) and looked now at the superior officers and now back at the men without losing step, his whole powerful body turning flexibly.
  • It was as if all the powers of his soul were concentrated on passing the commander in the best possible manner, and feeling that he was doing it well he was happy.
  • A fat major skirted a bush, puffing and falling out of step; a soldier who had fallen behind, his face showing alarm at his defection, ran at a trot, panting to catch up with his company.
  • A morose soldier marching on the left turned his eyes on Bagration as he shouted, with an expression that seemed to say: "We know that ourselves!"
  • Another, without looking round, as though fearing to relax, shouted with his mouth wide open and passed on.
  • He gave the reins to a Cossack, took off and handed over his felt coat, stretched his legs, and set his cap straight.
  • Zherkov, not removing his hand from his cap, turned his horse about and galloped off.
  • But no sooner had he left Bagration than his courage failed him.
  • Having reached the left flank, instead of going to the front where the firing was, he began to look for the general and his staff where they could not possibly be, and so did not deliver the order.
  • The general in command of the infantry went toward his horse with jerky steps, and having mounted drew himself up very straight and tall and rode to the Pavlograd commander.
  • "Quite avare, your excellency," suddenly shouted the colonel, touching his horse and turning purple in the face.
  • "If only they would be quick!" thought Rostov, feeling that at last the time had come to experience the joy of an attack of which he had so often heard from his fellow hussars.
  • Rook pulled at the reins and started of his own accord.
  • Before him, on the right, Rostov saw the front lines of his hussars and still farther ahead a dark line which he could not see distinctly but took to be the enemy.
  • Rostov anticipated his horse's movements and became more and more elated.
  • "Oh, how I will slash at him!" thought Rostov, gripping the hilt of his saber.
  • "Let anyone come my way now," thought Rostov driving his spurs into Rook and letting him go at a full gallop so that he outstripped the others.
  • There was warm blood under his arm.
  • Rook tried to rise on his forelegs but fell back, pinning his rider's leg.
  • Blood was flowing from his head; he struggled but could not rise.
  • Rostov also tried to rise but fell back, his sabretache having become entangled in the saddle.
  • Having disentangled his leg, he rose.
  • "Can something bad have happened to me?" he wondered as he got up: and at that moment he felt that something superfluous was hanging on his benumbed left arm.
  • He examined his hand carefully, vainly trying to find blood on it.
  • He was being held by the arms and his horse was being led behind him.
  • Who are these men? thought Rostov, scarcely believing his eyes.
  • He remembered his mother's love for him, and his family's, and his friends', and the enemy's intention to kill him seemed impossible.
  • The foremost Frenchman, the one with the hooked nose, was already so close that the expression of his face could be seen.
  • And the excited, alien face of that man, his bayonet hanging down, holding his breath, and running so lightly, frightened Rostov.
  • He seized his pistol and, instead of firing it, flung it at the Frenchman and ran with all his might toward the bushes.
  • One sentiment, fear for his life, possessed his whole being.
  • Rapidly leaping the furrows, he fled across the field with the impetuosity he used to show at catchplay, now and then turning his good-natured, pale, young face to look back.
  • The French had fallen behind, and just as he looked round the first man changed his run to a walk and, turning, shouted something loudly to a comrade farther back.
  • But at the same time, his left arm felt as heavy as if a seventy-pound weight were tied to it.
  • Rostov closed his eyes and stooped down.
  • He mustered his last remaining strength, took hold of his left hand with his right, and reached the bushes.
  • One soldier, in his fear, uttered the senseless cry, "Cut off!" that is so terrible in battle, and that word infected the whole crowd with a feeling of panic.
  • Despite his desperate shouts that used to seem so terrible to the soldiers, despite his furious purple countenance distorted out of all likeness to his former self, and the flourishing of his saber, the soldiers all continued to run, talking, firing into the air, and disobeying orders.
  • Dolokhov, running beside Timokhin, killed a Frenchman at close quarters and was the first to seize the surrendering French officer by his collar.
  • The man was wearing a bluish coat of broadcloth, he had no knapsack or cap, his head was bandaged, and over his shoulder a French munition pouch was slung.
  • He had an officer's sword in his hand.
  • The soldier was pale, his blue eyes looked impudently into the commander's face, and his lips were smiling.
  • But Dolokhov did not go away; he untied the handkerchief around his head, pulled it off, and showed the blood congealed on his hair.
  • Little Tushin, moving feebly and awkwardly, kept telling his orderly to "refill my pipe for that one!" and then, scattering sparks from it, ran forward shading his eyes with his small hand to look at the French.
  • Amid the smoke, deafened by the incessant reports which always made him jump, Tushin not taking his pipe from his mouth ran from gun to gun, now aiming, now counting the charges, now giving orders about replacing dead or wounded horses and harnessing fresh ones, and shouting in his feeble voice, so high pitched and irresolute.
  • His face grew more and more animated.
  • The soldiers, for the most part handsome fellows and, as is always the case in an artillery company, a head and shoulders taller and twice as broad as their officer--all looked at their commander like children in an embarrassing situation, and the expression on his face was invariably reflected on theirs.
  • Though he thought of everything, considered everything, and did everything the best of officers could do in his position, he was in a state akin to feverish delirium or drunkenness.
  • The enemy's guns were in his fancy not guns but pipes from which occasional puffs were blown by an invisible smoker.
  • In that world, the handsome drunkard Number One of the second gun's crew was "uncle"; Tushin looked at him more often than at anyone else and took delight in his every movement.
  • "Now then, Matvevna, dear old lady, don't let me down!" he was saying as he moved from the gun, when a strange, unfamiliar voice called above his head: "Captain Tushin!
  • "Why are they down on me?" thought Tushin, looking in alarm at his superior.
  • "I... don't..." he muttered, holding up two fingers to his cap.
  • A cannon ball, flying close to him, caused him to duck and bend over his horse.
  • He turned his horse and galloped off.
  • He decided to have the guns removed from their positions and withdrawn in his presence.
  • "Well, till we meet again..." he said, holding out his hand to Tushin.
  • Good-bye, my dear fellow! and for some unknown reason tears suddenly filled his eyes.
  • Tushin gave no orders, and, silently-- fearing to speak because at every word he felt ready to weep without knowing why--rode behind on his artillery nag.
  • "Lay a cloak for him to sit on, lad," he said, addressing his favorite soldier.
  • With one hand he supported the other; he was pale and his jaw trembled, shivering feverishly.
  • The cloak they spread under him was wet with blood which stained his breeches and arm.
  • "It was the officer, your honor, stained it," answered the artilleryman, wiping away the blood with his coat sleeve, as if apologizing for the state of his gun.
  • After a while the moving mass became agitated, someone rode past on a white horse followed by his suite, and said something in passing: What did he say?
  • Captain Tushin, having given orders to his company, sent a soldier to find a dressing station or a doctor for the cadet, and sat down by a bonfire the soldiers had kindled on the road.
  • From pain, cold, and damp, a feverish shivering shook his whole body.
  • Drowsiness was irresistibly mastering him, but he kept awake by an excruciating pain in his arm, for which he could find no satisfactory position.
  • He kept closing his eyes and then again looking at the fire, which seemed to him dazzlingly red, and at the feeble, round-shouldered figure of Tushin who was sitting cross-legged like a Turk beside him.
  • Tushin's large, kind, intelligent eyes were fixed with sympathy and commiseration on Rostov, who saw that Tushin with his whole heart wished to help him but could not.
  • An infantryman came to the fire, squatted on his heels, held his hands to the blaze, and turned away his face.
  • Then a thin, pale soldier, his neck bandaged with a bloodstained leg band, came up and in angry tones asked the artillerymen for water.
  • Tushin rose and, buttoning his greatcoat and pulling it straight, walked away from the fire.
  • Several of those present smiled at Zherkov's words, expecting one of his usual jokes, but noticing that what he was saying redounded to the glory of our arms and of the day's work, they assumed a serious expression, though many of them knew that what he was saying was a lie devoid of any foundation.
  • How was it that two guns were abandoned in the center? he inquired, searching with his eyes for someone.
  • Tushin appeared at the threshold and made his way timidly from behind the backs of the generals.
  • As he stepped past the generals in the crowded hut, feeling embarrassed as he always was by the sight of his superiors, he did not notice the staff of the banner and stumbled over it.
  • He was afraid of getting some other officer into trouble, and silently fixed his eyes on Bagration as a schoolboy who has blundered looks at an examiner.
  • Prince Andrew looked at Tushin from under his brows and his fingers twitched nervously.
  • Prince Andrew broke the silence with his abrupt voice, you were pleased to send me to Captain Tushin's battery.
  • "And, if your excellency will allow me to express my opinion," he continued, "we owe today's success chiefly to the action of that battery and the heroic endurance of Captain Tushin and his company," and without awaiting a reply, Prince Andrew rose and left the table.
  • The pain in his arm became more and more intense.
  • Irresistible drowsiness overpowered him, red rings danced before his eyes, and the impression of those voices and faces and a sense of loneliness merged with the physical pain.
  • It was they, these soldiers--wounded and unwounded--it was they who were crushing, weighing down, and twisting the sinews and scorching the flesh of his sprained arm and shoulder.
  • To rid himself of them he closed his eyes.
  • For a moment he dozed, but in that short interval innumerable things appeared to him in a dream: his mother and her large white hand, Sonya's thin little shoulders, Natasha's eyes and laughter, Denisov with his voice and mustache, and Telyanin and all that affair with Telyanin and Bogdanich.
  • That affair was the same thing as this soldier with the harsh voice, and it was that affair and this soldier that were so agonizingly, incessantly pulling and pressing his arm and always dragging it in one direction.
  • He tried to get away from them, but they would not for an instant let his shoulder move a hair's breadth.
  • He opened his eyes and looked up.
  • He was alone now, except for a soldier who was sitting naked at the other side of the fire, warming his thin yellow body.
  • He looked at the snowflakes fluttering above the fire and remembered a Russian winter at his warm, bright home, his fluffy fur coat, his quickly gliding sleigh, his healthy body, and all the affection and care of his family.
  • Prince Vasili was not a man who deliberately thought out his plans.
  • Still less did he think of injuring anyone for his own advantage.
  • Schemes and devices for which he never rightly accounted to himself, but which formed the whole interest of his life, were constantly shaping themselves in his mind, arising from the circumstances and persons he met.
  • Of these plans he had not merely one or two in his head but dozens, some only beginning to form themselves, some approaching achievement, and some in course of disintegration.
  • But when he came across a man of position his instinct immediately told him that this man could be useful, and without any premeditation Prince Vasili took the first opportunity to gain his confidence, flatter him, become intimate with him, and finally make his request.
  • He had Pierre at hand in Moscow and procured for him an appointment as Gentleman of the Bedchamber, which at that time conferred the status of Councilor of State, and insisted on the young man accompanying him to Petersburg and staying at his house.
  • Pierre, on unexpectedly becoming Count Bezukhov and a rich man, felt himself after his recent loneliness and freedom from cares so beset and preoccupied that only in bed was he able to be by himself.
  • He was always hearing such words as: "With your remarkable kindness," or, "With your excellent heart," "You are yourself so honorable Count," or, "Were he as clever as you," and so on, till he began sincerely to believe in his own exceptional kindness and extraordinary intelligence, the more so as in the depth of his heart it had always seemed to him that he really was very kind and intelligent.
  • Prince Vasili had come to the conclusion that it was necessary to throw this bone--a bill for thirty thousand rubles--to the poor princess that it might not occur to her to speak of his share in the affair of the inlaid portfolio.
  • From the death of Count Bezukhov he did not let go his hold of the lad.
  • Of his former bachelor acquaintances many were no longer in Petersburg.
  • His whole time was taken up with dinners and balls and was spent chiefly at Prince Vasili's house in the company of the stout princess, his wife, and his beautiful daughter Helene.
  • His whole time was taken up with dinners and balls and was spent chiefly at Prince Vasili's house in the company of the stout princess, his wife, and his beautiful daughter Helene.
  • Formerly in Anna Pavlovna's presence, Pierre had always felt that what he was saying was out of place, tactless and unsuitable, that remarks which seemed to him clever while they formed in his mind became foolish as soon as he uttered them, while on the contrary Hippolyte's stupidest remarks came out clever and apt.
  • Even if Anna Pavlovna did not say so, he could see that she wished to and only refrained out of regard for his modesty.
  • And at that moment Pierre felt that Helene not only could, but must, be his wife, and that it could not be otherwise.
  • She already had power over him, and between them there was no longer any barrier except the barrier of his own will.
  • The architect had told him that it was necessary, and Pierre, without knowing why, was having his enormous Petersburg house done up.
  • But at the very time he was expressing this conviction to himself, in another part of his mind her image rose in all its womanly beauty.
  • He had arranged this for himself so as to visit his neglected estates at the same time and pick up his son Anatole where his regiment was stationed, and take him to visit Prince Nicholas Bolkonski in order to arrange a match for him with the daughter of that rich old man.
  • "Youth, frivolity... well, God be with him," thought he, relishing his own goodness of heart, "but it must be brought to a head.
  • Pierre was one of those who are only strong when they feel themselves quite innocent, and since that day when he was overpowered by a feeling of desire while stooping over the snuffbox at Anna Pavlovna's, an unacknowledged sense of the guilt of that desire paralyzed his will.
  • On Helene's name day, a small party of just their own people--as his wife said--met for supper at Prince Vasili's.
  • On either side of her sat the more important guests--an old general and his wife, and Anna Pavlovna Scherer.
  • And again his handkerchief, and again: 'Sergey Kuzmich, From all sides,'... and tears, till at last somebody else was asked to read it.
  • Prince Vasili mimicked the sobbing of Sergey Kuzmich and at the same time his eyes glanced toward his daughter, and while he laughed the expression on his face clearly said: "Yes... it's getting on, it will all be settled today."
  • Anna Pavlovna threatened him on behalf of "our dear Vyazmitinov," and in her eyes, which, for an instant, glanced at Pierre, Prince Vasili read a congratulation on his future son-in-law and on his daughter's happiness.
  • Only now and then detached ideas and impressions from the world of reality shot unexpectedly through his mind.
  • I do not know, but it will certainly happen! thought Pierre, glancing at those dazzling shoulders close to his eyes.
  • He felt it awkward to attract everyone's attention and to be considered a lucky man and, with his plain face, to be looked on as a sort of Paris possessed of a Helen.
  • So why should I not stay at his house?
  • Then it would suddenly seem to him that it was not she but he was so unusually beautiful, and that that was why they all looked so at him, and flattered by this general admiration he would expand his chest, raise his head, and rejoice at his good fortune.
  • After supper Pierre with his partner followed the others into the drawing room.
  • He pictured the vanity of his diplomatic career in comparison with Pierre's happiness.
  • The old general grumbled at his wife when she asked how his leg was.
  • Now he felt that it was inevitable, but he could not make up his mind to take the final step.
  • "Well, Lelya?" he asked, turning instantly to his daughter and addressing her with the careless tone of habitual tenderness natural to parents who have petted their children from babyhood, but which Prince Vasili had only acquired by imitating other parents.
  • "Sergey Kuzmich--From all sides-" he said, unbuttoning the top button of his waistcoat.
  • When Prince Vasili returned to the drawing room, the princess, his wife, was talking in low tones to the elderly lady about Pierre.
  • He closed his eyes and seemed to be dozing.
  • His head sank forward and then he roused himself.
  • "Aline," he said to his wife, "go and see what they are about."
  • Shaking himself, he rose, threw back his head, and with resolute steps went past the ladies into the little drawing room.
  • His face was so unusually triumphant that Pierre rose in alarm on seeing it.
  • Tears actually moistened his cheeks.
  • Pierre held the hand of his betrothed in silence, looking at her beautiful bosom as it rose and fell.
  • "Oh, take those off... those..." she said, pointing to his spectacles.
  • He was about to stoop over her hand and kiss it, but with a rapid, almost brutal movement of her head, she intercepted his lips and met them with her own.
  • Old Prince Nicholas Bolkonski received a letter from Prince Vasili in November, 1805, announcing that he and his son would be paying him a visit.
  • A fortnight after the letter Prince Vasili's servants came one evening in advance of him, and he and his son arrived next day.
  • And now, from the hints contained in his letter and given by the little princess, he saw which way the wind was blowing, and his low opinion changed into a feeling of contemptuous ill will.
  • Whether he was in a bad temper because Prince Vasili was coming, or whether his being in a bad temper made him specially annoyed at Prince Vasili's visit, he was in a bad temper, and in the morning Tikhon had already advised the architect not to go to the prince with his report.
  • Stepping flat on his heels--we know what that means....
  • However, at nine o'clock the prince, in his velvet coat with a sable collar and cap, went out for his usual walk.
  • "Can a sleigh pass?" he asked his overseer, a venerable man, resembling his master in manners and looks, who was accompanying him back to the house.
  • The prince bowed his head and went up to the porch.
  • The prince turned round to the overseer and fixed his eyes on him, frowning.
  • Who gave orders? he said in his shrill, harsh voice.
  • "You thought!" shouted the prince, his words coming more and more rapidly and indistinctly.
  • I'll teach you to think! and lifting his stick he swung it and would have hit Alpatych, the overseer, had not the latter instinctively avoided the blow.
  • The prince looked at his daughter's frightened face and snorted.
  • His plate seemed to him not quite clean, and pointing to a spot he flung it away.
  • The prince reciprocated this antipathy, but it was overpowered by his contempt for her.
  • "His Excellency Prince Vasili Kuragin and his son, I understand?" she said inquiringly.
  • "His Excellency Prince Vasili Kuragin and his son, I understand?" she said inquiringly.
  • Hm!--his excellency is a puppy....
  • I got him his appointment in the service, said the prince disdainfully.
  • Why his son is coming I don't understand.
  • (He looked at his blushing daughter.)
  • After dinner, he went to see his daughter-in-law.
  • "All right, all right," interrupted the prince, and laughing his unnatural way, he stretched out his hand for Alpatych to kiss, and then proceeded to his study.
  • He was met in the avenue by coachmen and footmen, who, with loud shouts, dragged his sleighs up to one of the lodges over the road purposely laden with snow.
  • Anatole, having taken off his overcoat, sat with arms akimbo before a table on a corner of which he smilingly and absent-mindedly fixed his large and handsome eyes.
  • He regarded his whole life as a continual round of amusement which someone for some reason had to provide for him.
  • He shaved and scented himself with the care and elegance which had become habitual to him and, his handsome head held high, entered his father's room with the good-humored and victorious air natural to him.
  • Prince Vasili's two valets were busy dressing him, and he looked round with much animation and cheerfully nodded to his son as the latter entered, as if to say: "Yes, that's how I want you to look."
  • The little princess and Mademoiselle Bourienne had already received from Masha, the lady's maid, the necessary report of how handsome the minister's son was, with his rosy cheeks and dark eyebrows, and with what difficulty the father had dragged his legs upstairs while the son had followed him like an eagle, three steps at a time.
  • When Princess Mary came down, Prince Vasili and his son were already in the drawing room, talking to the little princess and Mademoiselle Bourienne.
  • Prince Vasili approached first, and she kissed the bold forehead that bent over her hand and answered his question by saying that, on the contrary, she remembered him quite well.
  • When she looked up at him she was struck by his beauty.
  • Anatole stood with his right thumb under a button of his uniform, his chest expanded and his back drawn in, slightly swinging one foot, and, with his head a little bent, looked with beaming face at the princess without speaking and evidently not thinking about her at all.
  • But Anatole was dumb, swung his foot, and smilingly examined the princess' hair.
  • Perhaps he did not really think this when he met women--even probably he did not, for in general he thought very little--but his looks and manner gave that impression.
  • The princess felt this, and as if wishing to show him that she did not even dare expect to interest him, she turned to his father.
  • "And didn't Hippolyte tell you?" asked Prince Vasili, turning to his son and seizing the little princess' arm as if she would have run away and he had just managed to catch her, "didn't he tell you how he himself was pining for the dear princess, and how she showed him the door?
  • The old prince dressed leisurely in his study, frowning and considering what he was to do.
  • What are Prince Vasili and that son of his to me?
  • What angered him was that the coming of these visitors revived in his mind an unsettled question he always tried to stifle, one about which he always deceived himself.
  • The question was whether he could ever bring himself to part from his daughter and give her to a husband.
  • Prince Vasili had brought his son with the evident intention of proposing, and today or tomorrow he would probably ask for an answer.
  • His birth and position in society were not bad.
  • He entered the drawing room with his usual alert step, glancing rapidly round the company.
  • He noticed the change in the little princess' dress, Mademoiselle Bourienne's ribbon, Princess Mary's unbecoming coiffure, Mademoiselle Bourienne's and Anatole's smiles, and the loneliness of his daughter amid the general conversation.
  • "Well, come and kiss me," and he offered his cheek.
  • Anatole kissed the old man, and looked at him with curiosity and perfect composure, waiting for a display of the eccentricities his father had told him to expect.
  • Prince Bolkonski sat down in his usual place in the corner of the sofa and, drawing up an armchair for Prince Vasili, pointed to it and began questioning him about political affairs and news.
  • Then rising, he suddenly went up to his daughter.
  • "You must do as you please," said Prince Bolkonski, bowing to his daughter-in-law, "but she need not make a fool of herself, she's plain enough as it is."
  • And he sat down again, paying no more attention to his daughter, who was reduced to tears.
  • He took Prince Vasili's arm and led him to his study.
  • As soon as they were alone together, Prince Vasili announced his hopes and wishes to the old prince.
  • "Let her marry, it's all the same to me!" he screamed in the same piercing tone as when parting from his son.
  • Anatole, laughing and in high spirits, came and leaned on his elbows, facing her and beside Mademoiselle Bourienne.
  • Princess Mary felt his look with a painfully joyous emotion.
  • But Anatole's expression, though his eyes were fixed on her, referred not to her but to the movements of Mademoiselle Bourienne's little foot, which he was then touching with his own under the clavichord.
  • Can it be possible? she thought, not daring to look at his face, but still feeling his eyes gazing at her.
  • She did not know how she found the courage, but she looked straight into his handsome face as it came near to her shortsighted eyes.
  • The old prince felt as though he had been insulted through his daughter.
  • The insult was the more pointed because it concerned not himself but another, his daughter, whom he loved more than himself.
  • The old prince knew that if he told his daughter she was making a mistake and that Anatole meant to flirt with Mademoiselle Bourienne, Princess Mary's self-esteem would be wounded and his point (not to be parted from her) would be gained, so pacifying himself with this thought, he called Tikhon and began to undress.
  • "What devil brought them here?" thought he, while Tikhon was putting the nightshirt over his dried-up old body and gray-haired chest.
  • "Devil take 'em!" he muttered, while his head was still covered by the shirt.
  • Tikhon, like all good valets, instinctively knew the direction of his master's thoughts.
  • He guessed that the question referred to Prince Vasili and his son.
  • "No good... no good..." said the prince rapidly, and thrusting his feet into his slippers and his arms into the sleeves of his dressing gown, he went to the couch on which he slept.
  • The old prince was very affectionate and careful in his treatment of his daughter that morning.
  • "I expect you have guessed that Prince Vasili has not come and brought his pupil with him" (for some reason Prince Bolkonski referred to Anatole as a "pupil") "for the sake of my beautiful eyes.
  • Prince Vasili finds you to his taste as a daughter-in-law and makes a proposal to you on his pupil's behalf.
  • He saw the effect these words had produced on his daughter.
  • He receives his orders and will marry you or anybody; but you are free to choose....
  • Go to your room, think it over, and come back in an hour and tell me in his presence: yes or no.
  • He drew back and a real tear appeared in his eye.
  • Yes, my opinion, and only my opinion, added Prince Bolkonski, turning to Prince Vasili and answering his imploring look.
  • I shall be so happy when she is his wife.
  • Not till midwinter was the count at last handed a letter addressed in his son's handwriting.
  • On receiving it, he ran on tiptoe to his study in alarm and haste, trying to escape notice, closed the door, and began to read the letter.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna, who always knew everything that passed in the house, on hearing of the arrival of the letter went softly into the room and found the count with it in his hand, sobbing and laughing at the same time.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna sat down beside him, with her own handkerchief wiped the tears from his eyes and from the letter, then having dried her own eyes she comforted the count, and decided that at dinner and till teatime she would prepare the countess, and after tea, with God's help, would inform her.
  • "It's because she was in love with that fat one in spectacles" (that was how Petya described his namesake, the new Count Bezukhov) "and now she's in love with that singer" (he meant Natasha's Italian singing master), "that's why she's ashamed!"
  • The count put his ear to the keyhole and listened.
  • Her face wore the proud expression of a surgeon who has just performed a difficult operation and admits the public to appreciate his skill.
  • When she saw the count, she stretched out her arms to him, embraced his bald head, over which she again looked at the letter and the portrait, and in order to press them again to her lips, she slightly pushed away the bald head.
  • After a brief description of the campaign and the two battles in which he had taken part, and his promotion, Nicholas said that he kissed his father's and mother's hands asking for their blessing, and that he kissed Vera, Natasha, and Petya.
  • How strange, how extraordinary, how joyful it seemed, that her son, the scarcely perceptible motion of whose tiny limbs she had felt twenty years ago within her, that son about whom she used to have quarrels with the too indulgent count, that son who had first learned to say "pear" and then "granny," that this son should now be away in a foreign land amid strange surroundings, a manly warrior doing some kind of man's work of his own, without help or guidance.
  • He says nothing about his sufferings.
  • On receiving Boris' letter he rode with a fellow officer to Olmutz, dined there, drank a bottle of wine, and then set off alone to the Guards' camp to find his old playmate.
  • Rostov had not yet had time to get his uniform.
  • Berg, who had obtained his captaincy during the campaign, had gained the confidence of his superiors by his promptitude and accuracy and had arranged his money matters very satisfactorily.
  • Berg held a smoking pipe between his knees.
  • Boris, in the accurate way characteristic of him, was building a little pyramid of chessmen with his delicate white fingers while awaiting Berg's move, and watched his opponent's face, evidently thinking about the game as he always thought only of whatever he was engaged on.
  • Oh, you petisenfans, allay cushay dormir! he exclaimed, imitating his Russian nurse's French, at which he and Boris used to laugh long ago.
  • He was about to embrace his friend, but Nicholas avoided him.
  • Without answering, Rostov shook the soldier's Cross of St. George fastened to the cording of his uniform and, indicating a bandaged arm, glanced at Berg with a smile.
  • You know, of course, that His Imperial Highness rode with our regiment all the time, so that we had every comfort and every advantage.
  • And the two friends told each other of their doings, the one of his hussar revels and life in the fighting line, the other of the pleasures and advantages of service under members of the Imperial family.
  • He went to his bed, drew a purse from under the clean pillow, and sent for wine.
  • After reading a few lines, he glanced angrily at Berg, then, meeting his eyes, hid his face behind the letter.
  • Do go somewhere, anywhere... to the devil!" he exclaimed, and immediately seizing him by the shoulder and looking amiably into his face, evidently wishing to soften the rudeness of his words, he added, "Don't be hurt, my dear fellow; you know I speak from my heart as to an old acquaintance."
  • "You are still the same dreamer, I see," remarked Boris, shaking his head.
  • He looked intently and inquiringly into his friend's eyes, evidently trying in vain to find the answer to some question.
  • That's the way, Count, said Berg, lighting his pipe and emitting rings of smoke.
  • He asked him to tell them how and where he got his wound.
  • He could not tell them simply that everyone went at a trot and that he fell off his horse and sprained his arm and then ran as hard as he could from a Frenchman into the wood.
  • His hearers expected a story of how beside himself and all aflame with excitement, he had flown like a storm at the square, cut his way in, slashed right and left, how his saber had tasted flesh and he had fallen exhausted, and so on.
  • His hearers expected a story of how beside himself and all aflame with excitement, he had flown like a storm at the square, cut his way in, slashed right and left, how his saber had tasted flesh and he had fallen exhausted, and so on.
  • In the middle of his story, just as he was saying: "You cannot imagine what a strange frenzy one experiences during an attack," Prince Andrew, whom Boris was expecting, entered the room.
  • Prince Andrew, who liked to help young men, was flattered by being asked for his assistance and being well disposed toward Boris, who had managed to please him the day before, he wished to do what the young man wanted.
  • In spite of Prince Andrew's disagreeable, ironical tone, in spite of the contempt with which Rostov, from his fighting army point of view, regarded all these little adjutants on the staff of whom the newcomer was evidently one, Rostov felt confused, blushed, and became silent.
  • He ordered his horse at once and, coldly taking leave of Boris, rode home.
  • The two Emperors, the Russian with his heir the Tsarevich, and the Austrian with the Archduke, inspected the allied army of eighty thousand men.
  • Seeing that smile, Rostov involuntarily smiled himself and felt a still stronger flow of love for his sovereign.
  • How gladly would he have died at once for his Tsar!
  • Rostov too, bending over his saddle, shouted "Hurrah!" with all his might, feeling that he would like to injure himself by that shout, if only to express his rapture fully.
  • The Tsar's foot, in the narrow pointed boot then fashionable, touched the groin of the bobtailed bay mare he rode, his hand in a white glove gathered up the reins, and he moved off accompanied by an irregularly swaying sea of aides-de-camp.
  • Farther and farther he rode away, stopping at other regiments, till at last only his white plumes were visible to Rostov from amid the suites that surrounded the Emperors.
  • Among the gentlemen of the suite, Rostov noticed Bolkonski, sitting his horse indolently and carelessly.
  • When the Emperor had passed nearly all the regiments, the troops began a ceremonial march past him, and Rostov on Bedouin, recently purchased from Denisov, rode past too, at the rear of his squadron--that is, alone and in full view of the Emperor.
  • Rostov himself, his legs well back and his stomach drawn in and feeling himself one with his horse, rode past the Emperor with a frowning but blissful face "like a vewy devil," as Denisov expressed it.
  • His every word and movement was described with ecstasy.
  • The day after the review, Boris, in his best uniform and with his comrade Berg's best wishes for success, rode to Olmutz to see Bolkonski, wishing to profit by his friendliness and obtain for himself the best post he could--preferably that of adjutant to some important personage, a position in the army which seemed to him most attractive.
  • He did not find Prince Andrew in Olmutz that day, but the appearance of the town where the headquarters and the diplomatic corps were stationed and the two Emperors were living with their suites, households, and courts only strengthened his desire to belong to that higher world.
  • Another, the red, stout Nesvitski, lay on a bed with his arms under his head, laughing with an officer who had sat down beside him.
  • None of these gentlemen changed his position on seeing Boris.
  • When he entered, Prince Andrew, his eyes drooping contemptuously (with that peculiar expression of polite weariness which plainly says, "If it were not my duty I would not talk to you for a moment"), was listening to an old Russian general with decorations, who stood very erect, almost on tiptoe, with a soldier's obsequious expression on his purple face, reporting something.
  • Prince Andrew came up to him and took his hand.
  • But this is what we'll do: I have a good friend, an adjutant general and an excellent fellow, Prince Dolgorukov; and though you may not know it, the fact is that now Kutuzov with his staff and all of us count for nothing.
  • Prince Andrew introduced his protege, but Prince Dolgorukov politely and firmly pressing his hand said nothing to Boris and, evidently unable to suppress the thoughts which were uppermost in his mind at that moment, addressed Prince Andrew in French.
  • And the talkative Dolgorukov, turning now to Boris, now to Prince Andrew, told how Bonaparte wishing to test Markov, our ambassador, purposely dropped a handkerchief in front of him and stood looking at Markov, probably expecting Markov to pick it up for him, and how Markov immediately dropped his own beside it and picked it up without touching Bonaparte's.
  • This short man nodded to Dolgorukov as to an intimate friend and stared at Prince Andrew with cool intensity, walking straight toward him and evidently expecting him to bow or to step out of his way.
  • Prince Andrew did neither: a look of animosity appeared on his face and the other turned away and went down the side of the corridor.
  • He was breathless with agitation, his face was red, and when he heard some French spoken he at once began speaking to the officers, addressing first one, then another.
  • The Cossacks sold the horse for two gold pieces, and Rostov, being the richest of the officers now that he had received his money, bought it.
  • In a moment everyone was in his place, waiting.
  • Rostov did not know or remember how he ran to his place and mounted.
  • He was filled with happiness at his nearness to the Emperor.
  • Not daring to look round and without looking round, he was ecstatically conscious of his approach.
  • Then all at once he raised his eyebrows, abruptly touched his horse with his left foot, and galloped on.
  • The Emperor, surrounded by his suite of officers and courtiers, was riding a bobtailed chestnut mare, a different one from that which he had ridden at the review, and bending to one side he gracefully held a gold lorgnette to his eyes and looked at a soldier who lay prone, with blood on his uncovered head.
  • The wounded soldier was so dirty, coarse, and revolting that his proximity to the Emperor shocked Rostov.
  • Rostov saw how the Emperor's rather round shoulders shuddered as if a cold shiver had run down them, how his left foot began convulsively tapping the horse's side with the spur, and how the well-trained horse looked round unconcerned and did not stir.
  • Let us drink to his health and to the certain defeat of the French!
  • When the officers had emptied and smashed their glasses, Kirsten filled others and, in shirt sleeves and breeches, went glass in hand to the soldiers' bonfires and with his long gray mustache, his white chest showing under his open shirt, he stood in a majestic pose in the light of the campfire, waving his uplifted arm.
  • Hurrah! he exclaimed in his dashing, old, hussar's baritone.
  • Late that night, when all had separated, Denisov with his short hand patted his favorite, Rostov, on the shoulder.
  • And Rostov got up and went wandering among the campfires, dreaming of what happiness it would be to die--not in saving the Emperor's life (he did not even dare to dream of that), but simply to die before his eyes.
  • The next day the Emperor stopped at Wischau, and Villier, his physician, was repeatedly summoned to see him.
  • The cause of this indisposition was the strong impression made on his sensitive mind by the sight of the killed and wounded.
  • His hour has come!
  • He is a man in a gray overcoat, very anxious that I should call him 'Your Majesty,' but who, to his chagrin, got no title from me!
  • As soon as Prince Andrew began to demonstrate the defects of the latter and the merits of his own plan, Prince Dolgorukov ceased to listen to him and gazed absent-mindedly not at the map, but at Prince Andrew's face.
  • Kutuzov looked sternly at his adjutant and, after a pause, replied: I think the battle will be lost, and so I told Count Tolstoy and asked him to tell the Emperor.
  • Shortly after nine o'clock that evening, Weyrother drove with his plans to Kutuzov's quarters where the council of war was to be held.
  • Weyrother, who was in full control of the proposed battle, by his eagerness and briskness presented a marked contrast to the dissatisfied and drowsy Kutuzov, who reluctantly played the part of chairman and president of the council of war.
  • "Since Prince Bagration is not coming, we may begin," said Weyrother, hurriedly rising from his seat and going up to the table on which an enormous map of the environs of Brunn was spread out.
  • Kutuzov, with his uniform unbuttoned so that his fat neck bulged over his collar as if escaping, was sitting almost asleep in a low chair, with his podgy old hands resting symmetrically on its arms.
  • At the sound of Weyrother's voice, he opened his one eye with an effort.
  • If at first the members of the council thought that Kutuzov was pretending to sleep, the sounds his nose emitted during the reading that followed proved that the commander-in-chief at that moment was absorbed by a far more serious matter than a desire to show his contempt for the dispositions or anything else--he was engaged in satisfying the irresistible human need for sleep.
  • Exactly opposite Weyrother, with his glistening wide-open eyes fixed upon him and his mustache twisted upwards, sat the ruddy Miloradovich in a military pose, his elbows turned outwards, his hands on his knees, and his shoulders raised.
  • He remained stubbornly silent, gazing at Weyrother's face, and only turned away his eyes when the Austrian chief of staff finished reading.
  • In the middle of one of the longest sentences, he stopped the rotary motion of the snuffbox, raised his head, and with inimical politeness lurking in the corners of his thin lips interrupted Weyrother, wishing to say something.
  • But the Austrian general, continuing to read, frowned angrily and jerked his elbows, as if to say: "You can tell me your views later, but now be so good as to look at the map and listen."
  • Langeron lifted his eyes with an expression of perplexity, turned round to Miloradovich as if seeking an explanation, but meeting the latter's impressive but meaningless gaze drooped his eyes sadly and again took to twirling his snuffbox.
  • When the reading which lasted more than an hour was over, Langeron again brought his snuffbox to rest and, without looking at Weyrother or at anyone in particular, began to say how difficult it was to carry out such a plan in which the enemy's position was assumed to be known, whereas it was perhaps not known, since the enemy was in movement.
  • Langeron's objections were valid but it was obvious that their chief aim was to show General Weyrother--who had read his dispositions with as much self-confidence as if he were addressing school children--that he had to do, not with fools, but with men who could teach him something in military matters.
  • He listened to what Langeron said, as if remarking, "So you are still at that silly business!" quickly closed his eye again, and let his head sink still lower.
  • Either he is retreating, which is the only thing we need fear, or he is changing his position.
  • But was it really not possible for Kutuzov to state his views plainly to the Emperor?
  • And suddenly, at this thought of death, a whole series of most distant, most intimate, memories rose in his imagination: he remembered his last parting from his father and his wife; he remembered the days when he first loved her.
  • And his fancy pictured the battle, its loss, the concentration of fighting at one point, and the hesitation of all the commanders.
  • He firmly and clearly expresses his opinion to Kutuzov, to Weyrother, and to the Emperors.
  • All are struck by the justness of his views, but no one undertakes to carry them out, so he takes a regiment, a division-stipulates that no one is to interfere with his arrangements--leads his division to the decisive point, and gains the victory alone.
  • Prince Andrew, however, did not answer that voice and went on dreaming of his triumphs.
  • His hussars were placed along the line in couples and he himself rode along the line trying to master the sleepiness that kept coming over him.
  • There are many stories of his getting to know an officer in just such a chance way and attaching him to himself!
  • Oh, how I would guard him, how I would tell him the truth, how I would unmask his deceivers!
  • He started and opened his eyes.
  • He readjusted himself in the saddle and touched up his horse to ride once more round his hussars.
  • And his head once more sank to his horse's neck.
  • At the moment he opened his eyes he heard in front of him, where the enemy was, the long-drawn shouts of thousands of voices.
  • His horse and the horse of the hussar near him pricked their ears at these shouts.
  • Steady! he cried to his fidgeting horse.
  • Rostov spurred his horse, called to Sergeant Fedchenko and two other hussars, told them to follow him, and trotted downhill in the direction from which the shouting came.
  • Bagration called to him from the hill not to go beyond the stream, but Rostov pretended not to hear him and did not stop but rode on and on, continually mistaking bushes for trees and gullies for men and continually discovering his mistakes.
  • Having come out onto the road he reined in his horse, hesitating whether to ride along it or cross it and ride over the black field up the hillside.
  • Rostov turned his horse and galloped back.
  • Rostov reined in his horse, whose spirits had risen, like his own, at the firing, and went back at a footpace.
  • Some more! a merry voice was saying in his soul.
  • Only when approaching Bagration did Rostov let his horse gallop again, and with his hand at the salute rode up to the general.
  • The fires and shouting in the enemy's army were occasioned by the fact that while Napoleon's proclamation was being read to the troops the Emperor himself rode round his bivouacs.
  • A soldier on the march is hemmed in and borne along by his regiment as much as a sailor is by his ship.
  • However far he has walked, whatever strange, unknown, and dangerous places he reaches, just as a sailor is always surrounded by the same decks, masts, and rigging of his ship, so the soldier always has around him the same comrades, the same ranks, the same sergeant major Ivan Mitrich, the same company dog Jack, and the same commanders.
  • The fog lay unbroken like a sea down below, but higher up at the village of Schlappanitz where Napoleon stood with his marshals around him, it was quite light.
  • The whole French army, and even Napoleon himself with his staff, were not on the far side of the streams and hollows of Sokolnitz and Schlappanitz beyond which we intended to take up our position and begin the action, but were on this side, so close to our own forces that Napoleon with the naked eye could distinguish a mounted man from one on foot.
  • Napoleon, in the blue cloak which he had worn on his Italian campaign, sat on his small gray Arab horse a little in front of his marshals.
  • Not a single muscle of his face--which in those days was still thin--moved.
  • His gleaming eyes were fixed intently on one spot.
  • His predictions were being justified.
  • Today was a great day for him--the anniversary of his coronation.
  • The marshals stood behind him not venturing to distract his attention.
  • When the sun had entirely emerged from the fog, and fields and mist were aglow with dazzling light--as if he had only awaited this to begin the action--he drew the glove from his shapely white hand, made a sign with it to the marshals, and ordered the action to begin.
  • He was firmly convinced that this was the day of his Toulon, or his bridge of Arcola.
  • His own strategic plan, which obviously could not now be carried out, was forgotten.
  • An Austrian officer in a white uniform with green plumes in his hat galloped up to Kutuzov and asked in the Emperor's name had the fourth column advanced into action.
  • Kutuzov turned round without answering and his eye happened to fall upon Prince Andrew, who was beside him.
  • Seeing him, Kutuzov's malevolent and caustic expression softened, as if admitting that what was being done was not his adjutant's fault, and still not answering the Austrian adjutant, he addressed Bolkonski.
  • Kutuzov still in the same place, his stout body resting heavily in the saddle with the lassitude of age, sat yawning wearily with closed eyes.
  • One in a black uniform with white plumes in his hat rode a bobtailed chestnut horse, the other who was in a white uniform rode a black one.
  • His whole appearance and manner were suddenly transformed.
  • He was slightly flushed after galloping two miles, and reining in his horse he sighed restfully and looked round at the faces of his suite, young and animated as his own.
  • The Emperor Francis, a rosy, long faced young man, sat very erect on his handsome black horse, looking about him in a leisurely and preoccupied manner.
  • The Emperor, frowning slightly, bent his ear forward as if he had not quite heard.
  • The Tsar heard but obviously did not like the reply; he shrugged his rather round shoulders and glanced at Novosiltsev who was near him, as if complaining of Kutuzov.
  • "However, if you command it, Your Majesty," said Kutuzov, lifting his head and again assuming his former tone of a dull, unreasoning, but submissive general.
  • He touched his horse and having called Miloradovich, the commander of the column, gave him the order to advance.
  • Miloradovich wheeled his horse sharply and stationed himself a little behind the Emperor.
  • Kutuzov accompanied by his adjutants rode at a walking pace behind the carabineers.
  • My turn has come, thought Prince Andrew, and striking his horse he rode up to Kutuzov.
  • Blood was flowing from his cheek.
  • Prince Andrew forced his way to him.
  • "You are wounded?" he asked, hardly able to master the trembling of his lower jaw.
  • "The wound is not here, it is there!" said Kutuzov, pressing the handkerchief to his wounded cheek and pointing to the fleeing soldiers.
  • "Stop them!" he shouted, and at the same moment, probably realizing that it was impossible to stop them, spurred his horse and rode to the right.
  • Having by a great effort got away to the left from that flood of men, Kutuzov, with his suite diminished by more than half, rode toward a sound of artillery fire near by.
  • Having forced his way out of the crowd of fugitives, Prince Andrew, trying to keep near Kutuzov, saw on the slope of the hill amid the smoke a Russian battery that was still firing and Frenchmen running toward it.
  • After this volley the regimental commander clutched at his leg; several soldiers fell, and a second lieutenant who was holding the flag let it fall from his hands.
  • But before he had finished speaking, Prince Andrew, feeling tears of shame and anger choking him, had already leapt from his horse and run to the standard.
  • He now saw clearly the figure of a red-haired gunner with his shako knocked awry, pulling one end of a mop while a French soldier tugged at the other.
  • He will not get away before the Frenchman remembers his bayonet and stabs him....
  • My legs are giving way, thought he, and fell on his back.
  • "And if I should meet His Majesty before I meet the commander-in-chief, your excellency?" said Rostov, with his hand to his cap.
  • "And if I should meet His Majesty before I meet the commander-in-chief, your excellency?" said Rostov, with his hand to his cap.
  • "You can give the message to His Majesty," said Dolgorukov, hurriedly interrupting Bagration.
  • On being relieved from picket duty Rostov had managed to get a few hours' sleep before morning and felt cheerful, bold, and resolute, with elasticity of movement, faith in his good fortune, and generally in that state of mind which makes everything seem possible, pleasant, and easy.
  • The morning was bright, he had a good horse under him, and his heart was full of joy and happiness.
  • On receiving the order he gave his horse the rein and galloped along the line.
  • These sights and sounds had no depressing or intimidating effect on him; on the contrary, they stimulated his energy and determination.
  • He had not ridden many hundred yards after that before he saw to his left, across the whole width of the field, an enormous mass of cavalry in brilliant white uniforms, mounted on black horses, trotting straight toward him and across his path.
  • Rostov could already see their faces and heard the command: "Charge!" shouted by an officer who was urging his thoroughbred to full speed.
  • Rostov, fearing to be crushed or swept into the attack on the French, galloped along the front as hard as his horse could go, but still was not in time to avoid them.
  • Rostov without hearing Boris to the end spurred his horse.
  • With a message to His Majesty.
  • "But that's the Grand Duke, and I want the commander-in-chief or the Emperor," said Rostov, and was about to spur his horse.
  • Rostov kept asking as he came up to Russian and Austrian soldiers running in confused crowds across his path.
  • He urged on his already weary horse to get quickly past these crowds, but the farther he went the more disorganized they were.
  • At last seizing a soldier by his collar he forced him to answer.
  • He remembered his mother's last letter.
  • One officer told Rostov that he had seen someone from headquarters behind the village to the left, and thither Rostov rode, not hoping to find anyone but merely to ease his conscience.
  • The rider, whose figure seemed familiar to Rostov and involuntarily riveted his attention, made a gesture of refusal with his head and hand and by that gesture Rostov instantly recognized his lamented and adored monarch.
  • At that moment Alexander turned his head and Rostov saw the beloved features that were so deeply engraved on his memory.
  • The Emperor was pale, his cheeks sunken and his eyes hollow, but the charm, the mildness of his features, was all the greater.
  • It is as if I were glad of a chance to take advantage of his being alone and despondent!
  • Not one of the innumerable speeches addressed to the Emperor that he had composed in his imagination could he now recall.
  • Those speeches were intended for quite other conditions, they were for the most part to be spoken at a moment of victory and triumph, generally when he was dying of wounds and the sovereign had thanked him for heroic deeds, and while dying he expressed the love his actions had proved.
  • His despair was all the greater from feeling that his own weakness was the cause of his grief.
  • His despair was all the greater from feeling that his own weakness was the cause of his grief.
  • It was a unique chance to show his devotion to the Emperor and he had not made use of it....
  • Przebyszewski and his corps had laid down their arms.
  • Dolokhov--now an officer--wounded in the arm, and on foot, with the regimental commander on horseback and some ten men of his company, represented all that was left of that whole regiment.
  • Dolokhov who was in the midst of the crowd forced his way to the edge of the dam, throwing two soldiers off their feet, and ran onto the slippery ice that covered the millpool.
  • The ice bore him but it swayed and creaked, and it was plain that it would give way not only under a cannon or a crowd, but very soon even under his weight alone.
  • The general on horseback at the entrance to the dam raised his hand and opened his mouth to address Dolokhov.
  • It flopped into something moist, and the general fell from his horse in a pool of blood.
  • He tried to right himself but fell in up to his waist.
  • The nearest soldiers shrank back, the gun driver stopped his horse, but from behind still came the shouts: Onto the ice, why do you stop?
  • On the Pratzen Heights, where he had fallen with the flagstaff in his hand, lay Prince Andrew Bolkonski bleeding profusely and unconsciously uttering a gentle, piteous, and childlike moan.
  • He did not know how long his unconsciousness lasted.
  • Suddenly he again felt that he was alive and suffering from a burning, lacerating pain in his head.
  • "Where is it, that lofty sky that I did not know till now, but saw today?" was his first thought.
  • He opened his eyes.
  • He did not turn his head and did not see those who, judging by the sound of hoofs and voices, had ridden up and stopped near him.
  • "Fine men!" remarked Napoleon, looking at a dead Russian grenadier, who, with his face buried in the ground and a blackened nape, lay on his stomach with an already stiffened arm flung wide.
  • His head was burning, he felt himself bleeding to death, and he saw above him the remote, lofty, and everlasting sky.
  • He knew it was Napoleon--his hero--but at that moment Napoleon seemed to him such a small, insignificant creature compared with what was passing now between himself and that lofty infinite sky with the clouds flying over it.
  • He collected all his strength, to stir and utter a sound.
  • He feebly moved his leg and uttered a weak, sickly groan which aroused his own pity.
  • The first words he heard on coming to his senses were those of a French convoy officer, who said rapidly: "We must halt here: the Emperor will pass here immediately; it will please him to see these gentlemen prisoners."
  • Bonaparte, having come up at a gallop, stopped his horse.
  • Napoleon apparently remembered seeing him on the battlefield and, addressing him, again used the epithet "young man" that was connected in his memory with Prince Andrew.
  • Au revoir, Prince Repnin! and he spurred his horse and galloped away.
  • His face shone with self-satisfaction and pleasure.
  • Prince Andrew did not see how and by whom it was replaced, but the little icon with its thin gold chain suddenly appeared upon his chest outside his uniform.
  • At every jolt he again felt unendurable pain; his feverishness increased and he grew delirious.
  • He was already enjoying that happiness when that little Napoleon had suddenly appeared with his unsympathizing look of shortsighted delight at the misery of others, and doubts and torments had followed, and only the heavens promised peace.
  • There's the corner at the crossroads, where the cabman, Zakhar, has his stand, and there's Zakhar himself and still the same horse!
  • Denisov raised his head, coughed, and made no answer.
  • "Dmitri," said Rostov to his valet on the box, "those lights are in our house, aren't they?"
  • Mind now, don't forget to put out my new coat, added Rostov, fingering his new mustache.
  • He looked up at the opening door and his expression of sleepy indifference suddenly changed to one of delighted amazement.
  • The young count! he cried, recognizing his young master.
  • My treasure! and Prokofy, trembling with excitement, rushed toward the drawing-room door, probably in order to announce him, but, changing his mind, came back and stooped to kiss the young man's shoulder.
  • "All well?" asked Rostov, drawing away his arm.
  • Rostov, who had completely forgotten Denisov, not wishing anyone to forestall him, threw off his fur coat and ran on tiptoe through the large dark ballroom.
  • Only his mother was not there, he noticed that.
  • Petya, clinging to his legs, kept shouting, "And me too!"
  • Natasha, after she had pulled him down toward her and covered his face with kisses, holding him tight by the skirt of his coat, sprang away and pranced up and down in one place like a goat and shrieked piercingly.
  • Sonya too, all rosy red, clung to his arm and, radiant with bliss, looked eagerly toward his eyes, waiting for the look for which she longed.
  • But now steps were heard at the door, steps so rapid that they could hardly be his mother's.
  • When they met, she fell on his breast, sobbing.
  • She could not lift her face, but only pressed it to the cold braiding of his hussar's jacket.
  • Denisov, who had come into the room unnoticed by anyone, stood there and wiped his eyes at the sight.
  • The old countess, not letting go of his hand and kissing it every moment, sat beside him: the rest, crowding round him, watched every movement, word, or look of his, never taking their blissfully adoring eyes off him.
  • His brother and sisters struggled for the places nearest to him and disputed with one another who should bring him his tea, handkerchief, and pipe.
  • His brother and sisters struggled for the places nearest to him and disputed with one another who should bring him his tea, handkerchief, and pipe.
  • Rostov, rubbing his eyes that seemed glued together, raised his disheveled head from the hot pillow.
  • Denisov hid his hairy legs under the blanket, looking with a scared face at his comrade for help.
  • Rostov hurriedly put something on his feet, drew on his dressing gown, and went out.
  • She touched his mustache.
  • Sitting on the sofa with the little cushions on its arms, in what used to be his old schoolroom, and looking into Natasha's wildly bright eyes, Rostov re-entered that world of home and childhood which had no meaning for anyone else, but gave him some of the best joys of his life; and the burning of an arm with a ruler as a proof of love did not seem to him senseless, he understood and was not surprised at it.
  • Her looks asked him to forgive her for having dared, by Natasha's intermediacy, to remind him of his promise, and then thanked him for his love.
  • His looks thanked her for offering him his freedom and told her that one way or another he would never cease to love her, for that would be impossible.
  • His looks thanked her for offering him his freedom and told her that one way or another he would never cease to love her, for that would be impossible.
  • On his return to Moscow from the army, Nicholas Rostov was welcomed by his home circle as the best of sons, a hero, and their darling Nikolenka; by his relations as a charming, attractive, and polite young man; by his acquaintances as a handsome lieutenant of hussars, a good dancer, and one of the best matches in the city.
  • His passion for the Emperor had cooled somewhat in Moscow.
  • He went to balls and into ladies' society with an affectation of doing so against his will.
  • Gallop off to our Moscow estate, he said to the factotum who appeared at his call.
  • A light footstep and the clinking of spurs were heard at the door, and the young count, handsome, rosy, with a dark little mustache, evidently rested and made sleeker by his easy life in Moscow, entered the room.
  • "Really, Papa, I believe Prince Bagration worried himself less before the battle of Schon Grabern than you do now," said his son with a smile.
  • "That's it, that's it!" exclaimed the count, and gaily seizing his son by both hands, he cried, "Now I've got you, so take the sleigh and pair at once, and go to Bezukhov's, and tell him 'Count Ilya has sent you to ask for strawberries and fresh pineapples.'
  • Though she came upon the count in his dressing gown every day, he invariably became confused and begged her to excuse his costume.
  • Pierre has arrived, and now we shall get anything we want from his hothouses.
  • The count was delighted at Anna Mikhaylovna's taking upon herself one of his commissions and ordered the small closed carriage for her.
  • I'll put his name down.
  • Is his wife with him? he asked.
  • How little we dreamed of such a thing when we were rejoicing at his happiness!
  • They say Pierre is quite broken by his misfortune.
  • In his person, honor was shown to a simple fighting Russian soldier without connections and intrigues, and to one who was associated by memories of the Italian campaign with the name of Suvorov.
  • Berg was mentioned, by those who did not know him, as having, when wounded in the right hand, taken his sword in the left, and gone forward.
  • Pierre, who at his wife's command had let his hair grow and abandoned his spectacles, went about the rooms fashionably dressed but looking sad and dull.
  • Here, as elsewhere, he was surrounded by an atmosphere of subservience to his wealth, and being in the habit of lording it over these people, he treated them with absent-minded contempt.
  • By his age he should have belonged to the younger men, but by his wealth and connections he belonged to the groups of old and honored guests, and so he went from one group to another.
  • He had no lambskin cap on his head, nor had he a loaded whip over his shoulder, as when Rostov had seen him on the eve of the battle of Austerlitz, but wore a tight new uniform with Russian and foreign Orders, and the Star of St. George on his left breast.
  • Evidently just before coming to the dinner he had had his hair and whiskers trimmed, which changed his appearance for the worse.
  • He walked shyly and awkwardly over the parquet floor of the reception room, not knowing what to do with his hands; he was more accustomed to walk over a plowed field under fire, as he had done at the head of the Kursk regiment at Schon Grabern--and he would have found that easier.
  • The committeemen met him at the first door and, expressing their delight at seeing such a highly honored guest, took possession of him as it were, without waiting for his reply, surrounded him, and led him to the drawing room.
  • Count Ilya, again thrusting his way through the crowd, went out of the drawing room and reappeared a minute later with another committeeman, carrying a large silver salver which he presented to Prince Bagration.
  • Someone obligingly took the dish from Bagration (or he would, it seemed, have held it till evening and have gone in to dinner with it) and drew his attention to the verses.
  • Bagration seemed to say, and, fixing his weary eyes on the paper, began to read them with a fixed and serious expression.
  • Bagration bowed his head and listened:
  • And Count Rostov, glancing angrily at the author who went on reading his verses, bowed to Bagration.
  • Nicholas Rostov, with Denisov and his new acquaintance, Dolokhov, sat almost at the middle of the table.
  • "There will be many toasts, it's time to begin," he whispered, and taking up his glass, he rose.
  • "To the health of our Sovereign, the Emperor!" he cried, and at the same moment his kindly eyes grew moist with tears of joy and enthusiasm.
  • "To the health of our Sovereign, the Emperor!" he roared, "Hurrah!" and emptying his glass at one gulp he dashed it to the floor.
  • Many followed his example, and the loud shouting continued for a long time.
  • The old count rose once more, glanced at a note lying beside his plate, and proposed a toast, "To the health of the hero of our last campaign, Prince Peter Ivanovich Bagration!" and again his blue eyes grew moist.
  • At that toast, the count took out his handkerchief and, covering his face, wept outright.
  • His face was depressed and gloomy.
  • Every time he chanced to meet Dolokhov's handsome insolent eyes, Pierre felt something terrible and monstrous rising in his soul and turned quickly away.
  • Involuntarily recalling his wife's past and her relations with Dolokhov, Pierre saw clearly that what was said in the letter might be true, or might at least seem to be true had it not referred to his wife.
  • He involuntarily remembered how Dolokhov, who had fully recovered his former position after the campaign, had returned to Petersburg and come to him.
  • Pierre recalled how Helene had smilingly expressed disapproval of Dolokhov's living at their house, and how cynically Dolokhov had praised his wife's beauty to him and from that time till they came to Moscow had not left them for a day.
  • It would be particularly pleasant to him to dishonor my name and ridicule me, just because I have exerted myself on his behalf, befriended him, and helped him.
  • He remembered the expression Dolokhov's face assumed in his moments of cruelty, as when tying the policeman to the bear and dropping them into the water, or when he challenged a man to a duel without any reason, or shot a post-boy's horse with a pistol.
  • Rostov was talking merrily to his two friends, one of whom was a dashing hussar and the other a notorious duelist and rake, and every now and then he glanced ironically at Pierre, whose preoccupied, absent-minded, and massive figure was a very noticeable one at the dinner.
  • Rostov looked inimically at Pierre, first because Pierre appeared to his hussar eyes as a rich civilian, the husband of a beauty, and in a word--an old woman; and secondly because Pierre in his preoccupation and absent-mindedness had not recognized Rostov and had not responded to his greeting.
  • When the Emperor's health was drunk, Pierre, lost in thought, did not rise or lift his glass.
  • Don't you hear it's His Majesty the Emperor's health?
  • Pierre, with downcast eyes, drank out of his glass without looking at Dolokhov or answering him.
  • He was just going to take it when Dolokhov, leaning across, snatched it from his hand and began reading it.
  • He leaned his whole massive body across the table.
  • Hearing that cry and seeing to whom it was addressed, Nesvitski and the neighbor on his right quickly turned in alarm to Bezukhov.
  • I challenge you! he ejaculated, and, pushing back his chair, he rose from the table.
  • His haggard face was yellow.
  • He looked about distractedly and screwed up his eyes as if dazzled by the sun.
  • He was entirely absorbed by two considerations: his wife's guilt, of which after his sleepless night he had not the slightest doubt, and the guiltlessness of Dolokhov, who had no reason to preserve the honor of a man who was nothing to him....
  • "I should perhaps have done the same thing in his place," thought Pierre.
  • Can't I go away from here, run away, bury myself somewhere? passed through his mind.
  • Dolokhov walked slowly without raising his pistol, looking intently with his bright, sparkling blue eyes into his antagonist's face.
  • His mouth wore its usual semblance of a smile.
  • He held the pistol in his right hand at arm's length, apparently afraid of shooting himself with it.
  • His left hand he held carefully back, because he wished to support his right hand with it and knew he must not do so.
  • His left hand he held carefully back, because he wished to support his right hand with it and knew he must not do so.
  • Not at all expecting so loud a report, Pierre shuddered at the sound and then, smiling at his own sensations, stood still.
  • He only heard Dolokhov's hurried steps, and his figure came in view through the smoke.
  • He was pressing one hand to his left side, while the other clutched his drooping pistol.
  • His face was pale.
  • His left hand was bloody; he wiped it on his coat and supported himself with it.
  • His left hand was bloody; he wiped it on his coat and supported himself with it.
  • His frowning face was pallid and quivered.
  • Pierre, hardly restraining his sobs, began running toward Dolokhov and was about to cross the space between the barriers, when Dolokhov cried:
  • "To your barrier!" and Pierre, grasping what was meant, stopped by his saber.
  • Dolokhov lowered his head to the snow, greedily bit at it, again raised his head, adjusted himself, drew in his legs and sat up, seeking a firm center of gravity.
  • He sucked and swallowed the cold snow, his lips quivered but his eyes, still smiling, glittered with effort and exasperation as he mustered his remaining strength.
  • He raised his pistol and aimed.
  • "Cover yourself!" even Denisov cried to his adversary.
  • Pierre clutched his temples, and turning round went into the forest, trampling through the deep snow, and muttering incoherent words:
  • Death... lies... he repeated, puckering his face.
  • But on entering Moscow he suddenly came to and, lifting his head with an effort, took Rostov, who was sitting beside him, by the hand.
  • When he had become a little quieter, he explained to Rostov that he was living with his mother, who, if she saw him dying, would not survive it.
  • Rostov went on ahead to do what was asked, and to his great surprise learned that Dolokhov the brawler, Dolokhov the bully, lived in Moscow with an old mother and a hunchback sister, and was the most affectionate of sons and brothers.
  • Pierre had of late rarely seen his wife alone.
  • The night after the duel he did not go to his bedroom but, as he often did, remained in his father's room, that huge room in which Count Bezukhov had died.
  • He remembered his honeymoon and blushed at the recollection.
  • He digested his sufferings alone.
  • "Louis XVI was executed because they said he was dishonorable and a criminal," came into Pierre's head, "and from their point of view they were right, as were those too who canonized him and died a martyr's death for his sake.
  • But at the moment when he imagined himself calmed by such reflections, she suddenly came into his mind as she was at the moments when he had most strongly expressed his insincere love for her, and he felt the blood rush to his heart and had again to get up and move about and break and tear whatever came to his hand.
  • In the night he called his valet and told him to pack up to go to Petersburg.
  • He resolved to go away next day and leave a letter informing her of his intention to part from her forever.
  • Next morning when the valet came into the room with his coffee, Pierre was lying asleep on the ottoman with an open book in his hand.
  • Pierre turned over heavily on the ottoman and opened his mouth, but could not reply.
  • Because I like his company?
  • He was suffering physically at that moment, there was a weight on his chest and he could not breathe.
  • His father's nature showed itself in Pierre.
  • A week later Pierre gave his wife full power to control all his estates in Great Russia, which formed the larger part of his property, and left for Petersburg alone.
  • "Your son," wrote Kutuzov, "fell before my eyes, a standard in his hand and at the head of a regiment--he fell as a hero, worthy of his father and his fatherland.
  • When Princess Mary went to him at the usual hour he was working at his lathe and, as usual, did not look round at her.
  • "Ah, Princess Mary!" he said suddenly in an unnatural voice, throwing down his chisel.
  • She approached him, saw his face, and something gave way within her.
  • She forgot all fear of her father, went up to him, took his hand, and drawing him down put her arm round his thin, scraggy neck.
  • Blackguards! shrieked the old man, turning his face away from her.
  • Had he repented of his unbelief?
  • He tried not to change his former way of life, but his strength failed him.
  • She prayed for her brother as living and was always awaiting news of his return.
  • "I've come to sit with you a bit, Masha," said the nurse, "and here I've brought the prince's wedding candles to light before his saint, my angel," she said with a sigh.
  • The old prince, stepping on his heels, paced up and down his study and sent Tikhon to ask Mary Bogdanovna what news.--"Say only that 'the prince told me to ask,' and come and tell me her answer."
  • After a while he re-entered it as if to snuff the candles, and, seeing the prince was lying on the sofa, looked at him, noticed his perturbed face, shook his head, and going up to him silently kissed him on the shoulder and left the room without snuffing the candles or saying why he had entered.
  • Yes, it was he, pale, thin, with a changed and strangely softened but agitated expression on his face.
  • He came up the stairs and embraced his sister.
  • "You did not get my letter?" he asked, and not waiting for a reply-- which he would not have received, for the princess was unable to speak-- he turned back, rapidly mounted the stairs again with the doctor who had entered the hall after him (they had met at the last post station), and again embraced his sister.
  • And having taken off his cloak and felt boots, he went to the little princess' apartment.
  • She saw her husband, but did not realize the significance of his appearance before her now.
  • She was not surprised at his having come; she did not realize that he had come.
  • His coming had nothing to do with her sufferings or with their relief.
  • Prince Andrew went again to his wife and sat waiting in the room next to hers.
  • He covered his face with his hands and remained so for some minutes.
  • The doctor with his shirt sleeves tucked up, without a coat, pale and with a trembling jaw, came out of the room.
  • He went into his wife's room.
  • Two hours later Prince Andrew, stepping softly, went into his father's room.
  • He was standing close to the door and as soon as it opened his rough old arms closed like a vise round his son's neck, and without a word he began to sob like a child.
  • "Ah, what have you done to me?" it still seemed to say, and Prince Andrew felt that something gave way in his soul and that he was guilty of a sin he could neither remedy nor forget.
  • His grandfather, who was his godfather, trembling and afraid of dropping him, carried the infant round the battered tin font and handed him over to the godmother, Princess Mary.
  • His grandfather, who was his godfather, trembling and afraid of dropping him, carried the infant round the battered tin font and handed him over to the godmother, Princess Mary.
  • As a result he could not go to the country with the rest of the family, but was kept all summer in Moscow by his new duties.
  • Dolokhov recovered, and Rostov became very friendly with him during his convalescence.
  • And Fedya, with his noble spirit, loved him and even now never says a word against him.
  • Bezukhov got off scotfree, while Fedya had to bear the whole burden on his shoulders.
  • "Oh, yes, I quite understand," answered Rostov, who was under his new friend's influence.
  • Nicholas brought many young men to his parents' house.
  • He was pointedly attentive to Sonya and looked at her in such a way that not only could she not bear his glances without coloring, but even the old countess and Natasha blushed when they saw his looks.
  • His approaching departure did not prevent his amusing himself, but rather gave zest to his pleasures.
  • His approaching departure did not prevent his amusing himself, but rather gave zest to his pleasures.
  • He spent the greater part of his time away from home, at dinners, parties, and balls.
  • This was the first time since his return that they had talked alone and about their love.
  • Denisov sat down by the old ladies and, leaning on his saber and beating time with his foot, told them something funny and kept them amused, while he watched the young people dancing, Iogel with Natasha, his pride and his best pupil, were the first couple.
  • Noiselessly, skillfully stepping with his little feet in low shoes, Iogel flew first across the hall with Natasha, who, though shy, went on carefully executing her steps.
  • Denisov did not take his eyes off her and beat time with his saber in a way that clearly indicated that if he was not dancing it was because he would not and not because he could not.
  • She can do anything with me! said Denisov, and he unhooked his saber.
  • He came out from behind the chairs, clasped his partner's hand firmly, threw back his head, and advanced his foot, waiting for the beat.
  • He glided silently on one foot half across the room, and seeming not to notice the chairs was dashing straight at them, when suddenly, clinking his spurs and spreading out his legs, he stopped short on his heels, stood so a second, stamped on the spot clanking his spurs, whirled rapidly round, and, striking his left heel against his right, flew round again in a circle.
  • Natasha guessed what he meant to do, and abandoning herself to him followed his lead hardly knowing how.
  • First he spun her round, holding her now with his left, now with his right hand, then falling on one knee he twirled her round him, and again jumping up, dashed so impetuously forward that it seemed as if he would rush through the whole suite of rooms without drawing breath, and then he suddenly stopped and performed some new and unexpected steps.
  • When at last, smartly whirling his partner round in front of her chair, he drew up with a click of his spurs and bowed to her, Natasha did not even make him a curtsy.
  • Denisov, flushed after the mazurka and mopping himself with his handkerchief, sat down by Natasha and did not leave her for the rest of the evening.
  • For two days after that Rostov did not see Dolokhov at his own or at Dolokhov's home: on the third day he received a note from him:
  • Rostov had not seen him since his proposal and Sonya's refusal and felt uncomfortable at the thought of how they would meet.
  • I'll just finish dealing, and then Ilyushka will come with his chorus.
  • But before he had thought of anything, Dolokhov, looking straight in his face, said slowly and deliberately so that everyone could hear:
  • To try his luck or the certainty?
  • Rostov sat down by his side and at first did not play.
  • He wrote "800 rubles" on a card, but while the waiter filled his glass he changed his mind and altered it to his usual stake of twenty rubles.
  • On the previous Sunday the old count had given his son two thousand rubles, and though he always disliked speaking of money difficulties had told Nicholas that this was all he could let him have till May, and asked him to be more economical this time.
  • Nicholas had replied that it would be more than enough for him and that he gave his word of honor not to take anything more till the spring.
  • Now only twelve hundred rubles was left of that money, so that this seven of hearts meant for him not only the loss of sixteen hundred rubles, but the necessity of going back on his word.
  • At that moment his home life, jokes with Petya, talks with Sonya, duets with Natasha, piquet with his father, and even his comfortable bed in the house on the Povarskaya rose before him with such vividness, clearness, and charm that it seemed as if it were all a lost and unappreciated bliss, long past.
  • Rostov almost screamed lifting both hands to his head.
  • Dolokhov was no longer listening to stories or telling them, but followed every movement of Rostov's hands and occasionally ran his eyes over the score against him.
  • He had fixed on that number because forty-three was the sum of his and Sonya's joint ages.
  • Rostov, leaning his head on both hands, sat at the table which was scrawled over with figures, wet with spilled wine, and littered with cards.
  • But it's not his fault.
  • Rostov submissively unbent the corner of his card and, instead of the six thousand he had intended, carefully wrote twenty-one.
  • He knew what a shock he would inflict on his father and mother by the news of this loss, he knew what a relief it would be to escape it all, and felt that Dolokhov knew that he could save him from all this shame and sorrow, but wanted now to play with him as a cat does with a mouse.
  • To say "tomorrow" and keep up a dignified tone was not difficult, but to go home alone, see his sisters, brother, mother, and father, confess and ask for money he had no right to after giving his word of honor, was terrible.
  • Denisov, with sparkling eyes and ruffled hair, sat at the clavichord striking chords with his short fingers, his legs thrown back and his eyes rolling as he sang, with his small, husky, but true voice, some verses called "Enchantress," which he had composed, and to which he was trying to fit music:
  • "Everything's still the same with them," thought Nicholas, glancing into the drawing room, where he saw Vera and his mother with the old lady.
  • A bullet through my brain is the only thing left me--not singing! his thoughts ran on.
  • "And what is she so pleased about?" thought Nicholas, looking at his sister.
  • He got up without saying a word and went downstairs to his own room.
  • A quarter of an hour later the old count came in from his club, cheerful and contented.
  • "Well--had a good time?" said the old count, smiling gaily and proudly at his son.
  • The count was lighting his pipe and did not notice his son's condition.
  • And suddenly, in the most casual tone, which made him feel ashamed of himself, he said, as if merely asking his father to let him have the carriage to drive to town:
  • "Dear me!" said his father, who was in a specially good humor.
  • "Well!..." said the old count, spreading out his arms and sinking helplessly on the sofa.
  • "It can't be helped It happens to everyone!" said the son, with a bold, free, and easy tone, while in his soul he regarded himself as a worthless scoundrel whose whole life could not atone for his crime.
  • The old count cast down his eyes on hearing his son's words and began bustlingly searching for something.
  • And seizing his father's hand, he pressed it to his lips and burst into tears.
  • Well then, accept his offer.
  • I will tell him myself, and you'll listen at the door, and Natasha ran across the drawing room to the dancing hall, where Denisov was sitting on the same chair by the clavichord with his face in his hands.
  • She kissed his rough curly black head.
  • After Denisov's departure, Rostov spent another fortnight in Moscow, without going out of the house, waiting for the money his father could not at once raise, and he spent most of his time in the girls' room.
  • It was as if she wanted to show him that his losses were an achievement that made her love him all the more, but Nicholas now considered himself unworthy of her.
  • He filled the girls' albums with verses and music, and having at last sent Dolokhov the whole forty-three thousand rubles and received his receipt, he left at the end of November, without taking leave of any of his acquaintances, to overtake his regiment which was already in Poland.
  • After his interview with his wife Pierre left for Petersburg.
  • Without undressing, he lay down on the leather sofa in front of a round table, put his big feet in their overboots on the table, and began to reflect.
  • And a bed got ready, and tea? asked his valet.
  • The postmaster, his wife, the valet, and a peasant woman selling Torzhok embroidery came into the room offering their services.
  • Without changing his careless attitude, Pierre looked at them over his spectacles unable to understand what they wanted or how they could go on living without having solved the problems that so absorbed him.
  • It was as if the thread of the chief screw which held his life together were stripped, so that the screw could not get in or out, but went on turning uselessly in the same place.
  • The postmaster came in and began obsequiously to beg his excellency to wait only two hours, when, come what might, he would let his excellency have the courier horses.
  • His servant handed him a half-cut novel, in the form of letters, by Madame de Souza.
  • God could not have put into her heart an impulse that was against His will.
  • With a pair of felt boots on his thin bony legs, and keeping on a worn, nankeen-covered, sheepskin coat, the traveler sat down on the sofa, leaned back his big head with its broad temples and close-cropped hair, and looked at Bezukhov.
  • His shriveled old hands were folded and on the finger of one of them Pierre noticed a large cast iron ring with a seal representing a death's head.
  • His servant was also a yellow, wrinkled old man, without beard or mustache, evidently not because he was shaven but because they had never grown.
  • When everything was ready, the stranger opened his eyes, moved to the table, filled a tumbler with tea for himself and one for the beardless old man to whom he passed it.
  • The servant brought back his tumbler turned upside down, * with an unfinished bit of nibbled sugar, and asked if anything more would be wanted.
  • All at once the stranger closed the book, putting in a marker, and again, leaning with his arms on the back of the sofa, sat in his former position with his eyes shut.
  • Pierre looked silently and inquiringly at him over his spectacles.
  • Pierre flushed and, hurriedly putting his legs down from the bed, bent forward toward the old man with a forced and timid smile.
  • He paused, his gaze still on Pierre, and moved aside on the sofa by way of inviting the other to take a seat beside him.
  • The stranger's face was not genial, it was even cold and severe, but in spite of this, both the face and words of his new acquaintance were irresistibly attractive to Pierre.
  • Only by laying stone on stone with the cooperation of all, by the millions of generations from our forefather Adam to our own times, is that temple reared which is to be a worthy dwelling place of the Great God, he added, and closed his eyes.
  • "He exists, but to understand Him is hard," the Mason began again, looking not at Pierre but straight before him, and turning the leaves of his book with his old hands which from excitement he could not keep still.
  • Pierre listened with swelling heart, gazing into the Mason's face with shining eyes, not interrupting or questioning him, but believing with his whole soul what the stranger said.
  • The Mason smiled with his gentle fatherly smile.
  • After these words, the Mason, as if tired by his long discourse, again leaned his arms on the back of the sofa and closed his eyes.
  • Pierre looked at that aged, stern, motionless, almost lifeless face and moved his lips without uttering a sound.
  • The Mason cleared his throat huskily, as old men do, and called his servant.
  • The traveler, having packed his things with his practiced hands, began fastening his coat.
  • Hand this to Count Willarski (he took out his notebook and wrote a few words on a large sheet of paper folded in four).
  • Not a trace of his former doubts remained in his soul.
  • Willarski bowed his head.
  • Then he drew his face down, kissed him, and taking him by the hand led him forward.
  • The hairs tied in the knot hurt Pierre and there were lines of pain on his face and a shamefaced smile.
  • His huge figure, with arms hanging down and with a puckered, though smiling face, moved after Willarski with uncertain, timid steps.
  • Once or twice he shrugged his shoulders and raised his hand to the kerchief, as if wishing to take it off, but let it drop again.
  • The five minutes spent with his eyes bandaged seemed to him an hour.
  • His arms felt numb, his legs almost gave way, it seemed to him that he was tired out.
  • His arms felt numb, his legs almost gave way, it seemed to him that he was tired out.
  • He felt afraid of what would happen to him and still more afraid of showing his fear.
  • Pierre took the bandage off his eyes and glanced around him.
  • Trying to stimulate his emotions he looked around.
  • This short man had on a white leather apron which covered his chest and part of his legs; he had on a kind of necklace above which rose a high white ruffle, outlining his rather long face which was lit up from below.
  • For a long time he could not utter a word, so that the Rhetor had to repeat his question.
  • The Rhetor cleared his throat, crossed his gloved hands on his breast, and began to speak.
  • Pierre repeated, and a mental image of his future activity in this direction rose in his mind.
  • The important mystery mentioned by the Rhetor, though it aroused his curiosity, did not seem to him essential, and the second aim, that of purifying and regenerating himself, did not much interest him because at that moment he felt with delight that he was already perfectly cured of his former faults and was ready for all that was good.
  • (He now felt so glad to be free from his own lawlessness and to submit his will to those who knew the indubitable truth.)
  • He listened to the Rhetor in silence, feeling from all he said that his ordeal was about to begin.
  • Pierre quickly took out his purse and watch, but could not manage for some time to get the wedding ring off his fat finger.
  • Pierre took off his coat, waistcoat, and left boot according to the Rhetor's instructions.
  • The Mason drew the shirt back from Pierre's left breast, and stooping down pulled up the left leg of his trousers to above the knee.
  • Pierre hurriedly began taking off his right boot also and was going to tuck up the other trouser leg to save this stranger the trouble, but the Mason told him that was not necessary and gave him a slipper for his left foot.
  • He went over his vices in his mind, not knowing to which of them to give the pre-eminence.
  • Soon after this there came into the dark chamber to fetch Pierre, not the Rhetor but Pierre's sponsor, Willarski, whom he recognized by his voice.
  • As he was being led up to some object he noticed a hesitation and uncertainty among his conductors.
  • After that they took his right hand, placed it on something, and told him to hold a pair of compasses to his left breast with the other hand and to repeat after someone who read aloud an oath of fidelity to the laws of the Order.
  • The bandage was taken off his eyes and, by the faint light of the burning spirit, Pierre, as in a dream, saw several men standing before him, wearing aprons like the Rhetor's and holding swords in their hands pointed at his breast.
  • On seeing this, Pierre moved forward with his breast toward the swords, meaning them to pierce it.
  • In the President's chair sat a young man he did not know, with a peculiar cross hanging from his neck.
  • On his right sat the Italian abbe whom Pierre had met at Anna Pavlovna's two years before.
  • All maintained a solemn silence, listening to the words of the President, who held a mallet in his hand.
  • Two of the brothers led Pierre up to the altar, placed his feet at right angles, and bade him lie down, saying that he must prostrate himself at the Gates of the Temple.
  • Pierre, perplexed, looked round with his shortsighted eyes without obeying, and suddenly doubts arose in his mind.
  • Pierre himself grew still more confused, blushed like a child till tears came to his eyes, began looking about him uneasily, and an awkward pause followed.
  • He managed to follow only the last words of the statutes and these remained in his mind.
  • He finished and, getting up, embraced and kissed Pierre, who, with tears of joy in his eyes, looked round him, not knowing how to answer the congratulations and greetings from acquaintances that met him on all sides.
  • The Grand Master rapped with his mallet.
  • The meeting was at an end, and on reaching home Pierre felt as if he had returned from a long journey on which he had spent dozens of years, had become completely changed, and had quite left behind his former habits and way of life.
  • Now and then his attention wandered from the book and the Square and he formed in imagination a new plan of life.
  • On the previous evening at the Lodge, he had heard that a rumor of his duel had reached the Emperor and that it would be wiser for him to leave Petersburg.
  • Pierre proposed going to his estates in the south and there attending to the welfare of his serfs.
  • You behaved as becomes a man who values his honor, perhaps too hastily, but we won't go into that.
  • But consider the position in which you are placing her and me in the eyes of society, and even of the court, he added, lowering his voice.
  • Pierre tried several times to speak, but, on one hand, Prince Vasili did not let him and, on the other, Pierre himself feared to begin to speak in the tone of decided refusal and disagreement in which he had firmly resolved to answer his father-in-law.
  • But before Prince Vasili had finished his playful speech, Pierre, without looking at him, and with a kind of fury that made him like his father, muttered in a whisper:
  • A week later, Pierre, having taken leave of his new friends, the Masons, and leaving large sums of money with them for alms, went away to his estates.
  • His new brethren gave him letters to the Kiev and Odessa Masons and promised to write to him and guide him in his new activity.
  • His new brethren gave him letters to the Kiev and Odessa Masons and promised to write to him and guide him in his new activity.
  • But the story of the duel, confirmed by Pierre's rupture with his wife, was the talk of society.
  • Prince Vasili expressed his opinion more openly.
  • He shrugged his shoulders when Pierre was mentioned and, pointing to his forehead, remarked:
  • Boris, grown more manly and looking fresh, rosy and self-possessed, entered the drawing room elegantly dressed in the uniform of an aide-de- camp and was duly conducted to pay his respects to the aunt and then brought back to the general circle.
  • Thanks to Anna Mikhaylovna's efforts, his own tastes, and the peculiarities of his reserved nature, Boris had managed during his service to place himself very advantageously.
  • In consequence of this discovery his whole manner of life, all his relations with old friends, all his plans for his future, were completely altered.
  • To be in Anna Pavlovna's drawing room he considered an important step up in the service, and he at once understood his role, letting his hostess make use of whatever interest he had to offer.
  • Speaking of the position of Prussia, Anna Pavlovna very naturally asked Boris to tell them about his journey to Glogau and in what state he found the Prussian army.
  • Boris, speaking with deliberation, told them in pure, correct French many interesting details about the armies and the court, carefully abstaining from expressing an opinion of his own about the facts he was recounting.
  • She asked him several questions about his journey and seemed greatly interested in the state of the Prussian army.
  • Bending forward in his armchair he said: "Le Roi de Prusse!" and having said this laughed.
  • Hippolyte said interrogatively, again laughing, and then calmly and seriously sat back in his chair.
  • He was continually traveling through the three provinces entrusted to him, was pedantic in the fulfillment of his duties, severe to cruel with his subordinates, and went into everything down to the minutest details himself.
  • Princess Mary had ceased taking lessons in mathematics from her father, and when the old prince was at home went to his study with the wet nurse and little Prince Nicholas (as his grandfather called him).
  • The baby Prince Nicholas lived with his wet nurse and nurse Savishna in the late princess' rooms and Princess Mary spent most of the day in the nursery, taking a mother's place to her little nephew as best she could.
  • But what was still stranger, though of this Prince Andrew said nothing to his sister, was that in the expression the sculptor had happened to give the angel's face, Prince Andrew read the same mild reproach he had read on the face of his dead wife: "Ah, why have you done this to me?"
  • Partly because of the depressing memories associated with Bald Hills, partly because Prince Andrew did not always feel equal to bearing with his father's peculiarities, and partly because he needed solitude, Prince Andrew made use of Bogucharovo, began building and spent most of his time there.
  • After the Austerlitz campaign Prince Andrew had firmly resolved not to continue his military service, and when the war recommenced and everybody had to serve, he took a post under his father in the recruitment so as to avoid active service.
  • The old prince and his son seemed to have changed roles since the campaign of 1805.
  • On February 26, 1807, the old prince set off on one of his circuits.
  • Prince Andrew remained at Bald Hills as usual during his father's absence.
  • Not finding the young prince in his study the valet went with the letters to Princess Mary's apartments, but did not find him there.
  • "What is it?" he said crossly, and, his hand shaking unintentionally, he poured too many drops into the glass.
  • "Oh, leave off, you always talk nonsense and keep putting things off-- and this is what comes of it!" said Prince Andrew in an exasperated whisper, evidently meaning to wound his sister.
  • "Devil take them!" he muttered, and after listening to the verbal instructions his father had sent and taking the correspondence and his father's letter, he returned to the nursery.
  • But he scowled at her angrily though also with suffering in his eyes, and stooped glass in hand over the infant.
  • Prince Andrew winced and, clutching his head, went out and sat down on a sofa in the next room.
  • He still had all the letters in his hand.
  • Gallop off to him at once and say I'll have his head off if everything is not here in a week.
  • He folded it up without reading it and reread his father's letter, ending with the words: "Gallop off to Korchevo and carry out instructions!"
  • "Ah yes, and what else did he say that's unpleasant?" thought Prince Andrew, recalling his father's letter.
  • Then he bursts into one of his wild furies and rages at everyone and everything, seizes the letters, opens them, and reads those from the Emperor addressed to others.
  • 'Grant leave to retire to his country seat to an old man who is already in any case dishonored by being unable to fulfill the great and glorious task for which he was chosen.
  • Buxhowden is commander-in-chief by seniority, but General Bennigsen does not quite see it; more particularly as it is he and his corps who are within sight of the enemy and he wishes to profit by the opportunity to fight a battle 'on his own hand' as the Germans say.
  • In short, we retreat after the battle but send a courier to Petersburg with news of a victory, and General Bennigsen, hoping to receive from Petersburg the post of commander in chief as a reward for his victory, does not give up the command of the army to General Buxhowden.
  • At first Prince Andrew read with his eyes only, but after a while, in spite of himself (although he knew how far it was safe to trust Bilibin), what he had read began to interest him more and more.
  • He shut his eyes, rubbed his forehead as if to rid himself of all interest in what he had read, and listened to what was passing in the nursery.
  • "All is over," he thought, and a cold sweat broke out on his forehead.
  • He drew the curtain aside and for some time his frightened, restless eyes could not find the baby.
  • At last he saw him: the rosy boy had tossed about till he lay across the bed with his head lower than the pillow, and was smacking his lips in his sleep and breathing evenly.
  • He bent over him and, as his sister had taught him, tried with his lips whether the child was still feverish.
  • Prince Andrew touched the head with his hand; even the hair was wet, so profusely had the child perspired.
  • Prince Andrew longed to snatch up, to squeeze, to hold to his heart, this helpless little creature, but dared not do so.
  • He stood over him, gazing at his head and at the little arms and legs which showed under the blanket.
  • He did not look round, but still gazing at the infant's face listened to his regular breathing.
  • Prince Andrew recognized her without looking and held out his hand to her.
  • The child moved slightly in his sleep, smiled, and rubbed his forehead against the pillow.
  • Prince Andrew looked at his sister.
  • Prince Andrew was the first to move away, ruffling his hair against the muslin of the curtain.
  • When he reached Kiev he sent for all his stewards to the head office and explained to them his intentions and wishes.
  • Despite Count Bezukhov's enormous wealth, since he had come into an income which was said to amount to five hundred thousand rubles a year, Pierre felt himself far poorer than when his father had made him an allowance of ten thousand rubles.
  • He discussed estate affairs every day with his chief steward.
  • In Kiev Pierre found some people he knew, and strangers hastened to make his acquaintance and joyfully welcomed the rich newcomer, the largest landowner of the province.
  • He consoled himself with the thought that he fulfilled another of the precepts--that of reforming the human race--and had other virtues--love of his neighbor, and especially generosity.
  • Everywhere preparations were made not for ceremonious welcomes (which he knew Pierre would not like), but for just such gratefully religious ones, with offerings of icons and the bread and salt of hospitality, as, according to his understanding of his master, would touch and delude him.
  • Everywhere were receptions, which though they embarrassed Pierre awakened a joyful feeling in the depth of his heart.
  • On all his estates Pierre saw with his own eyes brick buildings erected or in course of erection, all on one plan, for hospitals, schools, and almshouses, which were soon to be opened.
  • He did not know that since the nursing mothers were no longer sent to work on his land, they did still harder work on their own land.
  • He did not know that the priest who met him with the cross oppressed the peasants by his exactions, and that the pupils' parents wept at having to let him take their children and secured their release by heavy payments.
  • Returning from his journey through South Russia in the happiest state of mind, Pierre carried out an intention he had long had of visiting his friend Bolkonski, whom he had not seen for two years.
  • Pierre was struck by the modesty of the small though clean house after the brilliant surroundings in which he had last met his friend in Petersburg.
  • Pierre embraced him and lifting his spectacles kissed his friend on the cheek and looked at him closely.
  • Pierre said nothing; he looked fixedly at his friend with surprise.
  • The latter began to feel that it was in bad taste to speak of his enthusiasms, dreams, and hopes of happiness or goodness, in Prince Andrew's presence.
  • Pierre felt uncomfortable and even depressed in his friend's company and at last became silent.
  • "What does harm to another is wrong," said Pierre, feeling with pleasure that for the first time since his arrival Prince Andrew was roused, had begun to talk, and wanted to express what had brought him to his present state.
  • "Perhaps you are right for yourself," he added after a short pause, "but everyone lives in his own way.
  • "Come, let's argue then," said Prince Andrew, "You talk of schools," he went on, crooking a finger, "education and so forth; that is, you want to raise him" (pointing to a peasant who passed by them taking off his cap) "from his animal condition and awaken in him spiritual needs, while it seems to me that animal happiness is the only happiness possible, and that is just what you want to deprive him of.
  • But as I see it, physical labor is as essential to him, as much a condition of his existence, as mental activity is to you or me.
  • Just as I could not stand his terrible physical labor but should die of it in a week, so he could not stand my physical idleness, but would grow fat and die.
  • Prince Andrew expressed his ideas so clearly and distinctly that it was evident he had reflected on this subject more than once, and he spoke readily and rapidly like a man who has not talked for a long time.
  • His glance became more animated as his conclusions became more hopeless.
  • His glance became more animated as his conclusions became more hopeless.
  • Well, as I was saying," he continued, recovering his composure, "now there's this recruiting.
  • My father is one of the most remarkable men of his time.
  • His eyes glittered feverishly while he tried to prove to Pierre that in his actions there was no desire to do good to his neighbor.
  • His eyes glittered feverishly while he tried to prove to Pierre that in his actions there was no desire to do good to his neighbor.
  • Pointing to the fields, he spoke of the improvements he was making in his husbandry.
  • Pierre remained gloomily silent, answering in monosyllables and apparently immersed in his own thoughts.
  • But as soon as he thought of what he should say, he felt that Prince Andrew with one word, one argument, would upset all his teaching, and he shrank from beginning, afraid of exposing to possible ridicule what to him was precious and sacred.
  • Pierre suddenly began, lowering his head and looking like a bull about to charge, why do you think so?
  • Prince Andrew, leaning his arms on the raft railing, gazed silently at the flooding waters glittering in the setting sun.
  • Prince Andrew stood leaning on the railing of the raft listening to Pierre, and he gazed with his eyes fixed on the red reflection of the sun gleaming on the blue waters.
  • It vanished as soon as he returned to the customary conditions of his life, but he knew that this feeling which he did not know how to develop existed within him.
  • His meeting with Pierre formed an epoch in Prince Andrew's life.
  • Prince Andrew led Pierre to his own apartments, which were always kept in perfect order and readiness for him in his father's house; he himself went to the nursery.
  • "Really?" said Pierre, gazing over his spectacles with curiosity and seriousness (for which Princess Mary was specially grateful to him) into Ivanushka's face, who, seeing that she was being spoken about, looked round at them all with crafty eyes.
  • He received his sight!
  • His health was better in the winter, but last spring his wound reopened and the doctor said he ought to go away for a cure.
  • His health was better in the winter, but last spring his wound reopened and the doctor said he ought to go away for a cure.
  • Before supper, Prince Andrew, coming back to his father's study, found him disputing hotly with his visitor.
  • Old women's nonsense--old women's nonsense! he repeated, but still he patted Pierre affectionately on the shoulder, and then went up to the table where Prince Andrew, evidently not wishing to join in the conversation, was looking over the papers his father had brought from town.
  • The marshal, a Count Rostov, hasn't sent half his contingent.
  • Well, my boy, the old prince went on, addressing his son and patting Pierre on the shoulder.
  • That charm was not expressed so much in his relations with him as with all his family and with the household.
  • When returning from his leave, Rostov felt, for the first time, how close was the bond that united him to Denisov and the whole regiment.
  • On approaching it, Rostov felt as he had done when approaching his home in Moscow.
  • The regiment was also a home, and as unalterably dear and precious as his parents' house.
  • After his losses, he had determined to pay back his debt to his parents in five years.
  • He received ten thousand rubles a year, but now resolved to take only two thousand and leave the rest to repay the debt to his parents.
  • Denisov evidently tried to expose Rostov to danger as seldom as possible, and after an action greeted his safe return with evident joy.
  • On one of his foraging expeditions, in a deserted and ruined village to which he had come in search of provisions, Rostov found a family consisting of an old Pole and his daughter with an infant in arms.
  • Rostov brought them to his quarters, placed them in his own lodging, and kept them for some weeks while the old man was recovering.
  • Denisov patted him on the shoulder and began rapidly pacing the room without looking at Rostov, as was his way at moments of deep feeling.
  • "Ah, what a mad bweed you Wostovs are!" he muttered, and Rostov noticed tears in his eyes.
  • Denisov, who was living luxuriously because the soldiers of his squadron liked him, had also a board in the roof at the farther end, with a piece of (broken but mended) glass in it for a window.
  • One morning, between seven and eight, returning after a sleepless night, he sent for embers, changed his rain-soaked underclothes, said his prayers, drank tea, got warm, then tidied up the things on the table and in his own corner, and, his face glowing from exposure to the wind and with nothing on but his shirt, lay down on his back, putting his arms under his head.
  • He was pleasantly considering the probability of being promoted in a few days for his last reconnoitering expedition, and was awaiting Denisov, who had gone out somewhere and with whom he wanted a talk.
  • Rostov lay down again on his bed and thought complacently: "Let him fuss and bustle now, my job's done and I'm lying down--capitally!"
  • Five minutes later, Denisov came into the hut, climbed with muddy boots on the bed, lit his pipe, furiously scattered his things about, took his leaded whip, buckled on his saber, and went out again.
  • Having got warm in his corner, he fell asleep and did not leave the hut till toward evening.
  • "Now, what are you pestewing me for?" cried Denisov, suddenly losing his temper.
  • "Go to the devil! quick ma'ch, while you're safe and sound!" and Denisov turned his horse on the officer.
  • "Very well, very well!" muttered the officer, threateningly, and turning his horse he trotted away, jolting in his saddle.
  • The next day the regimental commander sent for Denisov, and holding his fingers spread out before his eyes said:
  • A deep saucer of black blood was taken from his hairy arm and only then was he able to relate what had happened to him.
  • Who is it that's starving us? shouted Denisov, hitting the table with the fist of his newly bled arm so violently that the table nearly broke down and the tumblers on it jumped about.
  • Take this and this!' and I hit him so pat, stwaight on his snout...
  • Every day, letters of inquiry and notices from the court arrived, and on the first of May, Denisov was ordered to hand the squadron over to the next in seniority and appear before the staff of his division to explain his violence at the commissariat office.
  • Denisov, as was his wont, rode out in front of the outposts, parading his courage.
  • A bullet fired by a French sharpshooter hit him in the fleshy part of his leg.
  • Rostov, who felt his friend's absence very much, having no news of him since he left and feeling very anxious about his wound and the progress of his affairs, took advantage of the armistice to get leave to visit Denisov in hospital.
  • The smell was so strong there that Rostov held his nose and had to pause and collect his strength before he could go on.
  • Just before him, almost across the middle of the passage on the bare floor, lay a sick man, probably a Cossack to judge by the cut of his hair.
  • The man lay on his back, his huge arms and legs outstretched.
  • He was knocking the back of his head against the floor, hoarsely uttering some word which he kept repeating.
  • Rostov glanced round, looking for someone who would put this man back in his place and bring him water.
  • "Good day, your honor!" he shouted, rolling his eyes at Rostov and evidently mistaking him for one of the hospital authorities.
  • "Get him to his place and give him some water," said Rostov, pointing to the Cossack.
  • "Yes, your honor," the soldier replied complacently, and rolling his eyes more than ever he drew himself up still straighter, but did not move.
  • His neighbor on the other side, who lay motionless some distance from him with his head thrown back, was a young soldier with a snub nose.
  • His neighbor on the other side, who lay motionless some distance from him with his head thrown back, was a young soldier with a snub nose.
  • His pale waxen face was still freckled and his eyes were rolled back.
  • His pale waxen face was still freckled and his eyes were rolled back.
  • Rostov looked at the young soldier and a cold chill ran down his back.
  • The first person Rostov met in the officers' ward was a thin little man with one arm, who was walking about the first room in a nightcap and hospital dressing gown, with a pipe between his teeth.
  • Denisov lay asleep on his bed with his head under the blanket, though it was nearly noon.
  • His face had the same swollen pallor as the faces of the other hospital patients, but it was not this that struck Rostov.
  • On Rostov's inquiry as to how the matter stood, he at once produced from under his pillow a paper he had received from the commission and the rough draft of his answer to it.
  • He became animated when he began reading his paper and specially drew Rostov's attention to the stinging rejoinders he made to his enemies.
  • His hospital companions, who had gathered round Rostov--a fresh arrival from the world outside--gradually began to disperse as soon as Denisov began reading his answer.
  • His hospital companions, who had gathered round Rostov--a fresh arrival from the world outside--gradually began to disperse as soon as Denisov began reading his answer.
  • Only the man who had the next bed, a stout Uhlan, continued to sit on his bed, gloomily frowning and smoking a pipe, and little one-armed Tushin still listened, shaking his head disapprovingly.
  • Denisov interrupted him, went on reading his paper.
  • He knew his stubborn will and straightforward hasty temper.
  • "Yes, wait a bit," said Denisov, glancing round at the officers, and taking his papers from under his pillow he went to the window, where he had an inkpot, and sat down to write.
  • Boris looked at his general inquiringly and immediately saw that he was being tested.
  • Since he had begun to move in the highest circles Boris had made it his habit to watch attentively all that went on around him and to note it down.
  • At the moment the Emperors went into the pavilion he looked at his watch, and did not forget to look at it again when Alexander came out.
  • On the evening of the twenty-fourth of June, Count Zhilinski arranged a supper for his French friends.
  • As soon as he noticed a French officer, who thrust his head out of the door, that warlike feeling of hostility which he always experienced at the sight of the enemy suddenly seized him.
  • An expression of annoyance showed itself for a moment on his face on first recognizing Rostov.
  • But Rostov had noticed his first impulse.
  • His eyes, looking serenely and steadily at Rostov, seemed to be veiled by something, as if screened by blue spectacles of conventionality.
  • As if you could come at a wrong time! said Boris, and he led him into the room where the supper table was laid and introduced him to his guests, explaining that he was not a civilian, but an hussar officer, and an old friend of his.
  • Zhilinski evidently did not receive this new Russian person very willingly into his circle and did not speak to Rostov.
  • Boris, with one leg crossed over the other and stroking his left hand with the slender fingers of his right, listened to Rostov as a general listens to the report of a subordinate, now looking aside and now gazing straight into Rostov's eyes with the same veiled look.
  • Each time this happened Rostov felt uncomfortable and cast down his eyes.
  • I have heard of such cases and know that His Majesty is very severe in such affairs.
  • In his civilian clothes and a round hat, he wandered about the town, staring at the French and their uniforms and at the streets and houses where the Russian and French Emperors were staying.
  • All is over between us, but I won't leave here without having done all I can for Denisov and certainly not without getting his letter to the Emperor.
  • And suddenly with a determination he himself did not expect, Rostov felt for the letter in his pocket and went straight to the house.
  • I will fall at his feet and beseech him.
  • "To hand in a letter, a petition, to His Majesty," said Nicholas, with a tremor in his voice.
  • "To hand in a letter, a petition, to His Majesty," said Nicholas, with a tremor in his voice.
  • Having heard Rostov to the end, the general shook his head gravely.
  • In the uniform of the Preobrazhensk regiment--white chamois-leather breeches and high boots-- and wearing a star Rostov did not know (it was that of the Legion d'honneur), the monarch came out into the porch, putting on his gloves and carrying his hat under his arm.
  • He stopped and looked about him, brightening everything around by his glance.
  • The Emperor said a few words to him and took a step toward his horse.
  • Stopping beside his horse, with his hand on the saddle, the Emperor turned to the cavalry general and said in a loud voice, evidently wishing to be heard by all:
  • I cannot, because the law is stronger than I, and he raised his foot to the stirrup.
  • The general bowed his head respectfully, and the monarch mounted and rode down the street at a gallop.
  • He came at a gallop, wearing a small hat, a blue uniform open over a white vest, and the St. Andrew ribbon over his shoulder.
  • On approaching Alexander he raised his hat, and as he did so, Rostov, with his cavalryman's eye, could not help noticing that Napoleon did not sit well or firmly in the saddle.
  • In spite of the trampling of the French gendarmes' horses, which were pushing back the crowd, Rostov kept his eyes on every movement of Alexander and Bonaparte.
  • Alexander listened attentively to what was said to him and, bending his head, smiled pleasantly.
  • Bonaparte meanwhile began taking the glove off his small white hand, tore it in doing so, and threw it away.
  • The Emperor knit his brows with dissatisfaction and, glancing back, remarked:
  • Kozlovski scanned the ranks resolutely and included Rostov in his scrutiny.
  • Lazarev stopped, casting a sidelong look at his colonel in alarm.
  • His face twitched, as often happens to soldiers called before the ranks.
  • Napoleon slightly turned his head, and put his plump little hand out behind him as if to take something.
  • The members of his suite, guessing at once what he wanted, moved about and whispered as they passed something from one to another, and a page--the same one Rostov had seen the previous evening at Boris'--ran forward and, bowing respectfully over the outstretched hand and not keeping it waiting a moment, laid in it an Order on a red ribbon.
  • Napoleon merely laid the cross on Lazarev's breast and, dropping his hand, turned toward Alexander as though sure that the cross would adhere there.
  • Russian and French officers embraced him, congratulated him, and pressed his hands.
  • Boris, too, with his friend Zhilinski, came to see the Preobrazhensk banquet.
  • On his way back, he noticed Rostov standing by the corner of a house.
  • In his mind, a painful process was going on which he could not bring to a conclusion.
  • Terrible doubts rose in his soul.
  • Now he remembered Denisov with his changed expression, his submission, and the whole hospital, with arms and legs torn off and its dirt and disease.
  • The officers, his comrades, like most of the army, were dissatisfied with the peace concluded after the battle of Friedland.
  • The process in his mind went on tormenting him without reaching a conclusion.
  • He feared to give way to his thoughts, yet could not get rid of them.
  • "How can you judge what's best?" he cried, the blood suddenly rushing to his face.
  • We cannot comprehend either the Emperor's aims or his actions!
  • That way we shall be saying there is no God--nothing! shouted Nicholas, banging the table--very little to the point as it seemed to his listeners, but quite relevantly to the course of his own thoughts.
  • All the plans Pierre had attempted on his estates--and constantly changing from one thing to another had never accomplished--were carried out by Prince Andrew without display and without perceptible difficulty.
  • He had in the highest degree a practical tenacity which Pierre lacked, and without fuss or strain on his part this set things going.
  • On one of his estates the three hundred serfs were liberated and became free agricultural laborers--this being one of the first examples of the kind in Russia.
  • A trained midwife was engaged for Bogucharovo at his expense, and a priest was paid to teach reading and writing to the children of the peasants and household serfs.
  • Prince Andrew spent half his time at Bald Hills with his father and his son, who was still in the care of nurses.
  • The other half he spent in "Bogucharovo Cloister," as his father called Prince Andrew's estate.
  • But apparently the coachman's sympathy was not enough for Peter, and he turned on the box toward his master.
  • During this journey he, as it were, considered his life afresh and arrived at his old conclusion, restful in its hopelessness: that it was not for him to begin anything anew--but that he must live out his life, content to do no harm, and not disturbing himself or desiring anything.
  • He heard merry girlish cries behind some trees on the right and saw a group of girls running to cross the path of his caleche.
  • He was glad to see Prince Andrew, as he was to see any new visitor, and insisted on his staying the night.
  • During the dull day, in the course of which he was entertained by his elderly hosts and by the more important of the visitors (the old count's house was crowded on account of an approaching name day), Prince Andrew repeatedly glanced at Natasha, gay and laughing among the younger members of the company, and asked himself each time, What is she thinking about?
  • He read awhile and then put out his candle, but relit it.
  • Prince Andrew leaned his elbows on the window ledge and his eyes rested on that sky.
  • His room was on the first floor.
  • Prince Andrew, too, dared not stir, for fear of betraying his unintentional presence.
  • In his soul there suddenly arose such an unexpected turmoil of youthful thoughts and hopes, contrary to the whole tenor of his life, that unable to explain his condition to himself he lay down and fell asleep at once.
  • It was already the beginning of June when on his return journey he drove into the birch forest where the gnarled old oak had made so strange and memorable an impression on him.
  • All the best moments of his life suddenly rose to his memory.
  • A whole series of sensible and logical considerations showing it to be essential for him to go to Petersburg, and even to re-enter the service, kept springing up in his mind.
  • He could not now understand how he could ever even have doubted the necessity of taking an active share in life, just as a month before he had not understood how the idea of leaving the quiet country could ever enter his head.
  • It now seemed clear to him that all his experience of life must be senselessly wasted unless he applied it to some kind of work and again played an active part in life.
  • After that journey to Ryazan he found the country dull; his former pursuits no longer interested him, and often when sitting alone in his study he got up, went to the mirror, and gazed a long time at his own face.
  • Then he would turn away to the portrait of his dead Lise, who with hair curled a la grecque looked tenderly and gaily at him out of the gilt frame.
  • And if anyone came into his room at such moments he was particularly cold, stern, and above all unpleasantly logical.
  • "If it were hot," Prince Andrew would reply at such times very dryly to his sister, "he could go out in his smock, but as it is cold he must wear warm clothes, which were designed for that purpose.
  • It was the time when the youthful Speranski was at the zenith of his fame and his reforms were being pushed forward with the greatest energy.
  • That same August the Emperor was thrown from his caleche, injured his leg, and remained three weeks at Peterhof, receiving Speranski every day and no one else.
  • Soon after his arrival Prince Andrew, as a gentleman of the chamber, presented himself at court and at a levee.
  • He mentioned what he had written to an old field marshal, a friend of his father's.
  • During his service, chiefly as an adjutant, Prince Andrew had seen the anterooms of many important men, and the different types of such rooms were well known to him.
  • One general (an important personage), evidently feeling offended at having to wait so long, sat crossing and uncrossing his legs and smiling contemptuously to himself.
  • Prince Andrew for the second time asked the adjutant on duty to take in his name, but received an ironical look and was told that his turn would come in due course.
  • Then suddenly the grating sound of a harsh voice was heard from the other side of the door, and the officer--with pale face and trembling lips--came out and passed through the waiting room, clutching his head.
  • Arakcheev turned his head toward him without looking at him.
  • His Majesty the Emperor has deigned to send your excellency a project submitted by me...
  • I do not approve of it, said Arakcheev, rising and taking a paper from his writing table.
  • And this movement of reconstruction of which Prince Andrew had a vague idea, and Speranski its chief promoter, began to interest him so keenly that the question of the army regulations quickly receded to a secondary place in his consciousness.
  • The reforming party cordially welcomed and courted him, in the first place because he was reputed to be clever and very well read, and secondly because by liberating his serfs he had obtained the reputation of being a liberal.
  • The party of the old and dissatisfied, who censured the innovations, turned to him expecting his sympathy in their disapproval of the reforms, simply because he was the son of his father.
  • The day after his interview with Count Arakcheev, Prince Andrew spent the evening at Count Kochubey's.
  • Kochubey shook his head smilingly, as if surprised at Bolkonski's simplicity.
  • "It was a small estate that brought in no profit," replied Prince Andrew, trying to extenuate his action so as not to irritate the old man uselessly.
  • "Those who pass the examinations, I suppose," replied Kochubey, crossing his legs and glancing round.
  • The newcomer wore a blue swallow-tail coat with a cross suspended from his neck and a star on his left breast.
  • This was Speranski, Secretary of State, reporter to the Emperor and his companion at Erfurt, where he had more than once met and talked with Napoleon.
  • Speranski did not shift his eyes from one face to another as people involuntarily do on entering a large company and was in no hurry to speak.
  • "What do you mean?" asked Speranski quietly, lowering his eyes.
  • His arguments were concise, simple, and clear.
  • Closing his eyes, he bowed a la francaise, without taking leave, and trying to attract as little attention as possible, he left the room.
  • During the first weeks of his stay in Petersburg Prince Andrew felt the whole trend of thought he had formed during his life of seclusion quite overshadowed by the trifling cares that engrossed him in that city.
  • On returning home in the evening he would jot down in his notebook four or five necessary calls or appointments for certain hours.
  • The mechanism of life, the arrangement of the day so as to be in time everywhere, absorbed the greater part of his vital energy.
  • As he had done on their first meeting at Kochubey's, Speranski produced a strong impression on Prince Andrew on the Wednesday, when he received him tête-à-tête at his own house and talked to him long and confidentially.
  • Had Speranski sprung from the same class as himself and possessed the same breeding and traditions, Bolkonski would soon have discovered his weak, human, unheroic sides; but as it was, Speranski's strange and logical turn of mind inspired him with respect all the more because he did not quite understand him.
  • If he replied and argued, it was only because he wished to maintain his independence and not submit to Speranski's opinions entirely.
  • This was Speranski's cold, mirrorlike look, which did not allow one to penetrate to his soul, and his delicate white hands, which Prince Andrew involuntarily watched as one does watch the hands of those who possess power.
  • He was unpleasantly struck, too, by the excessive contempt for others that he observed in Speranski, and by the diversity of lines of argument he used to support his opinions.
  • Nearly two years before this, in 1808, Pierre on returning to Petersburg after visiting his estates had involuntarily found himself in a leading position among the Petersburg Freemasons.
  • His life meanwhile continued as before, with the same infatuations and dissipations.
  • Amid the turmoil of his activities and distractions, however, Pierre at the end of a year began to feel that the more firmly he tried to rest upon it, the more masonic ground on which he stood gave way under him.
  • When he put his foot down it sank in.
  • Often after collecting alms, and reckoning up twenty to thirty rubles received for the most part in promises from a dozen members, of whom half were as well able to pay as himself, Pierre remembered the masonic vow in which each Brother promised to devote all his belongings to his neighbor, and doubts on which he tried not to dwell arose in his soul.
  • After the usual ceremonies Pierre rose and began his address.
  • "Dear Brothers," he began, blushing and stammering, with a written speech in his hand, "it is not sufficient to observe our mysteries in the seclusion of our lodge--we must act--act!
  • Pierre raised his notebook and began to read.
  • It is impossible to eradicate the passions; but we must strive to direct them to a noble aim, and it is therefore necessary that everyone should be able to satisfy his passions within the limits of virtue.
  • The Grand Master began answering him, and Pierre began developing his views with more and more warmth.
  • Even those members who seemed to be on his side understood him in their own way with limitations and alterations he could not agree to, as what he always wanted most was to convey his thought to others just as he himself understood it.
  • Pierre did not answer him and asked briefly whether his proposal would be accepted.
  • For three days after the delivery of his speech at the lodge he lay on a sofa at home receiving no one and going nowhere.
  • It was just then that he received a letter from his wife, who implored him to see her, telling him how grieved she was about him and how she wished to devote her whole life to him.
  • At the same time his mother-in-law, Prince Vasili's wife, sent to him imploring him to come if only for a few minutes to discuss a most important matter.
  • Pierre saw that there was a conspiracy against him and that they wanted to reunite him with his wife, and in the mood he then was, this was not even unpleasant to him.
  • Nothing in life seemed to him of much importance, and under the influence of the depression that possessed him he valued neither his liberty nor his resolution to punish his wife.
  • Had his wife come to him, he would not have turned her away.
  • Compared to what preoccupied him, was it not a matter of indifference whether he lived with his wife or not?
  • Without replying either to his wife or his mother-in-law, Pierre late one night prepared for a journey and started for Moscow to see Joseph Alexeevich.
  • This is what he noted in his diary:
  • From morning till late at night, except when he eats his very plain food, he is working at science.
  • Joseph Alexeevich, having remained silent and thoughtful for a good while, told me his view of the matter, which at once lit up for me my whole past and the future path I should follow.
  • Bilibin saved up his epigrams to produce them in Countess Bezukhova's presence.
  • At these parties his feelings were like those of a conjuror who always expects his trick to be found out at any moment.
  • He was that absent-minded crank, a grand seigneur husband who was in no one's way, and far from spoiling the high tone and general impression of the drawing room, he served, by the contrast he presented to her, as an advantageous background to his elegant and tactful wife.
  • He entered his wife's drawing room as one enters a theater, was acquainted with everybody, equally pleased to see everyone, and equally indifferent to them all.
  • Pierre went on with his diary, and this is what he wrote in it during that time:
  • It seemed to me that his object in entering the Brotherhood was merely to be intimate and in favor with members of our lodge.
  • His coming vexed me from the first, and I said something disagreeable to him.
  • But as soon as I drew near I saw that his face had changed and grown young, and he was quietly telling me something about the teaching of our order, but so softly that I could not hear it.
  • But he looked at me with vexation and jumped up, breaking off his remarks.
  • I embraced him and kissed his hands, and he said, "Hast thou noticed that my face is different?"
  • I looked at him, still holding him in my arms, and saw that his face was young, but that he had no hair on his head and his features were quite changed.
  • And suddenly I saw him lying like a dead body; then he gradually recovered and went with me into my study carrying a large book of sheets of drawing paper; I said, "I drew that," and he answered by bowing his head.
  • He narrated that episode so persistently and with so important an air that everyone believed in the merit and usefulness of his deed, and he had obtained two decorations for Austerlitz.
  • Though some skeptics smiled when told of Berg's merits, it could not be denied that he was a painstaking and brave officer, on excellent terms with his superiors, and a moral young man with a brilliant career before him and an assured position in society.
  • Now in Petersburg, having considered the Rostovs' position and his own, he decided that the time had come to propose.
  • "You see," said Berg to his comrade, whom he called "friend" only because he knew that everyone has friends, "you see, I have considered it all, and should not marry if I had not thought it all out or if it were in any way unsuitable.
  • Well, you will be coming," he was going to say, "to dine," but changed his mind and said "to take tea with us," and quickly doubling up his tongue he blew a small round ring of tobacco smoke, perfectly embodying his dream of happiness.
  • He did not know at all how much he had, what his debts amounted to, or what dowry he could give Vera.
  • The count was so disconcerted by this long-foreseen inquiry that without consideration he gave the first reply that came into his head.
  • Berg smiled meekly, kissed the count on the shoulder, and said that he was very grateful, but that it was impossible for him to arrange his new life without receiving thirty thousand in ready money.
  • The memory of Natasha was his most poetic recollection.
  • He had a brilliant position in society thanks to his intimacy with Countess Bezukhova, a brilliant position in the service thanks to the patronage of an important personage whose complete confidence he enjoyed, and he was beginning to make plans for marrying one of the richest heiresses in Petersburg, plans which might very easily be realized.
  • When she heard of his arrival she almost ran into the drawing room, flushed and beaming with a more than cordial smile.
  • This expression on his face pleased Natasha.
  • Boris' uniform, spurs, tie, and the way his hair was brushed were all comme il faut and in the latest fashion.
  • He did not stay more than ten minutes, then rose and took his leave.
  • Boris made up his mind to avoid meeting Natasha, but despite that resolution he called again a few days later and began calling often and spending whole days at the Rostovs'.
  • It seemed to him that he ought to have an explanation with Natasha and tell her that the old times must be forgotten, that in spite of everything... she could not be his wife, that he had no means, and they would never let her marry him.
  • These visits of Natasha's at night before the count returned from his club were one of the greatest pleasures of both mother, and daughter.
  • You have quite turned his head, I can see that....
  • You have quite turned his head, and why?
  • He was wearing a blue swallow-tail coat, shoes and stockings, and was perfumed and his hair pomaded.
  • The host also followed Natasha with his eyes and asked the count which was his daughter.
  • "Charming!" said he, kissing the tips of his fingers.
  • Put him beside his wife and he looks a regular buffoon!
  • Pierre, swaying his stout body, advanced, making way through the crowd and nodding to right and left as casually and good-naturedly as if he were passing through a crowd at a fair.
  • Takes after his father.
  • Behind him walked his host and hostess.
  • Everyone moved back, and the Emperor came smiling out of the drawing room leading his hostess by the hand but not keeping time to the music.
  • The handsome Anatole was smilingly talking to a partner on his arm and looked at Natasha as one looks at a wall.
  • Berg and his wife, who were not dancing, came up to them.
  • At last the Emperor stopped beside his last partner (he had danced with three) and the music ceased.
  • She smilingly raised her hand and laid it on his shoulder without looking at him.
  • The despairing, dejected expression of Natasha's face caught his eye.
  • He recognized her, guessed her feelings, saw that it was her debut, remembered her conversation at the window, and with an expression of pleasure on his face approached Countess Rostova.
  • "I have the pleasure of being already acquainted, if the countess remembers me," said Prince Andrew with a low and courteous bow quite belying Peronskaya's remarks about his rudeness, and approaching Natasha he held out his arm to grasp her waist before he had completed his invitation.
  • Prince Andrew was one of the best dancers of his day and Natasha danced exquisitely.
  • "If she goes to her cousin first and then to another lady, she will be my wife," said Prince Andrew to himself quite to his own surprise, as he watched her.
  • When the cotillion was over the old count in his blue coat came up to the dancers.
  • He invited Prince Andrew to come and see them, and asked his daughter whether she was enjoying herself.
  • At that ball Pierre for the first time felt humiliated by the position his wife occupied in court circles.
  • A deep furrow ran across his forehead, and standing by a window he stared over his spectacles seeing no one.
  • Next day Prince Andrew thought of the ball, but his mind did not dwell on it long.
  • That was all he thought about yesterday's ball, and after his morning tea he set to work.
  • He kept criticizing his own work, as he often did, and was glad when he heard someone coming.
  • Hardly had he got rid of his hat before he ran into Prince Andrew's room with a preoccupied air and at once began talking.
  • The Emperor said that the fiscal system must be reorganized and the accounts published, recounted Bitski, emphasizing certain words and opening his eyes significantly.
  • His guests surrounded him.
  • Still laughing, Speranski held out his soft white hand to Prince Andrew.
  • "One moment..." he went on, turning to Magnitski and interrupting his story.
  • Before Magnitski had finished his story someone else was anxious to relate something still funnier.
  • Speranski related how at the Council that morning a deaf dignitary, when asked his opinion, replied that he thought so too.
  • Magnitski starting quizzing Stolypin about his vehemence.
  • Prince Andrew did not laugh and feared that he would be a damper on the spirits of the company, but no one took any notice of his being out of harmony with the general mood.
  • He tried several times to join in the conversation, but his remarks were tossed aside each time like a cork thrown out of the water, and he could not jest with them.
  • He patted the little girl with his white hand and kissed her.
  • Two letters brought by a courier were handed to Speranski and he took them to his study.
  • When the verses were finished Prince Andrew went up to Speranski and took his leave.
  • When he reached home Prince Andrew began thinking of his life in Petersburg during those last four months as if it were something new.
  • He recalled his labors on the Legal Code, and how painstakingly he had translated the articles of the Roman and French codes into Russian, and he felt ashamed of himself.
  • Then he vividly pictured to himself Bogucharovo, his occupations in the country, his journey to Ryazan; he remembered the peasants and Dron the village elder, and mentally applying to them the Personal Rights he had divided into paragraphs, he felt astonished that he could have spent so much time on such useless work.
  • He looked at Natasha as she sang, and something new and joyful stirred in his soul.
  • His hopes for the future?...
  • Having lit his candle he sat up in bed, then got up, then lay down again not at all troubled by his sleeplessness: his soul was as fresh and joyful as if he had stepped out of a stuffy room into God's own fresh air.
  • He decided that he must attend to his son's education by finding a tutor and putting the boy in his charge, then he ought to retire from the service and go abroad, and see England, Switzerland and Italy.
  • Berg explained so clearly why he wanted to collect at his house a small but select company, and why this would give him pleasure, and why though he grudged spending money on cards or anything harmful, he was prepared to run into some expense for the sake of good society--that Pierre could not refuse, and promised to come.
  • Contrary to his habit of being late, Pierre on that day arrived at the Bergs' house, not at ten but at fifteen minutes to eight.
  • In their new, clean, and light study with its small busts and pictures and new furniture sat Berg and his wife.
  • Berg, closely buttoned up in his new uniform, sat beside his wife explaining to her that one always could and should be acquainted with people above one, because only then does one get satisfaction from acquaintances.
  • (Berg measured his life not by years but by promotions.)
  • Berg, judging by his wife, thought all women weak and foolish.
  • Berg rose and embraced his wife carefully, so as not to crush her lace fichu for which he had paid a good price, kissing her straight on the lips.
  • There was a shade of condescension and patronage in his treatment of Berg and Vera.
  • After playing out a whole suit and to his partner's delight taking five tricks, Pierre, hearing greetings and the steps of someone who had entered the room while he was picking up his tricks, glanced again at Natasha.
  • Prince Andrew went up to Pierre, and the latter noticed a new and youthful expression in his friend's face.
  • Pierre changed places several times during the game, sitting now with his back to Natasha and now facing her, but during the whole of the six rubbers he watched her and his friend.
  • Pierre went up to his friend and, asking whether they were talking secrets, sat down beside them.
  • This return to the subject of Natalie caused Prince Andrew to knit his brows with discomfort: he was about to rise, but Vera continued with a still more subtle smile:
  • I expect he has told you of his childish love for Natasha?
  • "Oh, undoubtedly!" said Prince Andrew, and with sudden and unnatural liveliness he began chaffing Pierre about the need to be very careful with his fifty-year-old Moscow cousins, and in the midst of these jesting remarks he rose, taking Pierre by the arm, and drew him aside.
  • "Well?" asked Pierre, seeing his friend's strange animation with surprise, and noticing the glance he turned on Natasha as he rose.
  • "I... but no, I will talk to you later on," and with a strange light in his eyes and restlessness in his movements, Prince Andrew approached Natasha and sat down beside her.
  • The smile of pleasure never left his face.
  • Everything was similar: the ladies' subtle talk, the cards, the general raising his voice at the card table, and the samovar and the tea cakes; only one thing was lacking that he had always seen at the evening parties he wished to imitate.
  • Prince Andrew surprised her by his timidity.
  • Only I feel afraid in his presence.
  • Mamma, one need not be ashamed of his being a widower?
  • At that very time Prince Andrew was sitting with Pierre and telling him of his love for Natasha and his firm resolve to make her his wife.
  • Pierre, who had come downstairs, walked through the rooms and struck everyone by his preoccupied, absent-minded, and morose air.
  • At the same time the feeling he had noticed between his protegee Natasha and Prince Andrew accentuated his gloom by the contrast between his own position and his friend's.
  • He tried equally to avoid thinking about his wife, and about Natasha and Prince Andrew; and again everything seemed to him insignificant in comparison with eternity; again the question: for what? presented itself; and he forced himself to work day and night at masonic labors, hoping to drive away the evil spirit that threatened him.
  • Toward midnight, after he had left the countess' apartments, he was sitting upstairs in a shabby dressing gown, copying out the original transaction of the Scottish lodge of Freemasons at a table in his low room cloudy with tobacco smoke, when someone came in.
  • He pointed to his manuscript book with that air of escaping from the ills of life with which unhappy people look at their work.
  • Prince Andrew, with a beaming, ecstatic expression of renewed life on his face, paused in front of Pierre and, not noticing his sad look, smiled at him with the egotism of joy.
  • Suddenly Pierre heaved a deep sigh and dumped his heavy person down on the sofa beside Prince Andrew.
  • Where was his spleen, his contempt for life, his disillusionment?
  • Pierre was the only person to whom he made up his mind to speak openly; and to him he told all that was in his soul.
  • "Yes, yes," Pierre assented, looking at his friend with a touched and sad expression in his eyes.
  • The brighter Prince Andrew's lot appeared to him, the gloomier seemed his own.
  • Prince Andrew needed his father's consent to his marriage, and to obtain this he started for the country next day.
  • His father received his son's communication with external composure, but inward wrath.
  • His father received his son's communication with external composure, but inward wrath.
  • He could not comprehend how anyone could wish to alter his life or introduce anything new into it, when his own life was already ending.
  • With his son, however, he employed the diplomacy he reserved for important occasions and, adopting a quiet tone, discussed the whole matter.
  • Mind, the last... concluded the prince, in a tone which showed that nothing would make him alter his decision.
  • Pierre did not come either and Natasha, not knowing that Prince Andrew had gone to see his father, could not explain his absence to herself.
  • She knew this for certain, though she hardly heard his voice through the closed doors.
  • As soon as he saw Natasha his face brightened.
  • She held out her hand to him, and with a mixed feeling of estrangement and tenderness pressed her lips to his forehead as he stooped to kiss her hand.
  • My father, to whom I have told my plans, has made it an express condition of his consent that the wedding is not to take place for a year.
  • Prince Andrew held her hands, looked into her eyes, and did not find in his heart his former love for her.
  • "No," she replied, but she had not understood his question.
  • Natasha listened with concentrated attention, trying but failing to take in the meaning of his words.
  • Prince Andrew did not reply, but his face expressed the impossibility of altering that decision.
  • After a few days they grew accustomed to him, and without restraint in his presence pursued their usual way of life, in which he took his part.
  • Natasha shared this as she did all his feelings, which she constantly divined.
  • Once she began questioning him about his son.
  • Prince Andrew blushed, as he often did now--Natasha particularly liked it in him--and said that his son would not live with them.
  • I cannot take him away from his grandfather, and besides...
  • Sometimes the old count would come up, kiss Prince Andrew, and ask his advice about Petya's education or Nicholas' service.
  • He seldom laughed, but when he did he abandoned himself entirely to his laughter, and after such a laugh she always felt nearer to him.
  • But a fortnight after his departure, to the surprise of those around her, she recovered from her mental sickness just as suddenly and became her old self again, but with a change in her moral physiognomy, as a child gets up after a long illness with a changed expression of face.
  • During that year after his son's departure, Prince Nicholas Bolkonski's health and temper became much worse.
  • He grew still more irritable, and it was Princess Mary who generally bore the brunt of his frequent fits of unprovoked anger.
  • She felt that something had happened to him, but he said nothing to her about his love.
  • Before he left he had a long talk with his father about something, and Princess Mary noticed that before his departure they were dissatisfied with one another.
  • Five years have passed since then, and already I, with my petty understanding, begin to see clearly why she had to die, and in what way that death was but an expression of the infinite goodness of the Creator, whose every action, though generally incomprehensible to us, is but a manifestation of His infinite love for His creatures.
  • And His will is governed only by infinite love for us, and so whatever befalls us is for our good.
  • After his sorrow he only this year quite recovered his spirits.
  • The good he has done to everybody here, from his peasants up to the gentry, is incalculable.
  • On his arrival in Petersburg he received only his due.
  • I do not think my brother will ever marry again, and certainly not her; and this is why: first, I know that though he rarely speaks about the wife he has lost, the grief of that loss has gone too deep in his heart for him ever to decide to give her a successor and our little angel a stepmother.
  • May God keep you in His holy and mighty care.
  • He informed her of his engagement to Natasha Rostova.
  • He asked his sister to forgive him for not having told her of his resolve when he had last visited Bald Hills, though he had spoken of it to his father.
  • The princess was about to reply, but her father would not let her speak and, raising his voice more and more, cried:
  • But repressed vexation at his son's poor-spirited behavior found expression in his treatment of his daughter.
  • "Why shouldn't I marry her?" he asked his daughter.
  • She wrote to Prince Andrew about the reception of his letter, but comforted him with hopes of reconciling their father to the idea.
  • Prince Andrew had loved his wife, she died, but that was not enough: he wanted to bind his happiness to another woman.
  • Rostov had become a bluff, good-natured fellow, whom his Moscow acquaintances would have considered rather bad form, but who was liked and respected by his comrades, subordinates, and superiors, and was well contented with his life.
  • He felt that sooner or later he would have to re-enter that whirlpool of life, with its embarrassments and affairs to be straightened out, its accounts with stewards, quarrels, and intrigues, its ties, society, and with Sonya's love and his promise to her.
  • It was all dreadfully difficult and complicated; and he replied to his mother in cold, formal letters in French, beginning: "My dear Mamma," and ending: "Your obedient son," which said nothing of when he would return.
  • In 1810 he received letters from his parents, in which they told him of Natasha's engagement to Bolkonski, and that the wedding would be in a year's time because the old prince made difficulties.
  • But in the spring of that year, he received a letter from his mother, written without his father's knowledge, and that letter persuaded him to return.
  • A week later he obtained his leave.
  • His hussar comrades--not only those of his own regiment, but the whole brigade--gave Rostov a dinner to which the subscription was fifteen rubles a head, and at which there were two bands and two choirs of singers.
  • His hussar comrades--not only those of his own regiment, but the whole brigade--gave Rostov a dinner to which the subscription was fifteen rubles a head, and at which there were two bands and two choirs of singers.
  • Thoughts of home grew stronger the nearer he approached it--far stronger, as though this feeling of his was subject to the law by which the force of attraction is in inverse proportion to the square of the distance.
  • At the last post station before Otradnoe he gave the driver a three-ruble tip, and on arriving he ran breathlessly, like a boy, up the steps of his home.
  • His father and mother were much the same, only a little older.
  • She told him about her romance with Prince Andrew and of his visit to Otradnoe and showed him his last letter.
  • Once, when he had touched on this topic with his mother, he discovered, to his surprise and somewhat to his satisfaction, that in the depth of her soul she too had doubts about this marriage.
  • His health is very delicate.
  • He was worried by the impending necessity of interfering in the stupid business matters for which his mother had called him home.
  • To throw off this burden as quickly as possible, on the third day after his arrival he went, angry and scowling and without answering questions as to where he was going, to Mitenka's lodge and demanded an account of everything.
  • Then with no less fear and delight they saw how the young count, red in the face and with bloodshot eyes, dragged Mitenka out by the scruff of the neck and applied his foot and knee to his behind with great agility at convenient moments between the words, shouting, Be off!
  • She went several times to his door on tiptoe and listened, as he lighted one pipe after another.
  • On the fifteenth, when young Rostov, in his dressing gown, looked out of the window, he saw it was an unsurpassable morning for hunting: it was as if the sky were melting and sinking to the earth without any wind.
  • Milka, a black-spotted, broad-haunched bitch with prominent black eyes, got up on seeing her master, stretched her hind legs, lay down like a hare, and then suddenly jumped up and licked him right on his nose and mustache.
  • Another borzoi, a dog, catching sight of his master from the garden path, arched his back and, rushing headlong toward the porch with lifted tail, began rubbing himself against his legs.
  • He doffed his Circassian cap to his master and looked at him scornfully.
  • This scorn was not offensive to his master.
  • "What orders, your excellency?" said the huntsman in his deep bass, deep as a proto-deacon's and hoarse with hallooing--and two flashing black eyes gazed from under his brows at his master, who was silent.
  • "I sent Uvarka at dawn to listen," his bass boomed out after a minute's pause.
  • Having finished his inquiries and extorted from Daniel an opinion that the hounds were fit (Daniel himself wished to go hunting), Nicholas ordered the horses to be saddled.
  • He cast down his eyes and hurried out as if it were none of his business, careful as he went not to inflict any accidental injury on the young lady.
  • The old count had always kept up an enormous hunting establishment.
  • He had a look at all the details of the hunt, sent a pack of hounds and huntsmen on ahead to find the quarry, mounted his chestnut Donets, and whistling to his own leash of borzois, set off across the threshing ground to a field leading to the Otradnoe wood.
  • Each man in the hunt knew his business, his place, what he had to do.
  • Petya, who was laughing, whipped and pulled at his horse.
  • "In the first place, Trunila is not a 'dog,' but a harrier," thought Nicholas, and looked sternly at his sister, trying to make her feel the distance that ought to separate them at that moment.
  • "Karay, here!" he shouted, answering "Uncle's" remark by this call to his borzoi.
  • Having straightened his coat and fastened on his hunting knives and horn, he mounted his good, sleek, well-fed, and comfortable horse, Viflyanka, which was turning gray, like himself.
  • His horses and trap were sent home.
  • Beside him was Simon Chekmar, his personal attendant, an old horseman now somewhat stiff in the saddle.
  • Before the hunt, by old custom, the count had drunk a silver cupful of mulled brandy, taken a snack, and washed it down with half a bottle of his favorite Bordeaux.
  • His eyes were rather moist and glittered more than usual, and as he sat in his saddle, wrapped up in his fur coat, he looked like a child taken out for an outing.
  • His eyes were rather moist and glittered more than usual, and as he sat in his saddle, wrapped up in his fur coat, he looked like a child taken out for an outing.
  • The thin, hollow-cheeked Chekmar, having got everything ready, kept glancing at his master with whom he had lived on the best of terms for thirty years, and understanding the mood he was in expected a pleasant chat.
  • This person was a gray-bearded old man in a woman's cloak, with a tall peaked cap on his head.
  • He understands the matter so well that Daniel and I are often quite astounded, said Simon, well knowing what would please his master.
  • And how well he looks on his horse, eh?
  • "To search far," he said, turning back the skirt of his coat to get at his snuffbox.
  • He bent down his head and listened, shaking a warning finger at his master.
  • His voice seemed to fill the whole wood and carried far beyond out into the open field.
  • After listening a few moments in silence, the count and his attendant convinced themselves that the hounds had separated into two packs: the sound of the larger pack, eagerly giving tongue, began to die away in the distance, the other pack rushed by the wood past the count, and it was with this that Daniel's voice was heard calling ulyulyu.
  • Simon sighed and stooped to straighten the leash a young borzoi had entangled; the count too sighed and, noticing the snuffbox in his hand, opened it and took a pinch.
  • The count turned and saw on his right Mitka staring at him with eyes starting out of his head, raising his cap and pointing before him to the other side.
  • On its long back sat Daniel, hunched forward, capless, his disheveled gray hair hanging over his flushed, perspiring face.
  • When he caught sight of the count his eyes flashed lightning.
  • "Blast you!" he shouted, holding up his whip threateningly at the count.
  • What sportsmen! and as if scorning to say more to the frightened and shamefaced count, he lashed the heaving flanks of his sweating chestnut gelding with all the anger the count had aroused and flew off after the hounds.
  • Nicholas Rostov meanwhile remained at his post, waiting for the wolf.
  • He expected the wolf to come his way any moment.
  • Several times he addressed a prayer to God that the wolf should come his way.
  • A thousand times during that half-hour Rostov cast eager and restless glances over the edge of the wood, with the two scraggy oaks rising above the aspen undergrowth and the gully with its water-worn side and "Uncle's" cap just visible above the bush on his right.
  • Memories of Austerlitz and of Dolokhov flashed rapidly and clearly through his mind.
  • The height of happiness was reached--and so simply, without warning, or noise, or display, that Rostov could not believe his eyes and remained in doubt for over a second.
  • Rostov, holding his breath, looked round at the borzois.
  • Old Karay had turned his head and was angrily searching for fleas, baring his yellow teeth and snapping at his hind legs.
  • "Ulyulyulyu!" whispered Rostov, pouting his lips.
  • Karay finished scratching his hindquarters and, cocking his ears, got up with quivering tail from which tufts of matted hair hung down.
  • Nicholas did not hear his own cry nor feel that he was galloping, nor see the borzois, nor the ground over which he went: he saw only the wolf, who, increasing her speed, bounded on in the same direction along the hollow.
  • "Karay, ulyulyu!..." he shouted, looking round for the old borzoi who was now his only hope.
  • That instant, when Nicholas saw the wolf struggling in the gully with the dogs, while from under them could be seen her gray hair and outstretched hind leg and her frightened choking head, with her ears laid back (Karay was pinning her by the throat), was the happiest moment of his life.
  • With his hand on his saddlebow, he was ready to dismount and stab the wolf, when she suddenly thrust her head up from among that mass of dogs, and then her forepaws were on the edge of the gully.
  • Karay, his hair bristling, and probably bruised or wounded, climbed with difficulty out of the gully.
  • "Uncle's" huntsman was galloping from the other side across the wolf's path and his borzois once more stopped the animal's advance.
  • Nicholas and his attendant, with "Uncle" and his huntsman, were all riding round the wolf, crying "ulyulyu!" shouting and preparing to dismount each moment that the wolf crouched back, and starting forward again every time she shook herself and moved toward the wood where she would be safe.
  • He saw Karay seize the wolf, and checked his horse, supposing the affair to be over.
  • But when he saw that the horsemen did not dismount and that the wolf shook herself and ran for safety, Daniel set his chestnut galloping, not at the wolf but straight toward the wood, just as Karay had run to cut the animal off.
  • Daniel galloped up silently, holding a naked dagger in his left hand and thrashing the laboring sides of his chestnut horse with his whip as if it were a flail.
  • Daniel rose a little, took a step, and with his whole weight, as if lying down to rest, fell on the wolf, seizing her by the ears.
  • We'll gag her! and, changing his position, set his foot on the wolf's neck.
  • "Yes, your excellency," answered Daniel, quickly doffing his cap.
  • The count remembered the wolf he had let slip and his encounter with Daniel.
  • Nicholas standing in a fallow field could see all his whips.
  • Facing him lay a field of winter rye, there his own huntsman stood alone in a hollow behind a hazel bush.
  • The huntsman standing in the hollow moved and loosed his borzois, and Nicholas saw a queer, short-legged red fox with a fine brush going hard across the field.
  • While still at a distance he took off his cap and tried to speak respectfully, but he was pale and breathless and his face was angry.
  • One of his eyes was black, but he probably was not even aware of it.
  • Do you want a taste of this?... said the huntsman, pointing to his dagger and probably imagining himself still speaking to his foe.
  • Nicholas, not stopping to talk to the man, asked his sister and Petya to wait for him and rode to the spot where the enemy's, Ilagin's, hunting party was.
  • The victorious huntsman rode off to join the field, and there, surrounded by inquiring sympathizers, recounted his exploits.
  • Nicholas, though he had never seen Ilagin, with his usual absence of moderation in judgment, hated him cordially from reports of his arbitrariness and violence, and regarded him as his bitterest foe.
  • He rode in angry agitation toward him, firmly grasping his whip and fully prepared to take the most resolute and desperate steps to punish his enemy.
  • Having ridden up to Nicholas, Ilagin raised his beaver cap and said he much regretted what had occurred and would have the man punished who had allowed himself to seize a fox hunted by someone else's borzois.
  • To expiate his huntsman's offense, Ilagin pressed the Rostovs to come to an upland of his about a mile away which he usually kept for himself and which, he said, swarmed with hares.
  • And considering it polite to return the young count's compliment, Ilagin looked at his borzois and picked out Milka who attracted his attention by her breadth.
  • "Yes, she's fast enough," replied Nicholas, and thought: "If only a full-grown hare would cross the field now I'd show you what sort of borzoi she is," and turning to his groom, he said he would give a ruble to anyone who found a hare.
  • (he again raised his cap to Natasha) "but as for counting skins and what one takes, I don't care about that."
  • He stood on a knoll in the stubble, holding his whip aloft, and again repeated his long-drawn cry, "A-tu!"
  • The latter was riding with a sullen expression on his face.
  • "Rugayushka!" he added, involuntarily by this diminutive expressing his affection and the hopes he placed on this red borzoi.
  • The huntsman stood halfway up the knoll holding up his whip and the gentlefolk rode up to him at a footpace; the hounds that were far off on the horizon turned away from the hare, and the whips, but not the gentlefolk, also moved away.
  • When he jumped up he did not run at once, but pricked his ears listening to the shouting and trampling that resounded from all sides at once.
  • He took a dozen bounds, not very quickly, letting the borzois gain on him, and, finally having chosen his direction and realized his danger, laid back his ears and rushed off headlong.
  • The hare arched his back and bounded off yet more swiftly.
  • Again the beautiful Erza reached him, but when close to the hare's scut paused as if measuring the distance, so as not to make a mistake this time but seize his hind leg.
  • Erza did not hearken to his appeal.
  • Only the delighted "Uncle" dismounted, and cut off a pad, shaking the hare for the blood to drip off, and anxiously glancing round with restless eyes while his arms and legs twitched.
  • That's it, come on! said he, panting and looking wrathfully around as if he were abusing someone, as if they were all his enemies and had insulted him, and only now had he at last succeeded in justifying himself.
  • "Once she had missed it and turned it away, any mongrel could take it," Ilagin was saying at the same time, breathless from his gallop and his excitement.
  • "Uncle" himself twisted up the hare, threw it neatly and smartly across his horse's back as if by that gesture he meant to rebuke everybody, and, with an air of not wishing to speak to anyone, mounted his bay and rode off.
  • For a long time they continued to look at red Rugay who, his arched back spattered with mud and clanking the ring of his leash, walked along just behind "Uncle's" horse with the serene air of a conqueror.
  • But when it is, then look out! his appearance seemed to Nicholas to be saying.
  • Toward evening Ilagin took leave of Nicholas, who found that they were so far from home that he accepted "Uncle's" offer that the hunting party should spend the night in his little village of Mikhaylovna.
  • "Uncle" dismounted at the porch of his little wooden house which stood in the midst of an overgrown garden and, after a glance at his retainers, shouted authoritatively that the superfluous ones should take themselves off and that all necessary preparations should be made to receive the guests and the visitors.
  • "Uncle" asked his visitors to sit down and make themselves at home, and then went out of the room.
  • Rugay, his back still muddy, came into the room and lay down on the sofa, cleaning himself with his tongue and teeth.
  • Petya, leaning on his elbow, fell asleep at once.
  • They looked at one another (now that the hunt was over and they were in the house, Nicholas no longer considered it necessary to show his manly superiority over his sister), Natasha gave him a wink, and neither refrained long from bursting into a peal of ringing laughter even before they had a pretext ready to account for it.
  • "Uncle" too was in high spirits and far from being offended by the brother's and sister's laughter (it could never enter his head that they might be laughing at his way of life) he himself joined in the merriment.
  • After a casual pause, such as often occurs when receiving friends for the first time in one's own house, "Uncle," answering a thought that was in his visitors' minds, said:
  • Involuntarily Rostov recalled all the good he had heard about him from his father and the neighbors.
  • "Uncle" sat listening, slightly smiling, with his head on one side.
  • Without looking at anyone, "Uncle" blew the dust off it and, tapping the case with his bony fingers, tuned the guitar and settled himself in his armchair.
  • He took the guitar a little above the fingerboard, arching his left elbow with a somewhat theatrical gesture, and, with a wink at Anisya Fedorovna, struck a single chord, pure and sonorous, and then quietly, smoothly, and confidently began playing in very slow time, not My Lady, but the well-known song: Came a maiden down the street.
  • Played "Uncle" once more, running his fingers skillfully over the strings, and then he stopped short and jerked his shoulders.
  • "Uncle" played another song and a valse; then after a pause he cleared his throat and sang his favorite hunting song:
  • She asked "Uncle" for his guitar and at once found the chords of the song.
  • "Good-bye, dear niece," his voice called out of the darkness--not the voice Natasha had known previously, but the one that had sung As 'twas growing dark last night.
  • Well, you see, first I thought that Rugay, the red hound, was like Uncle, and that if he were a man he would always keep Uncle near him, if not for his riding, then for his manner.
  • "I know, I expect you thought of him," said Nicholas, smiling as Natasha knew by the sound of his voice.
  • Count Ilya Rostov had resigned the position of Marshal of the Nobility because it involved him in too much expense, but still his affairs did not improve.
  • Such were Dimmler the musician and his wife, Vogel the dancing master and his family, Belova, an old maiden lady, an inmate of the house, and many others such as Petya's tutors, the girls' former governess, and other people who simply found it preferable and more advantageous to live in the count's house than at home.
  • There was still the hunting establishment which Nicholas had enlarged.
  • The count moved in his affairs as in a huge net, trying not to believe that he was entangled but becoming more and more so at every step, and feeling too feeble to break the meshes or to set to work carefully and patiently to disentangle them.
  • Nicholas guessed what his mother's remarks were leading to and during one of these conversations induced her to speak quite frankly.
  • She told him that her only hope of getting their affairs disentangled now lay in his marrying Julie Karagina.
  • "No, you have not understood me," said his mother, not knowing how to justify herself.
  • Nicholas was spending the last of his leave at home.
  • The old count was resting in his study.
  • And tapping with her heels, she ran quickly upstairs to see Vogel and his wife who lived on the upper story.
  • Petya ran up and offered her his back.
  • She jumped on it, putting her arms round his neck, and he pranced along with her.
  • "No, don't... the island of Madagascar!" she said, and jumping off his back she went downstairs.
  • The same faces, the same talk, Papa holding his cup and blowing in the same way! thought Natasha, feeling with horror a sense of repulsion rising up in her for the whole household, because they were always the same.
  • Of course I do, I remember his teeth as if I had just seen them.
  • Yes, and you remember how Papa in his blue overcoat fired a gun in the porch?
  • Dimmler had finished the piece but still sat softly running his fingers over the strings, evidently uncertain whether to stop or to play something else.
  • Nicholas did not take his eyes off his sister and drew breath in time with her.
  • Nicholas, who, as the roads were in splendid condition, wanted to take them all for a drive in his troyka, proposed to take with them about a dozen of the serf mummers and drive to "Uncle's."
  • But the countess would not agree to his going; he had had a bad leg all these last days.
  • Nicholas, in his old lady's dress over which he had belted his hussar overcoat, stood in the middle of the sleigh, reins in hand.
  • "You go ahead, Zakhar!" shouted Nicholas to his father's coachman, wishing for a chance to race past him.
  • The old count's troyka, with Dimmler and his party, started forward, squeaking on its runners as though freezing to the snow, its deep-toned bell clanging.
  • The near side horse, arching his head and breaking into a short canter, tugged at his traces.
  • The shaft horse swayed from side to side, moving his ears as if asking: "Isn't it time to begin now?"
  • And shouting to his horses, he began to pass the first sleigh.
  • Zakhar held back his horses and turned his face, which was already covered with hoarfrost to his eyebrows.
  • Zakhar, while still keeping his arms extended, raised one hand with the reins.
  • Nicholas put all his horses to a gallop and passed Zakhar.
  • Again checking his horses, Nicholas looked around him.
  • "Look, his mustache and eyelashes are all white!" said one of the strange, pretty, unfamiliar people--the one with fine eyebrows and mustache.
  • That's not forbidden by his law.
  • He slipped his arms under the cloak that covered her head, embraced her, pressed her to him, and kissed her on the lips that wore a mustache and had a smell of burnt cork.
  • Sonya kissed him full on the lips, and disengaging her little hands pressed them to his cheeks.
  • On the way back Nicholas drove at a steady pace instead of racing and kept peering by that fantastic all-transforming light into Sonya's face and searching beneath the eyebrows and mustache for his former and his present Sonya from whom he had resolved never to be parted again.
  • "Then it's all right?" said Nicholas, again scrutinizing the expression of his sister's face to see if she was in earnest.
  • Then he jumped down and, his boots scrunching the snow, ran back to his sleigh.
  • His face was cheerful, and he turned to me.
  • Soon after the Christmas holidays Nicholas told his mother of his love for Sonya and of his firm resolve to marry her.
  • Nicholas, for the first time, felt that his mother was displeased with him and that, despite her love for him, she would not give way.
  • Nicholas replied that he could not go back on his word, and his father, sighing and evidently disconcerted, very soon became silent and went in to the countess.
  • She could not help loving the countess and the whole Rostov family, but neither could she help loving Nicholas and knowing that his happiness depended on that love.
  • Nicholas felt the situation to be intolerable and went to have an explanation with his mother.
  • The countess, with a coldness her son had never seen in her before, replied that he was of age, that Prince Andrew was marrying without his father's consent, and he could do the same, but that she would never receive that intriguer as her daughter.
  • Exploding at the word intriguer, Nicholas, raising his voice, told his mother he had never expected her to try to force him to sell his feelings, but if that were so, he would say for the last time....
  • But he had no time to utter the decisive word which the expression of his face caused his mother to await with terror, and which would perhaps have forever remained a cruel memory to them both.
  • Be quiet, be quiet, be quiet, I tell you!... she almost screamed, so as to drown his voice.
  • The countess, sobbing heavily, hid her face on her daughter's breast, while Nicholas rose, clutching his head, and left the room.
  • Natasha set to work to effect a reconciliation, and so far succeeded that Nicholas received a promise from his mother that Sonya should not be troubled, while he on his side promised not to undertake anything without his parents' knowledge.
  • Firmly resolved, after putting his affairs in order in the regiment, to retire from the army and return and marry Sonya, Nicholas, serious, sorrowful, and at variance with his parents, but, as it seemed to him, passionately in love, left at the beginning of January to rejoin his regiment.
  • The count was more perturbed than ever by the condition of his affairs, which called for some decisive action.
  • His letters for the most part irritated her.
  • The more interesting his letters were the more vexed she felt.
  • Only the skeleton of life remained: his house, a brilliant wife who now enjoyed the favors of a very important personage, acquaintance with all Petersburg, and his court service with its dull formalities.
  • His purse was always empty because it was open to everyone.
  • As soon as he sank into his place on the sofa after two bottles of Margaux he was surrounded, and talking, disputing, and joking began.
  • When there were quarrels, his kindly smile and well-timed jests reconciled the antagonists.
  • Had he not at one time longed with all his heart to establish a republic in Russia; then himself to be a Napoleon; then to be a philosopher; and then a strategist and the conqueror of Napoleon?
  • Had he not seen the possibility of, and passionately desired, the regeneration of the sinful human race, and his own progress to the highest degree of perfection?
  • Had he not established schools and hospitals and liberated his serfs?
  • But instead of all that--here he was, the wealthy husband of an unfaithful wife, a retired gentleman-in-waiting, fond of eating and drinking and, as he unbuttoned his waistcoat, of abusing the government a bit, a member of the Moscow English Club, and a universal favorite in Moscow society.
  • We all profess the Christian law of forgiveness of injuries and love of our neighbors, the law in honor of which we have built in Moscow forty times forty churches--but yesterday a deserter was knouted to death and a minister of that same law of love and forgiveness, a priest, gave the soldier a cross to kiss before his execution.
  • Every sphere of work was connected, in his eyes, with evil and deception.
  • On coming home, while his valets were still taking off his things, he picked up a book and began to read.
  • Though the doctors warned him that with his corpulence wine was dangerous for him, he drank a great deal.
  • He was only quite at ease when having poured several glasses of wine mechanically into his large mouth he felt a pleasant warmth in his body, an amiability toward all his fellows, and a readiness to respond superficially to every idea without probing it deeply.
  • At the beginning of winter Prince Nicholas Bolkonski and his daughter moved to Moscow.
  • She did not go out into society; everyone knew that her father would not let her go anywhere without him, and his failing health prevented his going out himself, so that she was not invited to dinners and evening parties.
  • Like the old emigre who declined to marry the lady with whom he had spent his evenings for years, she regretted Julie's presence and having no one to write to.
  • Next day the prince did not say a word to his daughter, but she noticed that at dinner he gave orders that Mademoiselle Bourienne should be served first.
  • After dinner, when the footman handed coffee and from habit began with the princess, the prince suddenly grew furious, threw his stick at Philip, and instantly gave instructions to have him conscripted for the army.
  • Metivier, who came in the morning with his felicitations, considered it proper in his quality of doctor de forcer la consigne, * as he told Princess Mary, and went in to see the prince.
  • It happened that on that morning of his name day the prince was in one of his worst moods.
  • At first she heard only Metivier's voice, then her father's, then both voices began speaking at the same time, the door was flung open, and on the threshold appeared the handsome figure of the terrified Metivier with his shock of black hair, and the prince in his dressing gown and fez, his face distorted with fury and the pupils of his eyes rolled downwards.
  • Metivier, shrugging his shoulders, went up to Mademoiselle Bourienne who at the sound of shouting had run in from an adjoining room.
  • Keep calm, I will call again tomorrow, said Metivier; and putting his fingers to his lips he hastened away.
  • After Metivier's departure the old prince called his daughter in, and the whole weight of his wrath fell on her.
  • But he could not restrain himself and with the virulence of which only one who loves is capable, evidently suffering himself, he shook his fists at her and screamed:
  • Then he slammed the door, sent for Mademoiselle Bourienne, and subsided into his study.
  • These guests--the famous Count Rostopchin, Prince Lopukhin with his nephew, General Chatrov an old war comrade of the prince's, and of the younger generation Pierre and Boris Drubetskoy--awaited the prince in the drawing room.
  • The prince's house did not belong to what is known as fashionable society, but his little circle--though not much talked about in town-- was one it was more flattering to be received in than any other.
  • Boris had realized this the week before when the commander-in-chief in his presence invited Rostopchin to dinner on St. Nicholas' Day, and Rostopchin had replied that he could not come:
  • Incidents were related evidently confirming the opinion that everything was going from bad to worse, but whether telling a story or giving an opinion the speaker always stopped, or was stopped, at the point beyond which his criticism might touch the sovereign himself.
  • "The Duke of Oldenburg bears his misfortunes with admirable strength of character and resignation," remarked Boris, joining in respectfully.
  • He said this because on his journey from Petersburg he had had the honor of being presented to the Duke.
  • Prince Bolkonski glanced at the young man as if about to say something in reply, but changed his mind, evidently considering him too young.
  • There was a momentary pause in the conversation; the old general cleared his throat to draw attention.
  • Yes, I heard something: he said something awkward in His Majesty's presence.
  • "His Majesty drew attention to the Grenadier division and to the march past," continued the general, "and it seems the ambassador took no notice and allowed himself to reply that: 'We in France pay no attention to such trifles!'
  • He was here; they admitted him in spite of my request that they should let no one in, he went on, glancing angrily at his daughter.
  • And he narrated his whole conversation with the French doctor and the reasons that convinced him that Metivier was a spy.
  • He gave her a cold, angry look and offered her his wrinkled, clean- shaven cheek to kiss.
  • The whole expression of his face told her that he had not forgotten the morning's talk, that his decision remained in force, and only the presence of visitors hindered his speaking of it to her now.
  • Prince Nicholas grew more animated and expressed his views on the impending war.
  • There now, you turned Metivier out by the scruff of his neck because he is a Frenchman and a scoundrel, but our ladies crawl after him on their knees.
  • "Well, good-by, your excellency, keep well!" said Rostopchin, getting up with characteristic briskness and holding out his hand to the prince.
  • His words are music, I never tire of hearing him! said the old prince, keeping hold of the hand and offering his cheek to be kissed.
  • His words are music, I never tire of hearing him! said the old prince, keeping hold of the hand and offering his cheek to be kissed.
  • "May I stay a little longer?" he said, letting his stout body sink into an armchair beside her.
  • When they had last met on the old prince's name day, she had answered at random all his attempts to talk sentimentally, evidently not listening to what he was saying.
  • Julie on the contrary accepted his attentions readily, though in a manner peculiar to herself.
  • Boris says his soul finds repose at your house.
  • Boris smiled almost imperceptibly while listening to his mother.
  • His leave was expiring.
  • "My dear," said Anna Mikhaylovna to her son, "I know from a reliable source that Prince Vasili has sent his son to Moscow to get him married to Julie.
  • Boris began, wishing to sting her; but at that instant the galling thought occurred to him that he might have to leave Moscow without having accomplished his aim, and have vainly wasted his efforts--which was a thing he never allowed to happen.
  • He checked himself in the middle of the sentence, lowered his eyes to avoid seeing her unpleasantly irritated and irresolute face, and said:
  • He blushed hotly, raised his eyes to hers, and said:
  • The old man is here and his son's expected any day.
  • You'll have to make his acquaintance.
  • He is here too, with his wife.
  • I like him and all his family.
  • You know that old Prince Nicholas much dislikes his son's marrying.
  • When he comes, he'll find you already know his sister and father and are liked by them.
  • He well remembered the last interview he had had with the old prince at the time of the enrollment, when in reply to an invitation to dinner he had had to listen to an angry reprimand for not having provided his full quota of men.
  • He did not mention this to his daughter, but Natasha noticed her father's nervousness and anxiety and felt mortified by it.
  • And his eyes--how I see those eyes! thought Natasha.
  • And what do his father and sister matter to me?
  • He looked at the Rostovs from under his brows and said something, smiling, to his betrothed.
  • What right has he not to wish to receive me into his family?
  • In the front, in the very center, leaning back against the orchestra rail, stood Dolokhov in a Persian dress, his curly hair brushed up into a huge shock.
  • Count Rostov resumed his seat.
  • Though the performance was proceeding, he walked deliberately down the carpeted gangway, his sword and spurs slightly jingling and his handsome perfumed head held high.
  • Having looked at Natasha he approached his sister, laid his well gloved hand on the edge of her box, nodded to her, and leaning forward asked a question, with a motion toward Natasha.
  • "Mais charmante!" said he, evidently referring to Natasha, who did not exactly hear his words but understood them from the movement of his lips.
  • Then he took his place in the first row of the stalls and sat down beside Dolokhov, nudging with his elbow in a friendly and offhand way that Dolokhov whom others treated so fawningly.
  • He winked at him gaily, smiled, and rested his foot against the orchestra screen.
  • Shinshin, lowering his voice, began to tell the count of some intrigue of Kuragin's in Moscow, and Natasha tried to overhear it just because he had said she was "charmante."
  • His face looked sad, and he had grown still stouter since Natasha last saw him.
  • When he got there he leaned on his elbows and, smiling, talked to her for a long time.
  • During this act every time Natasha looked toward the stalls she saw Anatole Kuragin with an arm thrown across the back of his chair, staring at her.
  • The king waved his right arm and, evidently nervous, sang something badly and sat down on a crimson throne.
  • She sang something mournfully, addressing the queen, but the king waved his arm severely, and men and women with bare legs came in from both sides and began dancing all together.
  • The cymbals and horns in the orchestra struck up more loudly, and this man with bare legs jumped very high and waved his feet about very rapidly.
  • While saying this he never removed his smiling eyes from her face, her neck, and her bare arms.
  • When she was not looking at him she felt that he was looking at her shoulders, and she involuntarily caught his eye so that he should look into hers rather than this.
  • But looking into his eyes she was frightened, realizing that there was not that barrier of modesty she had always felt between herself and other men.
  • Do come!" and putting out his hand to her bouquet and dropping his voice, he added, "You will be the prettiest there.
  • Natasha did not understand what he was saying any more than he did himself, but she felt that his incomprehensible words had an improper intention.
  • She did not know what to say and turned away as if she had not heard his remark.
  • She smiled just as he was doing, gazing straight into his eyes.
  • In the fourth act there was some sort of devil who sang waving his arm about, till the boards were withdrawn from under him and he disappeared down below.
  • His father announced to him that he would now pay half his debts for the last time, but only on condition that he went to Moscow as adjutant to the commander-in-chief--a post his father had procured for him--and would at last try to make a good match there.
  • His father announced to him that he would now pay half his debts for the last time, but only on condition that he went to Moscow as adjutant to the commander-in-chief--a post his father had procured for him--and would at last try to make a good match there.
  • Pierre received him unwillingly at first, but got used to him after a while, sometimes even accompanied him on his carousals, and gave him money under the guise of loans.
  • As Shinshin had remarked, from the time of his arrival Anatole had turned the heads of the Moscow ladies, especially by the fact that he slighted them and plainly preferred the gypsy girls and French actresses--with the chief of whom, Mademoiselle George, he was said to be on intimate relations.
  • There was talk of his intrigues with some of the ladies, and he flirted with a few of them at the balls.
  • There was a special reason for this, as he had got married two years before--a fact known only to his most intimate friends.
  • At that time while with his regiment in Poland, a Polish landowner of small means had forced him to marry his daughter.
  • Anatole had very soon abandoned his wife and, for a payment which he agreed to send to his father-in-law, had arranged to be free to pass himself off as a bachelor.
  • Anatole was always content with his position, with himself, and with others.
  • He was instinctively and thoroughly convinced that it was impossible for him to live otherwise than as he did and that he had never in his life done anything base.
  • More than once he had vexed his father by spoiling his own career, and he laughed at distinctions of all kinds.
  • Dolokhov, who had reappeared that year in Moscow after his exile and his Persian adventures, and was leading a life of luxury, gambling, and dissipation, associated with his old Petersburg comrade Kuragin and made use of him for his own ends.
  • Anatole was sincerely fond of Dolokhov for his cleverness and audacity.
  • Dolokhov, who needed Anatole Kuragin's name, position, and connections as a bait to draw rich young men into his gambling set, made use of him and amused himself at his expense without letting the other feel it.
  • At supper after the opera he described to Dolokhov with the air of a connoisseur the attractions of her arms, shoulders, feet, and hair and expressed his intention of making love to her.
  • Anatole had no notion and was incapable of considering what might come of such love-making, as he never had any notion of the outcome of any of his actions.
  • The count decided not to sit down to cards or let his girls out of his sight and to get away as soon as Mademoiselle George's performance was over.
  • "Come, come, Natasha!" said the count, as he turned back for his daughter.
  • Wherever she went and whomever she was speaking to, she felt his eyes upon her.
  • Can I never...? and, blocking her path, he brought his face close to hers.
  • His large, glittering, masculine eyes were so close to hers that she saw nothing but them.
  • He took it into his head to begin shouting, but I am not one to be shouted down.
  • If the old man came round it would be all the better to visit him in Moscow or at Bald Hills later on; and if not, the wedding, against his wishes, could only be arranged at Otradnoe.
  • But if he won't--that's his affair, said Marya Dmitrievna, looking for something in her reticule.
  • He is an invalid and an old man who must be forgiven; but he is good and magnanimous and will love her who makes his son happy.
  • As soon as I saw him I felt he was my master and I his slave, and that I could not help loving him.
  • Why, you have read his letter and you have seen him.
  • If he is an honorable man he should either declare his intentions or cease seeing you; and if you won't do this, I will.
  • On Friday the Rostovs were to return to the country, but on Wednesday the count went with the prospective purchaser to his estate near Moscow.
  • Anatole had a passport, an order for post horses, ten thousand rubles he had taken from his sister and another ten thousand borrowed with Dolokhov's help.
  • Two witnesses for the mock marriage--Khvostikov, a retired petty official whom Dolokhov made use of in his gambling transactions, and Makarin, a retired hussar, a kindly, weak fellow who had an unbounded affection for Kuragin--were sitting at tea in Dolokhov's front room.
  • In his large study, the walls of which were hung to the ceiling with Persian rugs, bearskins, and weapons, sat Dolokhov in a traveling cloak and high boots, at an open desk on which lay an abacus and some bundles of paper money.
  • Anatole, with uniform unbuttoned, walked to and fro from the room where the witnesses were sitting, through the study to the room behind, where his French valet and others were packing the last of his things.
  • Dolokhov banged down the lid of his desk and turned to Anatole with an ironic smile:
  • Anatole returned and looked at Dolokhov, trying to give him his attention and evidently submitting to him involuntarily.
  • "Go to the devil!" cried Anatole and, clutching his hair, left the room, but returned at once and dropped into an armchair in front of Dolokhov with his feet turned under him.
  • He took Dolokhov's hand and put it on his heart.
  • He glanced at his watch.
  • Anatole lay on the sofa in the study leaning on his elbow and smiling pensively, while his handsome lips muttered tenderly to himself.
  • Balaga was a famous troyka driver who had known Dolokhov and Anatole some six years and had given them good service with his troykas.
  • In their service he risked his skin and his life twenty times a year, and in their service had lost more horses than the money he had from them would buy.
  • He liked giving a painful lash on the neck to some peasant who, more dead than alive, was already hurrying out of his way.
  • Anatole and Dolokhov liked Balaga too for his masterly driving and because he liked the things they liked.
  • With others Balaga bargained, charging twenty-five rubles for a two hours' drive, and rarely drove himself, generally letting his young men do so.
  • But with "his gentlemen" he always drove himself and never demanded anything for his work.
  • "Good day, your excellency!" he said, again holding out his hand to Anatole who had just come in.
  • "I say, Balaga," said Anatole, putting his hands on the man's shoulders, "do you care for me or not?
  • Don't make jokes! cried Anatole, suddenly rolling his eyes.
  • After refusing it for manners' sake, he drank it and wiped his mouth with a red silk handkerchief he took out of his cap.
  • Anatole looked at his watch.
  • Anatole went out of the room and returned a few minutes later wearing a fur coat girt with a silver belt, and a sable cap jauntily set on one side and very becoming to his handsome face.
  • Though they were all going with him, Anatole evidently wished to make something touching and solemn out of this address to his comrades.
  • He spoke slowly in a loud voice and throwing out his chest slightly swayed one leg.
  • Hurrah!... he cried, and emptying his glass flung it on the floor.
  • "To your health!" said Balaga who also emptied his glass, and wiped his mouth with his handkerchief.
  • Makarin embraced Anatole with tears in his eyes.
  • Joseph, his valet, handed him his sabretache and saber, and they all went out into the vestibule.
  • Hey, Matrena, the sable! he shouted so that his voice rang far through the rooms.
  • Balaga took his seat in the front one and holding his elbows high arranged the reins deliberately.
  • "Go!" he cried, twisting the reins round his hands, and the troyka tore down the Nikitski Boulevard.
  • "Come to the mistress, please," said the footman in his deep bass, intercepting any retreat.
  • Who hindered his coming to the house?
  • Next day Count Rostov returned from his estate near Moscow in time for lunch as he had promised.
  • From the pretense of illness, from his daughter's distress, and by the embarrassed faces of Sonya and Marya Dmitrievna, the count saw clearly that something had gone wrong during his absence, but it was so terrible for him to think that anything disgraceful had happened to his beloved daughter, and he so prized his own cheerful tranquillity, that he avoided inquiries and tried to assure himself that nothing particularly had happened; and he was only dissatisfied that her indisposition delayed their return to the country.
  • Soon after the Rostovs came to Moscow the effect Natasha had on him made him hasten to carry out his intention.
  • When he returned to Moscow Pierre was handed a letter from Marya Dmitrievna asking him to come and see her on a matter of great importance relating to Andrew Bolkonski and his betrothed.
  • "If only Prince Andrew would hurry up and come and marry her!" thought he on his way to the house.
  • Pierre raised his head.
  • In a sleigh drawn by two gray trotting-horses that were bespattering the dashboard with snow, Anatole and his constant companion Makarin dashed past.
  • Anatole was sitting upright in the classic pose of military dandies, the lower part of his face hidden by his beaver collar and his head slightly bent.
  • His face was fresh and rosy, his white-plumed hat, tilted to one side, disclosed his curled and pomaded hair besprinkled with powdery snow.
  • His face was fresh and rosy, his white-plumed hat, tilted to one side, disclosed his curled and pomaded hair besprinkled with powdery snow.
  • In Marya Dmitrievna's anteroom the footman who helped him off with his fur coat said that the mistress asked him to come to her bedroom.
  • Pierre raised his shoulders and listened open-mouthed to what was told him, scarcely able to believe his own ears.
  • He thought of his wife.
  • But still he pitied Prince Andrew to the point of tears and sympathized with his wounded pride, and the more he pitied his friend the more did he think with contempt and even with disgust of that Natasha who had just passed him in the ballroom with such a look of cold dignity.
  • Pierre saw that the count was much upset and tried to change the subject, but the count returned to his troubles.
  • And clutching the spare gray locks on his temples the count left the room.
  • "Natalya Ilynichna," Pierre began, dropping his eyes with a feeling of pity for her and loathing for the thing he had to do, "whether it is true or not should make no difference to you, because..."
  • Pierre gave his word of honor.
  • He drove through the town seeking Anatole Kuragin, at the thought of whom now the blood rushed to his heart and he felt a difficulty in breathing.
  • Pierre felt it strange to see this calm, indifferent crowd of people unaware of what was going on in his soul.
  • In the evening he drove to his sister's to discuss with her how to arrange a meeting.
  • When Pierre returned home after vainly hunting all over Moscow, his valet informed him that Prince Anatole was with the countess.
  • Pierre without greeting his wife whom he had not seen since his return-- at that moment she was more repulsive to him than ever--entered the drawing room and seeing Anatole went up to him.
  • "Where you are, there is vice and evil!" said Pierre to his wife.
  • Anatole glanced round at his sister and rose submissively, ready to follow Pierre.
  • Anatole followed him with his usual jaunty step but his face betrayed anxiety.
  • Having entered his study Pierre closed the door and addressed Anatole without looking at him.
  • He seized Anatole by the collar of his uniform with his big hand and shook him from side to side till Anatole's face showed a sufficient degree of terror.
  • Anatole glanced at him and immediately thrust his hand into his pocket and drew out his pocketbook.
  • Pierre took the letter Anatole handed him and, pushing aside a table that stood in his way, threw himself on the sofa.
  • Anatole sat at a table frowning and biting his lips.
  • "I don't know about that, eh?" said Anatole, growing more confident as Pierre mastered his wrath.
  • "I don't know that and don't want to," he said, not looking at Pierre and with a slight tremor of his lower jaw, "but you have used such words to me--'mean' and so on--which as a man of honor I can't allow anyone to use."
  • The expression of that base and cringing smile, which Pierre knew so well in his wife, revolted him.
  • It seemed to Pierre that it was his duty to conceal the whole affair and re-establish Natasha's reputation.
  • He seemed in better spirits than usual and awaited his son with great impatience.
  • Some days after Anatole's departure Pierre received a note from Prince Andrew, informing him of his arrival and asking him to come to see him.
  • As soon as he reached Moscow, Prince Andrew had received from his father Natasha's note to Princess Mary breaking off her engagement (Mademoiselle Bourienne had purloined it from Princess Mary and given it to the old prince), and he heard from him the story of Natasha's elopement, with additions.
  • She sighed, looking toward the door of the room where Prince Andrew was, evidently intending to express her sympathy with his sorrow, but Pierre saw by her face that she was glad both at what had happened and at the way her brother had taken the news of Natasha's faithlessness.
  • I know his pride will not let him express his feelings, but still he has taken it better, far better, than I expected.
  • His face quivered and immediately assumed a vindictive expression.
  • Still getting stouter? he said with animation, but the new wrinkle on his forehead deepened.
  • Pierre now recognized in his friend a need with which he was only too familiar, to get excited and to have arguments about extraneous matters in order to stifle thoughts that were too oppressive and too intimate.
  • His face was gloomy and his lips compressed.
  • His face was gloomy and his lips compressed.
  • Pierre saw that Prince Andrew was going to speak of Natasha, and his broad face expressed pity and sympathy.
  • "I much regret her illness," said Prince Andrew; and he smiled like his father, coldly, maliciously, and unpleasantly.
  • "So Monsieur Kuragin has not honored Countess Rostova with his hand?" said Prince Andrew, and he snorted several times.
  • Prince Andrew laughed disagreeably, again reminding one of his father.
  • Prince Andrew talked incessantly, arguing now with his father, now with the Swiss tutor Dessalles, and showing an unnatural animation, the cause of which Pierre so well understood.
  • Till then he had reproached her in his heart and tried to despise her, but he now felt so sorry for her that there was no room in his soul for reproach.
  • He felt the tears trickle under his spectacles and hoped they would not be noticed.
  • "We won't speak of it any more, my dear," said Pierre, and his gentle, cordial tone suddenly seemed very strange to Natasha.
  • But when he said it he was amazed at his own words.
  • Pierre too when she had gone almost ran into the anteroom, restraining tears of tenderness and joy that choked him, and without finding the sleeves of his fur cloak threw it on and got into his sleigh.
  • "Home!" said Pierre, and despite twenty-two degrees of frost Fahrenheit he threw open the bearskin cloak from his broad chest and inhaled the air with joy.
  • At the entrance to the Arbat Square an immense expanse of dark starry sky presented itself to his eyes.
  • It seemed to Pierre that this comet fully responded to what was passing in his own softened and uplifted soul, now blossoming into a new life.
  • The higher a man stands on the social ladder, the more people he is connected with and the more power he has over others, the more evident is the predestination and inevitability of his every action.
  • * "To shed (or not to shed) the blood of his peoples."
  • Before leaving, Napoleon showed favor to the emperor, kings, and princes who had deserved it, reprimanded the kings and princes with whom he was dissatisfied, presented pearls and diamonds of his own--that is, which he had taken from other kings--to the Empress of Austria, and having, as his historian tells us, tenderly embraced the Empress Marie Louise--who regarded him as her husband, though he had left another wife in Paris--left her grieved by the parting which she seemed hardly able to bear.
  • Early in the morning of the twelfth of June he came out of his tent, which was pitched that day on the steep left bank of the Niemen, and looked through a spyglass at the streams of his troops pouring out of the Vilkavisski forest and flowing over the three bridges thrown across the river.
  • Without lifting his head he said something, and two of his aides-de-camp galloped off to the Polish uhlans.
  • The colonel of the Polish uhlans, a handsome old man, flushed and, fumbling in his speech from excitement, asked the aide-de-camp whether he would be permitted to swim the river with his uhlans instead of seeking a ford.
  • He gave an angry thrust to his horse, which had grown restive under him, and plunged into the water, heading for the deepest part where the current was swift.
  • For him it was no new conviction that his presence in any part of the world, from Africa to the steppes of Muscovy alike, was enough to dumfound people and impel them to insane self-oblivion.
  • He called for his horse and rode to his quarters.
  • The colonel and some of his men got across and with difficulty clambered out on the further bank.
  • All the efforts of those who surrounded the sovereign seemed directed merely to making him spend his time pleasantly and forget that war was impending.
  • The Emperor gave his consent.
  • The very day that Napoleon issued the order to cross the Niemen, and his vanguard, driving off the Cossacks, crossed the Russian frontier, Alexander spent the evening at the entertainment given by his aides-de- camp at Bennigsen's country house.
  • Boris was now a rich man who had risen to high honors and no longer sought patronage but stood on an equal footing with the highest of those of his own age.
  • Arakcheev looked at the Emperor from under his brow and, sniffing with his red nose, stepped forward from the crowd as if expecting the Emperor to address him.
  • But the Emperor and Balashev passed out into the illuminated garden without noticing Arakcheev who, holding his sword and glancing wrathfully around, followed some twenty paces behind them.
  • He was satisfied with the form in which he had expressed his thoughts, but displeased that Boris had overheard it.
  • Boris understood that this was meant for him and, closing his eyes, slightly bowed his head.
  • On first receiving the news, under the influence of indignation and resentment the Emperor had found a phrase that pleased him, fully expressed his feelings, and has since become famous.
  • Yesterday I learned that, despite the loyalty with which I have kept my engagements with Your Majesty, your troops have crossed the Russian frontier, and I have this moment received from Petersburg a note, in which Count Lauriston informs me, as a reason for this aggression, that Your Majesty has considered yourself to be in a state of war with me from the time Prince Kuragin asked for his passports.
  • The reasons on which the Duc de Bassano based his refusal to deliver them to him would never have led me to suppose that that could serve as a pretext for aggression.
  • In fact, the ambassador, as he himself has declared, was never authorized to make that demand, and as soon as I was informed of it I let him know how much I disapproved of it and ordered him to remain at his post.
  • At two in the morning of the fourteenth of June, the Emperor, having sent for Balashev and read him his letter to Napoleon, ordered him to take it and hand it personally to the French Emperor.
  • The noncommissioned officer began talking with his comrades about regimental matters without looking at the Russian general.
  • A French colonel of hussars, who had evidently just left his bed, came riding from the village on a handsome sleek gray horse, accompanied by two hussars.
  • The colonel said that the commander of the division was a mile and a quarter away and would receive Balashev and conduct him to his destination.
  • In front of the group, on a black horse with trappings that glittered in the sun, rode a tall man with plumes in his hat and black hair curling down to his shoulders.
  • He wore a red mantle, and stretched his long legs forward in French fashion.
  • This man rode toward Balashev at a gallop, his plumes flowing and his gems and gold lace glittering in the bright June sunshine.
  • On seeing the Russian general he threw back his head, with its long hair curling to his shoulders, in a majestically royal manner, and looked inquiringly at the French colonel.
  • The colonel respectfully informed His Majesty of Balashev's mission, whose name he could not pronounce.
  • As soon as the King began to speak loud and fast his royal dignity instantly forsook him, and without noticing it he passed into his natural tone of good-natured familiarity.
  • He laid his hand on the withers of Balashev's horse and said:
  • He dismounted, took Balashev's arm, and moving a few steps away from his suite, which waited respectfully, began to pace up and down with him, trying to speak significantly.
  • He referred to the fact that the Emperor Napoleon had resented the demand that he should withdraw his troops from Prussia, especially when that demand became generally known and the dignity of France was thereby offended.
  • And he went on to inquiries about the Grand Duke and the state of his health, and to reminiscences of the gay and amusing times he had spent with him in Naples.
  • This inevitability alone can explain how the cruel Arakcheev, who tore out a grenadier's mustache with his own hands, whose weak nerves rendered him unable to face danger, and who was neither an educated man nor a courtier, was able to maintain his powerful position with Alexander, whose own character was chivalrous, noble, and gentle.
  • He became still more absorbed in his task when the Russian general entered, and after glancing over his spectacles at Balashev's face, which was animated by the beauty of the morning and by his talk with Murat, he did not rise or even stir, but scowled still more and sneered malevolently.
  • When he noticed in Balashev's face the disagreeable impression this reception produced, Davout raised his head and coldly asked what he wanted.
  • Contrary to his expectation, Davout, after hearing him, became still surlier and ruder.
  • "You are perfectly at liberty to treat me with respect or not," protested Balashev, "but permit me to observe that I have the honor to be adjutant general to His Majesty...."
  • "You will be treated as is fitting," said he and, putting the packet in his pocket, left the shed.
  • Four days before, sentinels of the Preobrazhensk regiment had stood in front of the house to which Balashev was conducted, and now two French grenadiers stood there in blue uniforms unfastened in front and with shaggy caps on their heads, and an escort of hussars and uhlans and a brilliant suite of aides-de-camp, pages, and generals, who were waiting for Napoleon to come out, were standing at the porch, round his saddle horse and his Mameluke, Rustan.
  • Napoleon received Balashev in the very house in Vilna from which Alexander had dispatched him on his mission.
  • Duroc said that Napoleon would receive the Russian general before going for his ride.
  • Balashev went into a small reception room, one door of which led into a study, the very one from which the Russian Emperor had dispatched him on his mission.
  • He had just finished dressing for his ride, and wore a blue uniform, opening in front over a white waistcoat so long that it covered his rotund stomach, white leather breeches tightly fitting the fat thighs of his short legs, and Hessian boots.
  • His short hair had evidently just been brushed, but one lock hung down in the middle of his broad forehead.
  • His short hair had evidently just been brushed, but one lock hung down in the middle of his broad forehead.
  • His plump white neck stood out sharply above the black collar of his uniform, and he smelled of Eau de Cologne.
  • His plump white neck stood out sharply above the black collar of his uniform, and he smelled of Eau de Cologne.
  • His full face, rather young-looking, with its prominent chin, wore a gracious and majestic expression of imperial welcome.
  • He entered briskly, with a jerk at every step and his head slightly thrown back.
  • His whole short corpulent figure with broad thick shoulders, and chest and stomach involuntarily protruding, had that imposing and stately appearance one sees in men of forty who live in comfort.
  • He glanced with his large eyes into Balashav's face and immediately looked past him.
  • Evidently only what took place within his own mind interested him.
  • Nothing outside himself had any significance for him, because everything in the world, it seemed to him, depended entirely on his will.
  • And he began clearly and concisely to explain his reasons for dissatisfaction with the Russian government.
  • Here Balashev hesitated: he remembered the words the Emperor Alexander had not written in his letter, but had specially inserted in the rescript to Saltykov and had told Balashev to repeat to Napoleon.
  • During the speech that followed, Balashev, who more than once lowered his eyes, involuntarily noticed the quivering of Napoleon's left leg which increased the more Napoleon raised his voice.
  • The latter bowed his head respectfully.
  • Balashev noticed that his left leg was quivering faster than before and his face seemed petrified in its stern expression.
  • This quivering of his left leg was a thing Napoleon was conscious of.
  • Napoleon almost screamed, quite to his own surprise.
  • But who first joined his army?
  • What has she given you? he continued hurriedly, evidently no longer trying to show the advantages of peace and discuss its possibility, but only to prove his own rectitude and power and Alexander's errors and duplicity.
  • But he had begun talking, and the more he talked the less could he control his words.
  • The whole purport of his remarks now was evidently to exalt himself and insult Alexander--just what he had least desired at the commencement of the interview.
  • Balashev bowed his head affirmatively.
  • Oh, what a splendid reign! he repeated several times, then paused, drew from his pocket a gold snuffbox, lifted it to his nose, and greedily sniffed at it.
  • Barclay is said to be the most capable of them all, but I cannot say so, judging by his first movements.
  • I give you my word of honor," said Napoleon, forgetting that his word of honor could carry no weight--"I give you my word of honor that I have five hundred and thirty thousand men this side of the Vistula.
  • Napoleon grinned maliciously and again raised his snuffbox to his nose.
  • To the alleged insanity of the Swedes, Balashev wished to reply that when Russia is on her side Sweden is practically an island: but Napoleon gave an angry exclamation to drown his voice.
  • Balashev began to feel uncomfortable: as envoy he feared to demean his dignity and felt the necessity of replying; but, as a man, he shrank before the transport of groundless wrath that had evidently seized Napoleon.
  • He knew that none of the words now uttered by Napoleon had any significance, and that Napoleon himself would be ashamed of them when he came to his senses.
  • "Know that if you stir up Prussia against me, I'll wipe it off the map of Europe!" he declared, his face pale and distorted by anger, and he struck one of his small hands energetically with the other.
  • And he walked silently several times up and down the room, his fat shoulders twitching.
  • When Balashev had ended, Napoleon again took out his snuffbox, sniffed at it, and stamped his foot twice on the floor as a signal.
  • The door opened, a gentleman-in-waiting, bending respectfully, handed the Emperor his hat and gloves; another brought him a pocket handkerchief.
  • But, to his surprise, Balashev received, through Duroc, an invitation to dine with the Emperor that day.
  • He not only showed no sign of constraint or self-reproach on account of his outburst that morning, but, on the contrary, tried to reassure Balashev.
  • The Emperor was in very good spirits after his ride through Vilna, where crowds of people had rapturously greeted and followed him.
  • From all the windows of the streets through which he rode, rugs, flags, and his monogram were displayed, and the Polish ladies, welcoming him, waved their handkerchiefs to him.
  • In the course of conversation he mentioned Moscow and questioned Balashev about the Russian capital, not merely as an interested traveler asks about a new city he intends to visit, but as if convinced that Balashev, as a Russian, must be flattered by his curiosity.
  • So little was his rejoinder appreciated that Napoleon did not notice it at all and naively asked Balashev through what towns the direct road from there to Moscow passed.
  • Napoleon sat down, toying with his Sevres coffee cup, and motioned Balashev to a chair beside him.
  • Napoleon was in that well-known after-dinner mood which, more than any reasoned cause, makes a man contented with himself and disposed to consider everyone his friend.
  • It seemed to him that he was surrounded by men who adored him: and he felt convinced that, after his dinner, Balashev too was his friend and worshiper.
  • Balashev made no reply and bowed his head in silence.
  • Has he not thought that I may do the same? and he turned inquiringly to Balashev, and evidently this thought turned him back on to the track of his morning's anger, which was still fresh in him.
  • "And let him know that I will do so!" said Napoleon, rising and pushing his cup away with his hand.
  • I'll drive all his Wurttemberg, Baden, and Weimar relations out of Germany....
  • Balashev bowed his head with an air indicating that he would like to make his bow and leave, and only listened because he could not help hearing what was said to him.
  • "Are the horses ready for the general?" he added, with a slight inclination of his head in reply to Balashev's bow.
  • After his interview with Pierre in Moscow, Prince Andrew went to Petersburg, on business as he told his family, but really to meet Anatole Kuragin whom he felt it necessary to encounter.
  • Pierre had warned his brother-in-law that Prince Andrew was on his track.
  • Not only could he no longer think the thoughts that had first come to him as he lay gazing at the sky on the field of Austerlitz and had later enlarged upon with Pierre, and which had filled his solitude at Bogucharovo and then in Switzerland and Rome, but he even dreaded to recall them and the bright and boundless horizons they had revealed.
  • He was now concerned only with the nearest practical matters unrelated to his past interests, and he seized on these the more eagerly the more those past interests were closed to him.
  • As a general on duty on Kutuzov's staff, he applied himself to business with zeal and perseverance and surprised Kutuzov by his willingness and accuracy in work.
  • Kutuzov, who was already weary of Bolkonski's activity which seemed to reproach his own idleness, very readily let him go and gave him a mission to Barclay de Tolly.
  • Before joining the Western Army which was then, in May, encamped at Drissa, Prince Andrew visited Bald Hills which was directly on his way, being only two miles off the Smolensk highroad.
  • He had grown, become rosier, had curly dark hair, and, when merry and laughing, quite unconsciously lifted the upper lip of his pretty little mouth just as the little princess used to do.
  • The household was divided into two alien and hostile camps, who changed their habits for his sake and only met because he was there.
  • During his stay at Bald Hills all the family dined together, but they were ill at ease and Prince Andrew felt that he was a visitor for whose sake an exception was being made and that his presence made them all feel awkward.
  • The old prince knew very well that he tormented his daughter and that her life was very hard, but he also knew that he could not help tormenting her and that she deserved it.
  • Why does Prince Andrew, who sees this, say nothing to me about his sister?
  • Does he think me a scoundrel, or an old fool who, without any reason, keeps his own daughter at a distance and attaches this Frenchwoman to himself?
  • And he began explaining why he could not put up with his daughter's unreasonable character.
  • That day he did not see his father, who did not leave his room and admitted no one but Mademoiselle Bourienne and Tikhon, but asked several times whether his son had gone.
  • Next day, before leaving, Prince Andrew went to his son's rooms.
  • The boy, curly- headed like his mother and glowing with health, sat on his knee, and Prince Andrew began telling him the story of Bluebeard, but fell into a reverie without finishing the story.
  • He thought not of this pretty child, his son whom he held on his knee, but of himself.
  • He sought in himself either remorse for having angered his father or regret at leaving home for the first time in his life on bad terms with him, and was horrified to find neither.
  • What meant still more to him was that he sought and did not find in himself the former tenderness for his son which he had hoped to reawaken by caressing the boy and taking him on his knee.
  • "Well, go on!" said his son.
  • Prince Andrew, without replying, put him down from his knee and went out of the room.
  • "So you've decided to go, Andrew?" asked his sister.
  • She understood that when speaking of "trash" he referred not only to Mademoiselle Bourienne, the cause of her misery, but also to the man who had ruined his own happiness.
  • Men are His tools.
  • Men are His instruments, they are not to blame.
  • She, poor innocent creature, is left to be victimized by an old man who has outlived his wits.
  • His mind was occupied by the interests of the center that was conducting a gigantic war, and he was glad to be free for a while from the distraction caused by the thought of Kuragin.
  • Already from his military experience and what he had seen in the Austrian campaign, he had come to the conclusion that in war the most deeply considered plans have no significance and that all depends on the way unexpected movements of the enemy--that cannot be foreseen--are met, and on how and by whom the whole matter is handled.
  • To clear up this last point for himself, Prince Andrew, utilizing his position and acquaintances, tried to fathom the character of the control of the army and of the men and parties engaged in it, and he deduced for himself the following of the state of affairs.
  • It was this: the Emperor did not assume the title of commander-in-chief, but disposed of all the armies; the men around him were his assistants.
  • Of a fourth opinion the most conspicuous representative was the Tsarevich, who could not forget his disillusionment at Austerlitz, where he had ridden out at the head of the Guards, in his casque and cavalry uniform as to a review, expecting to crush the French gallantly; but unexpectedly finding himself in the front line had narrowly escaped amid the general confusion.
  • They feared Napoleon, recognized his strength and their own weakness, and frankly said so.
  • If Barclay is now to be superseded by Bennigsen all will be lost, for Bennigsen showed his incapacity already in 1807.
  • A man who simply wished to retain his lucrative post would today agree with Pfuel, tomorrow with his opponent, and the day after, merely to avoid responsibility or to please the Emperor, would declare that he had no opinion at all on the matter.
  • Another who wished to gain some advantage would attract the Emperor's attention by loudly advocating the very thing the Emperor had hinted at the day before, and would dispute and shout at the council, beating his breast and challenging those who did not agree with him to duels, thereby proving that he was prepared to sacrifice himself for the common good.
  • A third, in the absence of opponents, between two councils would simply solicit a special gratuity for his faithful services, well knowing that at that moment people would be too busy to refuse him.
  • That arousing of the people by their sovereign and his call to them to defend their country--the very incitement which was the chief cause of Russia's triumph in so far as it was produced by the Tsar's personal presence in Moscow--was suggested to the Emperor, and accepted by him, as a pretext for quitting the army.
  • Chernyshev was sitting at a window in the first room with a French novel in his hand.
  • At first sight, Pfuel, in his ill-made uniform of a Russian general, which fitted him badly like a fancy costume, seemed familiar to Prince Andrew, though he saw him now for the first time.
  • His face was much wrinkled and his eyes deep set.
  • His face was much wrinkled and his eyes deep set.
  • Awkwardly holding up his sword, he addressed Chernyshev and asked in German where the Emperor was.
  • He nodded hurriedly in reply to Chernyshev, and smiled ironically on hearing that the sovereign was inspecting the fortifications that he, Pfuel, had planned in accord with his theory.
  • From this short interview with Pfuel, Prince Andrew, thanks to his Austerlitz experiences, was able to form a clear conception of the man.
  • The unbrushed tufts of hair sticking up behind and the hastily brushed hair on his temples expressed this most eloquently.
  • He passed into the next room, and the deep, querulous sounds of his voice were at once heard from there.
  • Prince Andrew's eyes were still following Pfuel out of the room when Count Bennigsen entered hurriedly, and nodding to Bolkonski, but not pausing, went into the study, giving instructions to his adjutant as he went.
  • Marquis Paulucci was talking to him with particular warmth and the Emperor, with his head bent to the left, was listening with a dissatisfied air.
  • Some disputed his arguments, others defended them.
  • Young Count Toll objected to the Swedish general's views more warmly than anyone else, and in the course of the dispute drew from his side pocket a well-filled notebook, which he asked permission to read to them.
  • During all these discussions Pfuel and his interpreter, Wolzogen (his "bridge" in court relations), were silent.
  • So when Prince Volkonski, who was in the chair, called on him to give his opinion, he merely said:
  • But when Volkonski said, with a frown, that it was in the Emperor's name that he asked his opinion, Pfuel rose and, suddenly growing animated, began to speak:
  • The principles laid down by me must be strictly adhered to, said he, drumming on the table with his bony fingers.
  • Wolzogen took his place and continued to explain his views in French, every now and then turning to Pfuel and saying, "Is it not so, your excellency?"
  • But Pfuel, like a man heated in a fight who strikes those on his own side, shouted angrily at his own supporter, Wolzogen:
  • He was ridiculous, and unpleasantly sarcastic, but yet he inspired involuntary respect by his boundless devotion to an idea.
  • From the tone in which the courtiers addressed him and the way Paulucci had allowed himself to speak of him to the Emperor, but above all from a certain desperation in Pfuel's own expressions, it was clear that the others knew, and Pfuel himself felt, that his fall was at hand.
  • And despite his self-confidence and grumpy German sarcasm he was pitiable, with his hair smoothly brushed on the temples and sticking up in tufts behind.
  • Though he concealed the fact under a show of irritation and contempt, he was evidently in despair that the sole remaining chance of verifying his theory by a huge experiment and proving its soundness to the whole world was slipping away from him.
  • At the review next day the Emperor asked Prince Andrew where he would like to serve, and Prince Andrew lost his standing in court circles forever by not asking to remain attached to the sovereign's person, but for permission to serve in the army.
  • Before the beginning of the campaign, Rostov had received a letter from his parents in which they told him briefly of Natasha's illness and the breaking off of her engagement to Prince Andrew (which they explained by Natasha's having rejected him) and again asked Nicholas to retire from the army and return home.
  • On receiving this letter, Nicholas did not even make any attempt to get leave of absence or to retire from the army, but wrote to his parents that he was sorry Natasha was ill and her engagement broken off, and that he would do all he could to meet their wishes.
  • But now the campaign was beginning, and he had to remain with his regiment.
  • Rostov remembered Sventsyani, because on the first day of their arrival at that small town he changed his sergeant major and was unable to manage all the drunken men of his squadron who, unknown to him, had appropriated five barrels of old beer.
  • Rostov, smoking his pipe and turning his head about as the water trickled down his neck, listened inattentively, with an occasional glance at Ilyin, who was pressing close to him.
  • He recounted how Raevski had led his two sons onto the dam under terrific fire and had charged with them beside him.
  • And so he did not like Zdrzhinski's tale, nor did he like Zdrzhinski himself who, with his mustaches extending over his cheeks, bent low over the face of his hearer, as was his habit, and crowded Rostov in the narrow shanty.
  • And why expose his own children in the battle?
  • But he did not express his thoughts, for in such matters, too, he had gained experience.
  • The doctor, whether from lack of means or because he did not like to part from his young wife in the early days of their marriage, took her about with him wherever the hussar regiment went and his jealousy had become a standing joke among the hussar officers.
  • Rostov threw his cloak over his shoulders, shouted to Lavrushka to follow with the things, and--now slipping in the mud, now splashing right through it--set off with Ilyin in the lessening rain and the darkness that was occasionally rent by distant lightning.
  • She, seeing herself surrounded by such brilliant and polite young men, beamed with satisfaction, try as she might to hide it, and perturbed as she evidently was each time her husband moved in his sleep behind her.
  • Rostov received his tumbler, and adding some rum to it asked Mary Hendrikhovna to stir it.
  • His face was sad and depressed.
  • "No, gentlemen, you have had your sleep, but I have not slept for two nights," replied the doctor, and he sat down morosely beside his wife, waiting for the game to end.
  • Seeing his gloomy face as he frowned at his wife, the officers grew still merrier, and some of them could not refrain from laughter, for which they hurriedly sought plausible pretexts.
  • When he had gone, taking his wife with him, and had settled down with her in their covered cart, the officers lay down in the tavern, covering themselves with their wet cloaks, but they did not sleep for a long time; now they exchanged remarks, recalling the doctor's uneasiness and his wife's delight, now they ran out into the porch and reported what was taking place in the covered trap.
  • But Rostov went off to his squadron without waiting for tea.
  • As they left the tavern in the twilight of the dawn, Rostov and Ilyin both glanced under the wet and glistening leather hood of the doctor's cart, from under the apron of which his feet were sticking out, and in the middle of which his wife's nightcap was visible and her sleepy breathing audible.
  • Now he rode beside Ilyin under the birch trees, occasionally plucking leaves from a branch that met his hand, sometimes touching his horse's side with his foot, or, without turning round, handing a pipe he had finished to an hussar riding behind him, with as calm and careless an air as though he were merely out for a ride.
  • Count Ostermann with his suite rode up behind the squadron, halted, spoke to the commander of the regiment, and rode up the hill to the guns.
  • Drawing himself up, he viewed the field of battle opening out before him from the hill, and with his whole soul followed the movement of the uhlans.
  • Rostov, without waiting to hear him out, touched his horse, galloped to the front of his squadron, and before he had time to finish giving the word of command, the whole squadron, sharing his feeling, was following him.
  • The bullets were whining and whistling so stimulatingly around him and his horse was so eager to go that he could not restrain himself.
  • He touched his horse, gave the word of command, and immediately, hearing behind him the tramp of the horses of his deployed squadron, rode at full trot downhill toward the dragoons.
  • With the same feeling with which he had galloped across the path of a wolf, Rostov gave rein to his Donets horse and galloped to intersect the path of the dragoons' disordered lines.
  • On the way he came upon a bush, his gallant horse cleared it, and almost before he had righted himself in his saddle he saw that he would immediately overtake the enemy he had selected.
  • That Frenchman, by his uniform an officer, was going at a gallop, crouching on his gray horse and urging it on with his saber.
  • In another moment Rostov's horse dashed its breast against the hindquarters of the officer's horse, almost knocking it over, and at the same instant Rostov, without knowing why, raised his saber and struck the Frenchman with it.
  • The officer fell, not so much from the blow--which had but slightly cut his arm above the elbow--as from the shock to his horse and from fright.
  • Rostov reined in his horse, and his eyes sought his foe to see whom he had vanquished.
  • His eyes, screwed up with fear as if he every moment expected another blow, gazed up at Rostov with shrinking terror.
  • His pale and mud-stained face--fair and young, with a dimple in the chin and light-blue eyes--was not an enemy's face at all suited to a battlefield, but a most ordinary, homelike face.
  • He hurriedly but vainly tried to get his foot out of the stirrup and did not remove his frightened blue eyes from Rostov's face.
  • Some hussars who galloped up disengaged his foot and helped him into the saddle.
  • On all sides, the hussars were busy with the dragoons; one was wounded, but though his face was bleeding, he would not give up his horse; another was perched up behind an hussar with his arms round him; a third was being helped by an hussar to mount his horse.
  • When sent for by Count Ostermann, Rostov, remembering that he had charged without orders, felt sure his commander was sending for him to punish him for breach of discipline.
  • Rostov saw the prisoners being led away and galloped after them to have a look at his Frenchman with the dimple on his chin.
  • All that day and the next his friends and comrades noticed that Rostov, without being dull or angry, was silent, thoughtful, and preoccupied.
  • He drank reluctantly, tried to remain alone, and kept turning something over in his mind.
  • And how was he to blame, with his dimple and blue eyes?
  • But while Nicholas was considering these questions and still could reach no clear solution of what puzzled him so, the wheel of fortune in the service, as often happens, turned in his favor.
  • Doctors came to see her singly and in consultation, talked much in French, German, and Latin, blamed one another, and prescribed a great variety of medicines for all the diseases known to them, but the simple idea never occurred to any of them that they could not know the disease Natasha was suffering from, as no disease suffered by a live man can be known, for every living person has his own peculiarities and always has his own peculiar, personal, novel, complicated disease, unknown to medicine--not a disease of the lungs, liver, skin, heart, nerves, and so on mentioned in medical books, but a disease consisting of one of the innumerable combinations of the maladies of those organs.
  • This simple thought could not occur to the doctors (as it cannot occur to a wizard that he is unable to work his charms) because the business of their lives was to cure, and they received money for it and had spent the best years of their lives on that business.
  • But when he had gone into another room, to which the countess hurriedly followed him, he assumed a grave air and thoughtfully shaking his head said that though there was danger, he had hopes of the effect of this last medicine and one must wait and see, that the malady was chiefly mental, but...
  • Natasha unconsciously felt this delicacy and so found great pleasure in his society.
  • But she was not even grateful to him for it; nothing good on Pierre's part seemed to her to be an effort, it seemed so natural for him to be kind to everyone that there was no merit in his kindness.
  • Sometimes Natasha noticed embarrassment and awkwardness on his part in her presence, especially when he wanted to do something to please her, or feared that something they spoke of would awaken memories distressing to her.
  • She noticed this and attributed it to his general kindness and shyness, which she imagined must be the same toward everyone as it was to her.
  • After those involuntary words--that if he were free he would have asked on his knees for her hand and her love--uttered at a moment when she was so strongly agitated, Pierre never spoke to Natasha of his feelings; and it seemed plain to her that those words, which had then so comforted her, were spoken as all sorts of meaningless words are spoken to comfort a crying child.
  • "Be quite easy," he continued playfully, as he adroitly took the gold coin in his palm.
  • When he had finished the Litany the deacon crossed the stole over his breast and said, "Let us commit ourselves and our whole lives to Christ the Lord!"
  • The priest came out with his purple velvet biretta on his head, adjusted his hair, and knelt down with an effort.
  • Everybody followed his example and they looked at one another in surprise.
  • Bless his counsels, his undertakings, and his work; strengthen his kingdom by Thine almighty hand, and give him victory over his enemy, even as Thou gavest Moses the victory over Amalek, Gideon over Midian, and David over Goliath.
  • From the day when Pierre, after leaving the Rostovs' with Natasha's grateful look fresh in his mind, had gazed at the comet that seemed to be fixed in the sky and felt that something new was appearing on his own horizon--from that day the problem of the vanity and uselessness of all earthly things, that had incessantly tormented him, no longer presented itself.
  • And his soul felt calm and peaceful.
  • He felt that the condition he was in could not continue long, that a catastrophe was coming which would change his whole life, and he impatiently sought everywhere for signs of that approaching catastrophe.
  • Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast: for it is the number of a man; and his number is Six hundred threescore and six.
  • Once when making such calculations he wrote down his own name in French, Comte Pierre Besouhoff, but the sum of the numbers did not come right.
  • Then it occurred to him: if the answer to the question were contained in his name, his nationality would also be given in the answer.
  • His love for Natasha, Antichrist, Napoleon, the invasion, the comet, 666, L'Empereur Napoleon, and L'russe Besuhof--all this had to mature and culminate, to lift him out of that spellbound, petty sphere of Moscow habits in which he felt himself held captive and lead him to a great achievement and great happiness.
  • In the morning, when he went to call at Rostopchin's he met there a courier fresh from the army, an acquaintance of his own, who often danced at Moscow balls.
  • Among these letters was one from Nicholas Rostov to his father.
  • His coachman did not even ask whether he was to wait.
  • He knew that when his master was at the Rostovs' he stayed till midnight.
  • The Rostovs' footman rushed eagerly forward to help him off with his cloak and take his hat and stick.
  • Even before he saw her, while taking off his cloak, he heard her.
  • She had her back to him when he opened the door, but when, turning quickly, she saw his broad, surprised face, she blushed and came rapidly up to him.
  • If I were in his place...
  • He was preparing to enter the university, but he and his friend Obolenski had lately, in secret, agreed to join the hussars.
  • Petya had come rushing out to talk to his namesake about this affair.
  • Petya pulled him by the arm to attract his attention.
  • Pierre began feeling in his pockets for the papers, but could not find them.
  • May the ruin he hopes to bring upon us recoil on his own head, and may Europe delivered from bondage glorify the name of Russia!
  • At this moment, Petya, to whom nobody was paying any attention, came up to his father with a very flushed face and said in his breaking voice that was now deep and now shrill:
  • But the count had already recovered from his excitement.
  • Be quiet, I tell you! cried the count, with a glance at his wife, who had turned pale and was staring fixedly at her son.
  • There, there, I tell you, and the count moved to go out of the room, taking the papers, probably to reread them in his study before having a nap.
  • "Because I love you!" was what he wanted to say, but he did not say it, and only blushed till the tears came, and lowered his eyes.
  • He tried to smile but could not: his smile expressed suffering, and he silently kissed her hand and went out.
  • Pierre made up his mind not to go to the Rostovs' any more.
  • After the definite refusal he had received, Petya went to his room and there locked himself in and wept bitterly.
  • That morning Petya was a long time dressing and arranging his hair and collar to look like a grown-up man.
  • He frowned before his looking glass, gesticulated, shrugged his shoulders, and finally, without saying a word to anyone, took his cap and left the house by the back door, trying to avoid notice.
  • Petya decided to go straight to where the Emperor was and to explain frankly to some gentleman-in-waiting (he imagined the Emperor to be always surrounded by gentlemen-in-waiting) that he, Count Rostov, in spite of his youth wished to serve his country; that youth could be no hindrance to loyalty, and that he was ready to...
  • But the farther he went and the more his attention was diverted by the ever-increasing crowds moving toward the Kremlin, the less he remembered to walk with the sedateness and deliberation of a man.
  • As he approached the Kremlin he even began to avoid being crushed and resolutely stuck out his elbows in a menacing way.
  • But within the Trinity Gateway he was so pressed to the wall by people who probably were unaware of the patriotic intentions with which he had come that in spite of all his determination he had to give in, and stop while carriages passed in, rumbling beneath the archway.
  • After standing some time in the gateway, Petya tried to move forward in front of the others without waiting for all the carriages to pass, and he began resolutely working his way with his elbows, but the woman just in front of him, who was the first against whom he directed his efforts, angrily shouted at him:
  • "Anybody can shove," said the footman, and also began working his elbows to such effect that he pushed Petya into a very filthy corner of the gateway.
  • Petya wiped his perspiring face with his hands and pulled up the damp collar which he had arranged so well at home to seem like a man's.
  • One of the generals who drove past was an acquaintance of the Rostovs', and Petya thought of asking his help, but came to the conclusion that that would not be a manly thing to do.
  • But in spite of this he continued to struggle desperately forward, and from between the backs of those in front he caught glimpses of an open space with a strip of red cloth spread out on it; but just then the crowd swayed back--the police in front were pushing back those who had pressed too close to the procession: the Emperor was passing from the palace to the Cathedral of the Assumption--and Petya unexpectedly received such a blow on his side and ribs and was squeezed so hard that suddenly everything grew dim before his eyes and he lost consciousness.
  • When he came to himself, a man of clerical appearance with a tuft of gray hair at the back of his head and wearing a shabby blue cassock--probably a church clerk and chanter--was holding him under the arm with one hand while warding off the pressure of the crowd with the other.
  • Petya no longer thought of presenting his petition.
  • All these conversations, especially the joking with the girls, were such as might have had a particular charm for Petya at his age, but they did not interest him now.
  • He sat on his elevation--the pedestal of the cannon--still agitated as before by the thought of the Emperor and by his love for him.
  • Petya too would have run there, but the clerk who had taken the young gentleman under his protection stopped him.
  • Petya pushed her hand away with his knee, seized a biscuit, and as if fearing to be too late, again shouted "Hurrah!" with a voice already hoarse.
  • He did not go straight home from the Kremlin, but called on his friend Obolenski, who was fifteen and was also entering the regiment.
  • Pierre suddenly saw an outlet for his excitement.
  • He hardened his heart against the senator who was introducing this set and narrow attitude into the deliberations of the nobility.
  • The nobleman smote his breast.
  • One of the old men nearest to him looked round, but his attention was immediately diverted by an exclamation at the other side of the table.
  • He stood at the back, and, though he had heard hardly anything, understood everything in his own way.
  • Pierre was among those who saw him come out from the merchants' hall with tears of emotion in his eyes.
  • As became known later, he had scarcely begun to address the merchants before tears gushed from his eyes and he concluded in a trembling voice.
  • He now felt ashamed of his speech with its constitutional tendency and sought an opportunity of effacing it.
  • Old Rostov could not tell his wife of what had passed without tears, and at once consented to Petya's request and went himself to enter his name.
  • Barclay de Tolly tried to command the army in the best way, because he wished to fulfill his duty and earn fame as a great commander.
  • In historical works on the year 1812 French writers are very fond of saying that Napoleon felt the danger of extending his line, that he sought a battle and that his marshals advised him to stop at Smolensk, and of making similar statements to show that the danger of the campaign was even then understood.
  • And not only was Napoleon not afraid to extend his line, but he welcomed every step forward as a triumph and did not seek battle as eagerly as in former campaigns, but very lazily.
  • Barclay donned his sash and came out to meet and report to his senior officer Bagration.
  • Despite his seniority in rank Bagration, in this contest of magnanimity, took his orders from Barclay, but, having submitted, agreed with him less than ever.
  • This general, hating Barclay, rode to visit a friend of his own, a corps commander, and, having spent the day with him, returned to Barclay and condemned, as unsuitable from every point of view, the battleground he had not seen.
  • Napoleon advanced farther and we retired, thus arriving at the very result which caused his destruction.
  • The day after his son had left, Prince Nicholas sent for Princess Mary to come to his study.
  • He was ill and did not leave his study.
  • Princess Mary noticed to her surprise that during this illness the old prince not only excluded her from his room, but did not admit Mademoiselle Bourienne either.
  • At the end of the week the prince reappeared and resumed his former way of life, devoting himself with special activity to building operations and the arrangement of the gardens and completely breaking off his relations with Mademoiselle Bourienne.
  • His looks and cold tone to his daughter seemed to say: There, you see?
  • His looks and cold tone to his daughter seemed to say: There, you see?
  • Princess Mary spent half of every day with little Nicholas, watching his lessons, teaching him Russian and music herself, and talking to Dessalles; the rest of the day she spent over her books, with her old nurse, or with "God's folk" who sometimes came by the back door to see her.
  • The only thing that made Princess Mary anxious about him was that he slept very little and, instead of sleeping in his study as usual, changed his sleeping place every day.
  • One day he would order his camp bed to be set up in the glass gallery, another day he remained on the couch or on the lounge chair in the drawing room and dozed there without undressing, while--instead of Mademoiselle Bourienne--a serf boy read to him.
  • In his first letter which came soon after he had left home, Prince Andrew had dutifully asked his father's forgiveness for what he had allowed himself to say and begged to be restored to his favor.
  • In this letter Prince Andrew pointed out to his father the danger of staying at Bald Hills, so near the theater of war and on the army's direct line of march, and advised him to move to Moscow.
  • At dinner that day, on Dessalles' mentioning that the French were said to have already entered Vitebsk, the old prince remembered his son's letter.
  • But as soon as he had left the room the old prince, looking uneasily round, threw down his napkin and went himself.
  • On moving to the drawing room he handed the letter to Princess Mary and, spreading out before him the plan of the new building and fixing his eyes upon it, told her to read the letter aloud.
  • He was examining the plan, evidently engrossed in his own ideas.
  • I?... said the prince as if unpleasantly awakened, and not taking his eyes from the plan of the building.
  • His face suddenly took on a morose expression.
  • Dessalles dropped his eyes.
  • Well, Michael Ivanovich," he suddenly went on, raising his head and pointing to the plan of the building, "tell me how you mean to alter it...."
  • Princess Mary saw Dessalles' embarrassed and astonished look fixed on her father, noticed his silence, and was struck by the fact that her father had forgotten his son's letter on the drawing-room table; but she was not only afraid to speak of it and ask Dessalles the reason of his confusion and silence, but was afraid even to think about it.
  • When Michael Ivanovich returned to the study with the letter, the old prince, with spectacles on and a shade over his eyes, was sitting at his open bureau with screened candles, holding a paper in his outstretched hand, and in a somewhat dramatic attitude was reading his manuscript-- his "Remarks" as he termed it--which was to be transmitted to the Emperor after his death.
  • The prince had a list of things to be bought in Smolensk and, walking up and down the room past Alpatych who stood by the door, he gave his instructions.
  • He paced up and down for a while and glanced at his notes.
  • He sat down, sank into thought, closed his eyes, and dozed off.
  • The prince again went to his bureau, glanced into it, fingered his papers, closed the bureau again, and sat down at the table to write to the governor.
  • Every place seemed unsatisfactory, but worst of all was his customary couch in the study.
  • Frowning with vexation at the effort necessary to divest himself of his coat and trousers, the prince undressed, sat down heavily on the bed, and appeared to be meditating as he looked contemptuously at his withered yellow legs.
  • Pressing his lips together he made that effort for the twenty-thousandth time and lay down.
  • He opened his eyes as they were closing.
  • The prince slapped his hand on the table.
  • He had the letter taken from his pocket and the table--on which stood a glass of lemonade and a spiral wax candle--moved close to the bed, and putting on his spectacles he began reading.
  • He put the letter under the candlestick and closed his eyes.
  • The same evening that the prince gave his instructions to Alpatych, Dessalles, having asked to see Princess Mary, told her that, as the prince was not very well and was taking no steps to secure his safety, though from Prince Andrew's letter it was evident that to remain at Bald Hills might be dangerous, he respectfully advised her to send a letter by Alpatych to the Provincial Governor at Smolensk, asking him to let her know the state of affairs and the extent of the danger to which Bald Hills was exposed.
  • Having received all his orders Alpatych, wearing a white beaver hat--a present from the prince--and carrying a stick as the prince did, went out accompanied by his family.
  • His satellites--the senior clerk, a countinghouse clerk, a scullery maid, a cook, two old women, a little pageboy, the coachman, and various domestic serfs--were seeing him off.
  • His daughter placed chintz-covered down cushions for him to sit on and behind his back.
  • His daughter placed chintz-covered down cushions for him to sit on and behind his back.
  • His old sister-in-law popped in a small bundle, and one of the coachmen helped him into the vehicle.
  • For Christ's sake think of us! cried his wife, referring to the rumors of war and the enemy.
  • Women's fuss! muttered Alpatych to himself and started on his journey, looking round at the fields of yellow rye and the still- green, thickly growing oats, and at other quite black fields just being plowed a second time.
  • As he went along he looked with pleasure at the year's splendid crop of corn, scrutinized the strips of ryefield which here and there were already being reaped, made his calculations as to the sowing and the harvest, and asked himself whether he had not forgotten any of the prince's orders.
  • This fact impressed Alpatych, but in thinking about his own business he soon forgot it.
  • He was a stout, dark, red- faced peasant in the forties, with thick lips, a broad knob of a nose, similar knobs over his black frowning brows, and a round belly.
  • Wearing a waistcoat over his cotton shirt, Ferapontov was standing before his shop which opened onto the street.
  • He asked for a samovar and for hay for his horses, and when he had had his tea he went to bed.
  • "To see the Governor by his excellency's order," answered Alpatych, lifting his head and proudly thrusting his hand into the bosom of his coat as he always did when he mentioned the prince....
  • Alpatych swayed his head and went upstairs.
  • Alpatych moved forward and next time the official came out addressed him, one hand placed in the breast of his buttoned coat, and handed him two letters.
  • "To his Honor Baron Asch, from General-in-Chief Prince Bolkonski," he announced with such solemnity and significance that the official turned to him and took the letters.
  • "Go," he said, nodding his head to Alpatych, and began questioning the officer.
  • Involuntarily listening now to the firing, which had drawn nearer and was increasing in strength, Alpatych hurried to his inn.
  • Alpatych entered the innyard at a quicker pace than usual and went straight to the shed where his horses and trap were.
  • At these words Alpatych nodded as if in approval, and not wishing to hear more went to the door of the room opposite the innkeeper's, where he had left his purchases.
  • Ferapontov came out after her, but on seeing Alpatych adjusted his waistcoat, smoothed his hair, yawned, and followed Alpatych into the opposite room.
  • Alpatych, without answering or looking at his host, sorted his packages and asked how much he owed.
  • "Well, it seems to be getting quieter," remarked Ferapontov, finishing his third cup of tea and getting up.
  • Alpatych collected his parcels, handed them to the coachman who had come in, and settled up with the innkeeper.
  • Alpatych was getting into his trap.
  • Alpatych, his coachman, Ferapontov's wife and children and the house porter were all sitting in the cellar, listening.
  • Just then Ferapontov returned and entered his shop.
  • On seeing the soldiers he was about to shout at them, but suddenly stopped and, clutching at his hair, burst into sobs and laughter:
  • Seeing that his trap would not be able to move on for some time, Alpatych got down and turned into the side street to look at the fire.
  • Your excellency! answered Alpatych, immediately recognizing the voice of his young prince.
  • Prince Andrew in his riding cloak, mounted on a black horse, was looking at Alpatych from the back of the crowd.
  • At that moment the flames flared up and showed his young master's pale worn face.
  • Prince Andrew without replying took out a notebook and raising his knee began writing in pencil on a page he tore out.
  • He wrote to his sister:
  • Having written this and given the paper to Alpatych, he told him how to arrange for departure of the prince, the princess, his son, and the boy's tutor, and how and where to let him know immediately.
  • The man in the frieze coat raised his arms and shouted:
  • "Well then," continued Prince Andrew to Alpatych, "report to them as I have told you"; and not replying a word to Berg who was now mute beside him, he touched his horse and rode down the side street.
  • The burning of Smolensk and its abandonment made an epoch in his life.
  • A novel feeling of anger against the foe made him forget his own sorrow.
  • He was entirely devoted to the affairs of his regiment and was considerate and kind to his men and officers.
  • But he was kind and gentle only to those of his regiment, to Timokhin and the like--people quite new to him, belonging to a different world and who could not know and understand his past.
  • Everything that reminded him of his past was repugnant to him, and so in his relations with that former circle he confined himself to trying to do his duty and not to be unfair.
  • But despite this, thanks to his regiment, Prince Andrew had something to think about entirely apart from general questions.
  • An old peasant whom Prince Andrew in his childhood had often seen at the gate was sitting on a green garden seat, plaiting a bast shoe.
  • Alpatych, having sent his family away, was alone at Bald Hills and was sitting indoors reading the Lives of the Saints.
  • Then, vexed at his own weakness, he turned away and began to report on the position of affairs.
  • Alpatych turned his face to Prince Andrew, looked at him, and suddenly with a solemn gesture raised his arm.
  • Gently disengaging himself, the prince spurred his horse and rode down the avenue at a gallop.
  • But not far from Bald Hills he again came out on the road and overtook his regiment at its halting place by the dam of a small pond.
  • One fair-haired young soldier of the third company, whom Prince Andrew knew and who had a strap round the calf of one leg, crossed himself, stepped back to get a good run, and plunged into the water; another, a dark noncommissioned officer who was always shaggy, stood up to his waist in the water joyfully wriggling his muscular figure and snorted with satisfaction as he poured the water over his head with hands blackened to the wrists.
  • The officer, Timokhin, with his red little nose, standing on the dam wiping himself with a towel, felt confused at seeing the prince, but made up his mind to address him nevertheless.
  • "Flesh, bodies, cannon fodder!" he thought, and he looked at his own naked body and shuddered, not from cold but from a sense of disgust and horror he did not himself understand, aroused by the sight of that immense number of bodies splashing about in the dirty pond.
  • On the seventh of August Prince Bagration wrote as follows from his quarters at Mikhaylovna on the Smolensk road:
  • I swear to you on my honor that Napoleon was in such a fix as never before and might have lost half his army but could not have taken Smolensk.
  • He gave me his word he would not retreat, but suddenly sent instructions that he was retiring that night.
  • I am not merely civil to him but obey him like a corporal, though I am his senior.
  • Prince Vasili, who still occupied his former important posts, formed a connecting link between these two circles.
  • I told them his election as chief of the militia would not please the Emperor.
  • But he retrieved his mistake at once.
  • He will get nothing for his pains!
  • No one replied to his remarks.
  • Prince Vasili entered the room with the air of a happy conqueror who has attained the object of his desires.
  • The "man of great merit," despite his desire to obtain the post of director, could not refrain from reminding Prince Vasili of his former opinion.
  • "But, Prince, they say he is blind!" said he, reminding Prince Vasili of his own words.
  • As soon as he said this both Prince Vasili and Anna Pavlovna turned away from him and glanced sadly at one another with a sigh at his naivete.
  • Napoleon's historian Thiers, like other of his historians, trying to justify his hero says that he was drawn to the walls of Moscow against his will.
  • A good chessplayer having lost a game is sincerely convinced that his loss resulted from a mistake he made and looks for that mistake in the opening, but forgets that at each stage of the game there were similar mistakes and that none of his moves were perfect.
  • He only notices the mistake to which he pays attention, because his opponent took advantage of it.
  • On the march from Vyazma to Tsarevo-Zaymishche he rode his light bay bobtailed ambler accompanied by his Guards, his bodyguard, his pages, and aides-de-camp.
  • Berthier, his chief of staff, dropped behind to question a Russian prisoner captured by the cavalry.
  • Napoleon told him to ride by his side and began questioning him.
  • But when Napoleon asked him whether the Russians thought they would beat Bonaparte or not, Lavrushka screwed up his eyes and considered.
  • In this question he saw subtle cunning, as men of his type see cunning in everything, so he frowned and did not answer immediately.
  • "As soon as Napoleon's interpreter had spoken," says Thiers, "the Cossack, seized by amazement, did not utter another word, but rode on, his eyes fixed on the conqueror whose fame had reached him across the steppes of the East.
  • All his loquacity was suddenly arrested and replaced by a naive and silent feeling of admiration.
  • Napoleon rode on, dreaming of the Moscow that so appealed to his imagination, and "the bird restored to its native fields" galloped to our outposts, inventing on the way all that had not taken place but that he meant to relate to his comrades.
  • He found the Cossacks, inquired for the regiment operating with Platov's detachment and by evening found his master, Nicholas Rostov, quartered at Yankovo.
  • He ordered the militiamen to be called up from the villages and armed, and wrote a letter to the commander-in- chief informing him that he had resolved to remain at Bald Hills to the last extremity and to defend it, leaving to the commander-in-chief's discretion to take measures or not for the defense of Bald Hills, where one of Russia's oldest generals would be captured or killed, and he announced to his household that he would remain at Bald Hills.
  • Princess Mary, alarmed by her father's feverish and sleepless activity after his previous apathy, could not bring herself to leave him alone and for the first time in her life ventured to disobey him.
  • Trying to convict her, he told her she had worn him out, had caused his quarrel with his son, had harbored nasty suspicions of him, making it the object of her life to poison his existence, and he drove her from his study telling her that if she did not go away it was all the same to him.
  • She knew it was a proof that in the depth of his soul he was glad she was remaining at home and had not gone away.
  • The morning after little Nicholas had left, the old prince donned his full uniform and prepared to visit the commander-in-chief.
  • His caleche was already at the door.
  • Princess Mary saw him walk out of the house in his uniform wearing all his orders and go down the garden to review his armed peasants and domestic serfs.
  • She sat by the window listening to his voice which reached her from the garden.
  • She ran up to him and, in the play of the sunlight that fell in small round spots through the shade of the lime-tree avenue, could not be sure what change there was in his face.
  • All she could see was that his former stern and determined expression had altered to one of timidity and submission.
  • On seeing his daughter he moved his helpless lips and made a hoarse sound.
  • He was lifted up, carried to his study, and laid on the very couch he had so feared of late.
  • The doctor, who was fetched that same night, bled him and said that the prince had had a seizure paralyzing his right side.
  • He muttered unceasingly, his eyebrows and lips twitching, and it was impossible to tell whether he understood what was going on around him or not.
  • The doctor said this restlessness did not mean anything and was due to physical causes; but Princess Mary thought he wished to tell her something, and the fact that her presence always increased his restlessness confirmed her opinion.
  • Several times, waking up, she heard his groans and muttering, the creak of his bed, and the steps of Tikhon and the doctor when they turned him over.
  • Several times she listened at the door, and it seemed to her that his mutterings were louder than usual and that they turned him over oftener.
  • Though he did not speak, Princess Mary saw and knew how unpleasant every sign of anxiety on his account was to him.
  • She recalled all her life with him and in every word and act of his found an expression of his love of her.
  • Occasionally amid these memories temptations of the devil would surge into her imagination: thoughts of how things would be after his death, and how her new, liberated life would be ordered.
  • His head is clearer.
  • Princess Mary entered her father's room and went up to his bed.
  • He was lying on his back propped up high, and his small bony hands with their knotted purple veins were lying on the quilt; his left eye gazed straight before him, his right eye was awry, and his brows and lips motionless.
  • His face seemed to have shriveled or melted; his features had grown smaller.
  • His face seemed to have shriveled or melted; his features had grown smaller.
  • Princess Mary went up and kissed his hand.
  • He twitched her hand, and his brows and lips quivered angrily.
  • When she changed her position so that his left eye could see her face he calmed down, not taking his eyes off her for some seconds.
  • Then his lips and tongue moved, sounds came, and he began to speak, gazing timidly and imploringly at her, evidently afraid that she might not understand.
  • The comic efforts with which he moved his tongue made her drop her eyes and with difficulty repress the sobs that rose to her throat.
  • The prince shook his head, again repeated the same sounds.
  • He made a mumbling sound in confirmation of this, took her hand, and began pressing it to different parts of his breast as if trying to find the right place for it.
  • Princess Mary pressed her head against his hand, trying to hide her sobs and tears.
  • He moved his hand over her hair.
  • Princess Mary could not quite make out what he had said, but from his look it was clear that he had uttered a tender caressing word such as he had never used to her before.
  • "And I was wishing for his death!" thought Princess Mary.
  • "Thank you... daughter dear!... for all, for all... forgive!... thank you!... forgive!... thank you!..." and tears began to flow from his eyes.
  • "Call Andrew!" he said suddenly, and a childish, timid expression of doubt showed itself on his face as he spoke.
  • He himself seemed aware that his demand was meaningless.
  • He closed his eyes and remained silent a long time.
  • And he began to sob, and again tears flowed from his eyes.
  • Princess Mary could no longer restrain herself and wept while she gazed at his face.
  • Again he closed his eyes.
  • His sobs ceased, he pointed to his eyes, and Tikhon, understanding him, wiped away the tears.
  • His sobs ceased, he pointed to his eyes, and Tikhon, understanding him, wiped away the tears.
  • Then he again opened his eyes and said something none of them could understand for a long time, till at last Tikhon understood and repeated it.
  • She thought he was speaking of Russia, or Prince Andrew, of herself, of his grandson, or of his own death, and so she could not guess his words.
  • When she had left the room the prince again began speaking about his son, about the war, and about the Emperor, angrily twitching his brows and raising his hoarse voice, and then he had a second and final stroke.
  • I wished for his death!
  • He was still lying on the bed as before, but the stern expression of his quiet face made Princess Mary stop short on the threshold.
  • "No, he's not dead--it's impossible!" she told herself and approached him, and repressing the terror that seized her, she pressed her lips to his cheek.
  • Then they dressed him in uniform with his decorations and placed his shriveled little body on a table.
  • Toward night candles were burning round his coffin, a pall was spread over it, the floor was strewn with sprays of juniper, a printed band was tucked in under his shriveled head, and in a corner of the room sat a chanter reading the psalms.
  • But this he was unable to do, for he received tidings that the French had unexpectedly advanced, and had barely time to remove his own family and valuables from his estate.
  • Alpatych, arriving from the devastated Bald Hills estate, sent for his Dron on the day of the prince's funeral and told him to have twelve horses got ready for the princess' carriages and eighteen carts for the things to be removed from Bogucharovo.
  • But on hearing the order Dron lowered his eyes and remained silent.
  • His excellency Prince Andrew himself gave me orders to move all the people away and not leave them with the enemy, and there is an order from the Tsar about it too.
  • "I hear," Dron answered without lifting his eyes.
  • "Eh, Dron, it will turn out badly!" he said, shaking his head.
  • Alpatych repeated, withdrawing his hand from his bosom and solemnly pointing to the floor at Dron's feet.
  • Dron was disconcerted, glanced furtively at Alpatych and again lowered his eyes.
  • Dron suddenly fell on his knees.
  • Without saying anything of this to the princess, Alpatych had his own belongings taken out of the carts which had arrived from Bald Hills and had those horses got ready for the princess' carriages.
  • (This was before his talk with Dron.)
  • "Besides, is it for me, for me who desired his death, to condemn anyone?" she thought.
  • That I, the daughter of Prince Nicholas Bolkonski, asked General Rameau for protection and accepted his favor!
  • She went into Prince Andrew's study, trying to enter completely into his ideas, and considered her position.
  • "Dronushka," she said, regarding as a sure friend this Dronushka who always used to bring a special kind of gingerbread from his visit to the fair at Vyazma every year and smilingly offer it to her, "Dronushka, now since our misfortune..." she began, but could not go on.
  • She replied that she had never doubted his devotion and that she was ready to do anything for him and for the peasants.
  • "Why don't you speak?" she inquired of a very old man who stood just in front of her leaning on his stick.
  • I will do anything, said she, catching his eye.
  • But as if this angered him, he bent his head quite low and muttered:
  • With mournful pleasure she now lingered over these images, repelling with horror only the last one, the picture of his death, which she felt she could not contemplate even in imagination at this still and mystic hour of night.
  • She vividly recalled the moment when he had his first stroke and was being dragged along by his armpits through the garden at Bald Hills, muttering something with his helpless tongue, twitching his gray eyebrows and looking uneasily and timidly at her.
  • And she recalled in all its detail the night at Bald Hills before he had the last stroke, when with a foreboding of disaster she had remained at home against his will.
  • Now he will never tell anyone what he had in his soul.
  • From behind the door I heard how he lay down on his bed groaning and loudly exclaimed, 'My God!'
  • And Princess Mary uttered aloud the caressing word he had said to her on the day of his death.
  • She now saw his face before her.
  • And not the face she had known ever since she could remember and had always seen at a distance, but the timid, feeble face she had seen for the first time quite closely, with all its wrinkles and details, when she stooped near to his mouth to catch what he said.
  • With wide-open eyes she gazed at the moonlight and the shadows, expecting every moment to see his dead face, and she felt that the silence brooding over the house and within it held her fast.
  • On the way to Bogucharovo, a princely estate with a dwelling house and farm where they hoped to find many domestic serfs and pretty girls, they questioned Lavrushka about Napoleon and laughed at his stories, and raced one another to try Ilyin's horse.
  • "Yes, always first both on the grassland and here," answered Rostov, stroking his heated Donets horse.
  • Following Dunyasha, Alpatych advanced to Rostov, having bared his head while still at a distance.
  • "May I make bold to trouble your honor?" said he respectfully, but with a shade of contempt for the youthfulness of this officer and with a hand thrust into his bosom.
  • Rostov dismounted, gave his horse to the orderly, and followed Alpatych to the house, questioning him as to the state of affairs.
  • Princess Mary understood this and appreciated his delicacy.
  • Rostov, knitting his brows, left the room with another low bow.
  • He saw that his hero and commander was following quite a different train of thought.
  • Rostov stopped and, clenching his fists, suddenly and sternly turned on Alpatych.
  • And as if afraid of wasting his store of anger, he left Alpatych and went rapidly forward.
  • As soon as Rostov, followed by Ilyin, Lavrushka, and Alpatych, came up to the crowd, Karp, thrusting his fingers into his belt and smiling a little, walked to the front.
  • But before the words were well out of his mouth, his cap flew off and a fierce blow jerked his head to one side.
  • Traitors! cried Rostov unmeaningly in a voice not his own, gripping Karp by the collar.
  • And in fact two more peasants began binding Dron, who took off his own belt and handed it to them, as if to aid them.
  • What did I say? said Alpatych, coming into his own again.
  • His kind, honest eyes, with the tears rising in them when she herself had begun to cry as she spoke of her loss, did not leave her memory.
  • Sometimes when she recalled his looks, his sympathy, and his words, happiness did not appear impossible to her.
  • And that caused his sister to refuse my brother?
  • To remember her gave him pleasure, and when his comrades, hearing of his adventure at Bogucharovo, rallied him on having gone to look for hay and having picked up one of the wealthiest heiresses in Russia, he grew angry.
  • It made him angry just because the idea of marrying the gentle Princess Mary, who was attractive to him and had an enormous fortune, had against his will more than once entered his head.
  • And his plighted word?
  • He stopped in the village at the priest's house in front of which stood the commander-in-chief's carriage, and he sat down on the bench at the gate awaiting his Serene Highness, as everyone now called Kutuzov.
  • Prince Andrew replied that he was not on his Serene Highness' staff but was himself a new arrival.
  • The lieutenant colonel of hussars smiled beneath his mustache at the orderly's tone, dismounted, gave his horse to a dispatch runner, and approached Bolkonski with a slight bow.
  • I'm Lieutenant Colonel Denisov, better known as 'Vaska,' said Denisov, pressing Prince Andrew's hand and looking into his face with a particularly kindly attention.
  • He swayed his head.
  • This memory carried him sadly and sweetly back to those painful feelings of which he had not thought lately, but which still found place in his soul.
  • Of late he had received so many new and very serious impressions--such as the retreat from Smolensk, his visit to Bald Hills, and the recent news of his father's death--and had experienced so many emotions, that for a long time past those memories had not entered his mind, and now that they did, they did not act on him with nearly their former strength.
  • He smiled at the recollection of that time and of his love for Natasha, and passed at once to what now interested him passionately and exclusively.
  • He began explaining his plan to Prince Andrew.
  • Denisov rose and began gesticulating as he explained his plan to Bolkonski.
  • In the midst of his explanation shouts were heard from the army, growing more incoherent and more diffused, mingling with music and songs and coming from the field where the review was held.
  • His adjutants galloped into the yard before him.
  • Kutuzov was impatiently urging on his horse, which ambled smoothly under his weight, and he raised his hand to his white Horse Guard's cap with a red band and no peak, nodding his head continually.
  • Suddenly his face assumed a subtle expression, he shrugged his shoulders with an air of perplexity.
  • But the bleached eyeball, the scar, and the familiar weariness of his expression were still the same.
  • He was wearing the white Horse Guard's cap and a military overcoat with a whip hanging over his shoulder by a thin strap.
  • He sat heavily and swayed limply on his brisk little horse.
  • His face expressed the relief of relaxed strain felt by a man who means to rest after a ceremony.
  • He drew his left foot out of the stirrup and, lurching with his whole body and puckering his face with the effort, raised it with difficulty onto the saddle, leaned on his knee, groaned, and slipped down into the arms of the Cossacks and adjutants who stood ready to assist him.
  • He pulled himself together, looked round, screwing up his eyes, glanced at Prince Andrew, and, evidently not recognizing him, moved with his waddling gait to the porch.
  • As often occurs with old men, it was only after some seconds that the impression produced by Prince Andrew's face linked itself up with Kutuzov's remembrance of his personality.
  • Come along... said he, glancing wearily round, and he stepped onto the porch which creaked under his weight.
  • He unbuttoned his coat and sat down on a bench in the porch.
  • "I received news of his death, yesterday," replied Prince Andrew abruptly.
  • Kutuzov looked at him with eyes wide open with dismay and then took off his cap and crossed himself:
  • He sighed deeply, his whole chest heaving, and was silent for a while.
  • He embraced Prince Andrew, pressing him to his fat breast, and for some time did not let him go.
  • When he released him Prince Andrew saw that Kutuzov's flabby lips were trembling and that tears were in his eyes.
  • But at that moment Denisov, no more intimidated by his superiors than by the enemy, came with jingling spurs up the steps of the porch, despite the angry whispers of the adjutants who tried to stop him.
  • Kutuzov, his hands still pressed on the seat, glanced at him glumly.
  • Denisov, having given his name, announced that he had to communicate to his Serene Highness a matter of great importance for their country's welfare.
  • His plan seemed decidedly a good one, especially from the strength of conviction with which he spoke.
  • And from that hut, while Denisov was speaking, a general with a portfolio under his arm really did appear.
  • Kutuzov swayed his head, as much as to say: "How is one man to deal with it all?" and again listened to Denisov.
  • Kutuzov's adjutant whispered to Prince Andrew that this was the wife of the priest whose home it was, and that she intended to offer his Serene Highness bread and salt.
  • Her husband has welcomed his Serene Highness with the cross at the church, and she intends to welcome him in the house....
  • He despised them because of his old age and experience of life.
  • After hearing the matter, Kutuzov smacked his lips together and shook his head.
  • "Oh, this German precision!" he muttered, shaking his head.
  • "Well, that's all!" said Kutuzov as he signed the last of the documents, and rising heavily and smoothing out the folds in his fat white neck he moved toward the door with a more cheerful expression.
  • He screwed up his eyes, smiled, lifted her chin with his hand, and said:
  • He took some gold pieces from his trouser pocket and put them on the dish for her.
  • He had in his hand a French book which he closed as Prince Andrew entered, marking the place with a knife.
  • Prince Andrew told Kutuzov all he knew of his father's death, and what he had seen at Bald Hills when he passed through it.
  • Taking his hand and drawing him downwards, Kutuzov offered his cheek to be kissed, and again Prince Andrew noticed tears in the old man's eyes.
  • He swayed his head.
  • And tears again dimmed his eyes.
  • He will not bring in any plan of his own.
  • And above all," thought Prince Andrew, "one believes in him because he's Russian, despite the novel by Genlis and the French proverbs, and because his voice shook when he said: 'What they have brought us to!' and had a sob in it when he said he would 'make them eat horseflesh!'"
  • It was said that Mamonov's regiment would cost him eight hundred thousand rubles, and that Bezukhov had spent even more on his, but that the best thing about Bezukhov's action was that he himself was going to don a uniform and ride at the head of his regiment without charging anything for the show.
  • In spite of his absent-mindedness and good nature, Pierre's personality immediately checked any attempt to ridicule him to his face.
  • "No," said Pierre, with a laughing glance at his big, stout body.
  • The Razumovskis wanted to buy his house and his estate near Moscow, but it drags on and on.
  • "If he manages the business properly he will be able to pay off all his debts," said the militia officer, speaking of Rostov.
  • "If this patience comes out," he said to himself after shuffling the cards, holding them in his hand, and lifting his head, "if it comes out, it means... what does it mean?"
  • Count Rostopchin writes that he will stake his life on it that the enemy will not enter Moscow.
  • This is what his cajolery has brought us to!
  • You take everything so to heart, said Pierre, and began laying out his cards for patience.
  • The worse everything became, especially his own affairs, the better was Pierre pleased and the more evident was it that the catastrophe he expected was approaching.
  • Of his intimate friends only the Rostovs remained, but he did not go to see them.
  • To distract his thoughts he drove that day to the village of Vorontsovo to see the great balloon Leppich was constructing to destroy the foe, and a trial balloon that was to go up next day.
  • As soon as Leppich is ready, get together a crew of reliable and intelligent men for his car and send a courier to General Kutuzov to let him know.
  • It is essential for him to combine his movements with those of the commander-in-chief.
  • On his way home from Vorontsovo, as he was passing the Bolotnoe Place Pierre, seeing a large crowd round the Lobnoe Place, stopped and got out of his trap.
  • With a frightened and suffering look resembling that on the thin Frenchman's face, Pierre pushed his way in through the crowd.
  • The stout man rose, frowned, shrugged his shoulders, and evidently trying to appear firm began to pull on his jacket without looking about him, but suddenly his lips trembled and he began to cry, in the way full-blooded grown-up men cry, though angry with himself for doing so.
  • "Eh, mounseer, Russian sauce seems to be sour to a Frenchman... sets his teeth on edge!" said a wrinkled clerk who was standing behind Pierre, when the Frenchman began to cry.
  • The clerk glanced round, evidently hoping that his joke would be appreciated.
  • Pierre choked, his face puckered, and he turned hastily away, went back to his trap muttering something to himself as he went, and took his seat.
  • Idiot! shouted Pierre, abusing his coachman--a thing he rarely did.
  • On reaching home Pierre gave orders to Evstafey--his head coachman who knew everything, could do anything, and was known to all Moscow--that he would leave that night for the army at Mozhaysk, and that his saddle horses should be sent there.
  • He was told that there in Perkhushkovo the earth trembled from the firing, but nobody could answer his questions as to who had won.
  • Every house in Mozhaysk had soldiers quartered in it, and at the hostel where Pierre was met by his groom and coachman there was no room to be had.
  • Napoleon, riding to Valuevo on the twenty-fourth, did not see (as the history books say he did) the position of the Russians from Utitsa to Borodino (he could not have seen that position because it did not exist), nor did he see an advanced post of the Russian army, but while pursuing the Russian rearguard he came upon the left flank of the Russian position--at the Shevardino Redoubt--and unexpectedly for the Russians moved his army across the Kolocha.
  • At the descent of the high steep hill, down which a winding road led out of the town past the cathedral on the right, where a service was being held and the bells were ringing, Pierre got out of his vehicle and proceeded on foot.
  • The driver in his bast shoes ran panting up to it, placed a stone under one of its tireless hind wheels, and began arranging the breech-band on his little horse.
  • One of the wounded, an old soldier with a bandaged arm who was following the cart on foot, caught hold of it with his sound hand and turned to look at Pierre.
  • His whole head was wrapped in rags and one cheek was swollen to the size of a baby's head.
  • His nose and mouth were twisted to one side.
  • The third lay prone so that his face was not visible.
  • He kept looking to either side of the road for familiar faces, but only saw everywhere the unfamiliar faces of various military men of different branches of the service, who all looked with astonishment at his white hat and green tail coat.
  • Pierre got out and talked to the doctor, explaining his intention of taking part in a battle.
  • "Why should you be God knows where out of sight, during the battle?" he said, exchanging glances with his young companion.
  • Anyhow his Serene Highness knows you and will receive you graciously.
  • But the doctor interrupted him and moved toward his gig.
  • "I would go with you but on my honor I'm up to here"--and he pointed to his throat.
  • And by some latent sequence of thought the descent of the Mozhaysk hill, the carts with the wounded, the ringing bells, the slanting rays of the sun, and the songs of the cavalrymen vividly recurred to his mind.
  • Strange! thought Pierre, continuing his way to Tatarinova.
  • Pierre stepped out of his carriage and, passing the toiling militiamen, ascended the knoll from which, according to the doctor, the battlefield could be seen.
  • "I must ask someone who knows," he thought, and addressed an officer who was looking with curiosity at his huge unmilitary figure.
  • "Burdino, isn't it?" said the officer, turning to his companion.
  • The officer pointed with his hand to the smoke visible on the left beyond the river, and the same stern and serious expression that Pierre had noticed on many of the faces he had met came into his face.
  • "That's his again," said the officer.
  • His having moved his troops there is only a ruse; he will probably pass round to the right of the Moskva.
  • His having moved his troops there is only a ruse; he will probably pass round to the right of the Moskva.
  • "Oh, those damned fellows!" muttered the officer who followed him, holding his nose as he ran past the men at work.
  • Standing among the crowd of peasants, Pierre recognized several acquaintances among these notables, but did not look at them--his whole attention was absorbed in watching the serious expression on the faces of the crowd of soldiers and militiamen who were all gazing eagerly at the icon.
  • Pierre recognized him at once by his peculiar figure, which distinguished him from everybody else.
  • With a long overcoat on his exceedingly stout, round-shouldered body, with uncovered white head and puffy face showing the white ball of the eye he had lost, Kutuzov walked with plunging, swaying gait into the crowd and stopped behind the priest.
  • He crossed himself with an accustomed movement, bent till he touched the ground with his hand, and bowed his white head with a deep sigh.
  • When the service was over, Kutuzov stepped up to the icon, sank heavily to his knees, bowed to the ground, and for a long time tried vainly to rise, but could not do so on account of his weakness and weight.
  • His white head twitched with the effort.
  • At last he rose, kissed the icon as a child does with naively pouting lips, and again bowed till he touched the ground with his hand.
  • Boris Drubetskoy, brushing his knees with his hand (he had probably soiled them when he, too, had knelt before the icon), came up to him smiling.
  • He wore a long coat and like Kutuzov had a whip slung across his shoulder.
  • He explained his wish to be present at the battle and to see the position.
  • Those are his quarters, and he pointed to the third house in the village of Gorki.
  • "To tell you the truth, between ourselves, God only knows what state our left flank is in," said Boris confidentially lowering his voice.
  • Boris shrugged his shoulders, his Serene Highness would not have it, or someone persuaded him.
  • It is amazing how his Serene Highness could so foresee the intentions of the French!
  • The faces all expressed animation and apprehension, but it seemed to Pierre that the cause of the excitement shown in some of these faces lay chiefly in questions of personal success; his mind, however, was occupied by the different expression he saw on other faces--an expression that spoke not of personal matters but of the universal questions of life and death.
  • Pierre took off his hat and bowed respectfully to Kutuzov.
  • And should your Serene Highness require a man who will not spare his skin, please think of me....
  • Kutuzov repeated, his laughing eye narrowing more and more as he looked at Pierre.
  • Just then Boris, with his courtierlike adroitness, stepped up to Pierre's side near Kutuzov and in a most natural manner, without raising his voice, said to Pierre, as though continuing an interrupted conversation:
  • Boris evidently said this to Pierre in order to be overheard by his Serene Highness.
  • "Ah... a wonderful, a matchless people!" said Kutuzov; and he closed his eyes and swayed his head.
  • Then, evidently remembering what he wanted, he beckoned to Andrew Kaysarov, his adjutant's brother.
  • Kutuzov smilingly nodded his head to the rhythm of the verses.
  • When Pierre had left Kutuzov, Dolokhov came up to him and took his hand.
  • With tears in his eyes Dolokhov embraced Pierre and kissed him.
  • Boris said a few words to his general, and Count Bennigsen turned to Pierre and proposed that he should ride with him along the line.
  • Half an hour later Kutuzov left for Tatarinova, and Bennigsen and his suite, with Pierre among them, set out on their ride along the line.
  • This disposition on the left flank increased Pierre's doubt of his own capacity to understand military matters.
  • Bennigsen did not know this and moved the troops forward according to his own ideas without mentioning the matter to the commander-in-chief.
  • Narrow and burdensome and useless to anyone as his life now seemed to him, Prince Andrew on the eve of battle felt agitated and irritable as he had done seven years before at Austerlitz.
  • But his thoughts--the simplest, clearest, and therefore most terrible thoughts--would give him no peace.
  • The three great sorrows of his life held his attention in particular: his love for a woman, his father's death, and the French invasion which had overrun half Russia.
  • When my father built Bald Hills he thought the place was his: his land, his air, his peasants.
  • But Napoleon came and swept him aside, unconscious of his existence, as he might brush a chip from his path, and his Bald Hills and his whole life fell to pieces.
  • A cold shiver ran down his spine.
  • Prince Andrew looked out of the shed and saw Pierre, who had tripped over a pole on the ground and had nearly fallen, coming his way.
  • It was unpleasant to Prince Andrew to meet people of his own set in general, and Pierre especially, for he reminded him of all the painful moments of his last visit to Moscow.
  • As he said this his eyes and face expressed more than coldness--they expressed hostility, which Pierre noticed at once.
  • The officers were about to take leave, but Prince Andrew, apparently reluctant to be left alone with his friend, asked them to stay and have tea.
  • The officers gazed with surprise at Pierre's huge stout figure and listened to his talk of Moscow and the position of our army, round which he had ridden.
  • Prince Andrew remained silent, and his expression was so forbidding that Pierre addressed his remarks chiefly to the good-natured battalion commander.
  • "Oh!" said Pierre, looking over his spectacles in perplexity at Prince Andrew.
  • "I was very glad of his appointment, that's all I know," replied Prince Andrew.
  • But when his Serenity took command everything became straight forward.
  • Prince Andrew glanced at Timokhin, who looked at his commander in alarm and bewilderment.
  • Fine teachers! and again his voice grew shrill.
  • He paced up and down a few times in silence, but his eyes glittered feverishly and his lips quivered as he began speaking.
  • He closed his eyes.
  • One picture succeeded another in his imagination.
  • "I not only understood her, but it was just that inner, spiritual force, that sincerity, that frankness of soul-- that very soul of hers which seemed to be fettered by her body--it was that soul I loved in her... loved so strongly and happily..." and suddenly he remembered how his love had ended.
  • He only saw in her a pretty and fresh young girl, with whom he did not deign to unite his fate.
  • Fabvier, not entering the tent, remained at the entrance talking to some generals of his acquaintance.
  • The Emperor Napoleon had not yet left his bedroom and was finishing his toilet.
  • Another valet, with his finger over the mouth of a bottle, was sprinkling Eau de Cologne on the Emperor's pampered body with an expression which seemed to say that he alone knew where and how much Eau de Cologne should be sprinkled.
  • Napoleon's short hair was wet and matted on the forehead, but his face, though puffy and yellow, expressed physical satisfaction.
  • An aide-de-camp, who had entered the bedroom to report to the Emperor the number of prisoners taken in yesterday's action, was standing by the door after delivering his message, awaiting permission to withdraw.
  • Napoleon, frowning, looked at him from under his brows.
  • Go on... harder, harder! he muttered, hunching his back and presenting his fat shoulders.
  • Two valets rapidly dressed His Majesty, and wearing the blue uniform of the Guards he went with firm quick steps to the reception room.
  • Napoleon made ironic remarks during Fabvier's account, as if he had not expected that matters could go otherwise in his absence.
  • Napoleon turned to him gaily and pulled his ear.
  • Well, what is Paris saying? he asked, suddenly changing his former stern expression for a most cordial tone.
  • But though Napoleon knew that de Beausset had to say something of this kind, and though in his lucid moments he knew it was untrue, he was pleased to hear it from him.
  • Again he honored him by touching his ear.
  • Napoleon smiled and, lifting his head absent-mindedly, glanced to the right.
  • With courtly adroitness de Beausset half turned and without turning his back to the Emperor retired two steps, twitching off the cloth at the same time, and said:
  • The ball represented the terrestrial globe and the stick in his other hand a scepter.
  • With the natural capacity of an Italian for changing the expression of his face at will, he drew nearer to the portrait and assumed a look of pensive tenderness.
  • His eyes grew dim, he moved forward, glanced round at a chair (which seemed to place itself under him), and sat down on it before the portrait.
  • At a single gesture from him everyone went out on tiptoe, leaving the great man to himself and his emotion.
  • He ordered the portrait to be carried outside his tent, that the Old Guard, stationed round it, might not be deprived of the pleasure of seeing the King of Rome, the son and heir of their adored monarch.
  • After breakfast Napoleon in de Beausset's presence dictated his order of the day to the army.
  • When Napoleon came out of the tent the shouting of the Guards before his son's portrait grew still louder.
  • De Beausset closed his eyes, bowed his head, and sighed deeply, to indicate how profoundly he valued and comprehended the Emperor's words.
  • On the twenty-fifth of August, so his historians tell us, Napoleon spent the whole day on horseback inspecting the locality, considering plans submitted to him by his marshals, and personally giving commands to his generals.
  • To a proposal made by General Campan (who was to attack the fleches) to lead his division through the woods, Napoleon agreed, though the so-called Duke of Elchingen (Ney) ventured to remark that a movement through the woods was dangerous and might disorder the division.
  • After giving these and other commands he returned to his tent, and the dispositions for the battle were written down from his dictation.
  • This could not be done and was not done, because Poniatowski, advancing on the village through the wood, met Tuchkov there barring his way, and could not and did not turn the Russian position.
  • But this was not and could not be done, for during the whole battle Napoleon was so far away that, as appeared later, he could not know the course of the battle and not one of his orders during the fight could be executed.
  • And it was not Napoleon who directed the course of the battle, for none of his orders were executed and during the battle he did not know what was going on before him.
  • It only seemed to Napoleon that it all took place by his will.
  • His pseudo- orders during the battle were also no worse than formerly, but much the same as usual.
  • Having ordered punch and summoned de Beausset, he began to talk to him about Paris and about some changes he meant to make in the Empress' household, surprising the prefect by his memory of minute details relating to the court.
  • Having finished his second glass of punch, Napoleon went to rest before the serious business which, he considered, awaited him next day.
  • He was so much interested in that task that he was unable to sleep, and in spite of his cold which had grown worse from the dampness of the evening, he went into the large division of the tent at three o'clock in the morning, loudly blowing his nose.
  • Napoleon frowned and sat silent for a long time leaning his head on his hand.
  • Napoleon took a lozenge, put it in his mouth, and glanced at his watch.
  • Napoleon ordered another glass to be brought for Rapp, and silently sipped his own.
  • "I have neither taste nor smell," he remarked, sniffing at his glass.
  • Do you remember at Braunau he commanded an army for three weeks and did not once mount a horse to inspect his entrenchments....
  • He looked at his watch.
  • Napoleon walked about in front of his tent, looked at the fires and listened to these sounds, and as he was passing a tall guardsman in a shaggy cap, who was standing sentinel before his tent and had drawn himself up like a black pillar at sight of the Emperor, Napoleon stopped in front of him.
  • Napoleon with his suite rode up to the Shevardino Redoubt where he dismounted.
  • On returning to Gorki after having seen Prince Andrew, Pierre ordered his groom to get the horses ready and to call him early in the morning, and then immediately fell asleep behind a partition in a corner Boris had given up to him.
  • The panes were rattling in the little windows and his groom was shaking him.
  • All the gentlemen have gone out, and his Serene Highness himself rode past long ago.
  • A crowd of military men was assembled there, members of the staff could be heard conversing in French, and Kutuzov's gray head in a white cap with a red band was visible, his gray nape sunk between his shoulders.
  • He turned to look at Kutuzov and his suite, to compare his impressions with those of others.
  • All their faces were now shining with that latent warmth of feeling Pierre had noticed the day before and had fully understood after his talk with Prince Andrew.
  • Kutuzov was saying to a general who stood beside him, not taking his eye from the battlefield.
  • Having received this order the general passed by Pierre on his way down the knoll.
  • They all gazed with the same dissatisfied and inquiring expression at this stout man in a white hat, who for some unknown reason threatened to trample them under his horse's hoofs.
  • Another prodded his horse with the butt end of a musket, and Pierre, bending over his saddlebow and hardly able to control his shying horse, galloped ahead of the soldiers where there was a free space.
  • He looked about him with a smile which did not leave his face.
  • But the adjutant turned his horse about and rode on.
  • "Yes, I'll come with you," replied Pierre, looking round for his groom.
  • On that very meadow he had ridden over the day before, a soldier was lying athwart the rows of scented hay, with his head thrown awkwardly back and his shako off.
  • Pierre did not find his groom and rode along the hollow with the adjutant to Raevski's Redoubt.
  • His horse lagged behind the adjutant's and jolted him at every step.
  • Moreover, his whole attention was engrossed by watching the family circle--separated from all else-- formed by the men in the battery.
  • His first unconscious feeling of joyful animation produced by the sights and sounds of the battlefield was now replaced by another, especially since he had seen that soldier lying alone in the hayfield.
  • And the sergeant, taking one of the men by the shoulders, gave him a shove with his knee.
  • "Oh, she nearly knocked our gentleman's hat off!" cried the red-faced humorist, showing his teeth chaffing Pierre.
  • Pierre did not look out at the battlefield and was not concerned to know what was happening there; he was entirely absorbed in watching this fire which burned ever more brightly and which he felt was flaming up in the same way in his own soul.
  • Pierre looked over the wall of the trench and was particularly struck by a pale young officer who, letting his sword hang down, was walking backwards and kept glancing uneasily around.
  • The young officer, with his face still more flushed, commanded the men more scrupulously than ever.
  • The young officer, his hand to his shako, ran up to his superior.
  • A cannon ball struck the very end of the earth work by which he was standing, crumbling down the earth; a black ball flashed before his eyes and at the same instant plumped into something.
  • The sergeant ran up to the officer and in a frightened whisper informed him (as a butler at dinner informs his master that there is no more of some wine asked for) that there were no more charges.
  • The officer's face was red and perspiring and his eyes glittered under his frowning brow.
  • At the same instant he was dazzled by a great flash of flame, and immediately a deafening roar, crackling, and whistling made his ears tingle.
  • He saw the senior officer lying on the earth wall with his back turned as if he were examining something down below and that one of the soldiers he had noticed before was struggling forward shouting "Brothers!" and trying to free himself from some men who were holding him by the arm.
  • The officer, dropping his sword, seized Pierre by his collar.
  • Pierre too bent his head and let his hands fall.
  • The sun had risen brightly and its slanting rays struck straight into Napoleon's face as, shading his eyes with his hand, he looked at the fleches.
  • Napoleon, standing on the knoll, looked through a field glass, and in its small circlet saw smoke and men, sometimes his own and sometimes Russians, but when he looked again with the naked eye, he could not tell where what he had seen was.
  • But not only was it impossible to make out what was happening from where he was standing down below, or from the knoll above on which some of his generals had taken their stand, but even from the fleches themselves--in which by this time there were now Russian and now French soldiers, alternately or together, dead, wounded, alive, frightened, or maddened-- even at those fleches themselves it was impossible to make out what was taking place.
  • In the middle of the day Murat sent his adjutant to Napoleon to demand reinforcements.
  • "Reinforcements?" said Napoleon in a tone of stern surprise, looking at the adjutant--a handsome lad with long black curls arranged like Murat's own--as though he did not understand his words.
  • The handsome boy adjutant with the long hair sighed deeply without removing his hand from his hat and galloped back to where men were being slaughtered.
  • He swore on his honor that the Russians were lost if the Emperor would give another division.
  • Napoleon shrugged his shoulders and continued to pace up and down without replying.
  • The adjutant bent his head affirmatively and began to report, but the Emperor turned from him, took a couple of steps, stopped, came back, and called Berthier.
  • "We must give reserves," he said, moving his arms slightly apart.
  • Napoleon did not notice that in regard to his army he was playing the part of a doctor who hinders by his medicines--a role he so justly understood and condemned.
  • Napoleon silently shook his head in negation.
  • Napoleon was experiencing a feeling of depression like that of an ever- lucky gambler who, after recklessly flinging money about and always winning, suddenly just when he has calculated all the chances of the game, finds that the more he considers his play the more surely he loses.
  • But now something strange was happening to his troops.
  • Despite news of the capture of the fleches, Napoleon saw that this was not the same, not at all the same, as what had happened in his former battles.
  • He knew that it was a lost battle and that the least accident might now--with the fight balanced on such a strained center--destroy him and his army.
  • The Russians might fall on his left wing, might break through his center, he himself might be killed by a stray cannon ball.
  • He sat silently on a campstool below the knoll, with head bowed and elbows on his knees.
  • Neither Napoleon nor any of his generals had ever before seen such horrors or so many slain in such a small area.
  • Napoleon stopped his horse and again fell into the reverie from which Berthier had aroused him.
  • Napoleon bowed his head and remained silent a long time.
  • "At eight hundred leagues from France, I will not have my Guard destroyed!" he said, and turning his horse rode back to Shevardino.
  • On the rug-covered bench where Pierre had seen him in the morning sat Kutuzov, his gray head hanging, his heavy body relaxed.
  • Kutuzov's general expression was one of concentrated quiet attention, and his face wore a strained look as if he found it difficult to master the fatigue of his old and feeble body.
  • Kutuzov groaned and swayed his head.
  • "Ride over to Prince Peter Ivanovich and find out about it exactly," he said to one of his adjutants, and then turned to the Duke of Wurttemberg who was standing behind him.
  • Soon after the duke's departure--before he could possibly have reached Semenovsk--his adjutant came back from him and told Kutuzov that the duke asked for more troops.
  • When Scherbinin came galloping from the left flank with news that the French had captured the fleches and the village of Semenovsk, Kutuzov, guessing by the sounds of the battle and by Scherbinin's looks that the news was bad, rose as if to stretch his legs and, taking Scherbinin's arm, led him aside.
  • Several times his head dropped low as if it were falling and he dozed off.
  • He treated his Serene Highness with a somewhat affected nonchalance intended to show that, as a highly trained military man, he left it to Russians to make an idol of this useless old man, but that he knew whom he was dealing with.
  • Kutuzov called to his adjutant.
  • The tales passing from mouth to mouth at different ends of the army did not even resemble what Kutuzov had said, but the sense of his words spread everywhere because what he said was not the outcome of cunning calculations, but of a feeling that lay in the commander-in-chief's soul as in that of every Russian.
  • Prince Andrew, pale and gloomy like everyone in the regiment, paced up and down from the border of one patch to another, at the edge of the meadow beside an oatfield, with head bowed and arms behind his back.
  • All the powers of his soul, as of every soldier there, were unconsciously bent on avoiding the contemplation of the horrors of their situation.
  • A chill ran down his back.
  • At one and the same moment came the sound of an explosion, a whistle of splinters as from a breaking window frame, a suffocating smell of powder, and Prince Andrew started to one side, raising his arm, and fell on his chest.
  • From the right side of his abdomen, blood was welling out making a large stain on the grass.
  • Prince Andrew lay on his chest with his face in the grass, breathing heavily and noisily.
  • The peasants went up and took him by his shoulders and legs, but he moaned piteously and, exchanging looks, they set him down again.
  • Prince Andrew opened his eyes and looked up at the speaker from the stretcher into which his head had sunk deep and again his eyelids drooped.
  • Prince Andrew opened his eyes and for a long time could not make out what was going on around him.
  • He remembered the meadow, the wormwood, the field, the whirling black ball, and his sudden rush of passionate love of life.
  • Around him, eagerly listening to his talk, a crowd of wounded and stretcher-bearers was gathered.
  • One of the doctors came out of the tent in a bloodstained apron, holding a cigar between the thumb and little finger of one of his small bloodstained hands, so as not to smear it.
  • He raised his head and looked about him, but above the level of the wounded men.
  • After turning his head from right to left for some time, he sighed and looked down.
  • The pitiful groans from all sides and the torturing pain in his thigh, stomach, and back distracted him.
  • Four soldiers were holding him, and a spectacled doctor was cutting into his muscular brown back.
  • On the other table, round which many people were crowding, a tall well-fed man lay on his back with his head thrown back.
  • His curly hair, its color, and the shape of his head seemed strangely familiar to Prince Andrew.
  • His curly hair, its color, and the shape of his head seemed strangely familiar to Prince Andrew.
  • When he had finished with the Tartar, whom they covered with an overcoat, the spectacled doctor came up to Prince Andrew, wiping his hands.
  • Then he made a sign to someone, and the torturing pain in his abdomen caused Prince Andrew to lose consciousness.
  • Water was being sprinkled on his face.
  • As soon as Prince Andrew opened his eyes, the doctor bent over, kissed him silently on the lips, and hurried away.
  • Oh, ooh! his frightened moans could be heard, subdued by suffering and broken by sobs.
  • The wounded man was shown his amputated leg stained with clotted blood and with the boot still on.
  • Men were supporting him in their arms and offering him a glass of water, but his trembling, swollen lips could not grasp its rim.
  • He now remembered the connection that existed between himself and this man who was dimly gazing at him through tears that filled his swollen eyes.
  • He remembered everything, and ecstatic pity and love for that man overflowed his happy heart.
  • Prince Andrew could no longer restrain himself and wept tender loving tears for his fellow men, for himself, and for his own and their errors.
  • This day the horrible appearance of the battlefield overcame that strength of mind which he thought constituted his merit and his greatness.
  • He rode hurriedly from the battlefield and returned to the Shevardino knoll, where he sat on his campstool, his sallow face swollen and heavy, his eyes dim, his nose red, and his voice hoarse, involuntarily listening, with downcast eyes, to the sounds of firing.
  • He felt in his own person the sufferings and death he had witnessed on the battlefield.
  • The heaviness of his head and chest reminded him of the possibility of suffering and death for himself.
  • Never to the end of his life could he understand goodness, beauty, or truth, or the significance of his actions which were too contrary to goodness and truth, too remote from everything human, for him ever to be able to grasp their meaning.
  • He could not disavow his actions, belauded as they were by half the world, and so he had to repudiate truth, goodness, and all humanity.
  • To speak of what would have happened had Napoleon sent his Guards is like talking of what would happen if autumn became spring.
  • Napoleon did not give his Guards, not because he did not want to, but because it could not be done.
  • It was not Napoleon alone who had experienced that nightmare feeling of the mighty arm being stricken powerless, but all the generals and soldiers of his army whether they had taken part in the battle or not, after all their experience of previous battles--when after one tenth of such efforts the enemy had fled--experienced a similar feeling of terror before an enemy who, after losing HALF his men, stood as threateningly at the end as at the beginning of the battle.
  • Not that sort of victory which is defined by the capture of pieces of material fastened to sticks, called standards, and of the ground on which the troops had stood and were standing, but a moral victory that convinces the enemy of the moral superiority of his opponent and of his own impotence was gained by the Russians at Borodino.
  • For people accustomed to think that plans of campaign and battles are made by generals--as any one of us sitting over a map in his study may imagine how he would have arranged things in this or that battle--the questions present themselves: Why did Kutuzov during the retreat not do this or that?
  • Learned military authorities quite seriously tell us that Kutuzov should have moved his army to the Kaluga road long before reaching Fili, and that somebody actually submitted such a proposal to him.
  • On the Poklonny Hill, four miles from the Dorogomilov gate of Moscow, Kutuzov got out of his carriage and sat down on a bench by the roadside.
  • Bennigsen, who had chosen the position, warmly displayed his Russian patriotism (Kutuzov could not listen to this without wincing) by insisting that Moscow must be defended.
  • "My head, be it good or bad, must depend on itself," said he, rising from the bench, and he rode to Fili where his carriages were waiting.
  • Only Malasha, Andrew's six-year-old granddaughter whom his Serene Highness had petted and to whom he had given a lump of sugar while drinking his tea, remained on the top of the brick oven in the larger room.
  • He sat, sunk deep in a folding armchair, and continually cleared his throat and pulled at the collar of his coat which, though it was unbuttoned, still seemed to pinch his neck.
  • In the foremost place, immediately under the icons, sat Barclay de Tolly, his high forehead merging into his bald crown.
  • He had a St. George's Cross round his neck and looked pale and ill.
  • Chubby little Dokhturov was listening attentively with eyebrows raised and arms folded on his stomach.
  • On the other side sat Count Ostermann- Tolstoy, seemingly absorbed in his own thoughts.
  • His broad head with its bold features and glittering eyes was resting on his hand.
  • His broad head with its bold features and glittering eyes was resting on his hand.
  • Raevski, twitching forward the black hair on his temples as was his habit, glanced now at Kutuzov and now at the door with a look of impatience.
  • His glance met Malasha's, and the expression of his eyes caused the little girl to smile.
  • His glance met Malasha's, and the expression of his eyes caused the little girl to smile.
  • She was nearest to him and saw how his face puckered; he seemed about to cry, but this did not last long.
  • He lurched his heavy body forward out of the recliner.
  • That is the question on which I want your opinion, and he sank back in his chair.
  • Bennigsen did not yet consider his game lost.
  • When he had dismissed the generals Kutuzov sat a long time with his elbows on the table, thinking always of the same terrible question: When, when did the abandonment of Moscow become inevitable?
  • "I did not expect this," said he to his adjutant Schneider when the latter came in late that night.
  • The same thing that took place in Moscow had happened in all the towns and villages on Russian soil beginning with Smolensk, without the participation of Count Rostopchin and his broadsheets.
  • In his broadsheets Rostopchin impressed on them that to leave Moscow was shameful.
  • It is impossible to suppose that Rostopchin had scared them by his accounts of horrors Napoleon had committed in conquered countries.
  • The enchanting, middle-aged Frenchman laid his hands on her head and, as she herself afterward described it, she felt something like a fresh breeze wafted into her soul.
  • But the abbe, though he evidently enjoyed the beauty of his companion, was absorbed in his mastery of the matter.
  • He was delighted at the unexpected rapidity of his pupil's progress, but could not abandon the edifice of argument he had laboriously constructed.
  • Prince Vasili, who of late very often forgot what he had said and repeated one and the same thing a hundred times, remarked to his daughter whenever he chanced to see her:
  • That is all I have to say, and concealing his unvarying emotion he would press his cheek against his daughter's and move away.
  • "Listen, Bilibin," said Helene (she always called friends of that sort by their surnames), and she touched his coat sleeve with her white, beringed fingers.
  • Bilibin shrugged his shoulders, as much as to say that not even he could help in that difficulty.
  • Bilibin puckered his skin in preparation for something witty.
  • Just then the lady companion who lived with Helene came in to announce that His Highness was in the ballroom and wished to see her.
  • "Yes, she is right," thought the old princess, all her convictions dissipated by the appearance of His Highness.
  • And so I pray God to have you, my friend, in His holy and powerful keeping--Your friend Helene.
  • Toward the end of the battle of Borodino, Pierre, having run down from Raevski's battery a second time, made his way through a gully to Knyazkovo with a crowd of soldiers, reached the dressing station, and seeing blood and hearing cries and groans hurried on, still entangled in the crowds of soldiers.
  • The one thing he now desired with his whole soul was to get away quickly from the terrible sensations amid which he had lived that day and return to ordinary conditions of life and sleep quietly in a room in his own bed.
  • Pierre lay leaning on his elbow for a long time, gazing at the shadows that moved past him in the darkness.
  • "I, I..." said Pierre, feeling it necessary to minimize his social position as much as possible so as to be nearer to the soldiers and better understood by them.
  • Another shook his head.
  • As he sat bending greedily over it, helping himself to large spoonfuls and chewing one after another, his face was lit up by the fire and the soldiers looked at him in silence.
  • Pierre went on with the soldiers, quite forgetting that his inn was at the bottom of the hill and that he had already passed it.
  • The groom recognized Pierre in the darkness by his white hat.
  • "Good-bye!" he said and turned with his groom toward the inn.
  • "I ought to give them something!" he thought, and felt in his pocket.
  • Pierre went out into the yard and, covering himself up head and all, lay down in his carriage.
  • Scarcely had Pierre laid his head on the pillow before he felt himself falling asleep, but suddenly, almost with the distinctness of reality, he heard the boom, boom, boom of firing, the thud of projectiles, groans and cries, and smelled blood and powder, and a feeling of horror and dread of death seized him.
  • Filled with fright he opened his eyes and lifted his head from under his cloak.
  • "Thank God, there is no more of that!" he thought, covering up his head again.
  • And the memory of the dinner at the English Club when he had challenged Dolokhov flashed through Pierre's mind, and then he remembered his benefactor at Torzhok.
  • And now a picture of a solemn meeting of the lodge presented itself to his mind.
  • Pierre did not understand what his benefactor was saying, but he knew (the categories of thoughts were also quite distinct in his dream) that he was talking of goodness and the possibility of being what they were.
  • And they with their simple, kind, firm faces surrounded his benefactor on all sides.
  • Wishing to speak and to attract their attention, he got up, but at that moment his legs grew cold and bare.
  • He felt ashamed, and with one arm covered his legs from which his cloak had in fact slipped.
  • For a moment as he was rearranging his cloak Pierre opened his eyes and saw the same penthouse roofs, posts, and yard, but now they were all bluish, lit up, and glittering with frost or dew.
  • Again he covered himself up with his cloak, but now neither the lodge nor his benefactor was there.
  • If there were no suffering, man would not know his limitations, would not know himself.
  • The hardest thing (Pierre went on thinking, or hearing, in his dream) is to be able in your soul to unite the meaning of all.
  • Pierre turned away with repugnance, and closing his eyes quickly fell back on the carriage seat.
  • Pierre offered the use of his carriage, which had overtaken him, to a wounded general he knew, and drove with him to Moscow.
  • On the way Pierre was told of the death of his brother-in-law Anatole and of that of Prince Andrew.
  • Count Rostopchin had only that morning returned to town from his summer villa at Sokolniki.
  • In answer to questions with which he was greeted, the courier made a despairing gesture with his hand and passed through the room.
  • "But you see what he writes..." said another, pointing to a printed sheet he held in his hand.
  • His Serene Highness has passed through Mozhaysk in order to join up with the troops moving toward him and has taken up a strong position where the enemy will not soon attack him.
  • "Oh, so that is Vereshchagin!" said Pierre, looking at the firm, calm face of the old man and seeking any indication of his being a traitor.
  • An old gentleman wearing a star and another official, a German wearing a cross round his neck, approached the speaker.
  • His father keeps a cookshop here by the Stone Bridge, and you know there was a large icon of God Almighty painted with a scepter in one hand and an orb in the other.
  • When he entered the private room Count Rostopchin, puckering his face, was rubbing his forehead and eyes with his hand.
  • It has now come to my knowledge that you lent him your carriage for his removal from town, and that you have even accepted papers from him for safe custody.
  • "Why, nothing," answered Pierre without raising his eyes or changing the thoughtful expression of his face.
  • When left alone at last he opened and read his wife's letter.
  • And going to his bed he threw himself on it without undressing and immediately fell asleep.
  • Petya could not return unless his regiment did so or unless he was transferred to another regiment on active service.
  • Nicholas was somewhere with the army and had not sent a word since his last letter, in which he had given a detailed account of his meeting with Princess Mary.
  • The passionate tenderness with which his mother received him did not please the sixteen-year-old officer.
  • Though she concealed from him her intention of keeping him under her wing, Petya guessed her designs, and instinctively fearing that he might give way to emotion when with her--might "become womanish" as he termed it to himself--he treated her coldly, avoided her, and during his stay in Moscow attached himself exclusively to Natasha for whom he had always had a particularly brotherly tenderness, almost lover-like.
  • The countess watched the things being packed, was dissatisfied with everything, was constantly in pursuit of Petya who was always running away from her, and was jealous of Natasha with whom he spent all his time.
  • The major raised his hand to his cap with a smile.
  • "Which one do you want, Ma'am'selle?" said he, screwing up his eyes and smiling.
  • The count was not angry even when they told him that Natasha had countermanded an order of his, and the servants now came to her to ask whether a cart was sufficiently loaded, and whether it might be corded up.
  • The old servant returned to the caleche, looked into it, shook his head disconsolately, told the driver to turn into the yard, and stopped beside Mavra Kuzminichna.
  • So thought the major-domo on his master's behalf.
  • On waking up that morning Count Ilya Rostov left his bedroom softly, so as not to wake the countess who had fallen asleep only toward morning, and came out to the porch in his lilac silk dressing gown.
  • "Well, Vasilich, is everything ready?" asked the count, and stroking his bald head he looked good-naturedly at the officer and the orderly and nodded to them.
  • The officer came nearer and suddenly his face flushed crimson.
  • Before the officer had finished speaking the orderly made the same request on behalf of his master.
  • The count went into the house with him, repeating his order not to refuse the wounded who asked for a lift.
  • Flourishing his arms in despair the count left the room without replying.
  • Berg drove up to his father-in-law's house in his spruce little trap with a pair of sleek roans, exactly like those of a certain prince.
  • I tell you, Papa" (he smote himself on the breast as a general he had heard speaking had done, but Berg did it a trifle late for he should have struck his breast at the words "Russian army"), "I tell you frankly that we, the commanders, far from having to urge the men on or anything of that kind, could hardly restrain those... those... yes, those exploits of antique valor," he went on rapidly.
  • General Barclay de Tolly risked his life everywhere at the head of the troops, I can assure you.
  • Natasha watched him with an intent gaze that confused him, as if she were trying to find in his face the answer to some question.
  • Berg hurriedly jumped up, kissed her hand, asked about her health, and, swaying his head from side to side to express sympathy, remained standing beside her.
  • He got up from his chair and went to the door.
  • At that moment Berg drew out his handkerchief as if to blow his nose and, seeing the knot in it, pondered, shaking his head sadly and significantly.
  • (At the mention of the chiffonier and dressing table Berg involuntarily changed his tone to one of pleasure at his admirable domestic arrangements.)
  • Suddenly he sniffed and put his face closer to the window.
  • "The eggs... the eggs are teaching the hen," muttered the count through tears of joy, and he embraced his wife who was glad to hide her look of shame on his breast.
  • Then the count embraced Mavra Kuzminichna and Vasilich, who were to remain in Moscow, and while they caught at his hand and kissed his shoulder he patted their backs lightly with some vaguely affectionate and comforting words.
  • "Oh, those servants!" said the count, swaying his head.
  • Then Efim deliberately doffed his hat and began crossing himself.
  • "Off, in God's name!" said Efim, putting on his hat.
  • The postilion started the horses, the off pole horse tugged at his collar, the high springs creaked, and the body of the coach swayed.
  • At length when he had understood and looked in the direction the old man indicated, he recognized Natasha, and following his first impulse stepped instantly and rapidly toward the coach.
  • When he woke up on the morning after his return to Moscow and his interview with Count Rostopchin, he could not for some time make out where he was and what was expected of him.
  • When he was informed that among others awaiting him in his reception room there was a Frenchman who had brought a letter from his wife, the Countess Helene, he felt suddenly overcome by that sense of confusion and hopelessness to which he was apt to succumb.
  • Smiling unnaturally and muttering to himself, he first sat down on the sofa in an attitude of despair, then rose, went to the door of the reception room and peeped through the crack, returned flourishing his arms, and took up a book.
  • His major-domo came in a second time to say that the Frenchman who had brought the letter from the countess was very anxious to see him if only for a minute, and that someone from Bazdeev's widow had called to ask Pierre to take charge of her husband's books, as she herself was leaving for the country.
  • But as soon as the man had left the room Pierre took up his hat which was lying on the table and went out of his study by the other door.
  • He went along the whole length of this passage to the stairs and, frowning and rubbing his forehead with both hands, went down as far as the first landing.
  • When he felt he was being looked at he behaved like an ostrich which hides its head in a bush in order not to be seen: he hung his head and quickening his pace went down the street.
  • Gerasim, that sallow beardless old man Pierre had seen at Torzhok five years before with Joseph Bazdeev, came out in answer to his knock.
  • Makar Alexeevich, the brother of my late master--may the kingdom of heaven be his--has remained here, but he is in a weak state as you know, said the old servant.
  • Pierre went into that gloomy study which he had entered with such trepidation in his benefactor's lifetime.
  • He sat down at the dusty writing table, and, having laid the manuscripts before him, opened them out, closed them, finally pushed them away, and resting his head on his hand sank into meditation.
  • More than two hours passed and Gerasim took the liberty of making a slight noise at the door to attract his attention, but Pierre did not hear him.
  • "Look here," he added, taking Gerasim by a button of his coat and looking down at the old man with moist, shining, and ecstatic eyes, "I say, do you know that there is going to be a battle tomorrow?"
  • All the rest of that day Pierre spent alone in his benefactor's study, and Gerasim heard him pacing restlessly from one corner to another and talking to himself.
  • Gerasim, being a servant who in his time had seen many strange things, accepted Pierre's taking up his residence in the house without surprise, and seemed pleased to have someone to wait on.
  • Makar Alexeevich came twice that evening shuffling along in his galoshes as far as the door and stopped and looked ingratiatingly at Pierre.
  • But as soon as Pierre turned toward him he wrapped his dressing gown around him with a shamefaced and angry look and hurried away.
  • It was when Pierre (wearing the coachman's coat which Gerasim had procured for him and had disinfected by steam) was on his way with the old man to buy the pistol at the Sukharev market that he met the Rostovs.
  • At that very time, at ten in the morning of the second of September, Napoleon was standing among his troops on the Poklonny Hill looking at the panorama spread out before him.
  • In what light must I appear to them! thought he, thinking of his troops.
  • His speech to the boyars had already taken definite shape in his imagination.
  • His speech to the boyars had already taken definite shape in his imagination.
  • In his imagination he appointed days for assemblies at the palace of the Tsars, at which Russian notables and his own would mingle.
  • Meanwhile an agitated consultation was being carried on in whispers among his generals and marshals at the rear of his suite.
  • When with due circumspection Napoleon was informed that Moscow was empty, he looked angrily at his informant, turned away, and silently continued to walk to and fro.
  • Two officers, one with a scarf over his uniform and mounted on a lean, dark-gray horse, the other in an overcoat and on foot, stood at the corner of Ilyinka Street, talking.
  • A shopkeeper with red pimples on his cheeks near the nose, and a calm, persistent, calculating expression on his plump face, hurriedly and ostentatiously approached the officer, swinging his arms.
  • And flourishing his arm energetically he turned sideways to the officer.
  • The officer stood perplexed and his face showed indecision.
  • What is it? he asked, but his comrade was already galloping off past Vasili the Beatified in the direction from which the screams came.
  • The officer mounted his horse and rode after him.
  • He was told by his fellow officers that the screams of the crowd and the shrieks of the woman were due to the fact that General Ermolov, coming up to the crowd and learning that soldiers were dispersing among the shops while crowds of civilians blocked the bridge, had ordered two guns to be unlimbered and made a show of firing at the bridge.
  • They were the yard porter Ignat, and the page boy Mishka, Vasilich's grandson who had stayed in Moscow with his grandfather.
  • The yard porter, his arms akimbo, stood smiling with satisfaction before the large mirror.
  • "Only fancy!" answered Ignat, surprised at the broadening grin on his face in the mirror.
  • Ignat left off smiling, adjusted his belt, and went out of the room with meekly downcast eyes.
  • The young officer standing in the gateway, as if hesitating whether to enter or not, clicked his tongue.
  • Meanwhile, Mavra Kuzminichna was attentively and sympathetically examining the familiar Rostov features of the young man's face, his tattered coat and trodden-down boots.
  • "Oh well... it can't be helped!" said he in a tone of vexation and placed his hand on the gate as if to leave.
  • Swaying his head and smiling as if amused at himself, the officer ran almost at a trot through the deserted streets toward the Yauza bridge to overtake his regiment.
  • The sleeve of his coat kept slipping down and he always carefully rolled it up again with his left hand, as if it were most important that the sinewy white arm he was flourishing should be bare.
  • The tall lad waved his arm.
  • And, still rolling up his sleeve, he went out to the porch.
  • Another smith tried to enter the doorway, pressing against the publican with his chest.
  • At that moment the first smith got up and, scratching his bruised face to make it bleed, shouted in a tearful voice: Police!
  • The tall lad, standing in the porch, turned his bleared eyes from the publican to the smith and back again as if considering whom he ought to fight now.
  • "I daresay you would like to bind me!" shouted the publican, pushing away the men advancing on him, and snatching his cap from his head he flung it on the ground.
  • Robbery is not permitted to anybody now a days! shouted the publican, picking up his cap.
  • The publican, taking advantage of the increased crowd, dropped behind and returned to his tavern.
  • By the wall of China-Town a smaller group of people were gathered round a man in a frieze coat who held a paper in his hand.
  • When the crowd collected round him he seemed confused, but at the demand of the tall lad who had pushed his way up to him, he began in a rather tremulous voice to read the sheet from the beginning.
  • The tall lad hung his head gloomily.
  • The tall youth moved his lips and swayed from side to side.
  • The superintendent of police, who had gone that morning by Count Rostopchin's orders to burn the barges and had in connection with that matter acquired a large sum of money which was at that moment in his pocket, on seeing a crowd bearing down upon him told his coachman to stop.
  • "What people are these?" he shouted to the men, who were moving singly and timidly in the direction of his trap.
  • "Your honor..." replied the shopman in the frieze coat, "your honor, in accord with the proclamation of his highest excellency the count, they desire to serve, not sparing their lives, and it is not any kind of riot, but as his highest excellence said..."
  • "Go on!" he ordered his coachman.
  • The superintendent of police turned round at that moment with a scared look, said something to his coachman, and his horses increased their speed.
  • When later on in his memoirs Count Rostopchin explained his actions at this time, he repeatedly says that he was then actuated by two important considerations: to maintain tranquillity in Moscow and expedite the departure of the inhabitants.
  • Not only did it seem to him (as to all administrators) that he controlled the external actions of Moscow's inhabitants, but he also thought he controlled their mental attitude by means of his broadsheets and posters, written in a coarse tone which the people despise in their own class and do not understand from those in authority.
  • The inhabitants left against his wishes.
  • When, awakened from his sleep, he received that cold, peremptory note from Kutuzov, he felt the more irritated the more he felt himself to blame.
  • "Oh, tell that blockhead," he said in reply to the question from the Registrar's Department, "that he should remain to guard his documents.
  • The count ordered his carriage that he might drive to Sokolniki, and sat in his study with folded hands, morose, sallow, and taciturn.
  • While the sea of history remains calm the ruler-administrator in his frail bark, holding on with a boat hook to the ship of the people and himself moving, naturally imagines that his efforts move the ship he is holding on to.
  • The tall lad was standing in front, flourishing his arm and saying something with a stern look.
  • And this thought occurred to him just because he himself desired a victim, something on which to vent his rage.
  • On his thin, weak legs were heavy chains which hampered his irresolute movements.
  • "Ah!" said Rostopchin, hurriedly turning away his eyes from the young man in the fur-lined coat and pointing to the bottom step of the porch.
  • The young man in his clattering chains stepped clumsily to the spot indicated, holding away with one finger the coat collar which chafed his neck, turned his long neck twice this way and that, sighed, and submissively folded before him his thin hands, unused to work.
  • For several seconds while the young man was taking his place on the step the silence continued.
  • While waiting for the young man to take his place on the step Rostopchin stood frowning and rubbing his face with his hand.
  • "Lads!" said he, with a metallic ring in his voice.
  • The young man in the fur-lined coat, stooping a little, stood in a submissive attitude, his fingers clasped before him.
  • His emaciated young face, disfigured by the half-shaven head, hung down hopelessly.
  • At the count's first words he raised it slowly and looked up at him as if wishing to say something or at least to meet his eye.
  • A vein in the young man's long thin neck swelled like a cord and went blue behind the ear, and suddenly his face flushed.
  • He has betrayed his Tsar and his country, he has gone over to Bonaparte.
  • As if inflamed by the sight, he raised his arm and addressed the people, almost shouting:
  • "Draw sabers!" cried the dragoon officer, drawing his own.
  • The tall youth, with a stony look on his face, and rigid and uplifted arm, stood beside Vereshchagin.
  • And one of the soldiers, his face all at once distorted with fury, struck Vereshchagin on the head with the blunt side of his saber.
  • The dragoon was about to repeat his blow.
  • Vereshchagin with a cry of horror, covering his head with his hands, rushed toward the crowd.
  • The tall youth, against whom he stumbled, seized his thin neck with his hands and, yelling wildly, fell with him under the feet of the pressing, struggling crowd.
  • Only when the victim ceased to struggle and his cries changed to a long- drawn, measured death rattle did the crowd around his prostrate, bleeding corpse begin rapidly to change places.
  • A painstaking police officer, considering the presence of a corpse in his excellency's courtyard unseemly, told the dragoons to take it away.
  • At the moment when Vereshchagin fell and the crowd closed in with savage yells and swayed about him, Rostopchin suddenly turned pale and, instead of going to the back entrance where his carriage awaited him, went with hurried steps and bent head, not knowing where and why, along the passage leading to the rooms on the ground floor.
  • The count's face was white and he could not control the feverish twitching of his lower jaw.
  • At the back entrance stood his caleche.
  • He remembered with dissatisfaction the agitation and fear he had betrayed before his subordinates.
  • One God is above us both!--Vereshchagin's words suddenly recurred to him, and a disagreeable shiver ran down his back.
  • Since the world began and men have killed one another no one has ever committed such a crime against his fellow man without comforting himself with this same idea.
  • Not only did his reason not reproach him for what he had done, but he even found cause for self-satisfaction in having so successfully contrived to avail himself of a convenient opportunity to punish a criminal and at the same time pacify the mob.
  • Having reached his country house and begun to give orders about domestic arrangements, the count grew quite tranquil.
  • Half an hour later he was driving with his fast horses across the Sokolniki field, no longer thinking of what had occurred but considering what was to come.
  • Count Rostopchin was mentally preparing the angry and stinging reproaches he meant to address to Kutuzov for his deception.
  • He would make that foxy old courtier feel that the responsibility for all the calamities that would follow the abandonment of the city and the ruin of Russia (as Rostopchin regarded it) would fall upon his doting old head.
  • Planning beforehand what he would say to Kutuzov, Rostopchin turned angrily in his caleche and gazed sternly from side to side.
  • Swaying from side to side on his long, thin legs in his fluttering dressing gown, this lunatic was running impetuously, his gaze fixed on Rostopchin, shouting something in a hoarse voice and making signs to him to stop.
  • His black, agate pupils with saffron- yellow whites moved restlessly near the lower eyelids.
  • Thrice will I overthrow it and thrice re-establish it! he cried, raising his voice higher and higher.
  • "Go fas... faster!" he cried in a trembling voice to his coachman.
  • The caleche flew over the ground as fast as the horses could draw it, but for a long time Count Rostopchin still heard the insane despairing screams growing fainter in the distance, while his eyes saw nothing but the astonished, frightened, bloodstained face of "the traitor" in the fur-lined coat.
  • Recent as that mental picture was, Rostopchin already felt that it had cut deep into his heart and drawn blood.
  • Even now he felt clearly that the gory trace of that recollection would not pass with time, but that the terrible memory would, on the contrary, dwell in his heart ever more cruelly and painfully to the end of his life.
  • He seemed still to hear the sound of his own words: Cut him down!
  • Kutuzov, dejected and frowning, sat on a bench by the bridge toying with his whip in the sand when a caleche dashed up noisily.
  • A man in a general's uniform with plumes in his hat went up to Kutuzov and said something in French.
  • Kutuzov slightly shook his head and not taking his penetrating gaze from Rostopchin's face muttered softly:
  • "Good!" said Murat and, turning to one of the gentlemen in his suite, ordered four light guns to be moved forward to fire at the gates.
  • A general who was standing by the guns shouted some words of command to the officer, and the latter ran back again with his men.
  • And with that object he had asked Gerasim to get him a peasant's coat and a pistol, confiding to him his intentions of remaining in Joseph Alexeevich's house and keeping his name secret.
  • Then during the first day spent in inaction and solitude (he tried several times to fix his attention on the masonic manuscripts, but was unable to do so) the idea that had previously occurred to him of the cabalistic significance of his name in connection with Bonaparte's more than once vaguely presented itself.
  • And the risk to which he would expose his life by carrying out his design excited him still more.
  • Moreover, at this moment Pierre was supported in his design and prevented from renouncing it by what he had already done in that direction.
  • If he were now to leave Moscow like everyone else, his flight from home, the peasant coat, the pistol, and his announcement to the Rostovs that he would remain in Moscow would all become not merely meaningless but contemptible and ridiculous, and to this Pierre was very sensitive.
  • Pierre's physical condition, as is always the case, corresponded to his mental state.
  • The unaccustomed coarse food, the vodka he drank during those days, the absence of wine and cigars, his dirty unchanged linen, two almost sleepless nights passed on a short sofa without bedding--all this kept him in a state of excitement bordering on insanity.
  • Pierre knew this, but instead of acting he only thought about his undertaking, going over its minutest details in his mind.
  • "Well then, take me and execute me!" he went on, speaking to himself and bowing his head with a sad but firm expression.
  • His dressing gown was unfastened, his face red and distorted.
  • His dressing gown was unfastened, his face red and distorted.
  • On seeing Pierre he grew confused at first, but noticing embarrassment on Pierre's face immediately grew bold and, staggering on his thin legs, advanced into the middle of the room.
  • Makar Alexeevich, frowning with exertion, held on to the pistol and screamed hoarsely, evidently with some heroic fancy in his head.
  • Having done that, the officer, lifting his elbow with a smart gesture, stroked his mustache and lightly touched his hat.
  • "Master, not here--don't understand... me, you..." said Gerasim, trying to render his words more comprehensible by contorting them.
  • Still smiling, the French officer spread out his hands before Gerasim's nose, intimating that he did not understand him either, and moved, limping, to the door at which Pierre was standing.
  • With a madman's cunning, Makar Alexeevich eyed the Frenchman, raised his pistol, and took aim.
  • Just when Pierre snatched at and struck up the pistol Makar Alexeevich at last got his fingers on the trigger, there was a deafening report, and all were enveloped in a cloud of smoke.
  • His handsome face assumed a melodramatically gentle expression and he held out his hand.
  • His handsome face assumed a melodramatically gentle expression and he held out his hand.
  • Tell that to others, said the officer, waving his finger before his nose and smiling.
  • In reply to his last question Pierre again explained who Makar Alexeevich was and how just before their arrival that drunken imbecile had seized the loaded pistol which they had not had time to recover from him, and begged the officer to let the deed go unpunished.
  • The Frenchman expanded his chest and made a majestic gesture with his arm.
  • You ask his pardon?
  • Lead that man away! said he quickly and energetically, and taking the arm of Pierre whom he had promoted to be a Frenchman for saving his life, he went with him into the room.
  • The soldiers went out again, and the orderly, who had meanwhile had time to visit the kitchen, came up to his officer.
  • When the French officer went into the room with Pierre the latter again thought it his duty to assure him that he was not French and wished to go away, but the officer would not hear of it.
  • He was so very polite, amiable, good-natured, and genuinely grateful to Pierre for saving his life that Pierre had not the heart to refuse, and sat down with him in the parlor--the first room they entered.
  • "A Frenchman or a Russian prince incognito," said the officer, looking at Pierre's fine though dirty linen and at the ring on his finger.
  • You belong to the gentry? he concluded with a shade of inquiry in his tone.
  • Pierre bent his head.
  • His face grew red and was covered with perspiration.
  • The satisfaction of his hunger and the wine rendered the captain still more lively and he chatted incessantly all through dinner.
  • Here is one I got at Wagram" (he touched his side) "and a second at Smolensk"--he showed a scar on his cheek--"and this leg which as you see does not want to march, I got that on the seventh at the great battle of la Moskowa.
  • "Paris--the capital of the world," Pierre finished his remark for him.
  • He had a habit of stopping short in the middle of his talk and gazing intently with his laughing, kindly eyes.
  • Paris is Talma, la Duchenois, Potier, the Sorbonne, the boulevards," and noticing that his conclusion was weaker than what had gone before, he added quickly: "There is only one Paris in the world.
  • "The Emperor," Pierre repeated, and his face suddenly became sad and embarrassed, "is the Emperor...?"
  • I assure you I was his enemy eight years ago.
  • The Frenchman looked at his guilty face and smiled.
  • "No, he will make his entry tomorrow," he replied, and continued his talk.
  • The German who knew little French, answered the two first questions by giving the names of his regiment and of his commanding officer, but in reply to the third question which he did not understand said, introducing broken French into his own German, that he was the quartermaster of the regiment and his commander had ordered him to occupy all the houses one after another.
  • When he had understood what was said to him, the German submitted and took his men elsewhere.
  • When he returned to the room Pierre was sitting in the same place as before, with his head in his hands.
  • His face expressed suffering.
  • He was tormented by the consciousness of his own weakness.
  • The few glasses of wine he had drunk and the conversation with this good-natured man had destroyed the mood of concentrated gloom in which he had spent the last few days and which was essential for the execution of his design.
  • He did not know why, but he felt a foreboding that he would not carry out his intention.
  • The tune he was whistling, his gait, and the gesture with which he twirled his mustache, all now seemed offensive.
  • His eyes shone and his mustache twitched as if he were smiling to himself at some amusing thought.
  • His eyes shone and his mustache twitched as if he were smiling to himself at some amusing thought.
  • The captain looked at Pierre by the candlelight and was evidently struck by the troubled expression on his companion's face.
  • Ramballe, with genuine distress and sympathy in his face, went up to Pierre and bent over him.
  • I say it with my hand on my heart! said he, striking his chest.
  • The captain gazed intently at him as he had done when he learned that "shelter" was Unterkunft in German, and his face suddenly brightened.
  • Ramballe emptied his too, again pressed Pierre's hand, and leaned his elbows on the table in a pensive attitude.
  • And with a Frenchman's easy and naive frankness the captain told Pierre the story of his ancestors, his childhood, youth, and manhood, and all about his relations and his financial and family affairs, "ma pauvre mere" playing of course an important part in the story.
  • Pierre again emptied his glass and poured himself out a third.
  • "Oh, women, women!" and the captain, looking with glistening eyes at Pierre, began talking of love and of his love affairs.
  • It was plain that l'amour which the Frenchman was so fond of was not that low and simple kind that Pierre had once felt for his wife, nor was it the romantic love stimulated by himself that he experienced for Natasha.
  • Thus the captain touchingly recounted the story of his love for a fascinating marquise of thirty-five and at the same time for a charming, innocent child of seventeen, daughter of the bewitching marquise.
  • Finally, the latest episode in Poland still fresh in the captain's memory, and which he narrated with rapid gestures and glowing face, was of how he had saved the life of a Pole (in general, the saving of life continually occurred in the captain's stories) and the Pole had entrusted to him his enchanting wife (parisienne de coeur) while himself entering the French service.
  • Having repeated these words the captain wiped his eyes and gave himself a shake, as if driving away the weakness which assailed him at this touching recollection.
  • While listening to these love stories his own love for Natasha unexpectedly rose to his mind, and going over the pictures of that love in his imagination he mentally compared them with Ramballe's tales.
  • Listening to the story of the struggle between love and duty, Pierre saw before his eyes every minutest detail of his last meeting with the object of his love at the Sukharev water tower.
  • Challenged by this question Pierre raised his head and felt a need to express the thoughts that filled his mind.
  • He said that in all his life he had loved and still loved only one woman, and that she could never be his.
  • Whether it was the wine he had drunk, or an impulse of frankness, or the thought that this man did not, and never would, know any of those who played a part in his story, or whether it was all these things together, something loosened Pierre's tongue.
  • Speaking thickly and with a faraway look in his shining eyes, he told the whole story of his life: his marriage, Natasha's love for his best friend, her betrayal of him, and all his own simple relations with her.
  • Urged on by Ramballe's questions he also told what he had at first concealed--his own position and even his name.
  • More than anything else in Pierre's story the captain was impressed by the fact that Pierre was very rich, had two mansions in Moscow, and that he had abandoned everything and not left the city, but remained there concealing his name and station.
  • To the right and high up in the sky was the sickle of the waning moon and opposite to it hung that bright comet which was connected in Pierre's heart with his love.
  • And suddenly remembering his intention he grew dizzy and felt so faint that he leaned against the fence to save himself from falling.
  • Without taking leave of his new friend, Pierre left the gate with unsteady steps and returning to his room lay down on the sofa and immediately fell asleep.
  • The awful pain he suffered made him moan incessantly and piteously, and his moaning sounded terrible in the darkness of the autumn night.
  • She moved simply to be farther away from the wounded man.
  • His voice was calm and deliberate.
  • "Mother Moscow, the white..." his voice faltered, and he gave way to an old man's sob.
  • The count donned his dressing gown and went out to look.
  • Petya was no longer with the family, he had gone on with his regiment which was making for Troitsa.
  • When she saw an indistinct shape in the corner, and mistook his knees raised under the quilt for his shoulders, she imagined a horrible body there, and stood still in terror.
  • She passed the valet, the snuff fell from the candle wick, and she saw Prince Andrew clearly with his arms outside the quilt, and such as she had always seen him.
  • He was the same as ever, but the feverish color of his face, his glittering eyes rapturously turned toward her, and especially his neck, delicate as a child's, revealed by the turn-down collar of his shirt, gave him a peculiarly innocent, childlike look, such as she had never seen on him before.
  • He smiled and held out his hand to her.
  • His feverish state and the inflammation of his bowels, which were injured, were in the doctor's opinion sure to carry him off.
  • His feverish state and the inflammation of his bowels, which were injured, were in the doctor's opinion sure to carry him off.
  • The pain caused by his removal into the hut had made him groan aloud and again lose consciousness.
  • When he had been placed on his camp bed he lay for a long time motionless with closed eyes.
  • His remembering such a small detail of everyday life astonished the doctor.
  • He felt Prince Andrew's pulse, and to his surprise and dissatisfaction found it had improved.
  • He was dissatisfied because he knew by experience that if his patient did not die now, he would do so a little later with greater suffering.
  • They were accompanied by a doctor, Prince Andrew's valet, his coachman, and two orderlies.
  • Prince Andrew answered all his questions reluctantly but reasonably, and then said he wanted a bolster placed under him as he was uncomfortable and in great pain.
  • The doctor went into the passage to wash his hands.
  • "You fellows have no conscience," said he to the valet who was pouring water over his hands.
  • The first time Prince Andrew understood where he was and what was the matter with him and remembered being wounded and how was when he asked to be carried into the hut after his caleche had stopped at Mytishchi.
  • And those thoughts, though now vague and indefinite, again possessed his soul.
  • His mind was not in a normal state.
  • A healthy man can tear himself away from the deepest reflections to say a civil word to someone who comes in and can then return again to his own thoughts.
  • All the powers of his mind were more active and clearer than ever, but they acted apart from his will.
  • At the same time he felt that above his face, above the very middle of it, some strange airy structure was being erected out of slender needles or splinters, to the sound of this whispered music.
  • And suddenly thoughts and feelings again swam to the surface of his mind with peculiar clearness and force.
  • To love one's neighbors, to love one's enemies, to love everything, to love God in all His manifestations.
  • He now understood for the first time all the cruelty of his rejection of her, the cruelty of his rupture with her.
  • And his attention was suddenly carried into another world, a world of reality and delirium in which something particular was happening.
  • "Oh, how oppressive this continual delirium is," thought Prince Andrew, trying to drive that face from his imagination.
  • Prince Andrew collected all his strength in an effort to recover his senses, he moved a little, and suddenly there was a ringing in his ears, a dimness in his eyes, and like a man plunged into water he lost consciousness.
  • Prince Andrew sighed with relief, smiled, and held out his hand.
  • With a rapid but careful movement Natasha drew nearer to him on her knees and, taking his hand carefully, bent her face over it and began kissing it, just touching it lightly with her lips.
  • "Forgive me for what I ha-ve do-ne!" faltered Natasha in a scarcely audible, broken whisper, and began kissing his hand more rapidly, just touching it with her lips.
  • "I love you more, better than before," said Prince Andrew, lifting her face with his hand so as to look into her eyes.
  • "What's this?" said the doctor, rising from his bed.
  • That something shameful was his yesterday's conversation with Captain Ramballe.
  • Pierre rose, rubbed his eyes, and seeing the pistol with an engraved stock which Gerasim had replaced on the writing table, he remembered where he was and what lay before him that very day.
  • No, probably he won't make his entry into Moscow before noon.
  • After arranging his clothes, he took the pistol and was about to go out.
  • But it then occurred to him for the first time that he certainly could not carry the weapon in his hand through the streets.
  • It was difficult to hide such a big pistol even under his wide coat.
  • He could not carry it unnoticed in his belt or under his arm.
  • Having tied a girdle over his coat and pulled his cap low on his head, Pierre went down the corridor, trying to avoid making a noise or meeting the captain, and passed out into the street.
  • Besides his height and stoutness, and the strange morose look of suffering in his face and whole figure, the Russians stared at Pierre because they could not make out to what class he could belong.
  • Pierre shook his head and went on.
  • He carried his resolution within himself in terror and haste, like something dreadful and alien to him, for, after the previous night's experience, he was afraid of losing it.
  • But he was not destined to bring his mood safely to his destination.
  • Though he heard and saw nothing around him he found his way by instinct and did not go wrong in the side streets that led to the Povarskoy.
  • He stopped as if awakening from a dream and lifted his head.
  • The youngest child, a boy of about seven, who wore an overcoat and an immense cap evidently not his own, was crying in his old nurse's arms.
  • The woman's husband, a short, round- shouldered man in the undress uniform of a civilian official, with sausage-shaped whiskers and showing under his square-set cap the hair smoothly brushed forward over his temples, with expressionless face was moving the trunks, which were placed one on another, and was dragging some garments from under them.
  • As soon as she saw Pierre, the woman almost threw herself at his feet.
  • From the expression of his animated face the woman saw that this man might help her.
  • He held his head higher, his eyes shone with the light of life, and with swift steps he followed the maid, overtook her, and came out on the Povarskoy.
  • He ran round to the other side of the lodge and was about to dash into that part of it which was still standing, when just above his head he heard several voices shouting and then a cracking sound and the ring of something heavy falling close beside him.
  • Perhaps it's his brat that the fellow is looking for.
  • And a minute or two later the Frenchman, a black-eyed fellow with a spot on his cheek, in shirt sleeves, really did jump out of a window on the ground floor, and clapping Pierre on the shoulder ran with him into the garden.
  • "Hurry up, you others!" he called out to his comrades.
  • We must be human, we are all mortal you know! and the Frenchman with the spot on his cheek ran back to his comrades.
  • Pierre, however, seized her and lifted her in his arms.
  • Having run through different yards and side streets, Pierre got back with his little burden to the Gruzinski garden at the corner of the Povarskoy.
  • She had now become quiet and, clinging with her little hands to Pierre's coat, sat on his arm gazing about her like some little wild animal.
  • He did not find the civil servant or his wife where he had left them.
  • He had a nightcap on his head and his feet were bare.
  • The other, whose appearance particularly struck Pierre, was a long, lank, round-shouldered, fair-haired man, slow in his movements and with an idiotic expression of face.
  • The little barefooted Frenchman in the blue coat went up to the Armenians and, saying something, immediately seized the old man by his legs and the old man at once began pulling off his boots.
  • The little Frenchman had secured his second boot and was slapping one boot against the other.
  • "Let that woman alone!" exclaimed Pierre hoarsely in a furious voice, seizing the soldier by his round shoulders and throwing him aside.
  • But his comrade, throwing down the boots and drawing his sword, moved threateningly toward Pierre.
  • Pierre was in such a transport of rage that he remembered nothing and his strength increased tenfold.
  • He rushed at the barefooted Frenchman and, before the latter had time to draw his sword, knocked him off his feet and hammered him with his fists.
  • His face probably looked very terrible, for the officer said something in a whisper and four more uhlans left the ranks and placed themselves on both sides of Pierre.
  • A little man in Russian civilian clothes rode out from the ranks, and by his clothes and manner of speaking Pierre at once knew him to be a French salesman from one of the Moscow shops.
  • His elation increased at the sight of the little girl he had saved.
  • At Anna Pavlovna's on the twenty-sixth of August, the very day of the battle of Borodino, there was a soiree, the chief feature of which was to be the reading of a letter from His Lordship the Bishop when sending the Emperor an icon of the Venerable Sergius.
  • Prince Vasili himself, famed for his elocution, was to read it.
  • And having thus demolished the young man, Anna Pavlovna turned to another group where Bilibin was talking about the Austrians: having wrinkled up his face he was evidently preparing to smooth it out again and utter one of his mots.
  • "The Emperor returns these Austrian banners," said Bilibin, "friendly banners gone astray and found on a wrong path," and his brow became smooth again.
  • He knew no more than the others what his words meant.
  • During his diplomatic career he had more than once noticed that such utterances were received as very witty, and at every opportunity he uttered in that way the first words that entered his head.
  • Prince Vasili sternly declaimed, looking round at his audience as if to inquire whether anyone had anything to say to the contrary.
  • Bilibin attentively examined his nails, and many of those present appeared intimidated, as if asking in what they were to blame.
  • And at once, without leaving the church, thanks were rendered to the Creator for His help and for the victory.
  • That day Prince Vasili no longer boasted of his protege Kutuzov, but remained silent when the commander-in-chief was mentioned.
  • The Emperor at once received this messenger in his study at the palace on Stone Island.
  • * (2) Whose flames illumined his route.
  • "Very sad, sire," replied Michaud, lowering his eyes with a sigh.
  • "Have they surrendered my ancient capital without a battle?" asked the Emperor quickly, his face suddenly flushing.
  • The Emperor began to breathe heavily and rapidly, his lower lip trembled, and tears instantly appeared in his fine blue eyes.
  • He suddenly frowned, as if blaming himself for his weakness, and raising his head addressed Michaud in a firm voice:
  • He bent his head and was silent for some time.
  • Having stood there a few moments, he strode back to Michaud and pressed his arm below the elbow with a vigorous movement.
  • The Emperor's mild and handsome face was flushed and his eyes gleamed with resolution and anger.
  • Napoleon or I, said the Emperor, touching his breast.
  • When he heard these words and saw the expression of firm resolution in the Emperor's eyes, Michaud--quoique etranger, russe de coeur et d'ame-- at that solemn moment felt himself enraptured by all that he had heard (as he used afterwards to say), and gave expression to his own feelings and those of the Russian people whose representative he considered himself to be, in the following words:
  • If he tries to realize it his efforts are fruitless.
  • The commander of the militia was a civilian general, an old man who was evidently pleased with his military designation and rank.
  • Immediately on leaving the governor's, Nicholas hired post horses and, taking his squadron quartermaster with him, drove at a gallop to the landowner, fourteen miles away, who had the stud.
  • Everything seemed to him pleasant and easy during that first part of his stay in Voronezh and, as usually happens when a man is in a pleasant state of mind, everything went well and easily.
  • In very few words Nicholas bought seventeen picked stallions for six thousand rubles--to serve, as he said, as samples of his remounts.
  • When he had changed, poured water over his head, and scented himself, Nicholas arrived at the governor's rather late, but with the phrase "better late than never" on his lips.
  • Among the men was an Italian prisoner, an officer of the French army; and Nicholas felt that the presence of that prisoner enhanced his own importance as a Russian hero.
  • As soon as Nicholas entered in his hussar uniform, diffusing around him a fragrance of perfume and wine, and had uttered the words "better late than never" and heard them repeated several times by others, people clustered around him; all eyes turned on him, and he felt at once that he had entered into his proper position in the province--that of a universal favorite: a very pleasant position, and intoxicatingly so after his long privations.
  • His particularly free manner of dancing even surprised them all.
  • Jauntily shifting the position of his legs in their tight riding breeches, diffusing an odor of perfume, and admiring his partner, himself, and the fine outlines of his legs in their well-fitting Hessian boots, Nicholas told the blonde lady that he wished to run away with a certain lady here in Voronezh.
  • Her eyes" (Nicholas looked at his partner) "are blue, her mouth coral and ivory; her figure" (he glanced at her shoulders) "like Diana's...."
  • The husband came up and sullenly asked his wife what she was talking about.
  • "Ah, Nikita Ivanych!" cried Nicholas, rising politely, and as if wishing Nikita Ivanych to share his joke, he began to tell him of his intention to elope with a blonde lady.
  • When he had parted from Malvintseva Nicholas wished to return to the dancing, but the governor's little wife placed her plump hand on his sleeve and, saying that she wanted to have a talk with him, led him to her sitting room, from which those who were there immediately withdrew so as not to be in her way.
  • "Oh no, we are good friends with him," said Nicholas in the simplicity of his heart; it did not enter his head that a pastime so pleasant to himself might not be pleasant to someone else.
  • Nicholas suddenly felt a desire and need to tell his most intimate thoughts (which he would not have told to his mother, his sister, or his friend) to this woman who was almost a stranger.
  • The governor's wife pressed his elbow gratefully.
  • On reaching Moscow after her meeting with Rostov, Princess Mary had found her nephew there with his tutor, and a letter from Prince Andrew giving her instructions how to get to her Aunt Malvintseva at Voronezh.
  • When Rostov entered the room, the princess dropped her eyes for an instant, as if to give the visitor time to greet her aunt, and then just as Nicholas turned to her she raised her head and met his look with shining eyes.
  • Nicholas noticed this, as he noticed every shade of Princess Mary's character with an observation unusual to him, and everything confirmed his conviction that she was a quite unusual and extraordinary being.
  • When a pause occurred during his short visit, Nicholas, as is usual when there are children, turned to Prince Andrew's little son, caressing him and asking whether he would like to be an hussar.
  • He took the boy on his knee, played with him, and looked round at Princess Mary.
  • He knew that after his promise to Sonya it would be what he deemed base to declare his feelings to Princess Mary.
  • But he also knew (or rather felt at the bottom of his heart) that by resigning himself now to the force of circumstances and to those who were guiding him, he was not only doing nothing wrong, but was doing something very important--more important than anything he had ever done in his life.
  • After meeting Princess Mary, though the course of his life went on externally as before, all his former amusements lost their charm for him and he often thought about her.
  • He had pictured each of those young ladies as almost all honest-hearted young men do, that is, as a possible wife, adapting her in his imagination to all the conditions of married life: a white dressing gown, his wife at the tea table, his wife's carriage, little ones, Mamma and Papa, their relations to her, and so on--and these pictures of the future had given him pleasure.
  • If he tried, his pictures seemed incongruous and false.
  • He made haste to finish buying the horses, and often became unreasonably angry with his servant and squadron quartermaster.
  • A few days before his departure a special thanksgiving, at which Nicholas was present, was held in the cathedral for the Russian victory.
  • As had occurred before when she was present, Nicholas went up to her without waiting to be prompted by the governor's wife and not asking himself whether or not it was right and proper to address her here in church, and told her he had heard of her trouble and sympathized with his whole soul.
  • As soon as she heard his voice a vivid glow kindled in her face, lighting up both her sorrow and her joy.
  • The princess looked at him, not grasping what he was saying, but cheered by the expression of regretful sympathy on his face.
  • "Oh, that would be so dread..." she began and, prevented by agitation from finishing, she bent her head with a movement as graceful as everything she did in his presence and, looking up at him gratefully, went out, following her aunt.
  • When he had finished that business it was already too late to go anywhere but still too early to go to bed, and for a long time he paced up and down the room, reflecting on his life, a thing he rarely did.
  • His having encountered her in such exceptional circumstances, and his mother having at one time mentioned her to him as a good match, had drawn his particular attention to her.
  • His having encountered her in such exceptional circumstances, and his mother having at one time mentioned her to him as a good match, had drawn his particular attention to her.
  • He was, however, preparing to go away and it had not entered his head to regret that he was thus depriving himself of chances of meeting her.
  • But that day's encounter in church had, he felt, sunk deeper than was desirable for his peace of mind.
  • That pale, sad, refined face, that radiant look, those gentle graceful gestures, and especially the deep and tender sorrow expressed in all her features agitated him and evoked his sympathy.
  • How he would propose to her and how she would become his wife.
  • He felt awed, and no clear picture presented itself to his mind.
  • Tears were in his eyes and in his throat when the door opened and Lavrushka came in with some papers.
  • Why do you come in without being called? cried Nicholas, quickly changing his attitude.
  • Nicholas took the two letters, one of which was from his mother and the other from Sonya.
  • He had read only a few lines when he turned pale and his eyes opened wide with fear and joy.
  • He glanced through it, then read it again, and then again, and standing still in the middle of the room he raised his shoulders, stretching out his hands, with his mouth wide open and his eyes fixed.
  • In this letter the countess also mentioned that Prince Andrew was among the wounded traveling with them; his state was very critical, but the doctor said there was now more hope.
  • Next day Nicholas took his mother's letter and went to see Princess Mary.
  • The following day he saw Princess Mary off on her journey to Yaroslavl, and a few days later left to rejoin his regiment.
  • Not noticing the monk, who had risen to greet her and was drawing back the wide sleeve on his right arm, she went up to Sonya and took her hand.
  • His pale face was calm, his eyes closed, and they could see his regular breathing.
  • His pale face was calm, his eyes closed, and they could see his regular breathing.
  • I saw him lying on a bed," said she, making a gesture with her hand and a lifted finger at each detail, "and that he had his eyes closed and was covered just with a pink quilt, and that his hands were folded," she concluded, convincing herself that the details she had just seen were exactly what she had seen in the mirror.
  • She not only remembered what she had then said--that he turned to look at her and smiled and was covered with something red--but was firmly convinced that she had then seen and said that he was covered with a pink quilt and that his eyes were closed.
  • If they noticed anything remarkable about Pierre, it was only his unabashed, meditative concentration and thoughtfulness, and the way he spoke French, which struck them as surprisingly good.
  • On his way through the streets Pierre felt stifled by the smoke which seemed to hang over the whole city.
  • This officer, probably someone on the staff, was holding a paper in his hand, and called over all the Russians there, naming Pierre as "the man who does not give his name."
  • Without raising his eyes, he said in a low voice:
  • To him Davout was not merely a French general, but a man notorious for his cruelty.
  • Looking at his cold face, as he sat like a stern schoolmaster who was prepared to wait awhile for an answer, Pierre felt that every instant of delay might cost him his life; but he did not know what to say.
  • He did not venture to repeat what he had said at his first examination, yet to disclose his rank and position was dangerous and embarrassing.
  • But before he had decided what to do, Davout raised his head, pushed his spectacles back on his forehead, screwed up his eyes, and looked intently at him.
  • With an unexpected reverberation in his voice Pierre rapidly began:
  • Pierre remembered Ramballe, and named him and his regiment and the street where the house was.
  • Davout brightened up at the news the adjutant brought, and began buttoning up his uniform.
  • When the adjutant reminded him of the prisoner, he jerked his head in Pierre's direction with a frown and ordered him to be led away.
  • But where they were to take him Pierre did not know: back to the coach house or to the place of execution his companions had pointed out to him as they crossed the Virgin's Field.
  • He turned his head and saw that the adjutant was putting another question to Davout.
  • His faculties were quite numbed, he was stupefied, and noticing nothing around him went on moving his legs as the others did till they all stopped and he stopped too.
  • His faculties were quite numbed, he was stupefied, and noticing nothing around him went on moving his legs as the others did till they all stopped and he stopped too.
  • The only thought in his mind at that time was: who was it that had really sentenced him to death?
  • Then who was executing him, killing him, depriving him of life--him, Pierre, with all his memories, aspirations, hopes, and thoughts?
  • Pierre looked round at his fellow prisoners and scrutinized them.
  • One crossed himself continually, the other scratched his back and made a movement of the lips resembling a smile.
  • On the faces of all the Russians and of the French soldiers and officers without exception, he read the same dismay, horror, and conflict that were in his own heart.
  • Who? flashed for an instant through his mind.
  • Pierre was no longer able to turn away and close his eyes.
  • His curiosity and agitation, like that of the whole crowd, reached the highest pitch at this fifth murder.
  • Like the others this fifth man seemed calm; he wrapped his loose cloak closer and rubbed one bare foot with the other.
  • When they began to blindfold him he himself adjusted the knot which hurt the back of his head; then when they propped him against the bloodstained post, he leaned back and, not being comfortable in that position, straightened himself, adjusted his feet, and leaned back again more comfortably.
  • Pierre did not take his eyes from him and did not miss his slightest movement.
  • Pierre glanced into the pit and saw that the factory lad was lying with his knees close up to his head and one shoulder higher than the other.
  • Pierre was taken back to his place, and the rows of troops on both sides of the post made a half turn and went past it at a measured pace.
  • This one, a young soldier, his face deadly pale, his shako pushed back, and his musket resting on the ground, still stood near the pit at the spot from which he had fired.
  • An old, noncommissioned officer ran out of the ranks and taking him by the elbow dragged him to his company.
  • Without finishing what he had begun to say he made a hopeless movement with his arm and went away.
  • But now he felt that the universe had crumbled before his eyes and only meaningless ruins remained, and this not by any fault of his own.
  • He felt that it was not in his power to regain faith in the meaning of life.
  • Sitting silent and motionless on a heap of straw against the wall, Pierre sometimes opened and sometimes closed his eyes.
  • And he opened his eyes again and stared vacantly into the darkness around him.
  • This man was doing something to his legs in the darkness, and though Pierre could not see his face he felt that the man continually glanced at him.
  • On growing used to the darkness Pierre saw that the man was taking off his leg bands, and the way he did it aroused Pierre's interest.
  • Then he took out a knife, cut something, closed the knife, placed it under the head of his bed, and, seating himself comfortably, clasped his arms round his lifted knees and fixed his eyes on Pierre.
  • And there was so much kindliness and simplicity in his singsong voice that Pierre tried to reply, but his jaw trembled and he felt tears rising to his eyes.
  • The little fellow, giving Pierre no time to betray his confusion, instantly continued in the same pleasant tones:
  • And the soldier, pushing away a little dog that was jumping up at him, returned to his place and sat down.
  • In his hands he had something wrapped in a rag.
  • He took a potato, drew out his clasp knife, cut the potato into two equal halves on the palm of his hand, sprinkled some salt on it from the rag, and handed it to Pierre.
  • 'Michael,' he says, 'come here and bow down to his feet; and you, young woman, you bow down too; and you, grandchildren, also bow down before him!
  • And Platon shifted his seat on the straw.
  • Now you've curled up and got warm, you daughter of a bitch! said Karataev, touching the dog that lay at his feet, and again turning over he fell asleep immediately.
  • When Pierre saw his neighbor next morning at dawn the first impression of him, as of something round, was fully confirmed: Platon's whole figure--in a French overcoat girdled with a cord, a soldier's cap, and bast shoes--was round.
  • He did not himself know his age and was quite unable to determine it.
  • But his brilliantly white, strong teeth which showed in two unbroken semicircles when he laughed--as he often did--were all sound and good, there was not a gray hair in his beard or on his head, and his whole body gave an impression of suppleness and especially of firmness and endurance.
  • His face, despite its fine, rounded wrinkles, had an expression of innocence and youth, his voice was pleasant and musical.
  • His face, despite its fine, rounded wrinkles, had an expression of innocence and youth, his voice was pleasant and musical.
  • But the chief peculiarity of his speech was its directness and appositeness.
  • His physical strength and agility during the first days of his imprisonment were such that he seemed not to know what fatigue and sickness meant.
  • His physical strength and agility during the first days of his imprisonment were such that he seemed not to know what fatigue and sickness meant.
  • He did not sing like a trained singer who knows he is listened to, but like the birds, evidently giving vent to the sounds in the same way that one stretches oneself or walks about to get rid of stiffness, and the sounds were always high-pitched, mournful, delicate, and almost feminine, and his face at such times was very serious.
  • When he related anything it was generally some old and evidently precious memory of his "Christian" life, as he called his peasant existence.
  • He liked to talk and he talked well, adorning his speech with terms of endearment and with folk sayings which Pierre thought he invented himself, but the chief charm of his talk lay in the fact that the commonest events--sometimes just such as Pierre had witnessed without taking notice of them--assumed in Karataev's a character of solemn fitness.
  • He loved his dog, his comrades, the French, and Pierre who was his neighbor, but Pierre felt that in spite of Karataev's affectionate tenderness for him (by which he unconsciously gave Pierre's spiritual life its due) he would not have grieved for a moment at parting from him.
  • Platon Karataev knew nothing by heart except his prayers.
  • Sometimes Pierre, struck by the meaning of his words, would ask him to repeat them, but Platon could never recall what he had said a moment before, just as he never could repeat to Pierre the words of his favorite song: native and birch tree and my heart is sick occurred in it, but when spoken and not sung, no meaning could be got out of it.
  • Every word and action of his was the manifestation of an activity unknown to him, which was his life.
  • But his life, as he regarded it, had no meaning as a separate thing.
  • His words and actions flowed from him as evenly, inevitably, and spontaneously as fragrance exhales from a flower.
  • Whether it were difficult or easy, possible or impossible, she did not ask and did not want to know: it was her duty, not only to herself, to be near her brother who was perhaps dying, but to do everything possible to take his son to him, and so she prepared to set off.
  • That she had not heard from Prince Andrew himself, Princess Mary attributed to his being too weak to write or to his considering the long journey too hard and too dangerous for her and his son.
  • With her traveled Mademoiselle Bourienne, little Nicholas and his tutor, her old nurse, three maids, Tikhon, and a young footman and courier her aunt had sent to accompany her.
  • Not by a single word had Nicholas alluded to the fact that Prince Andrew's relations with Natasha might, if he recovered, be renewed, but Princess Mary saw by his face that he knew and thought of this.
  • His excellency is staying in the same house with them.
  • Is this his son? said the countess, turning to little Nicholas who was coming in with Dessalles.
  • As soon as Natasha, sitting at the head of Prince Andrew's bed, heard of Princess Mary's arrival, she softly left his room and hastened to her with those swift steps that had sounded buoyant to Princess Mary.
  • But how is his wound?
  • What is his general condition?
  • They sat a little while downstairs near his room till they had left off crying and were able to go to him with calm faces.
  • How has his whole illness gone?
  • She was sure he would speak soft, tender words to her such as her father had uttered before his death, and that she would not be able to bear it and would burst into sobs in his presence.
  • In one thin, translucently white hand he held a handkerchief, while with the other he stroked the delicate mustache he had grown, moving his fingers slowly.
  • His eyes gazed at them as they entered.
  • On seeing his face and meeting his eyes Princess Mary's pace suddenly slackened, she felt her tears dry up and her sobs ceased.
  • She suddenly felt guilty and grew timid on catching the expression of his face and eyes.
  • And his cold, stern look replied: "Because you are alive and thinking of the living, while I..."
  • In the deep gaze that seemed to look not outwards but inwards there was an almost hostile expression as he slowly regarded his sister and Natasha.
  • He kissed his sister, holding her hand in his as was their wont.
  • Had he screamed in agony, that scream would not have struck such horror into Princess Mary's heart as the tone of his voice.
  • Princess Mary pressed his hand.
  • In his words, his tone, and especially in that calm, almost antagonistic look could be felt an estrangement from everything belonging to this world, terrible in one who is alive.
  • Prince Andrew did not notice that she called his sister Mary, and only after calling her so in his presence did Natasha notice it herself.
  • "It's a great pity," and he gazed straight before him, absently stroking his mustache with his fingers.
  • "He wrote here that he took a great liking to you," he went on simply and calmly, evidently unable to understand all the complex significance his words had for living people.
  • Princess Mary heard his words but they had no meaning for her, except as a proof of how far away he now was from everything living.
  • When little Nicholas was brought into Prince Andrew's room he looked at his father with frightened eyes, but did not cry, because no one else was crying.
  • After that he avoided Dessalles and the countess who caressed him and either sat alone or came timidly to Princess Mary, or to Natasha of whom he seemed even fonder than of his aunt, and clung to them quietly and shyly.
  • She did not speak any more to Natasha of hopes of saving his life.
  • And joyful and agitating thoughts began to occupy his mind.
  • His illness pursued its normal physical course, but what Natasha referred to when she said: "This suddenly happened," had occurred two days before Princess Mary arrived.
  • It was the unexpected realization of the fact that he still valued life as presented to him in the form of his love for Natasha, and a last, though ultimately vanquished, attack of terror before the unknown.
  • As usual after dinner he was slightly feverish, and his thoughts were preternaturally clear.
  • At the Troitsa monastery they had spoken of the past, and he had told her that if he lived he would always thank God for his wound which had brought them together again, but after that they never spoke of the future.
  • Natasha almost shouted, taking hold of both his hands with a passionate movement.
  • Twice she turned and looked at him, and her eyes met his beaming at her.
  • Soon he really shut his eyes and fell asleep.
  • He went, and tried to hurry, but his legs refused to move and he knew he would not be in time to lock the door though he painfully strained all his powers.
  • He seized the door, making a final effort to hold it back--to lock it was no longer possible--but his efforts were weak and clumsy and the door, pushed from behind by that terror, opened and closed again.
  • And all at once it grew light in his soul and the veil that had till then concealed the unknown was lifted from his spiritual vision.
  • From that day an awakening from life came to Prince Andrew together with his awakening from sleep.
  • His last days and hours passed in an ordinary and simple way.
  • Neither in his presence nor out of it did they weep, nor did they ever talk to one another about him.
  • She closed them but did not kiss them, but clung to that which reminded her most nearly of him--his body.
  • Little Nicholas cried because his heart was rent by painful perplexity.
  • That movement from the Nizhni to the Ryazan, Tula, and Kaluga roads was so natural that even the Russian marauders moved in that direction, and demands were sent from Petersburg for Kutuzov to take his army that way.
  • At Tarutino Kutuzov received what was almost a reprimand from the Emperor for having moved his army along the Ryazan road, and the Emperor's letter indicated to him the very position he had already occupied near Kaluga.
  • Napoleon, with his usual assurance that whatever entered his head was right, wrote to Kutuzov the first words that occurred to him, though they were meaningless.
  • This letter having no other object, I pray God, monsieur le Prince Koutouzov, to keep you in His holy and gracious protection!
  • But he continued to exert all his powers to restrain his troops from attacking.
  • The Russian army was commanded by Kutuzov and his staff, and also by the Emperor from Petersburg.
  • As a result of the hostility between Kutuzov and Bennigsen, his Chief of Staff, the presence of confidential representatives of the Emperor, and these transfers, a more than usually complicated play of parties was going on among the staff of the army.
  • In view of all this information, when the enemy has scattered his forces in large detachments, and with Napoleon and his Guards in Moscow, is it possible that the enemy's forces confronting you are so considerable as not to allow of your taking the offensive?
  • Following the wounded hare he made his way far into the forest and came upon the left flank of Murat's army, encamped there without any precautions.
  • The Cossack laughingly told his comrades how he had almost fallen into the hands of the French.
  • A cornet, hearing the story, informed his commander.
  • I need only advise anything and his Highness is sure to do the opposite, replied Bennigsen.
  • The officer, mounting his horse, rode off to someone else.
  • These sounds made his spirits rise, but at the same time he was afraid that he would be blamed for not having executed sooner the important order entrusted to him.
  • Ermolov came forward with a frown on his face and, hearing what the officer had to say, took the papers from him without a word.
  • Kutuzov looked at them searchingly, stopped his carriage, and inquired what regiment they belonged to.
  • Getting out of his caleche, he waited with drooping head and breathing heavily, pacing silently up and down.