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  • His shoes were covered with mud; he had torn his coat on the thorny tree.
  • But he paid no attention to her warning.
  • "How long will it take you to stop my breath?" he asked.
  • He will save Europe!
  • He was, in fact, making this soup, his favorite dish.
  • He arched a dark brow "Alexia?"
  • But I warn you, if you don't tell me that this means war, if you still try to defend the infamies and horrors perpetrated by that Antichrist--I really believe he is Antichrist--I will have nothing more to do with you and you are no longer my friend, no longer my 'faithful slave,' as you call yourself!
  • Maybe he thought she would change her mind, but it wasn't going to happen.
  • Next to Washington he was the greatest American.
  • He has no time to be anything but a machine.
  • He stooped and picked up a bird's nest that had fallen upon the ground.
  • So he followed the Prince into the great domed hall, and Dorothy and Zeb came after them, while the throng of people trooped in also.
  • In any event, King Croesus had it in his mind to wage war against the Persians, so he asked the oracle: "Should I attack the Persians?"
  • It was true, and it brought color to his neck, but he didn't comment.
  • He had done one good deed.
  • And Croesus was so amazed that he endowed the Oracle at Delphi with all kinds of gifts and planned to run all-important questions by this oracle.
  • But in the excitement of carrying me to church my father lost the name on the way, very naturally, since it was one in which he had declined to have a part.
  • "Of course," he replied.
  • He married Lucy Helen Everett, who belonged to the same family of Everetts as Edward Everett and Dr. Edward Everett Hale.
  • He was a great hunter, I have been told, and a celebrated shot.
  • She had the most expressive face he had ever seen.
  • He made it all sound so innocent - even noble.
  • "How long will you be with us?" he asked.
  • Jim's ears were standing erect upon his head and every muscle of his big body was tense as he trotted toward home.
  • He was not going very fast, but on his flanks specks of foam began to appear and at times he would tremble like a leaf.
  • He turned onto Franz Josef Street, where he was not supposed to have been, and drove right in front of a surprised Princip.
  • Next to his family he loved his dogs and gun.
  • When a man is warmed by the several modes which I have described, what does he want next?
  • He hardened his heart against the senator who was introducing this set and narrow attitude into the deliberations of the nobility.
  • Not only was Pierre's attempt to speak unsuccessful, but he was rudely interrupted, pushed aside, and people turned away from him as from a common enemy.
  • He parked the truck in front of the house and headed down the hill.
  • He reached the edge of the tall roof, stepped one foot out into the air, and walked into space as calmly as if he were on firm ground.
  • "I wouldn't dare try," he said.
  • Very likely he has stopped to take care of them.
  • He lifted the nest gently and put it in a safe place in the forks of the tree.
  • He leaped into the saddle, and away he dashed with his officers close behind him.
  • The speech he gave in September 1962, announcing that goal, spent a good amount of time justifying the expense and explaining the urgency.
  • I was greatly puzzled to know what he was doing.
  • How can he remember well his ignorance--which his growth requires--who has so often to use his knowledge?
  • To the bison of the prairie it is a few inches of palatable grass, with water to drink; unless he seeks the Shelter of the forest or the mountain's shadow.
  • Count Rostov's mouth watered with pleasure and he nudged Pierre, but Pierre wanted to speak himself.
  • He pushed forward, feeling stirred, but not yet sure what stirred him or what he would say.
  • "Yes, and this is not a time for discussing," he continued, "but for acting: there is war in Russia!
  • Pierre wished to say that he was ready to sacrifice his money, his serfs, or himself, only one ought to know the state of affairs in order to be able to improve it, but he was unable to speak.
  • Glinka, the editor of the Russian Messenger, who was recognized (cries of "author! author!" were heard in the crowd), said that "hell must be repulsed by hell," and that he had seen a child smiling at lightning flashes and thunderclaps, but "we will not be that child."
  • She smiled to herself - and not always because he rubbed her the wrong way.
  • Obviously he was still struggling with it.
  • He walked down the hill, pausing a reverent moment at the headstone, and then ducked under a limb as he continued down the hill.
  • He walked down the hill, pausing a reverent moment at the headstone, and then ducked under a limb as he continued down the hill.
  • He reached her and turned, walking beside her as they started back up the hill to the house.
  • The voice and words belonged to Josh, and yet he had been dead for more than two years.
  • As they continued toward the house, he cleared his throat.
  • He was head of the house - the one who made final decisions.
  • He wanted... needed an answer.
  • Without answering, he headed for the fireplace and opened the wood box.
  • She gazed down at him as he knelt beside the fire.
  • Long dark lashes and black curly hair - he had it all.
  • She glanced up at him as he stopped beside her.
  • Presently he woke up, rose to a sitting position and rubbed his eyes briskly.
  • "Hello!" he said, seeing her, "are you Dorothy Gale?"
  • "Of course," he answered.
  • He laughed at that, and his laugh was merry and frank.
  • Jumping out of the buggy he put Dorothy's suit-case under the seat and her bird-cage on the floor in front.
  • "Canary-birds?" he asked.
  • Dorothy thought he just wiggled one of his drooping ears, but that was all.
  • "Perhaps," said Dorothy, "if you untied him, he would go."
  • "Guess I'm half asleep yet," he said, untying the horse.
  • Then he got into the buggy again and took the reins, and the horse at once backed away from the tree, turned slowly around, and began to trot down the sandy road which was just visible in the dim light.
  • "Yes; but we're used to such things in California," he replied.
  • The conductor said it was the worst quake he ever knew.
  • Then it must have happened while I was asleep, he said thoughtfully.
  • I work for Uncle Bill on his ranch, and he pays me six dollars a month and my board.
  • I work as well as I sleep, he added, with a laugh.
  • "Not a very pretty one," he answered, as if a little ashamed.
  • He was not going very fast, but on his flanks specks of foam began to appear and at times he would tremble like a leaf.
  • All this was so terrible and unreal that he could not understand it at all, and so had good reason to be afraid.
  • He was not a very large man, but was well formed and had a beautiful face--calm and serene as the face of a fine portrait.
  • The man had taken a step or two across the glass roof before he noticed the presence of the strangers; but then he stopped abruptly.
  • "Look out!" cried Dorothy, who noticed that the beautiful man did not look where he was going; "be careful, or you'll fall off!"
  • He reached the edge of the tall roof, stepped one foot out into the air, and walked into space as calmly as if he were on firm ground.
  • Soon he reached the street and disappeared through a glass doorway into one of the glass buildings.
  • "And maybe he won't!" answered Jim.
  • "He eats enough to get fat, I'm sure," said the boy, gravely.
  • Can you remember any breakfast that I've had today? growled Jim, as if he resented Zeb's speech.
  • But he did not wish the little girl to think him a coward, so he advanced slowly to the edge of the roof.
  • So, with a snort and a neigh and a whisk of his short tail he trotted off the roof into the air and at once began floating downward to the street.
  • For a moment the boy did not know what he meant by this question.
  • Then, remembering the stones that had fallen with them and passed them long before they had reached this place, he answered:
  • "The Rain of Stones has done much damage to our city," he said, "and we shall hold you responsible for it unless you can prove your innocence."
  • He turned and walked down the street, and after a moment's hesitation Dorothy caught Eureka in her arms and climbed into the buggy.
  • There was even a thorn upon the tip of his nose and he looked so funny that Dorothy laughed when she saw him.
  • "Why have you dared to intrude your unwelcome persons into the secluded Land of the Mangaboos?" he asked, sternly.
  • "Why did you wickedly and viciously send the Rain of Stones to crack and break our houses?" he continued.
  • But he smiled and bowed as he answered:
  • There sat the thorny Sorcerer in his chair of state, and when the Wizard saw him he began to laugh, uttering comical little chuckles.
  • "What an absurd creature!" he exclaimed.
  • It was one of the things Gwig usually did to prove he was a sorcerer.
  • He took off his hat and held it upside down, shaking it briskly.
  • He placed one upon the floor, so that it could run around, and pulled apart the other, making three piglets in all; and then one of these was pulled apart, making four piglets.
  • Then he caught up another piglet and pushed it into the first, where it disappeared.
  • When he removed his hat the last piglet had disappeared entirely.
  • He began making queer signs and passes toward the Wizard; but the little man did not watch him long.
  • Instead, he drew a leathern case from his pocket and took from it several sharp knives, which he joined together, one after another, until they made a long sword.
  • By the time he had attached a handle to this sword he was having much trouble to breathe, as the charm of the Sorcerer was beginning to take effect.
  • He is really dead now, and will wither very quickly.
  • "A nice country this is," he grumbled, "where a respectable horse has to eat pink grass!"
  • "He will sprout very soon," said the Prince, "and grow into a large bush, from which we shall in time be able to pick several very good sorcerers."
  • "That depends upon the care we take of ourselves," he replied.
  • He led them within another but smaller circle of hedge, where grew one large and beautiful bush.
  • "This," said he, "is the Royal Bush of the Mangaboos.
  • "Not quite," said he, finally.
  • I think I shall keep this Wizard until a new Sorcerer is ready to pick, for he seems quite skillful and may be of use to us.
  • He won't need to destroy ME, for if I don't get something to eat pretty soon I shall starve to death, and so save him the trouble.
  • "If he planted you, he might grow some cat-tails," suggested the Wizard.
  • The words of the cold and moist vegetable Prince were not very comforting, and as he spoke them he turned away and left the enclosure.
  • Instantly the Princess turned and faced him, and when he saw that she was picked the Prince stood still and began to tremble.
  • Slowly he took the shining star from his own brow and placed it upon that of the Princess.
  • "If that is so," said the boy, "how could he do that wonderful trick with the nine tiny piglets?"
  • The only bait he could find was a bright red blossom from a flower; but he knew fishes are easy to fool if anything bright attracts their attention, so he decided to try the blossom.
  • With this he began walking in the air toward the high openings, and Dorothy and Zeb followed him.
  • The little man, having had a good sleep, felt rested and refreshed, and looking through the glass partition of the room he saw Zeb sitting up on his bench and yawning.
  • So the boy went willingly upon the errand, and by the time he had returned Dorothy was awake.
  • He did it very cleverly, indeed, and the Princess looked at the strange piglets as if she were as truly astonished as any vegetable person could be.
  • Then he jointed together the blades of his sword and balanced it very skillfully upon the end of his nose.
  • Just then his eye fell upon the lanterns and the can of kerosene oil which Zeb had brought from the car of his balloon, and he got a clever idea from those commonplace things.
  • So he placed Dorothy upon one side of him and the boy upon the other and set a lantern upon each of their heads.
  • When he lighted the oil a hundred tongues of flame shot up, and the effect was really imposing.
  • "Don't be rough!" he would call out, if Eureka knocked over one of the round, fat piglets with her paw; but the pigs never minded, and enjoyed the sport very greatly.
  • An instant later he suddenly backed toward the crowd of Mangaboos and kicked out his hind legs as hard as he could.
  • "If the Wizard was here," said one of the piglets, sobbing bitterly, "he would not see us suffer so."
  • At once the Mangaboos began piling up the rocks of glass again, and as the little man realized that they were all about to be entombed in the mountain he said to the children:
  • Noticing that the light was growing dim he picked up his nine piglets, patted each one lovingly on its fat little head, and placed them carefully in his inside pocket.
  • So he carried the lantern back for quite a distance, while Dorothy and the Wizard followed at his side.
  • With some difficulty and danger Jim drew the buggy over the loose rocks until he reached the green lawns below, where the paths and orchards and gardens began.
  • He took the piglets from his pocket and let them run on the grass, and Jim tasted a mouthful of the green blades and declared he was very contented in his new surroundings.
  • He took the piglets from his pocket and let them run on the grass, and Jim tasted a mouthful of the green blades and declared he was very contented in his new surroundings.
  • "Can't imagine, my dear," he replied.
  • "Where are you?" he asked.
  • He picked it up, but could not see what he held.
  • He picked it up, but could not see what he held.
  • "It is very strange," said he, soberly.
  • As he spoke the voice came so near to Zeb that he jumped back in alarm.
  • "What is he good for?" was the next question.
  • "He draws the buggy you see fastened to him, and we ride in the buggy instead of walking," she explained.
  • "Can he fight?" asked the man's voice.
  • "No! he can kick pretty hard with his heels, and bite a little; but Jim can't 'zactly fight," she replied.
  • Our greatest Champion, Overman-Anu, once climbed the spiral stairway and fought nine days with the Gargoyles before he could escape them and come back; but he could never be induced to describe the dreadful creatures, and soon afterward a bear caught him and ate him up.
  • Oh, I guess Zeb could fight if he had to.
  • "True," he replied; "and in my satchel are other useful things to fight with."
  • But they were in great numbers, and the Champion could not shout much because he had to save his breath for fighting.
  • And if he was invis'ble, and the bears invis'ble, who knows that they really ate him up?
  • He had nearly finished this last task when a low growling was suddenly heard and the horse began to jump around and kick viciously with his heels.
  • As soon as he trotted out upon the surface of the river he found himself safe from pursuit, and Zeb was already running across the water toward Dorothy.
  • As the little Wizard turned to follow them he felt a hot breath against his cheek and heard a low, fierce growl.
  • The third time that he thrust out the weapon there was a loud roar and a fall, and suddenly at his feet appeared the form of a great red bear, which was nearly as big as the horse and much stronger and fiercer.
  • The Wizard opened his satchel and got out some sticking-plaster with which he mended the cuts Jim had received from the claws of the bears.
  • These birds were of enormous size, and reminded Zeb of the rocs he had read about in the Arabian Nights.
  • He was a very old man, bent nearly double; but the queerest thing about him was his white hair and beard.
  • "Yes, indeed; come into my shop, please," and the braided man turned and led the way into a smaller cave, where he evidently lived.
  • Will you buy it, my dear? he asked, addressing Dorothy.
  • Then he picked up another box.
  • "In this," he continued, "are many assorted flutters.
  • It did her good to see how the braided man's eyes sparkled when he received this treasure.
  • "You may need them, some time," he said, "and there is really no use in my manufacturing these things unless somebody uses them."
  • The kitten looked at the horse thoughtfully, as if trying to decide whether he meant it or not.
  • Then he halted, ducked down and began to back up, so that he nearly fell with the buggy onto the others.
  • "Let's go down again!" he said, in his hoarse voice.
  • With this speech he bent forward and dragged the buggy up the remaining steps.
  • He got his satchel from the buggy and, opening it, took out two deadly looking revolvers that made the children shrink back in alarm just to look at.
  • It's every man's duty to do the best he knows how; and I'm going to do it.
  • But Jim was ready for them, and when he saw them coming he turned his heels toward them and began kicking out as hard as he could.
  • The others picked themselves up from the ground one by one and quickly rejoined their fellows, so for a moment the horse thought he had won the fight with ease.
  • "Those wooden things are impossible to hurt," he said, "and all the damage Jim has done to them is to knock a few splinters from their noses and ears.
  • The Wizard's sword-blade snapped into a dozen pieces at the first blow he struck against the wooden people.
  • "I wish we had some of those loose wings," he said.
  • "Do you see that big rock standing on the hillside yonder?" he continued, pointing with his finger.
  • He had fastened one end of the strap to a wheel of the buggy, and now he let the line dangle over the side of the house.
  • He had fastened one end of the strap to a wheel of the buggy, and now he let the line dangle over the side of the house.
  • He put the harness together again and hitched Jim to the buggy.
  • Then, with the Wizard's help, he tried to fasten some of the wings to the old cab-horse.
  • Dorothy was a little anxious about the success of their trip, for the way Jim arched his long neck and spread out his bony legs as he fluttered and floundered through the air was enough to make anybody nervous.
  • Then he poured over them all the kerosene oil that was left in his oil-can, and lighting a match set fire to the pile.
  • "Why, it's a dragon!" he exclaimed.
  • So he sat down upon the floor of the cave, brought the piglets out one by one, and allowed them to run around as much as they pleased.
  • Our friend Oz is merely a humbug wizard, for he once proved it to me.
  • He can do several very wonderful things--if he knows how.
  • He can do several very wonderful things--if he knows how.
  • But he can't wiz a single thing if he hasn't the tools and machinery to work with.
  • "And were you?" asked Zeb, astonished at what he heard.
  • "Do you happen to know whatever became of the Tin Woodman and the Scarecrow?" he enquired.
  • The little man looked at his watch--a big silver one that he carried in his vest pocket.
  • "Half-past three," he said.
  • The cab-horse gave a nervous start and Zeb began to rub his eyes to make sure he was not asleep.
  • "On my word," he exclaimed, "it's little Jellia Jamb--as pert and pretty as ever!"
  • "Did you not wear green whiskers at one time?" he asked.
  • "But I assure you, my good people, that I do not wish to rule the Emerald City," he added, earnestly.
  • "Where is Dorothy?" enquired Zeb, anxiously, as he left the buggy and stood beside his friend the little Wizard.
  • He had seen considerable of life in the cities in his younger days, and knew that this regal palace was no place for him.
  • So Zeb unharnessed Jim, and several of the servants then led the horse around to the rear, where they selected a nice large apartment that he could have all to himself.
  • He knew the way to it, and a servant followed him, carrying his satchel.
  • Zeb was also escorted to a room--so grand and beautiful that he almost feared to sit in the chairs or lie upon the bed, lest he might dim their splendor.
  • In the closets he discovered many fancy costumes of rich velvets and brocades, and one of the attendants told him to dress himself in any of the clothes that pleased him and to be prepared to dine with the Princess and Dorothy in an hour's time.
  • "Your people built it," he answered.
  • "He shall amuse us with his tricks tomorrow," said the Princess.
  • "How are your brains?" enquired the little humbug, as he grasped the soft, stuffed hands of his old friend.
  • But he became nervous again when the next visitor was announced.
  • Then they told him dinner would be served directly and he replied that they could not serve it too quickly to suit his convenience.
  • "Take that stuff away!" he commanded.
  • Then the servants heaped a lot of rugs upon the floor and the old horse slept on the softest bed he had ever known in his life.
  • Jim's eyes stuck out as much as those of the Sawhorse, and he stared at the creature with his ears erect and his long head drawn back until it rested against his arched neck.
  • "Look at me!" he cried.
  • "Is it possible that you are a Real Horse?" he murmured.
  • "Not only possible, but true," replied Jim, who was gratified by the impression he had created.
  • Jim did not know, but he would not tell the Sawhorse that.
  • "How did you happen to be shod with gold?" he asked.
  • The cab-horse was about to reply when suddenly he gave a start and a neigh of terror and stood trembling like a leaf.
  • In the forest he would be thought ungainly, because his face is stretched out and his neck is uselessly long.
  • His joints, I notice, are swollen and overgrown, and he lacks flesh and is old in years.
  • If he thought to frighten the striped beast by such language he was mistaken.
  • This act he repeated until all of the nine tiny piglets were visible, and they were so glad to get out of his pocket that they ran around in a very lively manner.
  • When he had made them all disappear again Ozma declared she was sorry they were gone, for she wanted one of them to pet and play with.
  • There was enough material there to enable him to prepare several new tricks which he had learned from some of the jugglers in the circus, and he had passed part of the night in getting them ready.
  • But although the Munchkin was hardly tall enough to come to Zeb's shoulder he was so strong and clever that he laid the boy three times on his back with apparent ease.
  • He has won the race, and won it fairly; but what can a horse of flesh do against a tireless beast of wood?
  • "I ought to be a fairy," grumbled Jim, as he slowly drew the buggy home; "for to be just an ordinary horse in a fairy country is to be of no account whatever.
  • And the Woggle-Bug shall be the Public Accuser, because he is so learned that no one can deceive him.
  • The Wizard, when he returned to his own room, was exceedingly thoughtful.
  • He drew from his inside pocket one of the eight tiny piglets that were remaining and continued:
  • "Your Royal Highness and Fellow Citizens," he began; "the small cat you see a prisoner before you is accused of the crime of first murdering and then eating our esteemed Ruler's fat piglet--or else first eating and then murdering it.
  • "Your Highness," said he, "see how easy it is for a jury to be mistaken.
  • "In a room of the palace," he answered.
  • If he can produce but seven, then this is not the piglet that was lost, but another one.
  • Instead of keeping still, so I could eat him comfortably, he trembled so with fear that he fell off the table into a big vase that was standing on the floor.
  • At first the piglet stuck in the neck of the vase and I thought I should get him, after all, but he wriggled himself through and fell down into the deep bottom part--and I suppose he's there yet.
  • When he returned the Princess looked down the narrow neck of the big ornament and discovered her lost piglet, just as Eureka had said she would.
  • Zeb also wanted to see his home, and although he did not find anyone morning for him, the sight of Hugson's Ranch in the picture made him long to get back there.
  • "This is a fine country, and I like all the people that live in it," he told Dorothy.
  • That last evening was so delightful that the boy will never forget it as long as he lives.
  • Then Dorothy wound up Tik-tok and he danced a jig to amuse the company, after which the Yellow Hen related some of her adventures with the Nome King in the Land of Ev.
  • He gave a start and rubbed his eyes.
  • It's Zeb--and Jim, too! he exclaimed.
  • He had climbed many a tree when he was a boy.
  • He was elected president.
  • Suddenly he stopped at the foot of a tree.
  • He leaped into the saddle, and away he dashed with his officers close behind him.
  • He would do many more before the war was over.
  • He prayeth best, who loveth best All things both great and small; For the dear God who loveth us, He made and loveth all.
  • With one hand the little boy clung to his sister's arm, and with the other he held his primer.
  • This primer was his only book, and he loved it.
  • It had a bright blue cover, which he was careful not to soil.
  • And in it were some odd little pictures, which he never grew tired of looking at.
  • Edward could spell nearly all the words in his primer, and he could read quite well.
  • He was dressed in black, and had a very pleasant face.
  • They were glad to see Mr. Harris, for he was the minister.
  • "Good morning, children!" said the minister; and he kindly shook hands with both.
  • "I have something here for little Edward," he said.
  • Then he took from his pocket a sheet of paper on which some verses were written.
  • He spoke so well that everybody was pleased.
  • He pronounced every word plainly, as though he were talking to his schoolmates.
  • He pronounced every word plainly, as though he were talking to his schoolmates.
  • He grew up to become a famous man and one of our greatest orators.
  • He was only a child.
  • "Well, I know what that is," he said to himself; and he wrote the word _turnip_ on his slate.
  • Then he tried to tell what it was like, what it was good for, and what was done with it.
  • Before the half hour was ended he had written a very neat composition on his slate.
  • He then went into the house, and waited while the teacher read it.
  • He said, Henry Longfellow, you have done very well.
  • As soon as it was read to the school, he rubbed it off the slate, and it was forgotten.
  • He was the best loved of all our poets.
  • He wrote "The Village Blacksmith," "The Children's Hour," and many other beautiful pieces which you will like to read and remember.
  • On the day that he was seven years old, his mother gave him a few pennies.
  • He looked at the bright, yellow pieces and said, "What shall I do with these coppers, mother?"
  • It was the first money that he had ever had.
  • "And then will you give me more?" he asked.
  • He heard the pennies jingle in his pocket.
  • How rich he was!
  • As Benjamin ran down the street, he wondered what he should buy.
  • Should he buy candy?
  • He hardly knew how it tasted.
  • Should he buy a pretty toy?
  • If he had been the only child in the family, things might have been different.
  • But there were fourteen boys and girls older than he, and two little sisters who were younger.
  • He had not gone far when he met a larger boy, who was blowing a whistle.
  • He had not gone far when he met a larger boy, who was blowing a whistle.
  • "I wish I had that whistle," he said.
  • He held them in his hand, and showed them to the boy.
  • "Well, it's a bargain," said the boy; and he gave the whistle to Benjamin, and took the pennies.
  • Little Benjamin Franklin was very happy; for he was only seven years old.
  • He ran home as fast as he could, blowing the whistle as he ran.
  • He ran home as fast as he could, blowing the whistle as he ran.
  • "See, mother," he said, "I have bought a whistle."
  • "Well, well!" he said.
  • He threw it upon the floor and began to cry.
  • Benjamin Franklin lived to be a very old man, but he never forgot that lesson.
  • He was a great thinker and a great doer, and with Washington he helped to make our country free.
  • He was a great thinker and a great doer, and with Washington he helped to make our country free.
  • Sometimes he had several hundreds of lambs to look after.
  • He drove these to the pastures on the hills and watched them day after day while they fed on the short green grass.
  • He would drive them from place to place as his master wished.
  • Sometimes he would take care of the whole flock while the shepherd was resting or eating his dinner.
  • With his lighted lantern in his hand, he went up and down the rough hills calling for his lambs.
  • How had he managed to drive all the frightened little animals into this place of safety?
  • By some means, however, he learned to read; and after that he loved nothing so much as a good book.
  • But he was anxious to learn.
  • While watching his flocks, he spent much of his time in reading.
  • He loved poetry and soon began to write poems of his own.
  • He was often called the Ettrick Shepherd, because he was the keeper of sheep near the Ettrick Water.
  • He was often called the Ettrick Shepherd, because he was the keeper of sheep near the Ettrick Water.
  • Sometimes, if a poem was very pleasing, he gave the poet a prize.
  • When he had finished, he bowed, and waited, hoping that he would be rewarded.
  • Then he said, Listen now to my second word of wisdom.
  • "Wait, and I will tell you," said the caliph; and he smiled again.
  • Then he ordered his treasurer to pay the poet five hundred pieces of gold; for, indeed, the poem which he had recited was wonderfully fine.
  • He was the builder of a famous and beautiful city called Bagdad.
  • How could he find out?
  • He tried first one plan and then another; but none of them proved anything at all.
  • Then he called his wisest men together and asked them, "Is it really true that the first people in the world were Egyptians?"
  • He sent out among the poor people of the city and found two little babies who had never heard a word spoken.
  • He gave these to a shepherd and ordered him to bring them up among his sheep, far from the homes of men.
  • The shepherd did as he was bidden.
  • He took the children far away to a green valley where his flocks were feeding.
  • There he cared for them with love and kindness; but no word did he speak in their hearing.
  • Some time later, the shepherd went to the city and told the king that the children had learned to speak one word, but how or from whom, he did not know.
  • He covered his face and wept.
  • He has seen me in my blindness, and is trying to open my eyes.
  • He makes us pay taxes and gives us nothing in return.
  • He sends soldiers among us to take away our liberty.
  • He was ready to serve his country in any way that he could.
  • He was ready to serve his country in any way that he could.
  • He came very quietly and secretly, to escape the soldiers.
  • "I have something to tell you," he said.
  • He looked over toward Boston.
  • He knew where the old North Church stood, but he could not see much in the darkness.
  • He knew where the old North Church stood, but he could not see much in the darkness.
  • Hour after hour he stood and watched.
  • The town seemed very still; but now and then he could hear the beating of a drum or the shouting of some soldier.
  • The moon rose, and by its light he could see the dim form of the church tower, far away.
  • He heard the clock strike ten.
  • He waited and watched.
  • He was beginning to feel tired.
  • He walked up and down the river bank, leading his horse behind him; but he kept his eyes turned always toward the dim, dark spot which he knew was the old North Church.
  • He walked up and down the river bank, leading his horse behind him; but he kept his eyes turned always toward the dim, dark spot which he knew was the old North Church.
  • "Ah! there it is!" he cried.
  • He spoke to his horse.
  • He put his foot in the stirrup.
  • He was ready to mount.
  • At every farmhouse and every village he repeated his call.
  • In France there once lived a famous man who was known as the Marquis de Lafayette. When he was a little boy his mother called him Gilbert.
  • He was very proud to think of this, and he wished that he might grow up to be like them.
  • He was very proud to think of this, and he wished that he might grow up to be like them.
  • Often, when he was a little lad, he took long walks among the trees with his mother.
  • "Mother," he would say, "do not be afraid.
  • "Now for the wolf!" he said to himself.
  • He walked quickly, but very quietly, down the pathway into the darker woods.
  • He looked eagerly around, but saw only a squirrel frisking among the trees and a rabbit hopping across the road.
  • Soon he came to a wilder place.
  • He pushed the bushes aside and went a little farther.
  • He could see a green open space just beyond; and then the woods seemed to be thicker and darker.
  • "This is just the place for that wolf," he thought.
  • Then, all at once, he heard footsteps.
  • He could hear its footsteps.
  • He could hear its heavy breathing.
  • He stood very still and waited.
  • "It will try to bite me," he thought.
  • He could see its shadow as he peeped out through the clusters of leaves.
  • He could see its shadow as he peeped out through the clusters of leaves.
  • He planted his feet firmly and made ready to spring.
  • He saw its shaggy head and big round eyes.
  • He leaped from his hiding place and clasped it round its neck.
  • He was not hurt at all.
  • He looked at the beast, and--what do you think it was?
  • He hurried back to the pathway, and then ran to his mother.
  • Tears were in his eyes; but he tried to look brave.
  • Then he told her all that had happened.
  • His lips quivered and he began to cry.
  • He was the friend of Washington.
  • "Where? where?" he asked.
  • He says she was a monster; and she was running straight toward the hills with a little lamb in her mouth.
  • It was very dark there, and he could not see anything.
  • Then he tied a rope around his waist and said to his friends, Take hold of the other end, boys.
  • He got down on his hands and knees and crawled into the cave.
  • He crawled very slowly and carefully.
  • At last he saw something in the darkness that looked like two balls of fire.
  • He knew that these were the eyes of the wolf.
  • They feared that the wolf was upon him; but he wished only to get his gun.
  • Soon, with the gun in one hand, he crept back into the cave.
  • He raised his gun and fired at the great beast.
  • He crept into the cave for the third time.
  • After a while, however, he gave the rope a quick jerk.
  • When the Revolutionary War began he was one of the first to hurry to Boston to help the people defend themselves against the British soldiers.
  • He became famous as one of the bravest and best of the generals who fought to make our country free.
  • From a bar of iron he made four horseshoes.
  • These he hammered and shaped and fitted to the horse's feet.
  • Then he began to nail them on.
  • "I have only six nails," he said, "and it will take a little time to hammer out ten more."
  • So he quickly finished the shoeing, and the groom hurried to lead the horse to the king.
  • So he spurred his horse to ride to their aid.
  • He was hardly halfway across the stony field when one of the horse's shoes flew off.
  • He waved his sword in the air.
  • He shouted, A horse!
  • If a man was obliged to go from one city to another, he often rode on horseback.
  • Instead of a trunk for his clothing, he carried a pair of saddlebags.
  • Instead of sitting at his ease in a parlor car, he went jolting along through mud and mire, exposed to wind and weather.
  • He was riding very slowly, and both he and his horse were bespattered with mud.
  • He was riding very slowly, and both he and his horse were bespattered with mud.
  • He was dressed plainly, and, with his reddish-brown hair and mud-bespattered face, looked like a hard- working countryman just in from the backwoods.
  • "Have you a room here for me?" he asked the landlord.
  • Now the landlord prided himself upon keeping a first-class hotel, and he feared that his guests would not like the rough-looking traveler.
  • So he answered: No, sir.
  • "Well, then," answered the stranger, "I will see what they can do for me at the Planters' Tavern, round the corner;" and he rode away.
  • Oh, but he must be.
  • I met him as he rode into town, and he said that he intended to stop at this hotel.
  • He has been here about an hour.
  • Did he have reddish-brown hair, and did he ride a gray horse?
  • Yes, and he was quite tall.
  • He shall have all the rooms in the house, and the ladies' parlor, too, I'll go right round to the Planters' and fetch him back.
  • So he went to the other hotel, where he found the vice president sitting with some friends in the parlor.
  • "Mr. Jefferson," he said, "I have come to ask your pardon.
  • Then, without another word, he turned and walked away.
  • This time he brought a partridge.
  • He was a great admirer of Dean Swift, and took pleasure in sending him presents of game.
  • "Here's something else for the Dean," he said roughly, and tossed it into the servant's arms.
  • "The next time he comes," said the Dean, "let me know, and I will go to the door."
  • "I'll agree to that," said the man; and he stepped inside.
  • He walked up the street to the next block.
  • Then he came back and knocked gently at the door.
  • Then, taking out his purse, he offered the Dean a shilling.
  • The lesson in manners was not forgotten; for, always after that, the man was very polite when he brought his presents.
  • And the Dean also took the hint; for he always remembered to give the man a "tip" for his trouble.
  • He was only fourteen years old.
  • His older brothers were quite willing that he should go to sea.
  • He would soon become a captain and then perhaps a great admiral.
  • He agreed to take the boy with him and teach him how to be a good sailor.
  • If he begins as a common sailor, he will never be anything else.
  • He was headstrong and determined.
  • He would not listen to anyone who tried to persuade him to stay at home.
  • "Good-by, mother," he said.
  • He stood on the doorstep and looked back into the house.
  • He saw the kind faces of those whom he loved.
  • He saw the kind faces of those whom he loved.
  • He began to feel very sad.
  • He saw them rolling down her cheeks.
  • He knew that she did not wish him to go.
  • He could not bear to see her grief.
  • He stood still for a moment, thinking.
  • Then he turned quickly and said, Mother, I have changed my mind.
  • He was our most famous president.
  • He has been called the Father of his Country.
  • Near the top of a hill he saw a little shepherd boy who was lying on the ground while a flock of sheep and lambs were grazing around him.
  • As he came nearer he saw that the boy held a charred stick in his hand, with which he was drawing something on a flat rock.
  • The lad was so much interested in his work that he did not see the stranger.
  • The stranger bent over him and looked at the picture he had made on the rock.
  • "What is your name, my boy?" he said.
  • He jumped to his feet and looked up at the kind gentleman.
  • "My name is Giotto," [Footnote: Giotto (_pro_. jot'to).] he answered.
  • "I should like to learn to do that--oh, ever so much!" he answered.
  • The stranger's name was Cimabue.[Footnote: Cimabue (_pro_. she ma boo'a).] He was the most famous painter of the time.
  • "I know that the lad can draw pictures wonderfully well," he said.
  • He does not like to do anything else.
  • Perhaps he will do well with you.
  • Night came on before he had finished it.
  • "I will leave it till morning," he said; "then the light will be better."
  • In the morning, when he looked at the picture, he saw a fly on the man's nose.
  • He tried to brush it off, but it remained there.
  • "Who has done this?" he cried.
  • "I did it, master," he said.
  • He expected to be punished.
  • "There are few men who can draw so good a picture of a fly," he said.
  • There was once a painter whose name was Zeuxis. He could paint pictures so life-like that they were mistaken for the real things which they represented.
  • At one time he painted the picture of some fruit which was so real that the birds flew down and pecked at it.
  • "I am the only man in the world who can paint a picture so true to life," he said.
  • There was another famous artist whose name was Parrhasius. When he heard of the boast which Zeuxis had made, he said to himself, "I will see what I can do."
  • So he painted a beautiful picture which seemed to be covered with a curtain.
  • Then he invited Zeuxis to come and see it.
  • "Draw the curtain aside and show us the picture," he said.
  • When he hung this painting outside of his door, some birds flew down and tried to carry the cherries away.
  • "Ah! this picture is a failure," he said.
  • He stroked his chin.
  • He looked at the wreaths from every side.
  • He bit his lips.
  • He remembered that close by his window there was a climbing vine filled with beautiful sweet flowers.
  • He remembered that he had seen many bees flying among these flowers and gathering honey from them.
  • He remembered that he had seen many bees flying among these flowers and gathering honey from them.
  • So he said, "Open the window!"
  • Indeed, there were few things that he loved more.
  • But he had never seen any pictures except a few small ones in a book.
  • He was glad to do this; for he loved the baby.
  • He was glad to do this; for he loved the baby.
  • "Yes, mother," he said, "I will watch her every minute.
  • The baby was asleep in her cradle, and he must not make a noise and waken her.
  • For some time he sat very still.
  • He heard the clock ticking.
  • He heard the birds singing.
  • He began to feel a little lonesome.
  • A fly lighted on the baby's cheek, and he brushed it away.
  • Then he thought what a pretty picture might be made of his sister's sweet face and little hands.
  • He had no paper, but he knew where there was a smooth board.
  • He had no paper, but he knew where there was a smooth board.
  • He had no pencil, but there was a piece of black charcoal on the hearth.
  • He began to draw.
  • As often as he touched the charcoal to the smooth board, the picture grew.
  • So busy was he with the drawing that he did not think of anything else.
  • He heard neither the clock nor the birds.
  • He did not even hear his mother's footsteps as she came into the room.
  • He did not hear her soft breathing as she stood over him and watched him finish the wonderful drawing.
  • "It's only a picture of the baby, mother," he said.
  • "I didn't learn," he answered.
  • He turned the picture this way and that, and looked at it from every side.
  • He compared it with the baby's pretty face.
  • Then he handed it back to his wife and said:--
  • Then he called little Benjamin to him.
  • He put his hands on the lad's head and said:--
  • He was the first great American painter.
  • When Andrew Jackson was a little boy he lived with his mother in South Carolina.
  • He was eight years old when he heard about the ride of Paul Revere and the famous fight at Lexington.
  • He was eight years old when he heard about the ride of Paul Revere and the famous fight at Lexington.
  • "I am going to help drive those red-coated British out of the country," he said to his mother.
  • Then, without another word, he mounted his brother's little farm horse and rode away.
  • He was not old enough to be a soldier, but he could be a scout--and a good scout he was.
  • He was not old enough to be a soldier, but he could be a scout--and a good scout he was.
  • He was very tall--as tall as a man.
  • He was not afraid of anything.
  • He was strong and ready for every duty.
  • One day as he was riding through the woods, some British soldiers saw him.
  • Andrew's gray eyes blazed as he stood up straight and proud before the haughty captain.
  • The slim, tall boy seemed to grow taller, as he answered, "I'll not be the servant of any Englishman that ever lived."
  • He drew his sword to hit the boy with its flat side.
  • He is a brave boy.
  • He deserves to be treated as a gentleman.
  • The British soldiers soon returned to Charleston, and he was allowed to go home.
  • He was elected to Congress, he was chosen judge of the supreme court of Tennessee, he was appointed general in the army, and lastly he was for eight years the president of the United States.
  • He was elected to Congress, he was chosen judge of the supreme court of Tennessee, he was appointed general in the army, and lastly he was for eight years the president of the United States.
  • When Daniel Webster was a child he lived in the country, far from any city.
  • He was not strong enough to work on the farm like his brothers; but he loved books and study.
  • He was not strong enough to work on the farm like his brothers; but he loved books and study.
  • He was very young when he was first sent to school.
  • He was very young when he was first sent to school.
  • The schoolhouse was two or three miles from home, but he did not mind the long walk through the woods and over the hills.
  • He soon learned all that his teacher could teach; for he was bright and quick, and had a good memory.
  • He soon learned all that his teacher could teach; for he was bright and quick, and had a good memory.
  • "But," said he, "no man can rightly succeed without an education."
  • So it was decided that the boy should go to some school where he might be prepared for college.
  • He does me a favor by allowing you to ride on the animal, and I do him a favor by taking care of it.
  • He was honored at home and abroad.
  • He was in trouble because his scholars would not study.
  • But still they would whisper, and he could not prevent it.
  • "Children," he said, "we are going to play a new game.
  • He must stand there until he sees some one else whisper.
  • He must stand there until he sees some one else whisper.
  • He was tired, he was vexed, he hardly knew what he said.
  • He was tired, he was vexed, he hardly knew what he said.
  • He stood on one leg and then on the other, and watched very closely; but nobody whispered.
  • Could it be possible that he would receive that thrashing?
  • Suddenly, to his great joy he saw little Lucy Martin lean over her desk and whisper to the girl in front of her.
  • He wished to escape the punishment, and so he called out, "Lucy Martin!" and went proudly to his seat.
  • He wished to escape the punishment, and so he called out, "Lucy Martin!" and went proudly to his seat.
  • Everybody was astonished, for that boy was the best scholar in the school, and he had never been known to break a rule.
  • He worked many years as a blacksmith and studied books whenever he had a spare moment.
  • He worked many years as a blacksmith and studied books whenever he had a spare moment.
  • He learned many languages and became known all over the world as "The Learned Blacksmith."
  • "Mother," he said, "will you let me see that beautiful book again?"
  • Then he began with the first word on the first page and read the first story aloud without making one mistake.
  • And every day since you showed me the book, he has given me a lesson.
  • In history he is called Alfred the Great.
  • "I want to know," he said; "I want to know everything."
  • But after he had learned to read, she taught him to look in books for that which he wished to know.
  • He was a very little boy, but before he was three years old he could read quite well.
  • He was a very little boy, but before he was three years old he could read quite well.
  • When eight years of age he was the best scholar at the famous school at Harrow.
  • He was always reading, learning, inquiring.
  • "I want to know; I want to know," he kept saying.
  • He became one of the most famous scholars in the world.
  • He was noted for his great knowledge, the most of which he had obtained from books.
  • He was noted for his great knowledge, the most of which he had obtained from books.
  • It is said that he could speak and write forty languages.
  • He was not petted and spoiled like many other princes.
  • He knew how to work with his hands.
  • He ate only the plainest food.
  • He slept on a hard bed.
  • He learned to endure hunger and cold.
  • When Cyrus was twelve years old he went with his mother to Media to visit his grandfather.
  • He wished the lad to stay with him in Media.
  • He therefore gave him many beautiful gifts and everything that could please a prince.
  • There was to be music and dancing; and Cyrus was to invite as many guests as he chose.
  • "Well," said he, "all these rich foods that were prepared for the feast are yours.
  • So he gave one portion to the king's officer who had taught him to ride.
  • Another portion he gave to an old servant who waited upon his grandfather.
  • And the rest he divided among the young women who took care of his mother.
  • The king's cupbearer, Sarcas, was very much offended because he was not given a share of the feast.
  • "Why didn't you give something to Sarcas?" he asked.
  • He is proud and overbearing.
  • He thinks that he makes a fine figure when he waits on you.
  • He thinks that he makes a fine figure when he waits on you.
  • "And so he does," said the king.
  • He saw that Cyrus had a will of his own, and this pleased him very much.
  • "I shall be glad to see what you can do," he said.
  • He was dressed in the rich uniform of the cupbearer, and he came forward with much dignity and grace.
  • He was dressed in the rich uniform of the cupbearer, and he came forward with much dignity and grace.
  • He carried a white napkin upon his arm, and held the cup of wine very daintily with three of his fingers.
  • He does not drink merely to be drinking.
  • He drinks to quench his thirst, and that is all.
  • When Cyrus became a man, he succeeded his father as king of Persia; he also succeeded his grandfather Astyages as king of Media.
  • He was a very wise and powerful ruler, and he made his country the greatest of any that was then known.
  • He was a very wise and powerful ruler, and he made his country the greatest of any that was then known.
  • In history he is commonly called Cyrus the Great.
  • There was a caliph of Persia whose name was Al Mamoun. He had two sons whom he wished to become honest and noble men.
  • There was a caliph of Persia whose name was Al Mamoun. He had two sons whom he wished to become honest and noble men.
  • So he employed a wise man whose name was Al Farra to be their teacher.
  • When the caliph heard of this he sent for Al Farra and asked him, "Who is the most honored of men?"
  • "Well, boy, what have you got?" asked one of the robbers, as he pulled Otanes from his horse.
  • He had never heard of a boy with so much money as that.
  • "That is a good story" he said.
  • You can't make me believe that, said the robber; and he hurried away to rob one of the rich merchants.
  • "You are a brave lad to be joking with robbers" said the man; and he also hurried on to a more promising field.
  • "Why did you tell us where to find it?" he asked.
  • He thought of the number of times that he himself had been a coward.
  • He thought of the number of times that he himself had been a coward.
  • He was the advisor and friend of two of the kings who succeeded Cyrus.
  • He led his armies through many countries.
  • He plundered cities, he burned towns, he destroyed thousands of lives.
  • He plundered cities, he burned towns, he destroyed thousands of lives.
  • At last, far in the East, he came to a land of which he had never heard.
  • He led the great king to his palace and begged that he would dine with him.
  • He led the great king to his palace and begged that he would dine with him.
  • "What!" said he, "do you eat gold in this country?"
  • This treasure does not belong to me, for I bought only the ground; but when I offered it to my neighbor he refused it.
  • The second man then spoke up and said, It is true that I sold him the ground, but I did not reserve anything he might find in it.
  • Then he said to the first man, "Have you a son?"
  • He had given them a great deal of trouble, and they wished to destroy him.
  • Then we may be sure that he will never trouble us again.
  • No one knows how he escaped being dashed to pieces.
  • I think that he must have fallen upon some bushes and vines that grew in some parts of the chasm.
  • He groped around in the dim light, but could not find any way of escape.
  • There was no place where he could set his foot to climb out.
  • For three days he lay in his strange prison.
  • He grew weak from hunger and thirst.
  • He expected to die from starvation.
  • Suddenly he was startled by a noise close by him.
  • He watched quietly, and soon saw a large fox coming towards him.
  • He lay quite still till the animal was very near.
  • Then he sprang up quickly and seized it by the tail.
  • It ran into a narrow cleft which he had not seen before, and then through a long, dark passage which was barely large enough for a man's body.
  • At last he saw a ray of light far ahead of him.
  • What should he do?
  • He let go of the fox, and it ran out.
  • Then with great labor he began to widen the passageway.
  • Here the rocks were smaller, and he soon loosened them enough to allow him to squeeze through.
  • In a short time he was free and in the open air.
  • He lived two hundred years ago, and was famous for his courage in defending his country.
  • One day he was in the midst of a great battle.
  • The small house in which he had taken shelter was almost between the two armies.
  • He called to one of his officers and bade him sit down and write a short order for him.
  • The officer began to write, but just as he finished the first word, a bomb came through the roof of the house and struck the floor close by him.
  • He dropped the pen and sprang to his feet.
  • "These people are poor because they have been too lazy to work," he said.
  • "He is no true Roman," said some.
  • He persuaded other towns near Antium to send their soldiers to help him.
  • Soon, at the head of a very great army, he marched toward the city which had once been his home.
  • Then he told them what laws he would require them to obey.
  • But he drove them back with scornful words.
  • His heart will be hard indeed if he can refuse his mother and his wife.
  • When he saw his mother and his wife and his children, he was filled with joy.
  • At last, he could hold out no longer.
  • Then he commanded his army to march back to the city of Antium.
  • He was lost to them.
  • One summer he went over the sea to Italy; for his name was well known there, and many people wished to hear him sing.
  • He visited several cities, and in each place he was well paid for his music.
  • He visited several cities, and in each place he was well paid for his music.
  • At last, having become quite rich, he decided to go home.
  • They feared to spare him lest he should report the matter to the king.
  • He took his stand on the forward deck, while the robber sailors stood in a half circle before him, anxious to listen to his song.
  • He touched his lyre and began to play the accompaniment.
  • Then he sang a wonderful song, so sweet, so lively, so touching, that many of the sailors were moved to tears.
  • And now they would have spared him; but he was true to his promise,-- as soon as the song was finished, he threw himself headlong into the sea.
  • "Are you lately from Italy?" he asked.
  • "He was well and happy when we left Italy," they answered.
  • He has a mind to spend the rest of his life in that country.
  • He was dressed just as they had seen him when he jumped into the sea.
  • He was dressed just as they had seen him when he jumped into the sea.
  • Now, how was Arion saved from drowning when he leaped overboard?
  • Old story-tellers say that he alighted on the back of a large fish, called a dolphin, which had been charmed by his music and was swimming near the ship.
  • He told his wonderful story to the king; but the king would not believe him.
  • "Wait," said he, "till the ship arrives, and then we shall know the truth."
  • He lived more than seven hundred years ago in a quaint little town of Italy.
  • He spoke of the birds as his little brothers of the air, and he could never bear to see them harmed.
  • He spoke of the birds as his little brothers of the air, and he could never bear to see them harmed.
  • At Christmas time he scattered crumbs of bread under the trees, so that the tiny creatures could feast and be happy.
  • Once when a boy gave him a pair of doves which he had snared, St. Francis had a nest made for them, and the mother bird laid her eggs in it.
  • One day as he was walking among the trees the birds saw him and flew down to greet him.
  • Then, when they saw that he was about to speak, they nestled softly in the grass and listened.
  • For think what He has given you.
  • He has given you wings with which to fly through the air.
  • He has given you clothing both warm and beautiful.
  • He has given you the air in which to move and have homes.
  • He gives you the rivers and the brooks from which to drink.
  • He gives you the trees in which to build your nests.
  • And when he had blessed them, all began to sing; and the whole forest was filled with sweetness and joy because of their wonderful melodies.
  • A long time ago there lived a poor slave whose name was Aesop. He was a small man with a large head and long arms.
  • To do this, he had to take them to a large city where there was a slave market.
  • The other slaves laughed and said he was foolish.
  • But he threw it upon his shoulders and seemed well satisfied.
  • For the bundle which he had chosen had contained the food for the whole party.
  • As the slaves stood before him he asked each one to tell what kind of work he could do.
  • This answer pleased the rich man so well that he bought Aesop at once, and took him to his home on the island of Samos.
  • His master was so much pleased with him that he gave him his freedom.
  • His voice was clear and strong, and all knew that he, at least, was not afraid.
  • "This may be the last great day," he said.
  • Then with his strong face aglow in their feeble light, he made a speech in favor of a law to help poor fishermen.
  • And as he spoke, the other lawmakers listened in silence till the darkness began to fade and the sky grew bright again.
  • The people of Connecticut still remember Abraham Davenport, because he was a wise judge and a brave lawmaker.
  • The road was strange to him, and he traveled very slowly.
  • When night came on he stopped at a pleasant roadside inn and asked for lodging.
  • He called for his bill and paid it.
  • As he was starting away, the friendly innkeeper said, "Which way will you travel, Mr. Randolph?"
  • He turned his horse and rode away.
  • He had not gone farther than to the end of the innkeeper's field, when to his surprise he found that the road forked.
  • He had not gone farther than to the end of the innkeeper's field, when to his surprise he found that the road forked.
  • He did not know whether he should take the right-hand fork or the left-hand.
  • He did not know whether he should take the right-hand fork or the left-hand.
  • He paused for a while.
  • He looked back and saw the innkeeper still standing by the door.
  • He called to him:--"My friend, which of these roads shall I travel to go to Lynchburg?"
  • He went far out of his way and lost much time, all on account of his surliness.
  • He was famous as a lawyer and statesman.
  • He was a member of Congress for many years, and was noted for his odd manners and strong self- will.
  • He was quarrelsome and unruly.
  • He was often making trouble among his neighbors.
  • For this reason many people were glad when he ran away from home and went to sea.
  • "We hope that he will get what he deserves," they said.
  • He was big and strong and soon became a fine sailor.
  • But he was still headstrong and ill-tempered; and he was often in trouble with the other sailors.
  • He became very disagreeable.
  • He quarreled with the other sailors, and even with the captain.
  • "I would rather live alone on a desert island than be a sailor on this ship," he said.
  • So they filled a small boat with the things that he would need the most--an ax, a hoe, a kettle, and some other things.
  • He began to see how foolish he had been; he thought how terrible it would be to live there without one friend, without one person to whom he could speak.
  • He began to see how foolish he had been; he thought how terrible it would be to live there without one friend, without one person to whom he could speak.
  • He called loudly to the sailors and to the captain.
  • He built him a little hut for shelter at night and in stormy weather.
  • He planted a small garden.
  • He tried to make signals to them; he called as loudly as he could; but he was neither seen nor heard, and the ships came no nearer.
  • He tried to make signals to them; he called as loudly as he could; but he was neither seen nor heard, and the ships came no nearer.
  • "If I ever have the good fortune to escape from this island," he said, "I will be kind and obliging to every one.
  • For four years and four months he lived alone on the island.
  • He made himself known, and the captain willingly agreed to carry him back to his own country.
  • When he reached Scotland everybody was eager to hear him tell of his adventures, and he soon found himself famous.
  • He had written many stories which people at that time liked to read.
  • When Daniel Defoe heard how Selkirk had lived alone on the island of Juan Fernandez, he said to himself: Here is something worth telling about.
  • So he sat down and wrote a wonderful story, which he called "The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe."
  • When only a child he liked to stand by the river and see the ships sailing past.
  • He wondered where they had come from and where they were going.
  • He talked with some of the sailors.
  • "Oh, I wish I could be a sailor!" he said.
  • He could not think of anything else.
  • He thought how grand it would be to sail and sail on the wide blue sea.
  • He thought how pleasant it would be to visit strange countries and see strange peoples.
  • As he grew up, his father wished him to learn a trade.
  • "No, no, I am going to be a sailor; I am going to see the world" he said.
  • So, when he was eighteen years old, he ran away from his pleasant home and went to sea.
  • He soon found that his mother's words were true.
  • He visited many lands and saw many wonderful things.
  • He swam to an island that was not far away.
  • He had only a dog and some cats to keep him company.
  • Then he tamed a parrot and some goats.
  • He built a house of some sticks and vines.
  • He sowed grain and baked bread.
  • He made a boat for himself.
  • He did a great many things.
  • He was busy every day.
  • He was glad to go back to England to see his home and his friends once more.
  • Like other kings, he lived in a beautiful palace and had many officers and servants to wait upon him.
  • He rang the little bell which was used to call the page, but no page answered.
  • "I wonder what can have happened to the boy," he said; and he opened the door and looked out.
  • The poor child was so tired after his night's work that he could not keep awake.
  • The king was about to waken him roughly, when he saw a piece of paper on the floor beside him.
  • He picked it up and read it.
  • He took ten gold pieces from his table and wrapped them in the little letter.
  • Then he went out again, very quietly, and slipped them all into the boy's pocket.
  • After a while he rang the bell again, very loudly.
  • He was frightened and ready to cry.
  • He put his hand in his pocket, and was surprised to find the gold pieces wrapped in his mother's letter.
  • Then his eyes overflowed with tears, and he fell on his knees before the king.
  • He had fought a battle with his enemies, the English.
  • For many days he wandered through rough and dangerous places.
  • He waded rivers and climbed mountains.
  • Sometimes he was alone.
  • Late one evening he came to a little farmhouse in a lonely valley.
  • He walked in without knocking.
  • "May a poor traveler find rest and shelter here for the night?" he asked.
  • He is the rightful lord of this country.
  • He is now being hunted with hounds, but I hope soon to see him king over all Scotland.
  • The door was thrown open and he saw a hundred brave men, all ready to give him aid.
  • He forgot his hunger; he forgot his weariness.
  • He forgot his hunger; he forgot his weariness.
  • He began to ask about his enemies who had been hunting him.
  • Soon he became the real king and ruler of all Scotland,
  • So he raised a great army and made war against other countries.
  • He conquered many kings and burned many cities.
  • For a long time he wandered in fear from place to place.
  • He was in despair.
  • He was about to lose all hope.
  • One day he was lying under a tree, thinking of his misfortunes.
  • He had now been a wanderer for twenty days.
  • He could not hold out much longer.
  • He looked more closely and saw that it was an ant.
  • As Tamerlane looked, he saw that there was a hole in the tree only a little way above, and that this was the home of the ant.
  • "You are a brave fellow, Mr. Ant," he said; "but you have a heavy load to carry."
  • Just as he spoke, the ant lost its footing and fell to the ground.
  • And this he did.
  • He was dressed plainly, his coat was worn, and his hat was dingy.
  • On his arm he carried a small basket.
  • "I wish to get a fowl for to-morrow's dinner," he said.
  • He asked the price and paid for it.
  • "I will take one of those turkeys," he said.
  • He was dressed in fine style and carried a small cane.
  • Fancy me carrying a turkey along the street! said the young gentleman; and he began to grow very angry.
  • He had heard all that was said.
  • He bowed and went on.
  • He turned and walked briskly back to the market.
  • "Who is that polite old gentleman who carried my turkey for me?" he asked of the market man.
  • He is one of the greatest men in our country, was the answer.
  • "Why did he offer to carry my turkey?" he asked.
  • "He wished to teach you a lesson," answered the market man.
  • He wished to teach you that no man should feel himself too fine to carry his own packages.
  • Judge Marshall carried the turkey simply because he wished to be kind and obliging.
  • "Oh, I have a plan for making a boat move without poling it or rowing it," he answered.
  • He took something like an oarlock from his pocket and fastened it to the stern of the boat; then with a paddle which worked in this oarlock one of the boys could guide the boat while the other turned the paddle wheels.
  • That night when Christopher went home he had a wonderful story to tell.
  • "Bob Fulton planned the whole thing," he said, "and I helped him make the paddles and put them on the boat."
  • When Robert Fulton became a man, he did not forget his experiment with the old fishing boat.
  • He kept on, planning and thinking and working, until at last he succeeded in making a boat with paddle wheels that could be run by steam.
  • He kept on, planning and thinking and working, until at last he succeeded in making a boat with paddle wheels that could be run by steam.
  • He is now remembered and honored as the inventor of the steamboat.
  • He became famous because he was always thinking and studying and working.
  • He became famous because he was always thinking and studying and working.
  • One day a strange merchant came to him with some diamonds and pearls which he had brought from beyond the sea.
  • The caliph was so well pleased with these jewels that he bought them and paid the merchant a large sum of money.
  • The merchant put the gold in a bag of purple silk which he tied to his belt underneath his long cloak.
  • Then he set out on foot to walk to another city.
  • As the merchant was walking along, he came to a river that flowed gently between green and shady banks.
  • He was hot and covered with dust.
  • Why should he not cool himself in the refreshing water?
  • He put the bag of money on top of them and then leaped into the water.
  • Suddenly he heard a rustling noise behind him.
  • He turned quickly and saw an eagle rising into the air with his moneybag in its claws.
  • He jumped out of the water and shouted again.
  • "Why, what has happened to you?" he asked.
  • "Why didn't you come to us before?" he asked.
  • "Ride at once to the Black Mountains," he said.
  • A year ago he was so poor that he had scarcely clothes for his back.
  • Both he and his family dressed well; they had plenty to eat; he had even bought a horse to help him carry his produce to market.
  • He also ordered that the merchant should come at the same time.
  • As soon as he entered the hall the caliph went to meet him.
  • "Good friend," he said, "if you should find something that we have lost, what would you do with it?"
  • "Here it is, my lord," he said.
  • He will not care.'
  • But, as I came to your palace this morning, I kept saying to myself, 'When our lord Al Mansour learns just how it was that I borrowed the gold, I have no doubt that in his kindness of heart he will forgive me the debt.'
  • Great was the caliph's surprise when he heard the poor man's story.
  • He took the bag of money and handed it to the merchant.
  • "Take the bag and count the money that is in it," he said.
  • The merchant did as he was told.
  • "There is nothing lacking," he said, "but the ten pieces he has told you about; and I will give him these as a reward."
  • "No," said Al Mansour, "it is for me to reward the man as he deserves."
  • Saying this, he ordered that ten gold pieces be given to the merchant in place of those that were lacking.
  • Then he rewarded the gardener with ten more pieces for his honesty.
  • Think no more about it, he said.
  • "Who will sing us a song?" said the master woodman as he threw a fresh log upon the fire.
  • He sang of war, and of bold rough deeds, and of love and sorrow.
  • "What shall I do when it comes my turn?" he said to himself.
  • So he sat there trembling and afraid; for he was a timid, bashful man and did not like to be noticed.
  • At last, just as the blacksmith was in the midst of a stirring song, he rose quietly and went out into the darkness.
  • He went across the narrow yard to the sheds where the cattle were kept in stormy weather.
  • He soon found a warm corner, and there he lay down, covering himself with the straw.
  • He soon found a warm corner, and there he lay down, covering himself with the straw.
  • He was afraid and has slipped away from us.
  • He thought that a wonderful light was shining around him.
  • At first he was so bewildered that he could not answer.
  • Then he heard the voice again.
  • "What shall I sing?" he asked.
  • All through the night he sat among the abbey cows, and sang his wonderful song.
  • And all of the sweet-faced sisters and other women of the place listened while he sang again the wonderful song of the creation.
  • And this he did.
  • He lived in a splendid palace where there was everything that could give delight.
  • He had never gone beyond the beautiful gardens that surrounded his father's palace.
  • He had never seen nor heard of sorrow or sickness or poverty.
  • He knew only of those things that give joy and health and peace.
  • But one day after he had become a man, he said: Tell me about the great world which, you say, lies outside of these palace walls.
  • "Then to-morrow I will go out and see some of those things," he said.
  • At first he did not see anything that disturbed him; for word had gone before him to remove from sight everything that might be displeasing or painful.
  • Why do his legs tremble under him as he walks, leaning upon a stick?
  • He seems weak, and his eyes are dull.
  • Is he some new kind of man?
  • He has lived more than eighty years.
  • His face is white, and he seems very weak.
  • He is sick, answered the coachman.
  • The coachman explained as well as he was able; and they rode onward.
  • One night he left the beautiful palace which his father had given to him and went out into the world to do good and to help his fellow men.
  • He might be seen every day with a bag of charcoal on his back, carrying it to some of his customers.
  • Sometimes he carried three or four bags to the palace where the little king of France lived with his mother.
  • One evening he was very late coming home.
  • Then she saw that the child's face was very pale and that he neither opened his eyes nor moved.
  • Soon the little stranger was clad in the warm clothes; the dry soft blanket was wrapped around him; and he was laid on the children's bed.
  • Then, being very comfortable, he began to grow stronger.
  • He opened his eyes and looked around at the small, plain room and at the poor people standing near him.
  • He looked at the fire on the hearth.
  • Then he said, "Your house is a very poor place, I think."
  • He doesn't know what he says.
  • He doesn't know what he says.
  • Wait till he rests a while, and then he'll be in a better humor.
  • His eyes closed and he was soon fast asleep.
  • "I will tell you," he said.
  • He was almost drowned.
  • "Did he say anything, father?" asked Charlot.
  • He was senseless; but I knew he wasn't drowned.
  • He was senseless; but I knew he wasn't drowned.
  • Then I thought of our own warm little house, and how snug we could make him until he came to his senses again.
  • I wonder who he is.
  • "He shall be our little brother," said Blondel; and both the boys clapped their hands very softly.
  • He seemed to feel quite well and strong.
  • He sat up in the bed and looked around.
  • But he would not eat anything.
  • He has come after me.
  • Then he slipped quickly under the table and hid himself.
  • "Don't tell him I am here," he said softly.
  • He said to a soldier who stood at the door, "Tell your story again."
  • Then he turned to the cardinal and said, Now, I am ready.
  • He had just noticed that the king was wearing poor Charlot's Sunday suit instead of his own.
  • As the little king went out, he turned at the door and called to Charlot.
  • "Come to the palace to-morrow," he said, "and you shall have your clothes.
  • Louis the Fourteenth became king of France when he was only five years old.
  • In history he is often called the Grand Monarch.
  • Towards evening he told his men to ride home by the main road while he went by another way that was somewhat longer.
  • As he came out of the forest he saw a little boy by the roadside, who seemed to be watching for some one.
  • They say he is hunting in the woods, and perhaps will ride out this way.
  • "My good men," he said, "how many fish do you expect to draw in this time?"
  • "How much will you take for the fish that you are drawing in?" he asked.
  • "Here is your money," he said.
  • Then one of the fishermen said, "Let us ask the governor about it and do as he shall bid us."
  • "This is a very important question," he said.
  • "The prize shall go to the man who deserves it most," he said.
  • He is famous all over the world.
  • So, with his own hands he carried the golden tripod to the little house where Thales lived.
  • He knocked at the door and the wise man himself opened it.
  • He taught that men ought to be kind even to their enemies.
  • He taught, also, that a friend is the greatest blessing that any one can have.
  • He was a poor man and had no wish to be rich.
  • "It is better to be wise than wealthy," he said.
  • He would not take it.
  • "The oracle did not intend that I should have it," he said.
  • He is the man whom the oracle meant.
  • He was a brave soldier and a wise teacher.
  • The people of his country had made him their king; but as soon as he had made good laws for them he gave up his crown.
  • He looked at the tripod.
  • "How beautiful it is!" he said.
  • "It is well," said he, "that neither a merchant nor a fisherman shall have it; for such men think only of their business and care really nothing for beauty."
  • He is the handsomest and strongest of men, and I believe he is the wisest also.
  • He is the handsomest and strongest of men, and I believe he is the wisest also.
  • "Educate the children," he said; and for that reason his name is remembered to this day.
  • He lives in Corinth, [Footnote: Cor'inth.] and his name is Periander. [Footnote: Per i an'der.] Carry the precious gift to him.
  • When he heard that some men had come to Corinth with a very costly golden tripod, he had them brought before him.
  • "I have heard all about that tripod," he said, "and I know why you are carrying it from one place to another.
  • To my mind he deserves the golden prize.
  • They learned that Chilon was a very quiet man, that he never spoke about himself, and that he spent all his time in trying to make his country great and strong and happy.
  • He is my worst enemy, and yet, I admire him as the wisest man in the world.
  • He was the chief ruler of that great city.
  • He turned onto Franz Josef Street, where he was not supposed to have been, and drove right in front of a surprised Princip.
  • In the ancient world, man wanted guidance from the gods on what he should do.
  • Of the twenty thousand sales he has made in his career, he probably remembers a few hundred distinctly and a few thousand vaguely.
  • Two hundred years later, William Rutherford thought he had calculated it to 208 digits but only got the first 152 correct, so we will give him credit that far.
  • They might balk at getting on an airline flight flown by a computer and prefer having a pilot on board to take over if he "feels in his gut" that something is wrong (even if that feeling is the airport burrito he had for lunch).
  • He should have just become a steam drill operator!
  • He is well known because of an extraordinary practice.
  • And he said, "Okay."
  • Once Jim extends the invitation, he memorizes all the individuals' names, where they are from, what they do for a living, information about their families, and so forth.
  • So when I knocked on the door of Jim's atelier and said, "Hey, I'm Byron Reese," he said, "Oh, Byron, come over here, I want you to meet this guy.
  • He is also from Austin, and he's in Internet publishing, too.
  • He once said he does all this because he wants to introduce everyone in the world to everyone else.
  • He once said he does all this because he wants to introduce everyone in the world to everyone else.
  • When the salesperson rings up your purchase, no one tells him he had better forget what shoes he sold you with that suit and not to use that information to advise any future clients.
  • He computed the answer in his head and recited the thirty-nine-digit answer in pounds.
  • In 1921, a dozen years before he would be sworn in as president, Franklin Roosevelt was diagnosed with polio.
  • During his campaign and his time in office, the extent of the effect of his polio was kept from the public, but the fact he had the disease was commonly known.
  • With a grant from the National Foundation for Infant Paralysis, he went to work on a polio vaccine.
  • I replied, "Writing about polio," and he asked, "What is polio?"
  • In 1796, he extracted fluid from the pox on the hand of a dairymaid named Sarah Nelmes—who had caught the condition from her cow Blossom—and injected the fluid into a cut in eight-year-old James Phipps's arm.
  • Hippocrates was remarkable not only as a surgeon but also because he systematized medicine in his spare time.
  • He created many of the medical terms we use today, such as acute, chronic, endemic, epidemic, paroxysm, and relapse.
  • He formalized the structure of medical inquiry as an independent science.
  • He laid out how doctors should conduct themselves professionally, how to record patient records, and even suggested matters of personal hygiene for physicians, right down to their fingernails.
  • In 1665, physicist Robert Hooke pointed a microscope at a piece of cork and noticed many small compartments he called "cells."
  • He discovered the nucleus of the cell.
  • He had discovered, and seen, chromosomes.
  • For instance, have you ever seen one of those people on TV who is turning one hundred and says he ate bacon every day of his life?
  • He predicts that within twenty years, the first person to live to one thousand will be born.
  • With each trade he got something he valued more than what he traded away; and presumably all the people he traded with along the way also increased their value with each trade.
  • It is safe to say that the man with seventeen puppies is creating more happiness by giving one each to sixteen friends than he is forgoing by his loss of puppies.
  • And it seems to work pretty well, as author Dean Koontz noted when he observed, "Civilization rests on the fact that most people do the right thing most of the time." 3.
  • Smith says that if one man tried to make pins by himself, he might make one per day.
  • It doesn't matter that the person selling pencils doesn't know how the pencil is made; he only needs to know how to sell them.
  • What did he mean by this?
  • He had died by the time I read that passage in one of his books, so I couldn't write him, as is my normal practice when an author's words puzzle me.
  • Here is what I think he meant: If you could see a theoretical possibility for something in physics—"something that might be true"—then given enough time, you eventually could achieve it in reality.
  • He explained to me that with a lawnmower, one person would be able to do the job and eleven men would be unemployed.
  • He makes $10 an hour.
  • He works from home and has a night job remotely monitoring real-time security cameras after hours at an office building.
  • His job is to push a button if he sees anything suspicious.
  • He used to pay $10; now he pays one dollar.
  • He used to pay $10; now he pays one dollar.
  • He still has his labor to sell and can go get a new job.
  • Who do you think makes more money: the one person who operates the cotton gin we discussed in the last chapter or one of the fifty people he replaced?
  • He is freed from being a stand-in for a machine.
  • And he will find he is capable of adding far more value than as a set of eyes watching a screen.
  • That meant for every pound someone made, he owed more than a pound in taxes.
  • He distrusted government and said 'that government governs best which governs least.'
  • In 58 BC, Clodius Pulcher ran on a "free grain for the poor" platform as he tried to become tribune.
  • He worked to apply a means test, pared the rolls back, then died; the rolls swelled again, and his successor again tried to bring them in line, but it was hard.
  • First, it would be tempting to assume the person hauling manure can only do that, and if that job disappeared he would have no useful skills.
  • But in describing that job spectrum, I never said anything about his absolute ability—I said only that he was at the bottom of the list relative to others.
  • It turns out that he loves to paint.
  • In fact, let's say his own mother considered donating the portrait he painted of her to Goodwill but decided not to because "the poor have enough problems already."
  • Thus, because Chad is not good at painting, he cannot paint for a living.
  • Instead, he gets a job monitoring security cameras, which pays $10 an hour—until, of course, he loses that job to Chang.
  • Or these jobs can be divorced from economic realities, as the struggling painter or actor decides simply to do what he loves and live off the minimum income afforded by this planet-wide prosperity.
  • It is fascinating reading to this day because the things he notes about the American character are still very much with us.
  • He writes how in Europe when there is a problem, people turn to the government to solve it, but in America, they form what he calls "voluntary associations"—what we might term charities and nonprofits.
  • He writes how in Europe when there is a problem, people turn to the government to solve it, but in America, they form what he calls "voluntary associations"—what we might term charities and nonprofits.
  • And he used his decades of dominance on the national scene, as well as his fantastic oratorical ability, to advance that belief and essentially invent the Democratic Party we know today.
  • Eventually, he reasoned, the hungry hoards would overwhelm the beleaguered food supply.
  • And he even projects that if farmers followed his plan, it is quite conceivable that in 2050 there will be nine billion people feeding more comfortably than today off a smaller acreage of cropland, releasing large tracts of land for nature reserves.
  • He later recalled, I saw how food changed them ...
  • In 1953, he developed a method to make strains of wheat highly resistant to a single form of rust.
  • By the time Norman Borlaug passed away in 2009 at the age of ninety-five, he had become one of only six people to have won the Nobel Peace Prize, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and the Congressional Gold Medal.
  • He didn't have computers or even a calculator.
  • He didn't have genome sequencing.
  • He couldn't splice genes.
  • He had no way to collaborate with scientists in other places, no Internet, and no library.
  • He couldn't develop new irrigation techniques, invent new machinery, or create new fertilizers.
  • He basically followed old agriculture; he planted a lot of seed and hoped for rain.
  • He basically followed old agriculture; he planted a lot of seed and hoped for rain.
  • All he could do was cross strains of wheat, much in the same fashion as Gregor Mendel did in the 1800s.
  • And do you know how he crossed the grains?
  • He would pollinate a wheat stalk, then cover it with a trash bag to prevent contamination by other plants.
  • Between 1856 and 1863, he bred 29,000 pea plants.
  • He noticed that when he bred a tall one with a short one, sometimes he got tall offspring and sometimes a short offspring.
  • He noticed that when he bred a tall one with a short one, sometimes he got tall offspring and sometimes a short offspring.
  • He then noticed that when he bred short ones with short ones, he always got short ones.
  • He then noticed that when he bred short ones with short ones, he always got short ones.
  • Then he noticed when he bred tall pea plants with another tall plant, he occasionally got a short offspring, but usually tall ones.
  • In any case, he found something else interesting.
  • This fuel, he believes, will be vastly better than anything we currently produce.
  • Their produce is checked in to the warehouse and each farmer is issued a certificate corresponding to the amount of produce he brought.
  • He can sell the certificate, use it as collateral, or hold it for the future.
  • Napoleon Bonaparte made a comment along these lines when he stated, "Man is entitled by birthright to a share of the Earth's produce sufficient to fill the needs of his existence."
  • Rights do not mean much, he reasoned, to those with an "empty stomach, shirtless back, roofless dwellings ... unemployment and poverty, no education or medical attention."
  • And if that were not enough, he killed by starvation in the name of a program called—I kid you not—"The Super Great Leap Forward."
  • Inspired by the Chinese effort, he, too, tried to increase the agricultural production of his country by emptying the cities and sending everyone to work on the farms under brutal conditions.
  • Roosevelt went on to outline what he believed would be in this Second Bill of Rights: food, medicine, shelter, and so on.
  • He is raising the value of citizenship, not cheapening it.
  • If you knew someone who was a good business partner, was fun to hang out with, but let one of his children starve to death so that he could enjoy a higher standard of living, what would be your opinion of this person?
  • He pulls up next to a farmer and asks the farmer how to get to a certain place.
  • The Bulgarian king Samuel was so stricken by the sight of his mighty army staggering back home that he suffered a stroke and died two days later.
  • During World War II, when General Patton got sacked for slapping a soldier whom he regarded as cowardly, the Germans couldn't believe it: Their officers could have soldiers shot without trial!
  • The point is that he went to jail for it.
  • Early in his presidency, in a 1953 address that would become known as his "Cross of Iron" speech, he declared, "Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed.
  • After speaking about the economic costs of war, the burden it places on the economy, and the toll this takes on the people, Eisenhower closed by describing the peace proposals he was offering Russia and China.
  • Their aim, he said, was nothing less than "the lifting, from the backs and from the hearts of men, of their burden of arms and of fears, so that they may find before them a golden age of freedom and of peace."
  • So did de Tocqueville, touring nineteenth-century America, when he wrote that "All those who seek to destroy the liberties of a democratic nation ought to know that war is the surest and shortest means to accomplish it."
  • As Eisenhower's presidency neared an end, he spoke of war again, but less in terms of economic costs.
  • Nearly two terms of fighting the Cold War led him to conclude, as he put it, War in our time has become an anachronism.
  • Albert Einstein reflected this when he famously said, "I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones."
  • Trivia question: How old was Colonel William Travis when he died leading the Texans at the Alamo?
  • In the 1960 version of the film, he was played by a thirty-one-year-old Laurence Harvey.
  • In the 2004 incarnation of the film, he was played by thirty-one-year-old Patrick Wilson.
  • Now the "war stories" are about how Mark Zuckerberg was nineteen when he started Facebook, Bill Gates was nineteen when he started Microsoft, and Larry Page and Sergey Brin were in their early twenties when they started Google.
  • (Of course, when a king proves himself through battle, he is not risking his life but the lives of thousands of his subjects.
  • In fact, virtually everyone should have wondered why he was fighting soldiers from places he couldn't find on a map.
  • O'Neill observed that scrutiny of government had become so intense that officials never could have gotten away with that—and he was writing in the late 1980s.
  • Shakespeare remains so popular because he wrote about timeless human experiences: love and fear and envy, anger and revenge and jealousy, ambition and regret and guilt.
  • He convinces Othello that Desdemona, Othello's wife, is unfaithful to him.
  • He told Simonides he was only going to pay him half the fee and if he wanted the other half, he should collect it from Castor and Pollux.
  • He told Simonides he was only going to pay him half the fee and if he wanted the other half, he should collect it from Castor and Pollux.
  • Later that evening when Simonides was at a banquet with Scopas, he got word that two young men were outside looking for him.
  • He went to the door but didn't see anyone so went outside to look for them.
  • Augustine describes a day when he saw his mentor, Ambrose, looking intently at an open book.
  • When Augustine finally asked, "What are you doing?," Ambrose replied that he was reading.
  • Augustine said this could not be the case because he could neither hear Ambrose nor see his lips moving.
  • Ambrose replied that he was looking at the words and reading them that way.
  • Processing aurally was familiar to Augustine while reading silently was revelatory, so noteworthy that he wrote it in his autobiography.
  • He taught me everything I know about old cars and why they are cool.
  • His hospitality was great, almost to a fault, and he seldom came home without bringing a guest.
  • His special pride was the big garden where, it was said, he raised the finest watermelons and strawberries in the county; and to me he brought the first ripe grapes and the choicest berries.
  • I remember his caressing touch as he led me from tree to tree, from vine to vine, and his eager delight in whatever pleased me.
  • He had had a short illness, there had been a brief time of acute suffering, then all was over.
  • Often when he went his rounds I clung to his coat tails while he collected and punched the tickets.
  • His punch, with which he let me play, was a delightful toy.
  • When we arrived in Baltimore, Dr. Chisholm received us kindly: but he could do nothing.
  • He held me on his knee while I examined his watch, and he made it strike for me.
  • He held me on his knee while I examined his watch, and he made it strike for me.
  • He understood my signs, and I knew it and loved him at once.
  • The conversation he hears in his home stimulates his mind and suggests topics and calls forth the spontaneous expression of his own thoughts.
  • The illustrative strings and the orange stick representing the poles seemed so real that even to this day the mere mention of temperate zone suggests a series of twine circles; and I believe that if any one should set about it he could convince me that white bears actually climb the North Pole.
  • He had made his leap, he had seen the great world, and was content to stay in his pretty glass house under the big fuchsia tree until he attained the dignity of froghood.
  • He had made his leap, he had seen the great world, and was content to stay in his pretty glass house under the big fuchsia tree until he attained the dignity of froghood.
  • Then he went to live in the leafy pool at the end of the garden, where he made the summer nights musical with his quaint love-song.
  • That night, after I had hung my stocking, I lay awake a long time, pretending to be asleep and keeping alert to see what Santa Claus would do when he came.
  • Little Tim was so tame that he would hop on my finger and eat candied cherries out of my hand.
  • I saw him many times after that, and he was always a good friend to me; indeed, I was thinking of him when I called Boston "the City of Kind Hearts."
  • I felt of him and thought it very strange that he should carry his house on his back.
  • It suddenly occurred to me that he might make a delightful pet; so I seized him by the tail with both hands and carried him home.
  • But next morning I went to the trough, and lo, he had disappeared!
  • Nobody knew where he had gone, or how he had escaped.
  • I called him Black Beauty, as I had just read the book, and he resembled his namesake in every way, from his glossy black coat to the white star on his forehead.
  • He was unusually tender and kind to me, and for a brief space the shadow lifted.
  • He believed, or at least suspected, that Miss Sullivan and I had deliberately stolen the bright thoughts of another and imposed them on him to win his admiration.
  • But I do not understand how he ever thought a blind and deaf child of eleven could have invented them.
  • The young writer, as Stevenson has said, instinctively tries to copy whatever seems most admirable, and he shifts his admiration with astonishing versatility.
  • Since the publication of "The Story of My Life" in the Ladies' Home Journal, Mr. Anagnos has made a statement, in a letter to Mr. Macy, that at the time of the "Frost King" matter, he believed I was innocent.
  • He says, the court of investigation before which I was brought consisted of eight people: four blind, four seeing persons.
  • Mr. Anagnos states that he cast his vote with those who were favourable to me.
  • For two years he seems to have held the belief that Miss Sullivan and I were innocent.
  • Then he evidently retracted his favourable judgment, why I do not know.
  • In the electrical building we examined the telephones, autophones, phonographs, and other inventions, and he made me understand how it is possible to send a message on wires that mock space and outrun time, and, like Prometheus, to draw fire from the sky.
  • He taught me Latin grammar principally; but he often helped me in arithmetic, which I found as troublesome as it was uninteresting.
  • He taught me Latin grammar principally; but he often helped me in arithmetic, which I found as troublesome as it was uninteresting.
  • He, who made every one happy in a beautiful, unobtrusive way, was most kind and tender to Miss Sullivan and me.
  • So long as we felt his loving presence and knew that he took a watchful interest in our work, fraught with so many difficulties, we could not be discouraged.
  • I rejoiced over all his successes, I shut my eyes to his faults, and wondered, not that he had them, but that they had not crushed or dwarfed his soul.
  • He had to pass five hours at a time to have them counted.
  • Mr. Gilman spelled to me what I had written, and I made such changes as I thought necessary, and he inserted them.
  • Just before the books came, Mr. Gilman had begun to remonstrate with Miss Sullivan on the ground that I was working too hard, and in spite of my earnest protestations, he reduced the number of my recitations.
  • Mr. Gilman at first agreed to this; but when my tasks had become somewhat perplexing, he insisted that I was overworked, and that I should remain at his school three years longer.
  • He explained each time what I did not understand in the previous lesson, assigned new work, and took home with him the Greek exercises which I had written during the week on my typewriter, corrected them fully, and returned them to me.
  • He kept my mind alert and eager, and trained it to reason clearly, and to seek conclusions calmly and logically, instead of jumping wildly into space and arriving nowhere.
  • He was always gentle and forbearing, no matter how dull I might be, and believe me, my stupidity would often have exhausted the patience of Job.
  • He brings back Shakespeare, the poet.
  • Who was he and what did he do?
  • In desperation you seize the budget and dump everything out, and there in a corner is your man, serenely brooding on his own private thought, unconscious of the catastrophe which he has brought upon you.
  • The highest chords he strikes are those of reason and self-love.
  • When he speaks, it is not to impress others, but because his heart would burst if he did not find an outlet for the thoughts that burn in his soul.
  • I admire Victor Hugo – I appreciate his genius, his brilliancy, his romanticism; though he is not one of my literary passions.
  • He had steered through many a storm with firm hand and sea-wise eye.
  • Oh, man, how dost thou forget and obstruct thy brother man, and say, "Give us this day our daily bread," when he has none!
  • He has a long pedigree, a crooked tail and the drollest "phiz" in dogdom.
  • In imagination I can hear Homer singing, as with unsteady, hesitating steps he gropes his way from camp to camp--singing of life, of love, of war, of the splendid achievements of a noble race.
  • In the king's face, which he wore as a mask, there was a remoteness and inaccessibility of grief which I shall never forget.
  • I go to see him whenever I happen to be where he is acting.
  • He played "Rip Van Winkle."
  • Mr. Jefferson let me touch his face so that I could imagine how he looked on waking from that strange sleep of twenty years, and he showed me how poor old Rip staggered to his feet.
  • Once while I was calling on him in Boston he acted the most striking parts of "The Rivals" for me.
  • He asked me to indicate as far as I could the gestures and action that should go with the lines.
  • Of course, I have no sense whatever of dramatic action, and could make only random guesses; but with masterful art he suited the action to the word.
  • My spirit could not reach up to his, but he gave me a real sense of joy in life, and I never left him without carrying away a fine thought that grew in beauty and depth of meaning as I grew.
  • Bishop Brooks taught me no special creed or dogma; but he impressed upon my mind two great ideas--the fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of man, and made me feel that these truths underlie all creeds and forms of worship.
  • He was the most sympathetic of companions.
  • He knew so much and was so genial that it was impossible to feel dull in his presence.
  • He had invited Miss Sullivan and me to call on him one Sunday afternoon.
  • "Yes," he replied, "the Charles has many dear associations for me."
  • He made me sit in his armchair, while he brought different interesting things for me to examine, and at his request I recited "The Chambered Nautilus," which was then my favorite poem.
  • He made me sit in his armchair, while he brought different interesting things for me to examine, and at his request I recited "The Chambered Nautilus," which was then my favorite poem.
  • He had a book of his poems in raised print from which I read "In School Days."
  • He was delighted that I could pronounce the words so well, and said that he had no difficulty in understanding me.
  • He was delighted that I could pronounce the words so well, and said that he had no difficulty in understanding me.
  • He said he was the little boy in the poem, and that the girl's name was Sally, and more which I have forgotten.
  • He said he was the little boy in the poem, and that the girl's name was Sally, and more which I have forgotten.
  • I also recited "Laus Deo," and as I spoke the concluding verses, he placed in my hands a statue of a slave from whose crouching figure the fetters were falling, even as they fell from Peter's limbs when the angel led him forth out of prison.
  • Then he led me to the gate and kissed me tenderly on my forehead.
  • I promised to visit him again the following summer, but he died before the promise was fulfilled.
  • He has filled the old skins of dogma with the new wine of love, and shown men what it is to believe, live and be free.
  • What he has taught we have seen beautifully expressed in his own life--love of country, kindness to the least of his brethren, and a sincere desire to live upward and onward.
  • Here in Dr. Bell's laboratory, or in the fields on the shore of the great Bras d'Or, I have spent many delightful hours listening to what he had to tell me about his experiments, and helping him fly kites by means of which he expects to discover the laws that shall govern the future air-ship.
  • Dr. Bell is proficient in many fields of science, and has the art of making every subject he touches interesting, even the most abstruse theories.
  • He makes you feel that if you only had a little more time, you, too, might be an inventor.
  • He has a humorous and poetic side, too.
  • He is never quite so happy as when he has a little deaf child in his arms.
  • He is never quite so happy as when he has a little deaf child in his arms.
  • I also knew Mr. Charles Dudley Warner, the most delightful of story-tellers and the most beloved friend, whose sympathy was so broad that it may be truly said of him, he loved all living things and his neighbour as himself.
  • He has his own way of thinking, saying and doing everything.
  • Kind to every one, he goes about doing good, silent and unseen.
  • He looked at my eyes.
  • He can not get birds.
  • "Uncle Morrie" of the next letter is Mr. Morrison Heady, of Normandy, Kentucky, who lost his sight and hearing when he was a boy.
  • He is the author of some commendable verses.
  • He is picking strawberries for dinner.
  • When Capt. Baker gets well he will take me in his big ship to Africa.
  • We came to Boston last Thursday, and Mr. Anagnos was delighted to see me, and he hugged and kissed me.
  • The horse's name was Prince and he was gentle and liked to trot very fast.
  • Clifton did not kiss me because he does not like to kiss little girls.
  • I saw little Willie Swan in the car and he gave me a juicy pear.
  • He was six years old.
  • Cedric is my little boy, he is named for Lord Fauntleroy.
  • He has big brown eyes and long golden hair and pretty round cheeks.
  • He will not let anything harm us at night.
  • He had climbed the high mountains in Switzerland and visited beautiful churches in Italy and France, and he saw a great many ancient castles.
  • He had climbed the high mountains in Switzerland and visited beautiful churches in Italy and France, and he saw a great many ancient castles.
  • I will tell you what he did, and I think you will feel very sorry for the little child.
  • One sits on the twig of a tree, just beneath our window, and he fills the air with his glad songs.
  • He has on short dresses now.
  • Cousin Leila thinks he will walk in a little while.
  • He will pull the largest roses, and chase the gayest butterflies.
  • He eats little fishes, and other small animals.
  • Father says he can fly nearly all day without stopping.
  • The Earl said he should be delighted to visit Tuscumbia the next time he comes to America.
  • Tell her to shake him, and then he will blow his trumpet.
  • He is very soft and delicate yet.
  • He is delighted because I am here.
  • He was very brave.
  • This, the first of Helen's letters to Dr. Holmes, written soon after a visit to him, he published in "Over the Teacups." [Atlantic Monthly, May, 1890]
  • Jakey was the sweetest little fellow you can imagine, but he was poor and blind.
  • Simpson, that is my brother, brought me some beautiful pond lilies yesterday--he is a very brother to me.
  • I do not see how we can help thinking about God when He is so good to us all the time.
  • I am sure He is.
  • And He is happier than any of us because He is greater than any of us, and also because He not merely SEES your happiness as we do, but He also MADE it.
  • He gives it to you as the sun gives light and color to the rose.
  • But God does not only want us to be HAPPY; He wants us to be good.
  • He wants that most of all.
  • He knows that we can be really happy only when we are good.
  • "We KNOW that He loves us," He says.
  • And so He loved men Himself and though they were very cruel to Him and at last killed Him, He was willing to die for them because He loved them so.
  • And, Helen, He loves men still, and He loves us, and He tells us that we may love Him.
  • And my dear father, how he would like to hear about our journey!
  • He gave me a beautiful watch.
  • But I suppose he is very busy now.
  • At first I was very sorry when I found that the sun had hidden his shining face behind dull clouds, but afterwards I thought why he did it, and then I was happy.
  • The sun knows that you like to see the world covered with beautiful white snow and so he kept back all his brightness, and let the little crystals form in the sky.
  • Tommy Stringer, who appears in several of the following letters, became blind and deaf when he was four years old.
  • For a while he was kept in the general hospital at Allegheny.
  • From here he was to be sent to an almshouse, for at that time there was no other place for him in Pennsylvania.
  • He was admitted to the kindergarten on the sixth of April.
  • Once the Earl of Meath came to see me, and he told me that the queen was much beloved by her people, because of her gentleness and wisdom.
  • His name is Tommy, and he is five years old.
  • Education will bring light and music into Tommy's soul, and then he cannot help being happy.
  • He is poor and helpless and lonely now, but before another April education will have brought light and gladness into Tommy's life.
  • You will be glad to hear that Tommy has a kind lady to teach him, and that he is a pretty, active little fellow.
  • He loves to climb much better than to spell, but that is because he does not know yet what a wonderful thing language is.
  • He loves to climb much better than to spell, but that is because he does not know yet what a wonderful thing language is.
  • He cannot imagine how very, very happy he will be when he can tell us his thoughts, and we can tell him how we have loved him so long.
  • He cannot imagine how very, very happy he will be when he can tell us his thoughts, and we can tell him how we have loved him so long.
  • It is very beautiful to think that you can tell so many people of the heavenly Father's tender love for all His children even when they are not gentle and noble as He wishes them to be.
  • Before a teacher was found for Tommy and while he was still in the care of Helen and Miss Sullivan, a reception was held for him at the kindergarten.
  • He is very happy indeed at the kindergarten, and is learning something every day.
  • He has found out that doors have locks, and that little sticks and bits of paper can be got into the key-hole quite easily; but he does not seem very eager to get them out after they are in.
  • He has found out that doors have locks, and that little sticks and bits of paper can be got into the key-hole quite easily; but he does not seem very eager to get them out after they are in.
  • He loves to climb the bed-posts and unscrew the steam valves much better than to spell, but that is because he does not understand that words would help him to make new and interesting discoveries.
  • He loves to climb the bed-posts and unscrew the steam valves much better than to spell, but that is because he does not understand that words would help him to make new and interesting discoveries.
  • He is the same restless little creature he was when you saw him.
  • He is the same restless little creature he was when you saw him.
  • I tried to imagine my gentle poet when he was a school-boy, and I wondered if it was in Andover he learned the songs of the birds and the secrets of the shy little woodland children.
  • I am sure his heart was always full of music, and in God's beautiful world he must have heard love's sweet replying.
  • He has, in truth, behaved very strangely ever since we came to Brewster.
  • Perhaps the Old Sea God as he lay asleep upon the shore, heard the soft music of growing things--the stir of life in the earth's bosom, and his stormy heart was angry, because he knew that his and Winter's reign was almost at an end.
  • Please let Bishop Brooks know our plans, so that he may arrange to be with us.
  • And every stitch, he writes, represents a kind wish for my health and happiness.
  • I suppose he has been too busy to write to his little friend.
  • I do try to think that he is still near, very near; but sometimes the thought that he is not here, that I shall not see him when I go to Boston,--that he is gone,--rushes over my soul like a great wave of sorrow.
  • But after a minute I answered that beauty was a form of goodness--and he went away.
  • You see, none of my friends describe things to me so vividly and so beautifully as he does....
  • He invited me to visit his museum in Salem the next time I go to Boston.
  • I did not like to trouble them while I was trying to get money for poor little Tommy, for of course it was more important that he should be educated than that my people should have books to read. 4.
  • I think he is very handsome indeed....
  • Teacher said she thought he looked something like Paradeuski.
  • He has another daughter, named Mildred, who knows Carrie.
  • He said no, it would not be called for about fifteen minutes; so we sat down to wait; but in a moment the man came back and asked Teacher if we would like to go to the train at once.
  • She said we would, and he took us way out on the track and put us on board our train.
  • He has lately had several books printed in England for me, "Old Mortality," "The Castle of Otranto" and "King of No-land."...
  • It was so hard to lose him, he was the best and kindest of friends, and I do not know what we shall do without him....
  • He died last Saturday at my home in Tuscumbia, and I was not there.
  • He says he prefers to come here for the present.
  • He says he prefers to come here for the present.
  • Next to my own dear teacher, he has done more than any one else to enrich and broaden my mind.
  • Oh, he was simply beautiful!
  • I have just had some pictures taken, and if they are good, I would like to send one to Mr. Rogers, if you think he would like to have it.
  • I would like so much to show him in some way how deeply I appreciate all that he is doing for me, and I cannot think of anything better to do.
  • I really believe he knows more Latin and Greek Grammar than Cicero or Homer ever dreamed of!
  • He said she was very industrious and happy.
  • Perhaps, if you would send a copy of this to the head of the Cambridge School, it might enlighten his mind on a few subjects, on which he seems to be in total darkness just now....
  • Colonel Roosevelt was there, on Harvard's side; but bless you, he wore a white sweater, and no crimson that we know of!
  • He has such a kind heart!
  • After the service he asked Mr. Warren, the organist to play for me.
  • Finally he proposed a plan which delighted us all beyond words.
  • He is a great, strong boy now, and he will soon need a man to take care of him; he is really too big for a lady to manage.
  • He is a great, strong boy now, and he will soon need a man to take care of him; he is really too big for a lady to manage.
  • Anyway, he certainly never had a dress like mine!...
  • The mother is a physician and a brilliant woman, he says.
  • This little boy could speak two or three languages before he lost his hearing through sickness, and he is now only about five years old.
  • He has a charming, romantic house on a mountain called Beinn Bhreagh, which overlooks the Bras d'Or Lake....
  • He had just constructed a boat that could be propelled by a kite with the wind in its favor, and one day he tried experiments to see if he could steer the kite against the wind.
  • He had just constructed a boat that could be propelled by a kite with the wind in its favor, and one day he tried experiments to see if he could steer the kite against the wind.
  • After that he asked me if the strings were all right and changed them at once when I answered in the negative.
  • If he had not taken upon himself the responsibility of Laura Bridgman's education and led her out of the pit of Acheron back to her human inheritance, should I be a sophomore at Radcliffe College to-day--who can say?
  • He quoted the passages in which she explains that college is not the "universal Athens" she had hoped to find, and cited the cases of other remarkable persons whose college life had proved disappointing.
  • When she met Dr. Furness, the Shakespearean scholar, he warned her not to let the college professors tell her too many assumed facts about the life of Shakespeare; all we know, he said, is that Shakespeare was baptized, married, and died.
  • "Well," she replied, "he seems to have done all the essential things."
  • "That," he said, "is your prize-fighting bump."
  • She was slower than he expected her to be in identifying them by their relative weight and size.
  • He says that she did pretty well and managed to make, after models, some conventional designs of the outlines of leaves and rosettes.
  • The time that one of Miss Keller's friends realizes most strongly that she is blind is when he comes on her suddenly in the dark and hears the rustle of her fingers across the page.
  • Some time ago, when a policeman shot dead her dog, a dearly loved daily companion, she found in her forgiving heart no condemnation for the man; she only said, 'If he had only known what a good dog she was, he wouldn't have shot her.'
  • It is now sixty-five years since Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe knew that he had made his way through Laura Bridgman's fingers to her intelligence.
  • He was a great philanthropist, interested especially in the education of all defectives, the feeble-minded, the blind, and the deaf.
  • As head of the Perkins Institution for the Blind in Boston, he heard of Laura Bridgman and had her brought to the Institution on October 4, 1837.
  • Science and faith together led him to try to make his way into the soul which he believed was born in Laura Bridgman as in every other human being.
  • He pasted raised labels on objects and made her fit the labels to the objects and the objects to the labels.
  • As an investigator he kept always the scientist's attitude.
  • He never forgot to keep his records of Laura Bridgman in the fashion of one who works in a laboratory.
  • Why, one might just as well say that a two-year-old child converses fluently when he says 'apple give,' or 'baby walk go.'
  • As Mr. Anagnos was the head of a great institution, what he said had much more effect than the facts in Miss Sullivan's account on which he based his statements.
  • It seems that Mr. Anagnos had heard of Helen before he received Captain Keller's letter last summer.
  • He saw a gentleman whom he presumed to be the director, and told him about Helen.
  • He saw a gentleman whom he presumed to be the director, and told him about Helen.
  • He says the gentleman was not particularly interested, but said he would see if anything could be done.
  • He says the gentleman was not particularly interested, but said he would see if anything could be done.
  • Her father looks in at us morning and evening as he goes to and from his office, and sees her contentedly stringing her beads or making horizontal lines on her sewing-card, and exclaims, "How quiet she is!"
  • I have noticed also that she eats much less, a fact which troubles her father so much that he is anxious to get her home.
  • He says she is homesick.
  • She was delighted if he made a mistake, and made him form the letter over several times.
  • When he succeeded in forming it to suit her, she patted him on his woolly head so vigorously that I thought some of his slips were intentional.
  • One day this week Captain Keller brought Belle, a setter of which he is very proud, to see us.
  • He wondered if Helen would recognize her old playmate.
  • Her father says he is going to fit up a gymnasium for her in the pump-house; but we both like a good romp better than set exercises.
  • The child comes into the world with the ability to learn, and he learns of himself, provided he is supplied with sufficient outward stimulus.
  • He sees people do things, and he tries to do them.
  • He sees people do things, and he tries to do them.
  • He hears others speak, and he tried to speak.
  • He hears others speak, and he tried to speak.
  • BUT LONG BEFORE HE UTTERS HIS FIRST WORD, HE UNDERSTANDS WHAT IS SAID TO HIM.
  • Whereas, if the child is left to himself, he will think more and better, if less showily.
  • Let him go and come freely, let him touch real things and combine his impressions for himself, instead of sitting indoors at a little round table, while a sweet-voiced teacher suggests that he build a stone wall with his wooden blocks, or make a rainbow out of strips of coloured paper, or plant straw trees in bead flower-pots.
  • The "why?" is the DOOR THROUGH WHICH HE ENTERS THE WORLD OF REASON AND REFLECTION.
  • He invited her to come to see him at Hot Springs.
  • He agreed with Mr. Anagnos that it was my duty to give others the benefit of my experience.
  • Now he wants a picture "of darling Helen and her illustrious teacher, to grace the pages of the forthcoming annual report."
  • About this time I sent a list of the words she knew to Mr. Anagnos, and he very kindly had them printed for her.
  • She was greatly delighted with the monkeys and kept her hand on the star performer while he went through his tricks, and laughed heartily when he took off his hat to the audience.
  • TOO MUCH EXPLANATION DIRECTS THE CHILD'S ATTENTION TO WORDS AND SENTENCES, SO THAT HE FAILS TO GET THE THOUGHT AS A WHOLE.
  • I do not think anyone can read, or talk for that matter, until he forgets words and sentences in the technical sense.
  • One little chap, about seven, was persuaded to learn the letters, and he spelled his name for Helen.
  • When I told her that Santa Claus would not come until she was asleep, she shut her eyes and said, "He will think girl is asleep."
  • Mrs. Keller replied, "He is dead."
  • Why, for instance, does he take the trouble to ascribe motives to me that I never dreamed of?
  • Dr. Bell writes that Helen's progress is without a parallel in the education of the deaf, or something like that and he says many nice things about her teacher.
  • He lives in Hotsprings.
  • He said Dear Helen, Robert was glad to get a letter from dear, sweet little Helen.
  • Captain Keller said at breakfast this morning that he wished I would take Helen to church.
  • He put her answer down in his note book.
  • He gave her his watch to play with; but that didn't keep her still.
  • When the wine was passed to our neighbour, he was obliged to stand up to prevent her taking it away from him.
  • I tried to hurry Helen out-of-doors, but she kept her arm extended, and every coat-tail she touched must needs turn round and give an account of the children he left at home, and receive kisses according to their number.
  • Dr. Keller distributed the extracts from the report that Mr. Anagnos sent me, and he could have disposed of a thousand if he had had them.
  • He took us to drive one afternoon, and wanted to give Helen a doll; but she said: I do not like too many children.
  • He had never heard of "talking-gloves"; but I explained that she had seen a glove on which the alphabet was printed, and evidently thought they could be bought.
  • I told him he could buy some gloves if he wished, and that I would have the alphabet stamped on them.
  • He asked me how I had taught Helen adjectives and the names of abstract ideas like goodness and happiness.
  • If his experiences and observations hadn't led him to the concepts, SMALL, LARGE, GOOD, BAD, SWEET, SOUR, he would have nothing to attach the word-tags to.
  • You label it SOUR, and he adopts your symbol.
  • If you had called these sensations respectively BLACK and WHITE, he would have adopted them as readily; but he would mean by BLACK and WHITE the same things that he means by SWEET and SOUR.
  • At last it became necessary to kill him, and, when Helen next asked to go and see him, I told her that he was DEAD.
  • It was raining very hard and he had a very large umbrella to keep off the rain-drops.
  • I do not know where he was going because he was a little strange boy.
  • He had a bag in one hand.
  • I SUPPOSE he was going to take it to his mother.
  • He takes care of sixty little blind girls and seventy little blind boys.
  • It is impossible to isolate a child in the midst of society, so that he shall not be influenced by the beliefs of those with whom he associates.
  • After a moment she went on: A. says God is everywhere, and that He is all love; but I do not think a person can be made out of love.
  • She says He (meaning God) is my dear father.
  • Where did He get the soil, and the water, and the seeds, and the first animals?
  • "But," said Helen, quickly, "I think God could make some more worlds as well as He made this one."
  • When her friend added that some of the pupils he had seen in Budapest had more than one hundred tunes in their heads, she said, laughing, "I think their heads must be very noisy."
  • Then why did He let little sister fall this morning, and hurt her head so badly?
  • It is not necessary that a child should understand every word in a book before he can read with pleasure and profit.
  • All day long in their play-time and work-time Miss Sullivan kept spelling into her pupil's hand, and by that Helen Keller absorbed words, just as the child in the cradle absorbs words by hearing thousands of them before he uses one and by associating the words with the occasion of their utterance.
  • Thus he learns that words name things and actions and feelings.
  • True, single words do suggest and express ideas; the child may say simply "mamma" when he means "Where is mamma?" but he learns the expression of the ideas that relate to mamma--he learns language--by hearing complete sentences.
  • Books are the storehouse of language, and any child, whether deaf or not, if he has his attention attracted in any way to printed pages, must learn.
  • He learns not by reading what he understands, but by reading and remembering words he does not understand.
  • He learns not by reading what he understands, but by reading and remembering words he does not understand.
  • Surely Dr. Howe is wrong when he says, "A teacher cannot be a child."
  • She recognized that others used their lips; she "saw" her father reading a paper and when he laid it down she sat in his chair and held the paper before her face.
  • Occasionally she broke out into a merry laugh, and then she would reach out and touch the mouth of any one who happened to be near her, to see if he were laughing also.
  • Any teacher of composition knows that he can bring his pupils to the point of writing without errors in syntax or in the choice of words.
  • When Dr. Bell said this he was arguing his own case.
  • In one of his letters, speaking of how God in every way tells us of His love, he says, "I think he writes it even upon the walls of the great house of nature which we live in, that he is our Father."
  • And what do you think he did next!
  • He stood still a moment to look about him, and think what he should do first.
  • He stood still a moment to look about him, and think what he should do first.
  • As he came in sight of the rose-bushes that grew near the side of the house, he suddenly clapped his hands, and with a little shout of joy stopped to look at them; they were all covered with lovely rosebuds.
  • Now he found out that his father's words were true, for a few days of warm weather had turned the green balls into rosebuds, and they were SO beautiful that it was enough to make Birdie stand still before them, his blue eyes dancing with delight and his little hands clasped tightly together.
  • After awhile he went nearer, and looking closely at the buds, found that they were folded up, leaf over leaf, as eyelids are folded over sleeping eyes, so that Birdie thought they must be asleep.
  • "Lazy roses, wake up," said he, giving the branches a gentle shake; but only the dew fell off in bright drops, and the flowers were still shut up.
  • Every year Santa Claus takes a journey over the world in a sleigh drawn by a strong and rapid steed called "Rudolph."
  • He has two neighbours, who live still farther north; one is King Winter, a cross and churlish old monarch, who is hard and cruel, and delights in making the poor suffer and weep; but the other neighbour is Santa Claus, a fine, good-natured, jolly old soul, who loves to do good, and who brings presents to the poor, and to nice little children at Christmas.
  • Well, one day King Frost was trying to think of some good that he could do with his treasure; and suddenly he concluded to send some of it to his kind neighbour, Santa Claus, to buy presents of food and clothing for the poor, that they might not suffer so much when King Winter went near their homes.
  • So he called together his merry little fairies, and showing them a number of jars and vases filled with gold and precious stones, told them to carry those carefully to the palace of Santa Claus, and give them to him with the compliments of King Frost.
  • "He will know how to make good use of the treasure," added Jack Frost; then he told the fairies not to loiter by the way, but to do his bidding quickly.
  • "He will know how to make good use of the treasure," added Jack Frost; then he told the fairies not to loiter by the way, but to do his bidding quickly.
  • Their fears were well founded, for their long absence had alarmed the king, and he had started out to look for his tardy servants, and just as they were all hidden, he came along slowly, looking on all sides for the fairies.
  • Of course, he soon noticed the brightness of the leaves, and discovered the cause, too, when he caught sight of the broken jars and vases from which the melted treasure was still dropping.
  • And when he came to the nut trees, and saw the shells left by the idle fairies and all the traces of their frolic, he knew exactly how they had acted, and that they had disobeyed him by playing and loitering on their way through the woods.
  • Their pleasure charmed away King Frost's anger, and he, too, began to admire the painted trees, and at last he said to himself, My treasures are not wasted if they make little children happy.
  • The old King will welcome you kindly, for he loves children, and it is his chief delight to give them pleasure.
  • You must know that King Frost, like all other kings, has great treasures of gold and precious stones; but as he is a generous old monarch, he endeavours to make a right use of his riches.
  • So he called together the merry little fairies of his household and, showing them the jars and vases containing his treasures, he bade them carry them to the palace of Santa Claus as quickly as they could.
  • Their fears were well founded, for their long absence had alarmed the King, and he mounted North Wind and went out in search of his tardy couriers.
  • Of course, he had not gone far when he noticed the brightness of the leaves, and he quickly guessed the cause when he saw the broken jars from which the treasure was still dropping.
  • Their pleasure banished the anger from King Frost's heart and the frown from his brow, and he, too, began to admire the painted trees.
  • He said to himself, My treasures are not wasted if they make little children happy.
  • Helen told me that for a long time she had thought of Jack Frost as a king, because of the many treasures which he possessed.
  • She could not remember that any one had ever read to her any stories about King Frost, but said she had talked with her teacher about Jack Frost and the wonderful things he did.
  • Of the sources of his vocabulary he is, for the most part, as unaware as he is of the moment when he ate the food which makes a bit of his thumbnail.
  • A child with but few sources may keep distinct what he draws from each.
  • So the master of words is master of thoughts which the words create, and says things greater than he could otherwise know.
  • Let him get language and he gets the very stuff that language is made of, the thought and the experience of his race.
  • Tantalus, too, great as he was above all mortals, went down to the kingdom of the dead, never to return.
  • "Do you wish to buy any baskets?" he asked.
  • "What!" exclaimed the Indian as he went out the gate, "do you mean to starve us?"
  • Let him who has work to do recollect that the object of clothing is, first, to retain the vital heat, and secondly, in this state of society, to cover nakedness, and he may judge how much of any necessary or important work may be accomplished without adding to his wardrobe.
  • He was only a little more weather-beaten than when I saw him last.
  • Old shoes will serve a hero longer than they have served his valet--if a hero ever has a valet--bare feet are older than shoes, and he can make them do.
  • Who does not remember the interest with which, when young, he looked at shelving rocks, or any approach to a cave?
  • However, if one designs to construct a dwelling-house, it behooves him to exercise a little Yankee shrewdness, lest after all he find himself in a workhouse, a labyrinth without a clue, a museum, an almshouse, a prison, or a splendid mausoleum instead.
  • He adds that they were commonly carpeted and lined within with well-wrought embroidered mats, and were furnished with various utensils.
  • But how happens it that he who is said to enjoy these things is so commonly a poor civilized man, while the savage, who has them not, is rich as a savage?
  • To get his shoestrings he speculates in herds of cattle.
  • With consummate skill he has set his trap with a hair spring to catch comfort and independence, and then, as he turned away, got his own leg into it.
  • This is the reason he is poor; and for a similar reason we are all poor in respect to a thousand savage comforts, though surrounded by luxuries.
  • And when the farmer has got his house, he may not be the richer but the poorer for it, and it be the house that has got him.
  • And if the civilized man's pursuits are no worthier than the savage's, if he is employed the greater part of his life in obtaining gross necessaries and comforts merely, why should he have a better dwelling than the former?
  • The traveller who stops at the best houses, so called, soon discovers this, for the publicans presume him to be a Sardanapalus, and if he resigned himself to their tender mercies he would soon be completely emasculated.
  • When he was refreshed with food and sleep, he contemplated his journey again.
  • He dwelt, as it were, in a tent in this world, and was either threading the valleys, or crossing the plains, or climbing the mountain-tops.
  • The man who independently plucked the fruits when he was hungry is become a farmer; and he who stood under a tree for shelter, a housekeeper.
  • The owner of the axe, as he released his hold on it, said that it was the apple of his eye; but I returned it sharper than I received it.
  • When I called to see it he was not at home.
  • This he assured me was the only encumbrance.
  • He was there to represent spectatordom, and help make this seemingly insignificant event one with the removal of the gods of Troy.
  • A sentimental reformer in architecture, he began at the cornice, not at the foundation.
  • He may turn pale when the trial comes.
  • It would signify somewhat, if, in any earnest sense, he slanted them and daubed it; but the spirit having departed out of the tenant, it is of a piece with constructing his own coffin--the architecture of the grave--and "carpenter" is but another name for "coffin-maker."
  • Is he thinking of his last and narrow house?
  • What an abundance of leisure he must have!
  • Tuition, for instance, is an important item in the term bill, while for the far more valuable education which he gets by associating with the most cultivated of his contemporaries no charge is made.
  • I do not mean that exactly, but I mean something which he might think a good deal like that; I mean that they should not play life, or study it merely, while the community supports them at this expensive game, but earnestly live it from beginning to end.
  • After all, the man whose horse trots a mile in a minute does not carry the most important messages; he is not an evangelist, nor does he come round eating locusts and wild honey.
  • I have learned that the swiftest traveller is he that goes afoot.
  • This spending of the best part of one's life earning money in order to enjoy a questionable liberty during the least valuable part of it reminds me of the Englishman who went to India to make a fortune first, in order that he might return to England and live the life of a poet.
  • He should have gone up garret at once.
  • However, I should never have broken a horse or bull and taken him to board for any work he might do for me, for fear I should become a horseman or a herdsman merely; and if society seems to be the gainer by so doing, are we certain that what is one man's gain is not another's loss, and that the stable-boy has equal cause with his master to be satisfied?
  • Man thus not only works for the animal within him, but, for a symbol of this, he works for the animal without him.
  • None is so poor that he need sit on a pumpkin.
  • It is the same as if all these traps were buckled to a man's belt, and he could not move over the rough country where our lines are cast without dragging them--dragging his trap.
  • He was a lucky fox that left his tail in the trap.
  • How often he is at a dead set!
  • I look upon England today as an old gentleman who is travelling with a great deal of baggage, trumpery which has accumulated from long housekeeping, which he has not the courage to burn; great trunk, little trunk, bandbox, and bundle.
  • The moon will not sour milk nor taint meat of mine, nor will the sun injure my furniture or fade my carpet; and if he is sometimes too warm a friend, I find it still better economy to retreat behind some curtain which nature has provided, than to add a single item to the details of housekeeping.
  • When a man dies he kicks the dust.
  • The laborer's day ends with the going down of the sun, and he is then free to devote himself to his chosen pursuit, independent of his labor; but his employer, who speculates from month to month, has no respite from one end of the year to the other.
  • It is not necessary that a man should earn his living by the sweat of his brow, unless he sweats easier than I do.
  • One young man of my acquaintance, who has inherited some acres, told me that he thought he should live as I did, if he had the means.
  • The youth may build or plant or sail, only let him not be hindered from doing that which he tells me he would like to do.
  • If a man has faith, he will co-operate with equal faith everywhere; if he has not faith, he will continue to live like the rest of the world, whatever company he is joined to.
  • I heard it proposed lately that two young men should travel together over the world, the one without money, earning his means as he went, before the mast and behind the plow, the other carrying a bill of exchange in his pocket.
  • Often the poor man is not so cold and hungry as he is dirty and ragged and gross.
  • If you give him money, he will perhaps buy more rags with it.
  • This ducking was the very thing he needed.
  • A robust poor man, one sunny day here in Concord, praised a fellow-townsman to me, because, as he said, he was kind to the poor; meaning himself.
  • If anything ail a man, so that he does not perform his functions, if he have a pain in his bowels even--for that is the seat of sympathy--he forthwith sets about reforming--the world.
  • I believe that what so saddens the reformer is not his sympathy with his fellows in distress, but, though he be the holiest son of God, is his private ail.
  • The nearest that I came to actual possession was when I bought the Hollowell place, and had begun to sort my seeds, and collected materials with which to make a wheelbarrow to carry it on or off with; but before the owner gave me a deed of it, his wife--every man has such a wife--changed her mind and wished to keep it, and he offered me ten dollars to release him.
  • I have frequently seen a poet withdraw, having enjoyed the most valuable part of a farm, while the crusty farmer supposed that he had got a few wild apples only.
  • An honest man has hardly need to count more than his ten fingers, or in extreme cases he may add his ten toes, and lump the rest.
  • Hardly a man takes a half-hour's nap after dinner, but when he wakes he holds up his head and asks, "What's the news?" as if the rest of mankind had stood his sentinels.
  • "Pray tell me anything new that has happened to a man anywhere on this globe"--and he reads it over his coffee and rolls, that a man has had his eyes gouged out this morning on the Wachito River; never dreaming the while that he lives in the dark unfathomed mammoth cave of this world, and has but the rudiment of an eye himself.
  • Kieou-he-yu (great dignitary of the state of Wei) sent a man to Khoung-tseu to know his news.
  • The messenger answered with respect: My master desires to diminish the number of his faults, but he cannot come to the end of them.
  • One of his father's ministers having discovered him, revealed to him what he was, and the misconception of his character was removed, and he knew himself to be a prince.
  • If he should give us an account of the realities he beheld there, we should not recognize the place in his description.
  • The oldest Egyptian or Hindoo philosopher raised a corner of the veil from the statue of the divinity; and still the trembling robe remains raised, and I gaze upon as fresh a glory as he did, since it was I in him that was then so bold, and it is he in me that now reviews the vision.
  • The student may read Homer or Æschylus in the Greek without danger of dissipation or luxuriousness, for it implies that he in some measure emulate their heroes, and consecrate morning hours to their pages.
  • It is not in vain that the farmer remembers and repeats the few Latin words which he has heard.
  • I know a woodchopper, of middle age, who takes a French paper, not for news as he says, for he is above that, but to "keep himself in practice," he being a Canadian by birth; and when I ask him what he considers the best thing he can do in this world, he says, beside this, to keep up and add to his English.
  • One who has just come from reading perhaps one of the best English books will find how many with whom he can converse about it?
  • Or suppose he comes from reading a Greek or Latin classic in the original, whose praises are familiar even to the so-called illiterate; he will find nobody at all to speak to, but must keep silence about it.
  • As the sparrow had its trill, sitting on the hickory before my door, so had I my chuckle or suppressed warble which he might hear out of my nest.
  • He had never seen such a dull and out-of-the-way place; the folks were all gone off; why, you couldn't even hear the whistle!
  • Nor is there any man so independent on his farm that he can say them nay.
  • Or perchance, at evening, I hear him in his stable blowing off the superfluous energy of the day, that he may calm his nerves and cool his liver and brain for a few hours of iron slumber.
  • Here is a hogshead of molasses or of brandy directed to John Smith, Cuttingsville, Vermont, some trader among the Green Mountains, who imports for the farmers near his clearing, and now perchance stands over his bulkhead and thinks of the last arrivals on the coast, how they may affect the price for him, telling his customers this moment, as he has told them twenty times before this morning, that he expects some by the next train of prime quality.
  • Who would not be early to rise, and rise earlier and earlier every successive day of his life, till he became unspeakably healthy, wealthy, and wise?
  • He is more indigenous even than the natives.
  • And so I went home to my bed, and left him to pick his way through the darkness and the mud to Brighton--or Bright-town--which place he would reach some time in the morning.
  • It was a kind of fiction, a work of the imagination only, so far as he was concerned.
  • A man thinking or working is always alone, let him be where he will.
  • I have heard of a man lost in the woods and dying of famine and exhaustion at the foot of a tree, whose loneliness was relieved by the grotesque visions with which, owing to bodily weakness, his diseased imagination surrounded him, and which he believed to be real.
  • God is alone--but the devil, he is far from being alone; he sees a great deal of company; he is legion.
  • When the night arrived, to quote their own words--He laid us on the bed with himself and his wife, they at the one end and we at the other, it being only planks laid a foot from the ground and a thin mat upon them.
  • At one o'clock the next day Massasoit "brought two fishes that he had shot," about thrice as big as a bream.
  • He, too, has heard of Homer, and, "if it were not for books," would "not know what to do rainy days," though perhaps he has not read one wholly through for many rainy seasons.
  • He, too, has heard of Homer, and, "if it were not for books," would "not know what to do rainy days," though perhaps he has not read one wholly through for many rainy seasons.
  • He says, "That's good."
  • He has a great bundle of white oak bark under his arm for a sick man, gathered this Sunday morning.
  • To him Homer was a great writer, though what his writing was about he did not know.
  • He was about twenty-eight years old, and had left Canada and his father's house a dozen years before to work in the States, and earn money to buy a farm with at last, perhaps in his native country.
  • He wore a flat gray cloth cap, a dingy wool-colored greatcoat, and cowhide boots.
  • He came along early, crossing my bean-field, though without anxiety or haste to get to his work, such as Yankees exhibit.
  • He wasn't a-going to hurt himself.
  • He didn't care if he only earned his board.
  • He didn't care if he only earned his board.
  • Frequently he would leave his dinner in the bushes, when his dog had caught a woodchuck by the way, and go back a mile and a half to dress it and leave it in the cellar of the house where he boarded, after deliberating first for half an hour whether he could not sink it in the pond safely till nightfall--loving to dwell long upon these themes.
  • He would say, as he went by in the morning, How thick the pigeons are!
  • He would say, as he went by in the morning, How thick the pigeons are!
  • He was a skilful chopper, and indulged in some flourishes and ornaments in his art.
  • He cut his trees level and close to the ground, that the sprouts which came up afterward might be more vigorous and a sled might slide over the stumps; and instead of leaving a whole tree to support his corded wood, he would pare it away to a slender stake or splinter which you could break off with your hand at last.
  • He cut his trees level and close to the ground, that the sprouts which came up afterward might be more vigorous and a sled might slide over the stumps; and instead of leaving a whole tree to support his corded wood, he would pare it away to a slender stake or splinter which you could break off with your hand at last.
  • Sometimes I saw him at his work in the woods, felling trees, and he would greet me with a laugh of inexpressible satisfaction, and a salutation in Canadian French, though he spoke English as well.
  • Such an exuberance of animal spirits had he that he sometimes tumbled down and rolled on the ground with laughter at anything which made him think and tickled him.
  • Looking around he would exclaim "By George!"
  • In the winter he had a fire by which at noon he warmed his coffee in a kettle; and as he sat on a log to eat his dinner the chickadees would sometimes come round and alight on his arm and peck at the potato in his fingers; and he said that he "liked to have the little fellers about him."
  • I asked him once if he was not sometimes tired at night, after working all day; and he answered, with a sincere and serious look, "Gorrappit, I never was tired in my life."
  • He was so genuine and unsophisticated that no introduction would serve to introduce him, more than if you introduced a woodchuck to your neighbor.
  • He had got to find him out as you did.
  • He would not play any part.
  • He was so simply and naturally humble--if he can be called humble who never aspires--that humility was no distinct quality in him, nor could he conceive of it.
  • He was so simply and naturally humble--if he can be called humble who never aspires--that humility was no distinct quality in him, nor could he conceive of it.
  • If you told him that such a one was coming, he did as if he thought that anything so grand would expect nothing of himself, but take all the responsibility on itself, and let him be forgotten still.
  • He never heard the sound of praise.
  • He particularly reverenced the writer and the preacher.
  • I sometimes found the name of his native parish handsomely written in the snow by the highway, with the proper French accent, and knew that he had passed.
  • I asked him if he ever wished to write his thoughts.
  • A townsman told me that when he met him sauntering through the village in his small close-fitting cap, and whistling to himself, he reminded him of a prince in disguise.
  • I loved to sound him on the various reforms of the day, and he never failed to look at them in the most simple and practical light.
  • He had never heard of such things before.
  • Could he do without factories?
  • He had worn the home-made Vermont gray, he said, and that was good.
  • He had worn the home-made Vermont gray, he said, and that was good.
  • Could he dispense with tea and coffee?
  • He had soaked hemlock leaves in water and drank it, and thought that was better than water in warm weather.
  • If an ox were his property, and he wished to get needles and thread at the store, he thought it would be inconvenient and impossible soon to go on mortgaging some portion of the creature each time to that amount.
  • He could defend many institutions better than any philosopher, because, in describing them as they concerned him, he gave the true reason for their prevalence, and speculation had not suggested to him any other.
  • He could defend many institutions better than any philosopher, because, in describing them as they concerned him, he gave the true reason for their prevalence, and speculation had not suggested to him any other.
  • I asked him once, when I had not seen him for many months, if he had got a new idea this summer.
  • "Good Lord"--said he, "a man that has to work as I do, if he does not forget the ideas he has had, he will do well.
  • He would sometimes ask me first on such occasions, if I had made any improvement.
  • One man, perhaps, if he has got enough, will be satisfied to sit all day with his back to the fire and his belly to the table, by George!
  • If I suggested any improvement in his mode of life, he merely answered, without expressing any regret, that it was too late.
  • Yet he thoroughly believed in honesty and the like virtues.
  • Though he hesitated, and perhaps failed to express himself distinctly, he always had a presentable thought behind.
  • The Lord had made him so, yet he supposed the Lord cared as much for him as for another.
  • And there he was to prove the truth of his words.
  • He was a metaphysical puzzle to me.
  • I have rarely met a fellowman on such promising ground--it was so simple and sincere and so true all that he said.
  • I require of a visitor that he be not actually starving, though he may have the very best appetite in the world, however he got it.
  • While you are planting the seed, he cries--"Drop it, drop it--cover it up, cover it up--pull it up, pull it up, pull it up."
  • The hawk is aerial brother of the wave which he sails over and surveys, those his perfect air-inflated wings answering to the elemental unfledged pinions of the sea.
  • "The earth," he adds elsewhere, "especially if fresh, has a certain magnetism in it, by which it attracts the salt, power, or virtue (call it either) which gives it life, and is the logic of all the labor and stir we keep about it, to sustain us; all dungings and other sordid temperings being but the vicars succedaneous to this improvement."
  • He knows Nature but as a robber.
  • They all reflect and absorb his rays alike, and the former make but a small part of the glorious picture which he beholds in his daily course.
  • Once in a while we sat together on the pond, he at one end of the boat, and I at the other; but not many words passed between us, for he had grown deaf in his later years, but he occasionally hummed a psalm, which harmonized well enough with my philosophy.
  • He came here a-fishing, and used an old log canoe which he found on the shore.
  • He came here a-fishing, and used an old log canoe which he found on the shore.
  • He did not know whose it was; it belonged to the pond.
  • He used to make a cable for his anchor of strips of hickory bark tied together.
  • That devilish Iron Horse, whose ear-rending neigh is heard throughout the town, has muddied the Boiling Spring with his foot, and he it is that has browsed off all the woods on Walden shore, that Trojan horse, with a thousand men in his belly, introduced by mercenary Greeks!
  • He rounded this water with his hand, deepened and clarified it in his thought, and in his will bequeathed it to Concord.
  • The engineer does not forget at night, or his nature does not, that he has beheld this vision of serenity and purity once at least during the day.
  • What right had the unclean and stupid farmer, whose farm abutted on this sky water, whose shores he has ruthlessly laid bare, to give his name to it?
  • In the spring of '49 I talked with the man who lives nearest the pond in Sudbury, who told me that it was he who got out this tree ten or fifteen years before.
  • As near as he could remember, it stood twelve or fifteen rods from the shore, where the water was thirty or forty feet deep.
  • He sawed a channel in the ice toward the shore, and hauled it over and along and out on to the ice with oxen; but, before he had gone far in his work, he was surprised to find that it was wrong end upward, with the stumps of the branches pointing down, and the small end firmly fastened in the sandy bottom.
  • He sawed a channel in the ice toward the shore, and hauled it over and along and out on to the ice with oxen; but, before he had gone far in his work, he was surprised to find that it was wrong end upward, with the stumps of the branches pointing down, and the small end firmly fastened in the sandy bottom.
  • It was about a foot in diameter at the big end, and he had expected to get a good saw-log, but it was so rotten as to be fit only for fuel, if for that.
  • He had some of it in his shed then.
  • Beside, he tells us that he showed it to very few.
  • For I purposely talked to him as if he were a philosopher, or desired to be one.
  • If he and his family would live simply, they might all go a-huckleberrying in the summer for their amusement.
  • But he, poor man, disturbed only a couple of fins while I was catching a fair string, and he said it was his luck; but when we changed seats in the boat luck changed seats too.
  • Poor John Field!--I trust he does not read this, unless he will improve by it--thinking to live by some derivative old-country mode in this primitive new country--to catch perch with shiners.
  • He who is only a traveller learns things at second-hand and by the halves, and is poor authority.
  • No wonder, then, that he did not oftener stay to play on the common.
  • Of all ebriosity, who does not prefer to be intoxicated by the air he breathes?
  • He goes to the mill-pond, she to her preserve-pot.
  • Listen to every zephyr for some reproof, for it is surely there, and he is unfortunate who does not hear it.
  • He is blessed who is assured that the animal is dying out in him day by day, and the divine being established.
  • They are but one appetite, and we only need to see a person do any one of these things to know how great a sensualist he is.
  • How shall a man know if he is chaste?
  • He shall not know it.
  • He teaches how to eat, drink, cohabit, void excrement and urine, and the like, elevating what is mean, and does not falsely excuse himself by calling these things trifles.
  • Every man is the builder of a temple, called his body, to the god he worships, after a style purely his own, nor can he get off by hammering marble instead.
  • Having bathed, he sat down to re-create his intellectual man.
  • He had not attended to the train of his thoughts long when he heard some one playing on a flute, and that sound harmonized with his mood.
  • He had not attended to the train of his thoughts long when he heard some one playing on a flute, and that sound harmonized with his mood.
  • But the notes of the flute came home to his ears out of a different sphere from that he worked in, and suggested work for certain faculties which slumbered in him.
  • They gently did away with the street, and the village, and the state in which he lived.
  • He that does not eat need not work.
  • Or perchance he was some Achilles, who had nourished his wrath apart, and had now come to avenge or rescue his Patroclus.
  • I raised the glass, and he went off over the window-sill in that crippled state.
  • Whether he finally survived that combat, and spent the remainder of his days in some Hotel des Invalides, I do not know; but I thought that his industry would not be worth much thereafter.
  • Some station themselves on this side of the pond, some on that, for the poor bird cannot be omnipresent; if he dive here he must come up there.
  • If I endeavored to overtake him in a boat, in order to see how he would manoeuvre, he would dive and be completely lost, so that I did not discover him again, sometimes, till the latter part of the day.
  • He commonly went off in a rain.
  • I pursued with a paddle and he dived, but when he came up I was nearer than before.
  • He dived again, but I miscalculated the direction he would take, and we were fifty rods apart when he came to the surface this time, for I had helped to widen the interval; and again he laughed long and loud, and with more reason than before.
  • He dived again, but I miscalculated the direction he would take, and we were fifty rods apart when he came to the surface this time, for I had helped to widen the interval; and again he laughed long and loud, and with more reason than before.
  • He manoeuvred so cunningly that I could not get within half a dozen rods of him.
  • It was surprising how quickly he made up his mind and put his resolve into execution.
  • He led me at once to the widest part of the pond, and could not be driven from it.
  • While he was thinking one thing in his brain, I was endeavoring to divine his thought in mine.
  • Sometimes he would come up unexpectedly on the opposite side of me, having apparently passed directly under the boat.
  • Yet he appeared to know his course as surely under water as on the surface, and swam much faster there.
  • I found that it was as well for me to rest on my oars and wait his reappearing as to endeavor to calculate where he would rise; for again and again, when I was straining my eyes over the surface one way, I would suddenly be startled by his unearthly laugh behind me.
  • But why, after displaying so much cunning, did he invariably betray himself the moment he came up by that loud laugh?
  • He was indeed a silly loon, I thought.
  • I could commonly hear the splash of the water when he came up, and so also detected him.
  • But after an hour he seemed as fresh as ever, dived as willingly, and swam yet farther than at first.
  • It was surprising to see how serenely he sailed off with unruffled breast when he came to the surface, doing all the work with his webbed feet beneath.
  • I concluded that he laughed in derision of my efforts, confident of his own resources.
  • Though the sky was by this time overcast, the pond was so smooth that I could see where he broke the surface when I did not hear him.
  • He brought his own knife, though I had two, and we used to scour them by thrusting them into the earth.
  • He shared with me the labors of cooking.
  • There is as much secrecy about the cooking as if he had a design to poison you.
  • Green hickory finely split makes the woodchopper's kindlings, when he has a camp in the woods.
  • There are a few who remember his little patch among the walnuts, which he let grow up till he should be old and need them; but a younger and whiter speculator got them at last.
  • He too, however, occupies an equally narrow house at present.
  • One old frequenter of these woods remembers, that as he passed her house one noon he heard her muttering to herself over her gurgling pot--"Ye are all bones, bones!"
  • Not long since I read his epitaph in the old Lincoln burying-ground, a little on one side, near the unmarked graves of some British grenadiers who fell in the retreat from Concord--where he is styled "Sippio Brister"--Scipio Africanus he had some title to be called--"a man of color," as if he were discolored.
  • He gazed into the cellar from all sides and points of view by turns, always lying down to it, as if there was some treasure, which he remembered, concealed between the stones, where there was absolutely nothing but a heap of bricks and ashes.
  • He gazed into the cellar from all sides and points of view by turns, always lying down to it, as if there was some treasure, which he remembered, concealed between the stones, where there was absolutely nothing but a heap of bricks and ashes.
  • The house being gone, he looked at what there was left.
  • He had long ago bought a potter's wheel of him, and wished to know what had become of him.
  • Quoil, he was called.
  • If he had lived I should have made him fight his battles over again.
  • He was a man of manners, like one who had seen the world, and was capable of more civil speech than you could well attend to.
  • He wore a greatcoat in midsummer, being affected with the trembling delirium, and his face was the color of carmine.
  • He died in the road at the foot of Brister's Hill shortly after I came to the woods, so that I have not remembered him as a neighbor.
  • The skin of a woodchuck was freshly stretched upon the back of the house, a trophy of his last Waterloo; but no warm cap or mittens would he want more.
  • But no friendly Indian concerned himself about me; nor needed he, for the master of the house was at home.
  • He could hear me when I moved and cronched the snow with my feet, but could not plainly see me.
  • When I made most noise he would stretch out his neck, and erect his neck feathers, and open his eyes wide; but their lids soon fell again, and he began to nod.
  • I too felt a slumberous influence after watching him half an hour, as he sat thus with his eyes half open, like a cat, winged brother of the cat.
  • One of the last of the philosophers--Connecticut gave him to the world--he peddled first her wares, afterwards, as he declares, his brains.
  • These he peddles still, prompting God and disgracing man, bearing for fruit his brain only, like the nut its kernel.
  • I think that he must be the man of the most faith of any alive.
  • His words and attitude always suppose a better state of things than other men are acquainted with, and he will be the last man to be disappointed as the ages revolve.
  • He has no venture in the present.
  • With his hospitable intellect he embraces children, beggars, insane, and scholars, and entertains the thought of all, adding to it commonly some breadth and elegance.
  • He is perhaps the sanest man and has the fewest crotchets of any I chance to know; the same yesterday and tomorrow.
  • Whichever way we turned, it seemed that the heavens and the earth had met together, since he enhanced the beauty of the landscape.
  • I do not see how he can ever die; Nature cannot spare him.
  • The Vishnu Purana says, "The house-holder is to remain at eventide in his courtyard as long as it takes to milk a cow, or longer if he pleases, to await the arrival of a guest."
  • They tell me that if the fox would remain in the bosom of the frozen earth he would be safe, or if he would run in a straight line away no foxhound could overtake him; but, having left his pursuers far behind, he stops to rest and listen till they come up, and when he runs he circles round to his old haunts, where the hunters await him.
  • Sometimes, however, he will run upon a wall many rods, and then leap off far to one side, and he appears to know that water will not retain his scent.
  • A hunter told me that he once saw a fox pursued by hounds burst out on to Walden when the ice was covered with shallow puddles, run part way across, and then return to the same shore.
  • But I fear that he was not the wiser for all I told him, for every time I attempted to answer his questions he interrupted me by asking, "What do you do here?"
  • He had lost a dog, but found a man.
  • Late in the afternoon, as he was resting in the thick woods south of Walden, he heard the voice of the hounds far over toward Fair Haven still pursuing the fox; and on they came, their hounding cry which made all the woods ring sounding nearer and nearer, now from Well Meadow, now from the Baker Farm.
  • They waited in silence while he skinned the fox, then followed the brush a while, and at length turned off into the woods again.
  • The Concord hunter told him what he knew and offered him the skin; but the other declined it and departed.
  • The hunter who told me this could remember one Sam Nutting, who used to hunt bears on Fair Haven Ledges, and exchange their skins for rum in Concord village; who told him, even, that he had seen a moose there.
  • Nutting had a famous foxhound named Burgoyne--he pronounced it Bugine--which my informant used to borrow.
  • How, pray, did he get these in midwinter?
  • Oh, he got worms out of rotten logs since the ground froze, and so he caught them.
  • He gets his living by barking trees.
  • He would perhaps have placed alder branches over the narrow holes in the ice, which were four or five rods apart and an equal distance from the shore, and having fastened the end of the line to a stick to prevent its being pulled through, have passed the slack line over a twig of the alder, a foot or more above the ice, and tied a dry oak leaf to it, which, being pulled down, would show when he had a bite.
  • He would perhaps have placed alder branches over the narrow holes in the ice, which were four or five rods apart and an equal distance from the shore, and having fastened the end of the line to a stick to prevent its being pulled through, have passed the slack line over a twig of the alder, a foot or more above the ice, and tied a dry oak leaf to it, which, being pulled down, would show when he had a bite.
  • William Gilpin, who is so admirable in all that relates to landscapes, and usually so correct, standing at the head of Loch Fyne, in Scotland, which he describes as "a bay of salt water, sixty or seventy fathoms deep, four miles in breadth," and about fifty miles long, surrounded by mountains, observes, "If we could have seen it immediately after the diluvian crash, or whatever convulsion of nature occasioned it, before the waters gushed in, what a horrid chasm must it have appeared!
  • It may be that he lays up no treasures in this world which will cool his summer drink in the next.
  • He cuts and saws the solid pond, unroofs the house of fishes, and carts off their very element and air, held fast by chains and stakes like corded wood, through the favoring winter air, to wintry cellars, to underlie the summer there.
  • They said that a gentleman farmer, who was behind the scenes, wanted to double his money, which, as I understood, amounted to half a million already; but in order to cover each one of his dollars with another, he took off the only coat, ay, the skin itself, of Walden Pond in the midst of a hard winter.
  • Perhaps I shall hear a solitary loon laugh as he dives and plumes himself, or shall see a lonely fisher in his boat, like a floating leaf, beholding his form reflected in the waves, where lately a hundred men securely labored.
  • It was a warm day, and he was surprised to see so great a body of ice remaining.
  • Not seeing any ducks, he hid his boat on the north or back side of an island in the pond, and then concealed himself in the bushes on the south side, to await them.
  • He too is helping to crack it.
  • If I could ever find the twig he sits upon!
  • I mean he; I mean the twig.
  • It is because they do not obey the hint which God gives them, nor accept the pardon which he freely offers to all.
  • Men seeing the nature of this man like that of the brute, think that he has never possessed the innate faculty of reason.
  • The wild goose is more of a cosmopolite than we; he breaks his fast in Canada, takes a luncheon in the Ohio, and plumes himself for the night in a southern bayou.
  • One hastens to southern Africa to chase the giraffe; but surely that is not the game he would be after.
  • How long, pray, would a man hunt giraffes if he could?
  • He declared that "a soldier who fights in the ranks does not require half so much courage as a footpad"--"that honor and religion have never stood in the way of a well-considered and a firm resolve."
  • I learned this, at least, by my experiment: that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
  • Who that has heard a strain of music feared then lest he should speak extravagantly any more forever?
  • Shall a man go and hang himself because he belongs to the race of pygmies, and not be the biggest pygmy that he can?
  • Let every one mind his own business, and endeavor to be what he was made.
  • If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer.
  • Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
  • It is not important that he should mature as soon as an apple tree or an oak.
  • Shall he turn his spring into summer?
  • He proceeded instantly to the forest for wood, being resolved that it should not be made of unsuitable material; and as he searched for and rejected stick after stick, his friends gradually deserted him, for they grew old in their works and died, but he grew not older by a moment.
  • He proceeded instantly to the forest for wood, being resolved that it should not be made of unsuitable material; and as he searched for and rejected stick after stick, his friends gradually deserted him, for they grew old in their works and died, but he grew not older by a moment.
  • Before he had found a stock in all respects suitable the city of Kouroo was a hoary ruin, and he sat on one of its mounds to peel the stick.
  • He had made a new system in making a staff, a world with full and fair proportions; in which, though the old cities and dynasties had passed away, fairer and more glorious ones had taken their places.
  • "Tell the tailors," said he, "to remember to make a knot in their thread before they take the first stitch."
  • But presently the traveller's horse sank in up to the girths, and he observed to the boy, "I thought you said that this bog had a hard bottom."
  • So it is with the bogs and quicksands of society; but he is an old boy that knows it.
  • I called on the king, but he made me wait in his hall, and conducted like a man incapacitated for hospitality.
  • I answer, that he cannot without disgrace be associated with it.
  • Paley, a common authority with many on moral questions, in his chapter on the "Duty of Submission to Civil Government," resolves all civil obligation into expediency; and he proceeds to say that "so long as the interest of the whole society requires it, that is, so long as the established government cannot be resisted or changed without public inconveniency, it is the will of God... that the established government be obeyed, and no longer....
  • Of this, he says, every man shall judge for himself.
  • But he that would save his life, in such a case, shall lose it.
  • It is not a man's duty, as a matter of course, to devote himself to the eradication of any, even the most enormous wrong; he may still properly have other concerns to engage him; but it is his duty, at least, to wash his hands of it, and, if he gives it no thought longer, not to give it practically his support.
  • I must get off him first, that he may pursue his contemplations too.
  • The soldier is applauded who refuses to serve in an unjust war by those who do not refuse to sustain the unjust government which makes the war; is applauded by those whose own act and authority he disregards and sets at naught; as if the state were penitent to that degree that it hired one to scourge it while it sinned, but not to that degree that it left off sinning for a moment.
  • A man has not everything to do, but something; and because he cannot do everything, it is not necessary that he should do something wrong.
  • Through this wound a man's real manhood and immortality flow out, and he bleeds to an everlasting death.
  • It puts to rest many questions which he would otherwise be taxed to answer; while the only new question which it puts is the hard but superfluous one, how to spend it.
  • The best thing a man can do for his culture when he is rich is to endeavor to carry out those schemes which he entertained when he was poor.
  • A man may grow rich in Turkey even, if he will be in all respects a good subject of the Turkish government.
  • This I gave to the town clerk; and he has it.
  • When the door was locked, he showed me where to hang my hat, and how he managed matters there.
  • As near as I could discover, he had probably gone to bed in a barn when drunk, and smoked his pipe there; and so a barn was burnt.
  • I pumped my fellow-prisoner as dry as I could, for fear I should never see him again; but at length he showed me which was my bed, and left me to blow out the lamp.
  • Soon after he was let out to work at haying in a neighboring field, whither he went every day, and would not be back till noon; so he bade me good-day, saying that he doubted if he should see me again.
  • Let him see that he does only what belongs to himself and to the hour.
  • His words are wisdom to those legislators who contemplate no essential reform in the existing government; but for thinkers, and those who legislate for all time, he never once glances at the subject.
  • Comparatively, he is always strong, original, and, above all, practical.
  • He is not a leader, but a follower.
  • "I have never made an effort," he says, "and never propose to make an effort; I have never countenanced an effort, and never mean to countenance an effort, to disturb the arrangement as originally made, by which the various States came into the Union."
  • He has been received by the Emperor.
  • "What would you have me do?" he said at last.
  • He said no more, but expressed his resignation to cruel fate by a gesture.
  • He lives in the country.
  • He is the well-known Prince Bolkonski who had to retire from the army under the late Emperor, and was nicknamed 'the King of Prussia.'
  • She has a brother; I think you know him, he married Lise Meinen lately.
  • Prince Vasili's son, Hippolyte, had come with Mortemart, whom he introduced.
  • He is going to get himself killed.
  • On his way to the aunt he bowed to the little princess with a pleased smile, as to an intimate acquaintance.
  • He is a most interesting man.
  • First he had left a lady before she had finished speaking to him, and now he continued to speak to another who wished to get away.
  • With his head bent, and his big feet spread apart, he began explaining his reasons for thinking the abbe's plan chimerical.
  • He knew that all the intellectual lights of Petersburg were gathered there and, like a child in a toyshop, did not know which way to look, afraid of missing any clever conversation that was to be heard.
  • Seeing the self-confident and refined expression on the faces of those present he was always expecting to hear something very profound.
  • At last he came up to Morio.
  • Here the conversation seemed interesting and he stood waiting for an opportunity to express his own views, as young people are fond of doing.
  • The vicomte was a nice-looking young man with soft features and polished manners, who evidently considered himself a celebrity but out of politeness modestly placed himself at the disposal of the circle in which he found himself.
  • "How evidently he belongs to the best society," said she to a third; and the vicomte was served up to the company in the choicest and most advantageous style, like a well-garnished joint of roast beef on a hot dish.
  • "Madame, I doubt my ability before such an audience," said he, smilingly inclining his head.
  • He was dressed in a dark-green dress coat, knee breeches of the color of cuisse de nymphe effrayee, as he called it, shoes, and silk stockings.
  • He was dressed in a dark-green dress coat, knee breeches of the color of cuisse de nymphe effrayee, as he called it, shoes, and silk stockings.
  • At that moment Anna Pavlovna came up and, looking severely at Pierre, asked the Italian how he stood Russian climate.
  • He was a very handsome young man, of medium height, with firm, clearcut features.
  • It was evident that he not only knew everyone in the drawing room, but had found them to be so tiresome that it wearied him to look at or listen to them.
  • He turned away from her with a grimace that distorted his handsome face, kissed Anna Pavlovna's hand, and screwing up his eyes scanned the whole company.
  • May I? he added in a low voice so as not to disturb the vicomte who was continuing his story.
  • He wished to say something more, but at that moment Prince Vasili and his daughter got up to go and the two young men rose to let them pass.
  • I have asked Golitsyn and he has refused.
  • Prince Vasili knew this, and having once realized that if he asked on behalf of all who begged of him, he would soon be unable to ask for himself, he became chary of using his influence.
  • He turned to go.
  • He told me himself that all the Moscow ladies have conspired to give him all their sons as adjutants.
  • Nothing! and he became more animated.
  • And sighing disdainfully, he again changed his position.
  • He explained this to her with as much gravity as if she had asked him to do it.
  • He shrugged his shoulders and spread out his hands.
  • It was evident that he did not like the vicomte and was aiming his remarks at him, though without looking at him.
  • I do not know how far he was justified in saying so.
  • Before Anna Pavlovna and the others had time to smile their appreciation of the vicomte's epigram, Pierre again broke into the conversation, and though Anna Pavlovna felt sure he would say something inappropriate, she was unable to stop him.
  • "Yes, if having obtained power, without availing himself of it to commit murder he had restored it to the rightful king, I should have called him a great man," remarked the vicomte.
  • He could not do that.
  • The people only gave him power that he might rid them of the Bourbons and because they saw that he was a great man.
  • Everyone waited, so emphatically and eagerly did he demand their attention to his story.
  • Here he could contain himself no longer and went on, between gasps of laughter: "And the whole world knew...."
  • Though it was unintelligible why he had told it, or why it had to be told in Russian, still Anna Pavlovna and the others appreciated Prince Hippolyte's social tact in so agreeably ending Pierre's unpleasant and unamiable outburst.
  • Stout, about the average height, broad, with huge red hands; he did not know, as the saying is, how to enter a drawing room and still less how to leave one; that is, how to say something particularly agreeable before going away.
  • Prince Andrew's eyes were closed, so weary and sleepy did he seem.
  • "Are you ready?" he asked his wife, looking past her.
  • "Princesse, au revoir," cried he, stumbling with his tongue as well as with his feet.
  • Prince Hippolyte laughed spasmodically as he stood in the porch waiting for the vicomte whom he had promised to take home.
  • She will be quite ill now, said Prince Andrew, as he entered the study, rubbing his small white hands.
  • He lifted his eager face to Prince Andrew, smiled, and waved his hand.
  • When he returned to Moscow his father dismissed the abbe and said to the young man, Now go to Petersburg, look round, and choose your profession.
  • "If no one fought except on his own conviction, there would be no wars," he said.
  • I can't understand why he wants to go to the war, replied Pierre, addressing the princess with none of the embarrassment so commonly shown by young men in their intercourse with young women.
  • He is so well known, so much appreciated by everyone.
  • He is so well received everywhere.
  • Pierre looked at his friend and, noticing that he did not like the conversation, gave no reply.
  • "When are you starting?" he asked.
  • Just for a whim of his own, goodness only knows why, he leaves me and locks me up alone in the country.
  • And he expects me not to be afraid.
  • He seemed unable to bear the sight of tears and was ready to cry himself.
  • "No, he thinks only of himself," muttered the princess without restraining her angry tears.
  • "Good night, Lise," said he, rising and courteously kissing her hand as he would have done to a stranger.
  • "Let us go and have supper," he said with a sigh, going to the door.
  • But what's the good?... and he waved his arm.
  • It was evident that the more lifeless he seemed at ordinary times, the more impassioned he became in these moments of almost morbid irritation.
  • "You don't understand why I say this," he continued, "but it is the whole story of life.
  • He was free, he had nothing but his aim to consider, and he reached it.
  • He was free, he had nothing but his aim to consider, and he reached it.
  • He did not finish his sentence, but his tone showed how highly he thought of his friend and how much he expected of him in the future.
  • He did not finish his sentence, but his tone showed how highly he thought of his friend and how much he expected of him in the future.
  • "How can he talk like that?" thought Pierre.
  • Pierre was always astonished at Prince Andrew's calm manner of treating everybody, his extraordinary memory, his extensive reading (he had read everything, knew everything, and had an opinion about everything), but above all at his capacity for work and study.
  • And if Pierre was often struck by Andrew's lack of capacity for philosophical meditation (to which he himself was particularly addicted), he regarded even this not as a defect but as a sign of strength.
  • Let us talk about you, he added after a silence, smiling at his reassuring thoughts.
  • He suddenly blushed crimson, and it was plain that he had made a great effort to say this.
  • He suddenly blushed crimson, and it was plain that he had made a great effort to say this.
  • But he did not say what "it really" was.
  • He asked me for tonight, but I won't go.
  • But the nearer he drew to the house the more he felt the impossibility of going to sleep on such a night.
  • But he immediately recalled his promise to Prince Andrew not to go there.
  • He went to Kuragin's.
  • "At one draught, or he loses!" shouted a fourth.
  • Good man! cried he, addressing Pierre.
  • Wait a bit, he is not drunk yet!
  • A bottle here, said Anatole, taking a glass from the table he went up to Pierre.
  • Anatole kept on refilling Pierre's glass while explaining that Dolokhov was betting with Stevens, an English naval officer, that he would drink a bottle of rum sitting on the outer ledge of the third floor window with his legs hanging out.
  • "No, I won't," said Pierre, pushing Anatole aside, and he went up to the window.
  • He was about twenty-five.
  • Like all infantry officers he wore no mustache, so that his mouth, the most striking feature of his face, was clearly seen.
  • However much he drank, he never lost his clearheadedness.
  • He wanted to smash something.
  • Pushing away the footmen he tugged at the frame, but could not move it.
  • He smashed a pane.
  • "You have a try, Hercules," said he, turning to Pierre.
  • "Listen!" cried he, standing there and addressing those in the room.
  • Fifty imperials... that I will drink a whole bottle of rum without taking it from my mouth, sitting outside the window on this spot" (he stooped and pointed to the sloping ledge outside the window) "and without holding on to anything.
  • The Englishman nodded, but gave no indication whether he intended to accept this challenge or not.
  • Anatole did not release him, and though he kept nodding to show that he understood, Anatole went on translating Dolokhov's words into English.
  • Oh! he muttered, looking down from the window at the stones of the pavement.
  • Placing the bottle on the window sill where he could reach it easily, Dolokhov climbed carefully and slowly through the window and lowered his legs.
  • "If anyone comes meddling again," said he, emitting the words separately through his thin compressed lips, "I will throw him down there.
  • Saying this he again turned round, dropped his hands, took the bottle and lifted it to his lips, threw back his head, and raised his free hand to balance himself.
  • Suddenly Dolokhov made a backward movement with his spine, and his arm trembled nervously; this was sufficient to cause his whole body to slip as he sat on the sloping ledge.
  • As he began slipping down, his head and arm wavered still more with the strain.
  • Pierre again covered his eyes and thought he would never open them again.
  • Suddenly he was aware of a stir all around.
  • He looked up: Dolokhov was standing on the window sill, with a pale but radiant face.
  • He threw the bottle to the Englishman, who caught it neatly.
  • He smelt strongly of rum.
  • I'll do the same thing! he suddenly cried.
  • They seized him by his arms; but he was so strong that everyone who touched him was sent flying.
  • And he caught the bear, took it in his arms, lifted it from the ground, and began dancing round the room with it.
  • Prince Vasili kept the promise he had given to Princess Drubetskaya who had spoken to him on behalf of her only son Boris on the evening of Anna Pavlovna's soiree.
  • He received, however, no appointment to Kutuzov's staff despite all Anna Mikhaylovna's endeavors and entreaties.
  • He is in such bad health, and now this vexation about his son is enough to kill him!
  • "He chose his friends badly," interposed Anna Mikhaylovna.
  • Anatole Kuragin's father managed somehow to get his son's affair hushed up, but even he was ordered out of Petersburg.
  • He is a son of Marya Ivanovna Dolokhova, such a worthy woman, but there, just fancy!
  • And he was said to be so well educated and clever.
  • I should think he has a score of them.
  • He has lost count of his children, but this Pierre was his favorite.
  • "He is very much altered now," said Anna Mikhaylovna.
  • I hear he has come on some inspection business, remarked the visitor.
  • The fact is he has come to see Count Cyril Vladimirovich, hearing how ill he is.
  • "But do you know, my dear, that was a capital joke," said the count; and seeing that the elder visitor was not listening, he turned to the young ladies.
  • And as he waved his arms to impersonate the policeman, his portly form again shook with a deep ringing laugh, the laugh of one who always eats well and, in particular, drinks well.
  • "So do come and dine with us!" he said.
  • "Ah, here she is!" he exclaimed laughing.
  • Nicholas blushed when he entered the drawing room.
  • He evidently tried to find something to say, but failed.
  • Boris on the contrary at once found his footing, and related quietly and humorously how he had known that doll Mimi when she was still quite a young lady, before her nose was broken; how she had aged during the five years he had known her, and how her head had cracked right across the skull.
  • Having said this he glanced at Natasha.
  • Do you want the carriage? he asked his mother with a smile.
  • "Ah yes, my dear," said the count, addressing the visitor and pointing to Nicholas, "his friend Boris has become an officer, and so for friendship's sake he is leaving the university and me, his old father, and entering the military service, my dear.
  • He glanced at his cousin and the young lady visitor; and they were both regarding him with a smile of approbation.
  • As he spoke he kept glancing with the flirtatiousness of a handsome youth at Sonya and the young lady visitor.
  • He always flares up!
  • This Buonaparte has turned all their heads; they all think of how he rose from an ensign and became Emperor.
  • Well, well, God grant it, he added, not noticing his visitor's sarcastic smile.
  • In the midst of his talk he glanced round at her.
  • He waited for the first pause in the conversation, and then with a distressed face left the room to find Sonya.
  • "How plainly all these young people wear their hearts on their sleeves!" said Anna Mikhaylovna, pointing to Nicholas as he went out.
  • She's turned out splendidly all the same, he added, winking at Vera.
  • Natasha, very still, peered out from her ambush, waiting to see what he would do.
  • He stood a little while before the glass, smiled, and walked toward the other door.
  • How can you? said he, running up to her.
  • He drew her to him and kissed her.
  • "How funny you are!" he said, bending down to her and blushing still more, but he waited and did nothing.
  • Suddenly she jumped up onto a tub to be higher than he, embraced him so that both her slender bare arms clasped him above his neck, and, tossing back her hair, kissed him full on the lips.
  • "Natasha," he said, "you know that I love you, but..."
  • Sonya was sitting close to Nicholas who was copying out some verses for her, the first he had ever written.
  • "In a minute, in a minute," he said, dipping his pen.
  • He was so kind.
  • I expect he has forgotten me.
  • He paid me attentions in those days, said the countess, with a smile.
  • "He is just the same as ever," replied Anna Mikhaylovna, "overflowing with amiability.
  • He said to me, 'I am sorry I can do so little for you, dear Princess.
  • Yes, he is a fine fellow and a very kind relation.
  • "Surely he will leave something to Boris," said the countess.
  • He has been to the house, you know, and danced with the children.
  • He says Count Orlov never gave such a dinner as ours will be!
  • I only need see Prince Vasili Sergeevich: he is staying here, is he not?
  • "Princess Drubetskaya to see Prince Vasili Sergeevich," he called to a footman dressed in knee breeches, shoes, and a swallow-tail coat, who ran downstairs and looked over from the halfway landing.
  • The son noticed that an expression of profound sorrow suddenly clouded his mother's face, and he smiled slightly.
  • He wanted to thank you himself.
  • "Try to serve well and show yourself worthy," added he, addressing Boris with severity.
  • Are you here on leave? he went on in his usual tone of indifference.
  • He is his godson, she added, her tone suggesting that this fact ought to give Prince Vasili much satisfaction.
  • She bent her head and continued in a whisper: Has he performed his final duty, Prince?
  • It can make things no worse, and it is absolutely necessary to prepare him if he is so ill.
  • Evidently the prince understood her, and also understood, as he had done at Anna Pavlovna's, that it would be difficult to get rid of Anna Mikhaylovna.
  • I suppose he won't go? she continued, turning to the prince.
  • Here he is, and the count has not once asked for him.
  • He shrugged his shoulders.
  • He had now been for some days in Moscow and was staying as usual at his father's house.
  • Entering the drawing room, where the princesses spent most of their time, he greeted the ladies, two of whom were sitting at embroidery frames while a third read aloud.
  • Pierre was received as if he were a corpse or a leper.
  • Olga, go and see whether Uncle's beef tea is ready--it is almost time, she added, giving Pierre to understand that they were busy, and busy making his father comfortable, while evidently he, Pierre, was only busy causing him annoyance.
  • Pierre stood looking at the sisters; then he bowed and said: Then I will go to my rooms.
  • And he left the room, followed by the low but ringing laughter of the sister with the mole.
  • He sent for Pierre and said to him: My dear fellow, if you are going to behave here as you did in Petersburg, you will end very badly; that is all I have to say to you.
  • "England is done for," said he, scowling and pointing his finger at someone unseen.
  • But before Pierre--who at that moment imagined himself to be Napoleon in person and to have just effected the dangerous crossing of the Straits of Dover and captured London--could pronounce Pitt's sentence, he saw a well-built and handsome young officer entering his room.
  • He had left Moscow when Boris was a boy of fourteen, and had quite forgotten him, but in his usual impulsive and hearty way he took Boris by the hand with a friendly smile.
  • He had left Moscow when Boris was a boy of fourteen, and had quite forgotten him, but in his usual impulsive and hearty way he took Boris by the hand with a friendly smile.
  • I have come with my mother to see the count, but it seems he is not well.
  • Yes, it seems he is ill.
  • "Count Rostov asks you to come to dinner today," said he, after a considerable pause which made Pierre feel uncomfortable.
  • Boris knew nothing about the Boulogne expedition; he did not read the papers and it was the first time he had heard Villeneuve's name.
  • "We here in Moscow are more occupied with dinner parties and scandal than with politics," said he in his quiet ironical tone.
  • Moscow is chiefly busy with gossip, he continued.
  • Pierre smiled in his good-natured way as if afraid for his companion's sake that the latter might say something he would afterwards regret.
  • Everybody is wondering to whom the count will leave his fortune, though he may perhaps outlive us all, as I sincerely hope he will...
  • For a long time Pierre could not understand, but when he did, he jumped up from the sofa, seized Boris under the elbow in his quick, clumsy way, and, blushing far more than Boris, began to speak with a feeling of mingled shame and vexation.
  • It's queer," he added after a pause, "that you should have suspected me!"
  • He began to laugh.
  • He has not sent for me....
  • Pierre saw that Boris wished to change the subject, and being of the same mind he began explaining the advantages and disadvantages of the Boulogne expedition.
  • After he had gone Pierre continued pacing up and down the room for a long time, no longer piercing an imaginary foe with his imaginary sword, but smiling at the remembrance of that pleasant, intelligent, and resolute young man.
  • As often happens in early youth, especially to one who leads a lonely life, he felt an unaccountable tenderness for this young man and made up his mind that they would be friends.
  • He must not be left like this.
  • "Oh, he is in a dreadful state," said the mother to her son when they were in the carriage.
  • He hardly recognizes anybody.
  • But why do you expect that he will leave us anything?
  • He is so rich, and we are so poor!
  • How ill he is! exclaimed the mother.
  • He is worth it!
  • He sat down by his wife, his elbows on his knees and his hands ruffling his gray hair.
  • Hey, who's there? he called out in a tone only used by persons who are certain that those they call will rush to obey the summons.
  • "Bring me..." he reflected a moment, "yes, bring me seven hundred rubles, yes!
  • But, don't be uneasy, he added, noticing that the count was beginning to breathe heavily and quickly which was always a sign of approaching anger.
  • Oh, what a terrible state he is in!
  • One would not know him, he is so ill!
  • From time to time he went out to ask: "Hasn't she come yet?"
  • One of them was a sallow, clean-shaven civilian with a thin and wrinkled face, already growing old, though he was dressed like a most fashionable young man.
  • He seemed to be condescending to his companion.
  • His favorite occupation when not playing boston, a card game he was very fond of, was that of listener, especially when he succeeded in setting two loquacious talkers at one another.
  • His conversation always related entirely to himself; he would remain calm and silent when the talk related to any topic that had no direct bearing on himself.
  • But all he said was so prettily sedate, and the naivete of his youthful egotism was so obvious, that he disarmed his hearers.
  • Pierre had come just at dinnertime and was sitting awkwardly in the middle of the drawing room on the first chair he had come across, blocking the way for everyone.
  • He was in the way and was the only one who did not notice the fact.
  • "Oui, madame," replied he, looking around him.
  • He smiled quite inappropriately.
  • The latter understood that she was being asked to entertain this young man, and sitting down beside him she began to speak about his father; but he answered her, as he had the countess, only in monosyllables.
  • His father lies on his deathbed and he amuses himself setting a policeman astride a bear!
  • Of the two soups he chose turtle with savory patties and went on to the game without omitting a single dish or one of the wines.
  • Nicholas sat at some distance from Sonya, beside Julie Karagina, to whom he was again talking with the same involuntary smile.
  • The German tutor was trying to remember all the dishes, wines, and kinds of dessert, in order to send a full description of the dinner to his people in Germany; and he felt greatly offended when the butler with a bottle wrapped in a napkin passed him by.
  • He has stopped Austria's cackle and I fear it will be our turn next.
  • He resented Shinshin's remark.
  • Then with the unerring official memory that characterized him he repeated from the opening words of the manifesto:
  • "Nicholas is going away in a week's time, his... papers... have come... he told me himself... but still I should not cry," and she showed a paper she held in her hand--with the verses Nicholas had written, "still, I should not cry, but you can't... no one can understand... what a soul he has!"
  • And she began to cry again because he had such a noble soul.
  • And he is so clever and so good! said Natasha.
  • Nicholas will tell her himself, and he doesn't care at all for Julie.
  • Then Nicholas sang a song he had just learned:
  • He had not finished the last verse before the young people began to get ready to dance in the large hall, and the sound of the feet and the coughing of the musicians were heard from the gallery.
  • And lowering his big arm he offered it to the slender little girl.
  • He drew himself up, a smile of debonair gallantry lit up his face and as soon as the last figure of the ecossaise was ended, he clapped his hands to the musicians and shouted up to their gallery, addressing the first violin:
  • He drew himself up, a smile of debonair gallantry lit up his face and as soon as the last figure of the ecossaise was ended, he clapped his hands to the musicians and shouted up to their gallery, addressing the first violin:
  • This was the count's favorite dance, which he had danced in his youth.
  • A regular eagle he is! loudly remarked the nurse, as she stood in one of the doorways.
  • After sitting so for a while he rose, and, looking about him with frightened eyes, went with unusually hurried steps down the long corridor leading to the back of the house, to the room of the eldest princess.
  • How young-looking he is!
  • Yes, and he is over sixty.
  • So he may have something to drink?
  • Has he taken his medicine?
  • "And who will inherit his wealth?" he added in a whisper.
  • "Do you think he can last till morning?" asked the German, addressing Lorrain in French which he pronounced badly.
  • "Tonight, not later," said he in a low voice, and he moved away with a decorous smile of self-satisfaction at being able clearly to understand and state the patient's condition.
  • "You have made the place warm, I must say," he remarked.
  • "And I?" he said; "do you think it is easier for me?
  • The count," pointing to his portrait, "definitely demanded that he should be called."
  • Prince Vasili looked questioningly at the princess, but could not make out whether she was considering what he had just said or whether she was simply looking at him.
  • "Yes, yes, of course," interrupted Prince Vasili impatiently, rubbing his bald head and angrily pulling back toward him the little table that he had pushed away.
  • But... in short, the fact is... you know yourself that last winter the count made a will by which he left all his property, not to us his direct heirs, but to Pierre.
  • "He has made wills enough!" quietly remarked the princess.
  • But he cannot leave the estate to Pierre.
  • If not, then as soon as all is over," and Prince Vasili sighed to intimate what he meant by the words all is over, "and the count's papers are opened, the will and letter will be delivered to the Emperor, and the petition will certainly be granted.
  • He will then be the legal heir to everything and you won't get anything.
  • Our duty, my dear, is to rectify his mistake, to ease his last moments by not letting him commit this injustice, and not to let him die feeling that he is rendering unhappy those who...
  • "Who sacrificed everything for him," chimed in the princess, who would again have risen had not the prince still held her fast, "though he never could appreciate it.
  • He has, no doubt, forgotten it and will wish to destroy it.
  • Last winter she wheedled herself in here and told the count such vile, disgraceful things about us, especially about Sophie--I can't repeat them--that it made the count quite ill and he would not see us for a whole fortnight.
  • As the wheels rolled softly over the straw beneath the windows, Anna Mikhaylovna, having turned with words of comfort to her companion, realized that he was asleep in his corner and woke him up.
  • He noticed that they had not come to the front entrance but to the back door.
  • While he was getting down from the carriage steps two men, who looked like tradespeople, ran hurriedly from the entrance and hid in the shadow of the wall.
  • "Perhaps the count did not ask for me," said Pierre when he reached the landing.
  • "But really, hadn't I better go away?" he asked, looking kindly at her over his spectacles.
  • Think that he is your father... perhaps in the agony of death.
  • Pierre did not understand a word, but the conviction that all this had to be grew stronger, and he meekly followed Anna Mikhaylovna who was already opening a door.
  • Pierre could not make out what it was all about, and still less what "watching over his interests" meant, but he decided that all these things had to be.
  • As soon as Anna Mikhaylovna had disappeared he noticed that the eyes of all in the room turned to him with something more than curiosity and sympathy.
  • He noticed that they whispered to one another, casting significant looks at him with a kind of awe and even servility.
  • A deference such as he had never before received was shown him.
  • He was wearing his long coat with three stars on his breast.
  • He seemed to have grown thinner since the morning; his eyes seemed larger than usual when he glanced round and noticed Pierre.
  • He seemed to have grown thinner since the morning; his eyes seemed larger than usual when he glanced round and noticed Pierre.
  • He went up to him, took his hand (a thing he never used to do), and drew it downwards as if wishing to ascertain whether it was firmly fixed on.
  • He went up to him, took his hand (a thing he never used to do), and drew it downwards as if wishing to ascertain whether it was firmly fixed on.
  • He has asked to see you.
  • That is well! and he turned to go.
  • He had another stroke about half an hour ago.
  • He looked at Prince Vasili in perplexity, and only later grasped that a stroke was an attack of illness.
  • He could not walk well on tiptoe and his whole body jerked at each step.
  • He lay just under the icons; his large thick hands outside the quilt.
  • Prince Vasili in front of the door, near the invalid chair, a wax taper in his left hand, was leaning his left arm on the carved back of a velvet chair he had turned round for the purpose, and was crossing himself with his right hand, turning his eyes upward each time he touched his forehead.
  • "If you do not understand these sentiments," he seemed to be saying, "so much the worse for you!"
  • He lit it and, distracted by observing those around him, began crossing himself with the hand that held the taper.
  • The French doctor held no taper; he was leaning against one of the columns in a respectful attitude implying that he, a foreigner, in spite of all differences of faith, understood the full importance of the rite now being performed and even approved of it.
  • Pierre paid no more attention to this occurrence than to the rest of what went on, having made up his mind once for all that what he saw happening around him that evening was in some way essential.
  • Certainly he must be moved onto the bed; here it will be impossible...
  • The sick man was so surrounded by doctors, princesses, and servants that Pierre could no longer see the reddish-yellow face with its gray mane-- which, though he saw other faces as well, he had not lost sight of for a single moment during the whole service.
  • He judged by the cautious movements of those who crowded round the invalid chair that they had lifted the dying man and were moving him.
  • "Catch hold of my arm or you'll drop him!" he heard one of the servants say in a frightened whisper.
  • He lay with his head propped high on the pillows.
  • Once more Pierre looked questioningly at Anna Mikhaylovna to see what he was to do next.
  • Pierre obediently sat down, his eyes asking if he were doing right.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna looked attentively at the sick man's eyes, trying to guess what he wanted; she pointed first to Pierre, then to some drink, then named Prince Vasili in an inquiring whisper, then pointed to the quilt.
  • He made an effort to look at the servant who stood constantly at the head of the bed.
  • While the count was being turned over, one of his arms fell back helplessly and he made a fruitless effort to pull it forward.
  • "He is dozing," said Anna Mikhaylovna, observing that one of the princesses was coming to take her turn at watching.
  • As soon as they saw Pierre and his companion they became silent, and Pierre thought he saw the princess hide something as she whispered:
  • To Pierre he said nothing, merely giving his arm a sympathetic squeeze below the shoulder.
  • Pierre did not eat anything though he would very much have liked to.
  • He looked inquiringly at his monitress and saw that she was again going on tiptoe to the reception room where they had left Prince Vasili and the eldest princess.
  • "But, my dear princess," answered Anna Mikhaylovna blandly but impressively, blocking the way to the bedroom and preventing the other from passing, "won't this be too much for poor Uncle at a moment when he needs repose?
  • His cheeks, which were so flabby that they looked heavier below, were twitching violently; but he wore the air of a man little concerned in what the two ladies were saying.
  • All I know is that his real will is in his writing table, and this is a paper he has forgotten....
  • I think he will not be out of place in a family consultation; is it not so, Prince?
  • "Oh!" said he with reproach and surprise, "this is absurd!
  • He is dying and you leave me alone with him!
  • He staggered to the sofa on which Pierre was sitting and dropped onto it, covering his face with his hand.
  • Pierre noticed that he was pale and that his jaw quivered and shook as if in an ague.
  • "Ah, my friend!" said he, taking Pierre by the elbow; and there was in his voice a sincerity and weakness Pierre had never observed in it before.
  • Death is awful... and he burst into tears.
  • He is no more....
  • Anna Mikhaylovna left him, and when she returned he was fast asleep with his head on his arm.
  • But he had no time.
  • Though in the new reign he was free to return to the capitals, he still continued to live in the country, remarking that anyone who wanted to see him could come the hundred miles from Moscow to Bald Hills, while he himself needed no one and nothing.
  • He used to say that there are only two sources of human vice--idleness and superstition, and only two virtues--activity and intelligence.
  • He was himself always occupied: writing his memoirs, solving problems in higher mathematics, turning snuffboxes on a lathe, working in the garden, or superintending the building that was always going on at his estate.
  • He always came to table under precisely the same conditions, and not only at the same hour but at the same minute.
  • With those about him, from his daughter to his serfs, the prince was sharp and invariably exacting, so that without being a hardhearted man he inspired such fear and respect as few hardhearted men would have aroused.
  • After a few more turns of the lathe he removed his foot from the pedal, wiped his chisel, dropped it into a leather pouch attached to the lathe, and, approaching the table, summoned his daughter.
  • He took the exercise book containing lessons in geometry written by himself and drew up a chair with his foot.
  • "For tomorrow!" said he, quickly finding the page and making a scratch from one paragraph to another with his hard nail.
  • "Wait a bit, here's a letter for you," said the old man suddenly, taking a letter addressed in a woman's hand from a bag hanging above the table, onto which he threw it.
  • "The third, I said the third!" cried the prince abruptly, pushing the letter away, and leaning his elbows on the table he drew toward him the exercise book containing geometrical figures.
  • "Well, madam," he began, stooping over the book close to his daughter and placing an arm on the back of the chair on which she sat, so that she felt herself surrounded on all sides by the acrid scent of old age and tobacco, which she had known so long.
  • "Well now, isn't she a fool!" shouted the prince, pushing the book aside and turning sharply away; but rising immediately, he paced up and down, lightly touched his daughter's hair and sat down again.
  • "This won't do, Princess; it won't do," said he, when Princess Mary, having taken and closed the exercise book with the next day's lesson, was about to leave: "Mathematics are most important, madam!
  • Get used to it and you'll like it, and he patted her cheek.
  • She turned to go, but he stopped her with a gesture and took an uncut book from the high desk.
  • He patted her on the shoulder and himself closed the door after her.
  • This young man, of whom I spoke to you last summer, is so noble-minded and full of that real youthfulness which one seldom finds nowadays among our old men of twenty and, particularly, he is so frank and has so much heart.
  • He is said to be very handsome and a terrible scapegrace.
  • He says the count was the last representative but one of the great century, and that it is his own turn now, but that he will do all he can to let his turn come as late as possible.
  • He says the count was the last representative but one of the great century, and that it is his own turn now, but that he will do all he can to let his turn come as late as possible.
  • He always seemed to me to have an excellent heart, and that is the quality I value most in people.
  • So young, and burdened with such riches--to what temptations he will be exposed!
  • My father has not spoken to me of a suitor, but has only told me that he has received a letter and is expecting a visit from Prince Vasili.
  • However painful it may be to me, should the Almighty lay the duties of wife and mother upon me I shall try to perform them as faithfully as I can, without disquieting myself by examining my feelings toward him whom He may give me for husband.
  • He is in a very bad humor, very morose.
  • Prince Andrew apparently knew this as well as Tikhon; he looked at his watch as if to ascertain whether his father's habits had changed since he was at home last, and, having assured himself that they had not, he turned to his wife.
  • He will get up in twenty minutes.
  • Let us go across to Mary's room, he said.
  • "You've grown older, Tikhon," he said in passing to the old man, who kissed his hand.
  • Prince Andrew and his sister, hand in hand, kissed one another, and he told her she was still the same crybaby as ever.
  • He is leaving me here, God knows why, when he might have had promotion...
  • He is leaving me here, God knows why, when he might have had promotion...
  • The old man made a departure from his usual routine in honor of his son's arrival: he gave orders to admit him to his apartments while he dressed for dinner.
  • The old prince always dressed in old-fashioned style, wearing an antique coat and powdered hair; and when Prince Andrew entered his father's dressing room (not with the contemptuous look and manner he wore in drawing rooms, but with the animated face with which he talked to Pierre), the old man was sitting on a large leather-covered chair, wrapped in a powdering mantle, entrusting his head to Tikhon.
  • You at least must tackle him properly, or else if he goes on like this he'll soon have us, too, for his subjects!
  • And he held out his cheek.
  • He made no reply on his father's favorite topic-- making fun of the military men of the day, and more particularly of Bonaparte.
  • Well, go on," he continued, returning to his hobby; "tell me how the Germans have taught you to fight Bonaparte by this new science you call 'strategy.'"
  • "Give me time to collect my wits, Father," said he, with a smile that showed that his father's foibles did not prevent his son from loving and honoring him.
  • What about Austria? said he, rising from his chair and pacing up and down the room followed by Tikhon, who ran after him, handing him different articles of clothing.
  • Prince Andrew, seeing that his father insisted, began--at first reluctantly, but gradually with more and more animation, and from habit changing unconsciously from Russian to French as he went on--to explain the plan of operation for the coming campaign.
  • He explained how an army, ninety thousand strong, was to threaten Prussia so as to bring her out of her neutrality and draw her into the war; how part of that army was to join some Swedish forces at Stralsund; how two hundred and twenty thousand Austrians, with a hundred thousand Russians, were to operate in Italy and on the Rhine; how fifty thousand Russians and as many English were to land at Naples, and how a total force of five hundred thousand men was to attack the French from different sides.
  • The old prince did not evince the least interest during this explanation, but as if he were not listening to it continued to dress while walking about, and three times unexpectedly interrupted.
  • Once he stopped it by shouting: "The white one, the white one!"
  • This meant that Tikhon was not handing him the waistcoat he wanted.
  • Another time he interrupted, saying:
  • "How thoroughly like him that is!" he said to Princess Mary, who had come up to him.
  • She did not understand what he was laughing at.
  • He stroked her hair and then patted her awkwardly on the back of her neck.
  • "I'm glad, glad, to see you," he said, looking attentively into her eyes, and then quickly went to his place and sat down.
  • He indicated a place beside him to his daughter-in-law.
  • He laughed in his usual dry, cold, unpleasant way, with his lips only and not with his eyes.
  • "You must walk, walk as much as possible, as much as possible," he said.
  • He asked about mutual acquaintances, and she became still more animated and chattered away giving him greetings from various people and retelling the town gossip.
  • As she became animated the prince looked at her more and more sternly, and suddenly, as if he had studied her sufficiently and had formed a definite idea of her, he turned away and addressed Michael Ivanovich.
  • Michael Ivanovich did not at all know when "you and I" had said such things about Bonaparte, but understanding that he was wanted as a peg on which to hang the prince's favorite topic, he looked inquiringly at the young prince, wondering what would follow.
  • "He is a great tactician!" said the prince to his son, pointing to the architect.
  • "The past always seems good," said he, "but did not Suvorov himself fall into a trap Moreau set him, and from which he did not know how to escape?"
  • And he jerked away his plate, which Tikhon briskly caught.
  • No, my dear boy," he continued, "you and your generals won't get on against Buonaparte; you'll have to call in the French, so that birds of a feather may fight together.
  • Here, he says the same thing.
  • He has got splendid soldiers.
  • Besides he began by attacking Germans.
  • He made his reputation fighting them.
  • His son made no rejoinder, but it was evident that whatever arguments were presented he was as little able as his father to change his opinion.
  • He listened, refraining from a reply, and involuntarily wondered how this old man, living alone in the country for so many years, could know and discuss so minutely and acutely all the recent European military and political events.
  • Come now, where has this great commander of yours shown his skill? he concluded.
  • Mademoiselle Bourienne, here's another admirer of that powder-monkey emperor of yours, he exclaimed in excellent French.
  • "Dieu sait quand reviendra..." hummed the prince out of tune and, with a laugh still more so, he quitted the table.
  • "Oh, he is so kind!" answered Princess Mary.
  • Only those things he always kept with him remained in his room; a small box, a large canteen fitted with silver plate, two Turkish pistols and a saber--a present from his father who had brought it from the siege of Ochakov.
  • With his hands behind him he paced briskly from corner to corner of the room, looking straight before him and thoughtfully shaking his head.
  • It was the heavy tread of Princess Mary that he heard.
  • "And where is Lise?" he asked, answering her question only by a smile.
  • Prince Andrew smiled as he looked at his sister, as we smile at those we think we thoroughly understand.
  • "You live in the country and don't think the life terrible," he replied.
  • "He always was rather harsh; and now I should think he's getting very trying," said Prince Andrew, apparently speaking lightly of their father in order to puzzle or test his sister.
  • There was a look of tenderness, for he was touched, but also a gleam of irony on his face.
  • And I am sorry for that, he went on.
  • As he said this he rose, went to his sister, and, stooping, kissed her forehead.
  • His fine eyes lit up with a thoughtful, kindly, and unaccustomed brightness, but he was looking not at his sister but over her head toward the darkness of the open doorway.
  • Petrushka!" he called to his valet: "Come here, take these away.
  • He said nothing to her but looked at her forehead and hair, without looking at her eyes, with such contempt that the Frenchwoman blushed and went away without a word.
  • When he reached his sister's room his wife was already awake and her merry voice, hurrying one word after another, came through the open door.
  • He entered the room softly.
  • When Prince Andrew entered the study the old man in his old-age spectacles and white dressing gown, in which he received no one but his son, sat at the table writing.
  • And he went on writing.
  • "Kiss me here," and he touched his cheek: "Thanks, thanks!"
  • And he went on writing, so that his quill spluttered and squeaked.
  • These two things can be done together, he added.
  • "Hm... Hm..." muttered the old prince to himself, finishing what he was writing.
  • He signed with a flourish and suddenly turning to his son began to laugh.
  • He seized his son by the hand with small bony fingers, shook it, looked straight into his son's face with keen eyes which seemed to see through him, and again laughed his frigid laugh.
  • Andrew did not speak; he was both pleased and displeased that his father understood him.
  • "Listen!" said he; "don't worry about your wife: what can be done shall be.
  • Give this letter to Michael Ilarionovich. * I have written that he should make use of you in proper places and not keep you long as an adjutant: a bad position!
  • Write and tell me how he receives you.
  • If he is all right--serve him.
  • Nicholas Bolkonski's son need not serve under anyone if he is in disfavor.
  • He spoke so rapidly that he did not finish half his words, but his son was accustomed to understand him.
  • He spoke so rapidly that he did not finish half his words, but his son was accustomed to understand him.
  • He led him to the desk, raised the lid, drew out a drawer, and took out an exercise book filled with his bold, tall, close handwriting.
  • Andrew did not tell his father that he would no doubt live a long time yet.
  • He felt that he must not say it.
  • He felt that he must not say it.
  • "I will do it all, Father," he said.
  • He gave his son his hand to kiss, and embraced him.
  • "Remember this, Prince Andrew, if they kill you it will hurt me, your old father..." he paused unexpectedly, and then in a querulous voice suddenly shrieked: "but if I hear that you have not behaved like a son of Nicholas Bolkonski, I shall be ashamed!"
  • Go! he suddenly shouted in a loud, angry voice, opening his door.
  • "Well!" he said, turning to his wife.
  • And this "Well!" sounded coldly ironic, as if he were saying,: "Now go through your performance."
  • He cautiously released the shoulder she leaned on, looked into her face, and carefully placed her in an easy chair.
  • "Adieu, Mary," said he gently to his sister, taking her by the hand and kissing her, and then he left the room with rapid steps.
  • That's all right! said he; and looking angrily at the unconscious little princess, he shook his head reprovingly and slammed the door.
  • He had the air of a man happily performing one of the most solemn duties of his life.
  • He walked about in front of the line and at every step pulled himself up, slightly arching his back.
  • With this object he intended to meet the regiment; so the worse the condition it was in, the better pleased the commander- in-chief would be.
  • "A fine mess we've made of it!" he remarked.
  • "Oh, my God!" he added, stepping resolutely forward.
  • "Company commanders!" he shouted in a voice accustomed to command.
  • This! he shouted and stood still.
  • When the eager but misrepeated words had reached their destination in a cry of: "The general to the third company," the missing officer appeared from behind his company and, though he was a middle-aged man and not in the habit of running, trotted awkwardly stumbling on his toes toward the general.
  • The captain's face showed the uneasiness of a schoolboy who is told to repeat a lesson he has not learned.
  • The general looked the captain up and down as he came up panting, slackening his pace as he approached.
  • Has he been degraded into a field marshal, or into a soldier?
  • If a soldier, he should be dressed in regulation uniform like the others.
  • What?" he added with renewed irritation, "I beg you to dress your men decently."
  • Having snapped at an officer for an unpolished badge, at another because his line was not straight, he reached the third company.
  • Change his coat... the ras... he did not finish.
  • "I request you to have the goodness to change your coat," he said as he turned away.
  • Kutuzov and the Austrian general were talking in low voices and Kutuzov smiled slightly as treading heavily he stepped down from the carriage just as if those two thousand men breathlessly gazing at him and the regimental commander did not exist.
  • At first Kutuzov stood still while the regiment moved; then he and the general in white, accompanied by the suite, walked between the ranks.
  • Kutuzov walked through the ranks, sometimes stopping to say a few friendly words to officers he had known in the Turkish war, sometimes also to the soldiers.
  • Looking at their boots he several times shook his head sadly, pointing them out to the Austrian general with an expression which seemed to say that he was not blaming anyone, but could not help noticing what a bad state of things it was.
  • On reaching the third company he suddenly stopped.
  • He used to have a predilection for Bacchus.
  • The regimental commander was afraid he might be blamed for this and did not answer.
  • The same smile of the eyes with which he had turned from Captain Timokhin again flitted over his face.
  • He turned away and went to the carriage.
  • He was very pleased!
  • And he held out his hand to the captain.
  • And tell Mr. Dolokhov that I won't forget him--he may be quite easy.
  • "As far as the service goes he is quite punctilious, your excellency; but his character..." said Timokhin.
  • One day he is sensible, well educated, and good-natured, and the next he's a wild beast....
  • In Poland, if you please, he nearly killed a Jew.
  • You know he has important connections...
  • "I will, your excellency," said Timokhin, showing by his smile that he understood his commander's wish.
  • "A cup of vodka for the men from me," he added so that the soldiers could hear.
  • God be praised! and he rode past that company and overtook the next one.
  • And so he is!
  • No, friend, he is sharper-eyed than you are.
  • Boots and leg bands... he noticed everything...
  • When he looked at my feet, friend... well, thinks I...
  • And that other one with him, the Austrian, looked as if he were smeared with chalk--as white as flour!
  • Did he say when the battles are to begin?
  • And he says Buonaparte is in Braunau!
  • The commander-in-chief made a sign that the men should continue to march at ease, and he and all his suite showed pleasure at the sound of the singing and the sight of the dancing soldier and the gay and smartly marching men.
  • It was Dolokhov marching with particular grace and boldness in time to the song and looking at those driving past as if he pitied all who were not at that moment marching with the company.
  • But now that Kutuzov had spoken to the gentleman ranker, he addressed him with the cordiality of an old friend.
  • "My dear fellow, how are you?" said he through the singing, making his horse keep pace with the company.
  • "All I can say, General," said he with a pleasant elegance of expression and intonation that obliged one to listen to each deliberately spoken word.
  • But Kutuzov went on blandly smiling with the same expression, which seemed to say that he had a right to suppose so.
  • And, in fact, the last letter he had received from Mack's army informed him of a victory and stated strategically the position of the army was very favorable.
  • We have fully concentrated forces of nearly seventy thousand men with which to attack and defeat the enemy should he cross the Lech.
  • Also, as we are masters of Ulm, we cannot be deprived of the advantage of commanding both sides of the Danube, so that should the enemy not cross the Lech, we can cross the Danube, throw ourselves on his line of communications, recross the river lower down, and frustrate his intention should he try to direct his whole force against our faithful ally.
  • Here are two letters from Count Nostitz and here is one from His Highness the Archduke Ferdinand and here are these," he said, handing him several papers, "make a neat memorandum in French out of all this, showing all the news we have had of the movements of the Austrian army, and then give it to his excellency."
  • He gathered up the papers and with a bow to both, stepped softly over the carpet and went out into the waiting room.
  • Though not much time had passed since Prince Andrew had left Russia, he had changed greatly during that period.
  • He now looked like a man who has time to think of the impression he makes on others, but is occupied with agreeable and interesting work.
  • He now looked like a man who has time to think of the impression he makes on others, but is occupied with agreeable and interesting work.
  • On Kutuzov's staff, among his fellow officers and in the army generally, Prince Andrew had, as he had had in Petersburg society, two quite opposite reputations.
  • He took out a notebook, hurriedly scribbled something in pencil, tore out the leaf, gave it to Kozlovski, stepped quickly to the window, and threw himself into a chair, gazing at those in the room as if asking, "Why do they look at me?"
  • Then he lifted his head, stretched his neck as if he intended to say something, but immediately, with affected indifference, began to hum to himself, producing a queer sound which immediately broke off.
  • "Vous voyez le malheureux Mack," he uttered in a broken voice.
  • Kutuzov's face as he stood in the open doorway remained perfectly immobile for a few moments.
  • Then wrinkles ran over his face like a wave and his forehead became smooth again, he bowed his head respectfully, closed his eyes, silently let Mack enter his room before him, and closed the door himself behind him.
  • When he saw Mack and heard the details of his disaster he understood that half the campaign was lost, understood all the difficulties of the Russian army's position, and vividly imagined what awaited it and the part he would have to play.
  • Involuntarily he felt a joyful agitation at the thought of the humiliation of arrogant Austria and that in a week's time he might, perhaps, see and take part in the first Russian encounter with the French since Suvorov met them.
  • He feared that Bonaparte's genius might outweigh all the courage of the Russian troops, and at the same time could not admit the idea of his hero being disgraced.
  • Excited and irritated by these thoughts Prince Andrew went toward his room to write to his father, to whom he wrote every day.
  • In the corridor he met Nesvitski, with whom he shared a room, and the wag Zherkov; they were as usual laughing.
  • "Your excellency," said he in German, stepping forward and addressing the Austrian general, "I have the honor to congratulate you."
  • He bowed his head and scraped first with one foot and then with the other, awkwardly, like a child at a dancing lesson.
  • He screwed up his eyes showing that he was listening.
  • He screwed up his eyes showing that he was listening.
  • General Mack has arrived, quite well, only a little bruised just here, he added, pointing with a beaming smile to his head.
  • "Gott, wie naiv!" * said he angrily, after he had gone a few steps.
  • Quarante mille hommes massacres et l'armee de nos allies detruite, et vous trouvez la le mot pour rire, * he said, as if strengthening his views by this French sentence.
  • *(2) Only a hobbledehoy could amuse himself in this way, he added in Russian--but pronouncing the word with a French accent--having noticed that Zherkov could still hear him.
  • He waited a moment to see whether the cornet would answer, but he turned and went out of the corridor.
  • He waited a moment to see whether the cornet would answer, but he turned and went out of the corridor.
  • Cadet Rostov, ever since he had overtaken the regiment in Poland, had lived with the squadron commander.
  • "Ah, Bondarenko, dear friend!" said he to the hussar who rushed up headlong to the horse.
  • "Walk him up and down, my dear fellow," he continued, with that gay brotherly cordiality which goodhearted young people show to everyone when they are happy.
  • What a horse he will be! he thought with a smile, and holding up his saber, his spurs jingling, he ran up the steps of the porch.
  • Schon gut Morgen! * he said winking with a merry smile, evidently pleased to greet the young man.
  • "What about your master?" he asked Lavrushka, Denisov's orderly, whom all the regiment knew for a rogue.
  • I know by now, if he wins he comes back early to brag about it, but if he stays out till morning it means he's lost and will come back in a rage.
  • He wore an unfastened cloak, wide breeches hanging down in creases, and a crumpled shako on the back of his head.
  • He came up to the porch gloomily, hanging his head.
  • "Lavwuska!" he shouted loudly and angrily, "take it off, blockhead!"
  • Puckering up his face though smiling, and showing his short strong teeth, he began with stubby fingers of both hands to ruffle up his thick tangled black hair.
  • (an officer nicknamed "the rat") he said, rubbing his forehead and whole face with both hands.
  • Just fancy, he didn't let me win a single cahd, not one cahd.
  • He took the lighted pipe that was offered to him, gripped it in his fist, and tapped it on the floor, making the sparks fly, while he continued to shout.
  • He took the lighted pipe that was offered to him, gripped it in his fist, and tapped it on the floor, making the sparks fly, while he continued to shout.
  • He lets one win the singles and collahs it as soon as one doubles it; gives the singles and snatches the doubles!
  • He scattered the burning tobacco, smashed the pipe, and threw it away.
  • Then he remained silent for a while, and all at once looked cheerfully with his glittering, black eyes at Rostov.
  • "Wetched!" he muttered, throwing down a purse with some gold in it.
  • "Well, young cavalryman, how is my Rook behaving?" he asked.
  • The lieutenant never looked the man he was speaking to straight in the face; his eyes continually wandered from one object to another.
  • "I saw you riding this morning..." he added.
  • "Oh, he's all right, a good horse," answered Rostov, though the horse for which he had paid seven hundred rubbles was not worth half that sum.
  • "He's begun to go a little lame on the left foreleg," he added.
  • "Then I'll have it brought round," said Rostov wishing to avoid Telyanin, and he went out to give the order.
  • On seeing Rostov, Denisov screwed up his face and pointing over his shoulder with his thumb to the room where Telyanin was sitting, he frowned and gave a shudder of disgust.
  • I don't like that fellow, he said, regardless of the quartermaster's presence.
  • Rostov shrugged his shoulders as much as to say: "Nor do I, but what's one to do?" and, having given his order, he returned to Telyanin.
  • "Well there certainly are disgusting people," thought Rostov as he entered.
  • He leaned his elbows on the table with his pen in his hand and, evidently glad of a chance to say quicker in words what he wanted to write, told Rostov the contents of his letter.
  • He leaned his elbows on the table with his pen in his hand and, evidently glad of a chance to say quicker in words what he wanted to write, told Rostov the contents of his letter.
  • "You see, my fwiend," he said, "we sleep when we don't love.
  • Send him to the devil, I'm busy! he shouted to Lavrushka, who went up to him not in the least abashed.
  • "Wetched business," he muttered to himself.
  • "How much is left in the puhse?" he asked, turning to Rostov.
  • Call the quahtehmasteh, he shouted to Lavrushka.
  • He pulled off the quilt and shook it.
  • Where is it? he asked, turning to Lavrushka.
  • He could not draw breath.
  • "Nonsense!" he cried, and the veins on his forehead and neck stood out like cords.
  • "Do you understand what you're saying?" he said in a trembling voice.
  • He could not finish, and ran out of the room.
  • "Has something happened?" he added, surprised at the cadet's troubled face.
  • "Ah, you've come here too, young man!" he said, smiling and raising his eyebrows.
  • "Yes," said Rostov as if it cost him a great deal to utter the word; and he sat down at the nearest table.
  • When Telyanin had finished his lunch he took out of his pocket a double purse and, drawing its rings aside with his small, white, turned-up fingers, drew out a gold imperial, and lifting his eyebrows gave it to the waiter.
  • "Please be quick," he said.
  • "Allow me to look at your purse," he said in a low, almost inaudible, voice.
  • Yes, yes," he said, growing suddenly pale, and added, "Look at it, young man."
  • He stretched out his hand to take hold of the purse.
  • "Well, young man?" he said with a sigh, and from under his lifted brows he glanced into Rostov's eyes.
  • "That money is Denisov's; you took it..." he whispered just above Telyanin's ear.
  • He was glad, and at the same instant began to pity the miserable man who stood before him, but the task he had begun had to be completed.
  • He was glad, and at the same instant began to pity the miserable man who stood before him, but the task he had begun had to be completed.
  • He threw it on the table.
  • But at the door he stopped and then retraced his steps.
  • "If you need it, take the money," and he threw the purse to him and ran out of the inn.
  • He told me I lied, and I told him he lied.
  • He may keep me on duty every day, or may place me under arrest, but no one can make me apologize, because if he, as commander of this regiment, thinks it beneath his dignity to give me satisfaction, then...
  • He may keep me on duty every day, or may place me under arrest, but no one can make me apologize, because if he, as commander of this regiment, thinks it beneath his dignity to give me satisfaction, then...
  • He answered the staff captain's question by a disapproving shake of his head.
  • He did not shut me up, he said I was telling an untruth.
  • He did not shut me up, he said I was telling an untruth.
  • And Bogdanich was a brick: he told you you were saying what was not true.
  • Whatever Bogdanich may be, anyway he is an honorable and brave old colonel!
  • "And what has become of that scoundrel?" he asked Denisov.
  • "He has weported himself sick, he's to be stwuck off the list tomowwow," muttered Denisov.
  • They'll ransack that castle, he remarked with evident approval.
  • "No, but what I should like," added he, munching a pie in his moist-lipped handsome mouth, "would be to slip in over there."
  • He pointed with a smile to a turreted nunnery, and his eyes narrowed and gleamed.
  • "Would not your excellency like a little refreshment?" he said.
  • "I'll really call in on the nuns," he said to the officers who watched him smilingly, and he rode off by the winding path down the hill.
  • He looked back laughing to the Cossack who stood a few steps behind him holding two horses by their bridles.
  • Each time Prince Nesvitski tried to move on, soldiers and carts pushed him back again and pressed him against the railings, and all he could do was to smile.
  • And he also passed on with the wagon.
  • "And then, old fellow, he gives him one in the teeth with the butt end of his gun..." a soldier whose greatcoat was well tucked up said gaily, with a wide swing of his arm.
  • He just sends a ball and they think they'll all be killed, a sergeant was saying angrily and reproachfully.
  • I did, 'pon my word, I got that frightened! said he, as if bragging of having been frightened.
  • "Where are you going?" asked an infantry officer who was eating an apple, also half smiling as he looked at the handsome girl.
  • The German closed his eyes, signifying that he did not understand.
  • It'll be worse if he fires the bridge.
  • "Hey, Cossack, my horse!" he said.
  • With great difficulty he managed to get to his horse, and shouting continually he moved on.
  • "Tell these devils, these fiends, to let me pass!" shouted Denisov evidently in a fit of rage, his coal-black eyes with their bloodshot whites glittering and rolling as he waved his sheathed saber in a small bare hand as red as his face.
  • I'll hack you with my saber! he shouted, actually drawing his saber from its scabbard and flourishing it.
  • Beside the bridge Nesvitski found the colonel to whom he had to deliver the order, and having done this he rode back.
  • Carelessly holding in his stallion that was neighing and pawing the ground, eager to rejoin its fellows, he watched his squadron draw nearer.
  • He was glancing at everyone with a clear, bright expression, as if asking them to notice how calmly he sat under fire.
  • He was glancing at everyone with a clear, bright expression, as if asking them to notice how calmly he sat under fire.
  • The black, hairy, snub-nosed face of Vaska Denisov, and his whole short sturdy figure with the sinewy hairy hand and stumpy fingers in which he held the hilt of his naked saber, looked just as it usually did, especially toward evening when he had emptied his second bottle; he was only redder than usual.
  • With his shaggy head thrown back like birds when they drink, pressing his spurs mercilessly into the sides of his good horse, Bedouin, and sitting as though falling backwards in the saddle, he galloped to the other flank of the squadron and shouted in a hoarse voice to the men to look to their pistols.
  • He rode up to Kirsten.
  • "Well, what about it?" said he to Denisov.
  • "Ah, Wostov," he cried noticing the cadet's bright face, "you've got it at last."
  • And he smiled approvingly, evidently pleased with the cadet.
  • It seemed to Rostov that Bogdanich was only pretending not to notice him, and that his whole aim now was to test the cadet's courage, so he drew himself up and looked around him merrily; then it seemed to him that Bogdanich rode so near in order to show him his courage.
  • Next he thought that his enemy would send the squadron on a desperate attack just to punish him--Rostov.
  • Then he imagined how, after the attack, Bogdanich would come up to him as he lay wounded and would magnanimously extend the hand of reconciliation.
  • The high-shouldered figure of Zherkov, familiar to the Pavlograds as he had but recently left their regiment, rode up to the colonel.
  • After his dismissal from headquarters Zherkov had not remained in the regiment, saying he was not such a fool as to slave at the front when he could get more rewards by doing nothing on the staff, and had succeeded in attaching himself as an orderly officer to Prince Bagration.
  • He now came to his former chief with an order from the commander of the rear guard.
  • "How's this, Colonel?" he shouted as he approached.
  • "You spoke to me of inflammable material," said he, "but you said nothing about firing it."
  • "How did you get here?" said he, turning to Zherkov.
  • The colonel looked silently at the officer of the suite, at the stout staff officer, and at Zherkov, and he frowned.
  • "I will the bridge fire," he said in a solemn tone as if to announce that in spite of all the unpleasantness he had to endure he would still do the right thing.
  • He wishes to test me!
  • "Let him see whether I am a coward!" he thought.
  • Rostov no longer looked at the colonel, he had no time.
  • He was afraid of falling behind the hussars, so much afraid that his heart stood still.
  • His hand trembled as he gave his horse into an orderly's charge, and he felt the blood rush to his heart with a thud.
  • Rostov did not think what this call for stretchers meant; he ran on, trying only to be ahead of the others; but just at the bridge, not looking at the ground, he came on some sticky, trodden mud, stumbled, and fell on his hands.
  • "At boss zides, Captain," he heard the voice of the colonel, who, having ridden ahead, had pulled up his horse near the bridge, with a triumphant, cheerful face.
  • Rostov wiping his muddy hands on his breeches looked at his enemy and was about to run on, thinking that the farther he went to the front the better.
  • Come back, Cadet! he cried angrily; and turning to Denisov, who, showing off his courage, had ridden on to the planks of the bridge:
  • You should dismount, he said.
  • "He shouldn't have taken so many men," said the officer of the suite.
  • But now, even if they do get peppered, the squadron may be recommended for honors and he may get a ribbon.
  • He pointed to the French guns, the limbers of which were being detached and hurriedly removed.
  • He stood looking about him, when suddenly he heard a rattle on the bridge as if nuts were being spilt, and the hussar nearest to him fell against the rails with a groan.
  • He stood looking about him, when suddenly he heard a rattle on the bridge as if nuts were being spilt, and the hussar nearest to him fell against the rails with a groan.
  • For Christ's sake let me alone! cried the wounded man, but still he was lifted and laid on the stretcher.
  • "Was that grapeshot?" he asked Denisov.
  • And if he asks about the losses?
  • On the thirtieth he attacked Mortier's division, which was on the left bank, and broke it up.
  • As a mark of the commander-in-chief's special favor he was sent with the news of this victory to the Austrian court, now no longer at Vienna (which was threatened by the French) but at Brunn.
  • Despite his apparently delicate build Prince Andrew could endure physical fatigue far better than many very muscular men, and on the night of the battle, having arrived at Krems excited but not weary, with dispatches from Dokhturov to Kutuzov, he was sent immediately with a special dispatch to Brunn.
  • As soon as he closed his eyes his ears seemed filled with the rattle of the wheels and the sensation of victory.
  • Then he began to imagine that the Russians were running away and that he himself was killed, but he quickly roused himself with a feeling of joy, as if learning afresh that this was not so but that on the contrary the French had run away.
  • He again recalled all the details of the victory and his own calm courage during the battle, and feeling reassured he dozed off....
  • He again recalled all the details of the victory and his own calm courage during the battle, and feeling reassured he dozed off....
  • At one of the post stations he overtook a convoy of Russian wounded.
  • Some of them were talking (he heard Russian words), others were eating bread; the more severely wounded looked silently, with the languid interest of sick children, at the envoy hurrying past them.
  • "That's for them all," he said to the officer who came up.
  • "Get well soon, lads!" he continued, turning to the soldiers.
  • Go on! he shouted to the driver, and they galloped on.
  • Despite his rapid journey and sleepless night, Prince Andrew when he drove up to the palace felt even more vigorous and alert than he had done the day before.
  • He again vividly recalled the details of the battle, no longer dim, but definite and in the concise form in which he imagined himself stating them to the Emperor Francis.
  • He again vividly recalled the details of the battle, no longer dim, but definite and in the concise form in which he imagined himself stating them to the Emperor Francis.
  • He vividly imagined the casual questions that might be put to him and the answers he would give.
  • He vividly imagined the casual questions that might be put to him and the answers he would give.
  • He expected to be at once presented to the Emperor.
  • At the chief entrance to the palace, however, an official came running out to meet him, and learning that he was a special messenger led him to another entrance.
  • He will conduct you to the Minister of War.
  • Five minutes later he returned and bowing with particular courtesy ushered Prince Andrew before him along a corridor to the cabinet where the Minister of War was at work.
  • Prince Andrew's joyous feeling was considerably weakened as he approached the door of the minister's room.
  • "Away from the smell of powder, they probably think it easy to gain victories!" he thought.
  • He went on reading to the end, without raising his eyes at the opening of the door and the sound of footsteps.
  • "Take this and deliver it," said he to his adjutant, handing him the papers and still taking no notice of the special messenger.
  • "But that is a matter of perfect indifference to me," he thought.
  • He had an intellectual and distinctive head, but the instant he turned to Prince Andrew the firm, intelligent expression on his face changed in a way evidently deliberate and habitual to him.
  • He had an intellectual and distinctive head, but the instant he turned to Prince Andrew the firm, intelligent expression on his face changed in a way evidently deliberate and habitual to him.
  • "From General Field Marshal Kutuzov?" he asked.
  • He took the dispatch which was addressed to him and began to read it with a mournful expression.
  • Schmidt! he exclaimed in German.
  • Having glanced through the dispatch he laid it on the table and looked at Prince Andrew, evidently considering something.
  • The stupid smile, which had left his face while he was speaking, reappeared.
  • His Majesty will probably desire to see you, he added, bowing his head.
  • I could not have a more welcome visitor, said Bilibin as he came out to meet Prince Andrew.
  • Besides it was pleasant, after his reception by the Austrians, to speak if not in Russian (for they were speaking French) at least with a Russian who would, he supposed, share the general Russian antipathy to the Austrians which was then particularly strong.
  • He was not one of those many diplomats who are esteemed because they have certain negative qualities, avoid doing certain things, and speak French.
  • He was one of those, who, liking work, knew how to do it, and despite his indolence would sometimes spend a whole night at his writing table.
  • He worked well whatever the import of his work.
  • What the diplomatic matter might be he did not care, but it gave him great pleasure to prepare a circular, memorandum, or report, skillfully, pointedly, and elegantly.
  • Bilibin's services were valued not only for what he wrote, but also for his skill in dealing and conversing with those in the highest spheres.
  • Bilibin liked conversation as he liked work, only when it could be made elegantly witty.
  • In society he always awaited an opportunity to say something striking and took part in a conversation only when that was possible.
  • "They received me and my news as one receives a dog in a game of skittles," said he in conclusion.
  • He looked straight at Prince Andrew and suddenly unwrinkled his forehead.
  • After the fatigues and impressions of the journey, his reception, and especially after having dined, Bolkonski felt that he could not take in the full significance of the words he heard.
  • We heard reports that Prince Auersperg was defending Vienna? he said.
  • "Buonaparte?" said Bilibin inquiringly, puckering up his forehead to indicate that he was about to say something witty.
  • When Prince Andrew reached the room prepared for him and lay down in a clean shirt on the feather bed with its warmed and fragrant pillows, he felt that the battle of which he had brought tidings was far, far away from him.
  • "Yes, that all happened!" he said, and, smiling happily to himself like a child, he fell into a deep, youthful slumber.
  • Next day he woke late.
  • Recalling his recent impressions, the first thought that came into his mind was that today he had to be presented to the Emperor Francis; he remembered the Minister of War, the polite Austrian adjutant, Bilibin, and last night's conversation.
  • Having dressed for his attendance at court in full parade uniform, which he had not worn for a long time, he went into Bilibin's study fresh, animated, and handsome, with his hand bandaged.
  • "But the best of it was," said one, telling of the misfortune of a fellow diplomat, "that the Chancellor told him flatly that his appointment to London was a promotion and that he was so to regard it.
  • Can you fancy the figure he cut?...
  • He began to laugh.
  • "Tell me about that!" he said.
  • Kuragin is exquisite when he discusses politics--you should see his gravity!
  • He sat down beside Hippolyte and wrinkling his forehead began talking to him about politics.
  • "Wait, I have not finished..." he said to Prince Andrew, seizing him by the arm, "I believe that intervention will be stronger than nonintervention.
  • And he released Bolkonski's arm to indicate that he had now quite finished.
  • He was evidently distressed, and breathed painfully, but could not restrain the wild laughter that convulsed his usually impassive features.
  • He has a passion for giving audiences, but he does not like talking himself and can't do it, as you will see.
  • He has a passion for giving audiences, but he does not like talking himself and can't do it, as you will see.
  • But after it was over, the adjutant he had seen the previous day ceremoniously informed Bolkonski that the Emperor desired to give him an audience.
  • "Tell me, when did the battle begin?" he asked hurriedly.
  • When had he left Krems? and so on.
  • "I cannot inform Your Majesty at what o'clock the battle began at the front, but at Durrenstein, where I was, our attack began after five in the afternoon," replied Bolkonski growing more animated and expecting that he would have a chance to give a reliable account, which he had ready in his mind, of all he knew and had seen.
  • Everywhere he saw friendly looks and heard friendly words.
  • He did not know whom to answer, and for a few seconds collected his thoughts.
  • Contrary to Bilibin's forecast the news he had brought was joyfully received.
  • Between four and five in the afternoon, having made all his calls, he was returning to Bilibin's house thinking out a letter to his father about the battle and his visit to Brunn.
  • At the door he found a vehicle half full of luggage.
  • "What is it?" he asked.
  • This news grieved him and yet he was pleased.
  • Listening to Bilibin he was already imagining how on reaching the army he would give an opinion at the war council which would be the only one that could save the army, and how he alone would be entrusted with the executing of the plan.
  • "Stop this jesting," he said.
  • He lets them enter the tête-de-pont. * They spin him a thousand gasconades, saying that the war is over, that the Emperor Francis is arranging a meeting with Bonaparte, that they desire to see Prince Auersperg, and so on.
  • But what is best of all," he went on, his excitement subsiding under the delightful interest of his own story, "is that the sergeant in charge of the cannon which was to give the signal to fire the mines and blow up the bridge, this sergeant, seeing that the French troops were running onto the bridge, was about to fire, but Lannes stayed his hand.
  • Murat, seeing that all is lost if the sergeant is allowed to speak, turns to Auersperg with feigned astonishment (he is a true Gascon) and says: 'I don't recognize the world-famous Austrian discipline, if you allow a subordinate to address you like that!'
  • "It's not treachery nor rascality nor stupidity: it is just as at Ulm... it is..."--he seemed to be trying to find the right expression.
  • We are Macked), he concluded, feeling that he had produced a good epigram, a fresh one that would be repeated.
  • His hitherto puckered brow became smooth as a sign of pleasure, and with a slight smile he began to examine his nails.
  • "Where are you off to?" he said suddenly to Prince Andrew who had risen and was going toward his room.
  • That same night, having taken leave of the Minister of War, Bolkonski set off to rejoin the army, not knowing where he would find it and fearing to be captured by the French on the way to Krems.
  • Very sinister reports of the position of the army reached him as he went along, and the appearance of the troops in their disorderly flight confirmed these rumors.
  • "And should there be nothing left but to die?" he thought.
  • Wishing to find out where the commander-in-chief was, he rode up to a convoy.
  • Prince Andrew saw that the officer was in that state of senseless, tipsy rage when a man does not know what he is saying.
  • He saw that his championship of the doctor's wife in her queer trap might expose him to what he dreaded more than anything in the world--to ridicule; but his instinct urged him on.
  • He saw that his championship of the doctor's wife in her queer trap might expose him to what he dreaded more than anything in the world--to ridicule; but his instinct urged him on.
  • "It's all the fault of these fellows on the staff that there's this disorder," he muttered.
  • On reaching the village he dismounted and went to the nearest house, intending to rest if but for a moment, eat something, and try to sort out the stinging and tormenting thoughts that confused his mind.
  • "This is a mob of scoundrels and not an army," he was thinking as he went up to the window of the first house, when a familiar voice called him by name.
  • Nesvitski, moving his moist lips as he chewed something, and flourishing his arm, called him to enter.
  • Come quick... he shouted.
  • They hastily turned round to him asking if he had any news.
  • On their familiar faces he read agitation and alarm.
  • You must be ill to shiver like that, he added, noticing that Prince Andrew winced as at an electric shock.
  • He had just remembered his recent encounter with the doctor's wife and the convoy officer.
  • "What is the commander-in-chief doing here?" he asked.
  • Kutuzov himself, he was told, was in the house with Prince Bagration and Weyrother.
  • Kozlovski's face looked worn--he too had evidently not slept all night.
  • He glanced at Prince Andrew and did not even nod to him.
  • "Second line... have you written it?" he continued dictating to the clerk.
  • He turned to Kozlovski with urgent questions.
  • Just as he was going to open it the sounds ceased, the door opened, and Kutuzov with his eagle nose and puffy face appeared in the doorway.
  • He looked straight at his adjutant's face without recognizing him.
  • "Well, have you finished?" said he to Kozlovski.
  • "Well, good-by, Prince," said he to Bagration.
  • With his left hand he drew Bagration toward him, and with his right, on which he wore a ring, he made the sign of the cross over him with a gesture evidently habitual, offering his puffy cheek, but Bagration kissed him on the neck instead.
  • "Get in with me," said he to Bolkonski.
  • "Get in," said Kutuzov, and noticing that Bolkonski still delayed, he added: "I need good officers myself, need them myself!"
  • "If a tenth part of his detachment returns I shall thank God," he added as if speaking to himself.
  • "Yes, he has a right to speak so calmly of those men's death," thought Bolkonski.
  • "That is why I beg to be sent to that detachment," he said.
  • Five minutes later, gently swaying on the soft springs of the carriage, he turned to Prince Andrew.
  • On November 1 Kutuzov had received, through a spy, news that the army he commanded was in an almost hopeless position.
  • If Kutuzov decided to remain at Krems, Napoleon's army of one hundred and fifty thousand men would cut him off completely and surround his exhausted army of forty thousand, and he would find himself in the position of Mack at Ulm.
  • If Kutuzov decided to retreat along the road from Krems to Olmutz, to unite with the troops arriving from Russia, he risked being forestalled on that road by the French who had crossed the Vienna bridge, and encumbered by his baggage and transport, having to accept battle on the march against an enemy three times as strong, who would hem him in from two sides.
  • The night he received the news, Kutuzov sent Bagration's vanguard, four thousand strong, to the right across the hills from the Krems-Znaim to the Vienna-Znaim road.
  • Bagration was to make this march without resting, and to halt facing Vienna with Znaim to his rear, and if he succeeded in forestalling the French he was to delay them as long as possible.
  • Kutuzov with his transport had still to march for some days before he could reach Znaim.
  • Meeting Bagration's weak detachment on the Znaim road he supposed it to be Kutuzov's whole army.
  • To be able to crush it absolutely he awaited the arrival of the rest of the troops who were on their way from Vienna, and with this object offered a three days' truce on condition that both armies should remain in position without moving.
  • Bagration replied that he was not authorized either to accept or refuse a truce and sent his adjutant to Kutuzov to report the offer he had received.
  • On receiving the news he immediately dispatched Adjutant General Wintzingerode, who was in attendance on him, to the enemy camp.
  • As soon as Bonaparte (who was at Schonbrunn, sixteen miles from Hollabrunn) received Murat's dispatch with the proposal of a truce and a capitulation, he detected a ruse and wrote the following letter to Murat:
  • "If he is one of the ordinary little staff dandies sent to earn a medal he can get his reward just as well in the rearguard, but if he wishes to stay with me, let him... he'll be of use here if he's a brave officer," thought Bagration.
  • Prince Andrew, without replying, asked the prince's permission to ride round the position to see the disposition of the forces, so as to know his bearings should he be sent to execute an order.
  • The officer on duty was a handsome, elegantly dressed man with a diamond ring on his forefinger.
  • And there," he pointed to a sutler's tent, "they crowd in and sit.
  • Now you, Captain, and he turned to a thin, dirty little artillery officer who without his boots (he had given them to the canteen keeper to dry), in only his stockings, rose when they entered, smiling not altogether comfortably.
  • "Well, aren't you ashamed of yourself, Captain Tushin?" he continued.
  • "Kindly return to your posts, gentlemen, all of you, all!" he added in a tone of command.
  • Prince Andrew smiled involuntarily as he looked at the artillery officer Tushin, who silent and smiling, shifting from one stockinged foot to the other, glanced inquiringly with his large, intelligent, kindly eyes from Prince Andrew to the staff officer.
  • But before he had finished he felt that his jest was unacceptable and had not come off.
  • The farther forward and nearer the enemy he went, the more orderly and cheerful were the troops.
  • It's a shame for a soldier to steal; a soldier must be honest, honorable, and brave, but if he robs his fellows there is no honor in him, he's a scoundrel.
  • A young officer with a bewildered and pained expression on his face stepped away from the man and looked round inquiringly at the adjutant as he rode by.
  • Prince Andrew recognized him and stopped to listen to what he was saying.
  • * "What's he singing about?"
  • The Emperor will teach your Suvara as he has taught the others...
  • He is the Emperor!
  • Sacre nom...! cried he angrily.
  • "Let us go, Ivan Lukich," he said to the captain.
  • Here he dismounted, and stopped beside the farthest of the four unlimbered cannon.
  • Before the guns an artillery sentry was pacing up and down; he stood at attention when the officer arrived, but at a sign resumed his measured, monotonous pacing.
  • He made some notes on two points, intending to mention them to Bagration.
  • He imagined only important possibilities: "If the enemy attacks the right flank," he said to himself, "the Kiev grenadiers and the Podolsk chasseurs must hold their position till reserves from the center come up.
  • He imagined only important possibilities: "If the enemy attacks the right flank," he said to himself, "the Kiev grenadiers and the Podolsk chasseurs must hold their position till reserves from the center come up.
  • Suddenly, however, he was struck by a voice coming from the shed, and its tone was so sincere that he could not but listen.
  • "Yes, one is afraid," continued the first speaker, he of the familiar voice.
  • He recognized the agreeable, philosophizing voice with pleasure.
  • He did not finish.
  • His eyes ran rapidly over the wide space, but he only saw that the hitherto motionless masses of the French now swayed and that there really was a battery to their left.
  • He heard the cannonade behind him growing louder and more frequent.
  • Before he had reached the embankments that were being thrown up, he saw, in the light of the dull autumn evening, mounted men coming toward him.
  • He still looked ahead while Prince Andrew told him what he had seen.
  • He still looked ahead while Prince Andrew told him what he had seen.
  • Prince Andrew gazed with anxious curiosity at that impassive face and wished he could tell what, if anything, this man was thinking and feeling at that moment.
  • Prince Andrew asked himself as he looked.
  • However, he put his horse to a trot in the direction of Tushin's battery.
  • "He wants to see a battle," said Zherkov to Bolkonski, pointing to the accountant, "but he feels a pain in the pit of his stomach already."
  • "He wants to see a battle," said Zherkov to Bolkonski, pointing to the accountant, "but he feels a pain in the pit of his stomach already."
  • "Oh, leave off!" said the accountant with a beaming but rather cunning smile, as if flattered at being made the subject of Zherkov's joke, and purposely trying to appear stupider than he really was.
  • He seemed to swell with satisfaction.
  • He reined in his horse with the care of a skillful rider and, slightly bending over, disengaged his saber which had caught in his cloak.
  • He asked, "Whose company?" but he really meant, "Are you frightened here?" and the artilleryman understood him.
  • He asked, "Whose company?" but he really meant, "Are you frightened here?" and the artilleryman understood him.
  • As he approached, a ringing shot issued from it deafening him and his suite, and in the smoke that suddenly surrounded the gun they could see the gunners who had seized it straining to roll it quickly back to its former position.
  • "Lift it two lines more and it will be just right," cried he in a feeble voice to which he tried to impart a dashing note, ill-suited to his weak figure.
  • "Number Two!" he squeaked.
  • No one had given Tushin orders where and at what to fire, but after consulting his sergeant major, Zakharchenko, for whom he had great respect, he had decided that it would be a good thing to set fire to the village.
  • He rode off at a walk to the right and sent an adjutant to the dragoons with orders to attack the French.
  • Prince Andrew listened attentively to Bagration's colloquies with the commanding officers and the orders he gave them and, to his surprise, found that no orders were really given, but that Prince Bagration tried to make it appear that everything done by necessity, by accident, or by the will of subordinate commanders was done, if not by his direct command, at least in accord with his intentions.
  • All he knew was that at the commencement of the action balls and shells began flying all over his regiment and hitting men and that afterwards someone had shouted "Cavalry!" and our men had begun firing.
  • Prince Bagration bowed his head as a sign that this was exactly what he had desired and expected.
  • Turning to his adjutant he ordered him to bring down the two battalions of the Sixth Chasseurs whom they had just passed.
  • "Please, your excellency, for God's sake!" he kept saying, glancing for support at an officer of the suite who turned away from him.
  • "There, you see!" and he drew attention to the bullets whistling, singing, and hissing continually around them.
  • He spoke as if those bullets could not kill him, and his half-closed eyes gave still more persuasiveness to his words.
  • The staff officer joined in the colonel's appeals, but Bagration did not reply; he only gave an order to cease firing and re-form, so as to give room for the two approaching battalions.
  • While he was speaking, the curtain of smoke that had concealed the hollow, driven by a rising wind, began to move from right to left as if drawn by an invisible hand, and the hill opposite, with the French moving about on it, opened out before them.
  • At that moment he was clearly thinking of nothing but how dashing a fellow he would appear as he passed the commander.
  • He carried close to his leg a narrow unsheathed sword (small, curved, and not like a real weapon) and looked now at the superior officers and now back at the men without losing step, his whole powerful body turning flexibly.
  • It was as if all the powers of his soul were concentrated on passing the commander in the best possible manner, and feeling that he was doing it well he was happy.
  • A morose soldier marching on the left turned his eyes on Bagration as he shouted, with an expression that seemed to say: "We know that ourselves!"
  • He gave the reins to a Cossack, took off and handed over his felt coat, stretched his legs, and set his cap straight.
  • (He distinctly saw an old French officer who, with gaitered legs and turned-out toes, climbed the hill with difficulty.)
  • But no sooner had he left Bagration than his courage failed him.
  • He was seized by panic and could not go where it was dangerous.
  • Having reached the left flank, instead of going to the front where the firing was, he began to look for the general and his staff where they could not possibly be, and so did not deliver the order.
  • "He higher iss dan I in rank," said the German colonel of the hussars, flushing and addressing an adjutant who had ridden up, "so let him do what he vill, but I cannot sacrifice my hussars...
  • "He higher iss dan I in rank," said the German colonel of the hussars, flushing and addressing an adjutant who had ridden up, "so let him do what he vill, but I cannot sacrifice my hussars...
  • I beg of you, I beg of you," he repeated, "to occupy the position and prepare for an attack."
  • "If only they would be quick!" thought Rostov, feeling that at last the time had come to experience the joy of an attack of which he had so often heard from his fellow hussars.
  • Before him, on the right, Rostov saw the front lines of his hussars and still farther ahead a dark line which he could not see distinctly but took to be the enemy.
  • "Faster!" came the word of command, and Rostov felt Rook's flanks drooping as he broke into a gallop.
  • He had noticed a solitary tree ahead of him.
  • "Let anyone come my way now," thought Rostov driving his spurs into Rook and letting him go at a full gallop so that he outstripped the others.
  • From behind him Bondarchuk, an hussar he knew, jolted against him and looked angrily at him.
  • He was alone in the middle of a field.
  • Instead of the moving horses and hussars' backs, he saw nothing before him but the motionless earth and the stubble around him.
  • Blood was flowing from his head; he struggled but could not rise.
  • Where our men were, and where the French, he did not know.
  • Having disentangled his leg, he rose.
  • "Where, on which side, was now the line that had so sharply divided the two armies?" he asked himself and could not answer.
  • "Can something bad have happened to me?" he wondered as he got up: and at that moment he felt that something superfluous was hanging on his benumbed left arm.
  • He examined his hand carefully, vainly trying to find blood on it.
  • "Ah, here are people coming," he thought joyfully, seeing some men running toward him.
  • He was being held by the arms and his horse was being led behind him.
  • He remembered his mother's love for him, and his family's, and his friends', and the enemy's intention to kill him seemed impossible.
  • For more than ten seconds he stood not moving from the spot or realizing the situation.
  • He seized his pistol and, instead of firing it, flung it at the Frenchman and ran with all his might toward the bushes.
  • He did not now run with the feeling of doubt and conflict with which he had trodden the Enns bridge, but with the feeling of a hare fleeing from the hounds.
  • He did not now run with the feeling of doubt and conflict with which he had trodden the Enns bridge, but with the feeling of a hare fleeing from the hounds.
  • Rapidly leaping the furrows, he fled across the field with the impetuosity he used to show at catchplay, now and then turning his good-natured, pale, young face to look back.
  • A shudder of terror went through him: "No, better not look," he thought, but having reached the bushes he glanced round once more.
  • The French had fallen behind, and just as he looked round the first man changed his run to a walk and, turning, shouted something loudly to a comrade farther back.
  • He could run no more.
  • He mustered his last remaining strength, took hold of his left hand with his right, and reached the bushes.
  • The man was wearing a bluish coat of broadcloth, he had no knapsack or cap, his head was bandaged, and over his shoulder a French munition pouch was slung.
  • He had an officer's sword in his hand.
  • Though the commander was occupied in giving instructions to Major Ekonomov, he could not help taking notice of the soldier.
  • But Dolokhov did not go away; he untied the handkerchief around his head, pulled it off, and showed the blood congealed on his hair.
  • "Smack at 'em, lads!" he kept saying, seizing the guns by the wheels and working the screws himself.
  • Only when a man was killed or wounded did he frown and turn away from the sight, shouting angrily at the men who, as is always the case, hesitated about lifting the injured or dead.
  • Owing to the terrible uproar and the necessity for concentration and activity, Tushin did not experience the slightest unpleasant sense of fear, and the thought that he might be killed or badly wounded never occurred to him.
  • On the contrary, he became more and more elated.
  • It seemed to him that it was a very long time ago, almost a day, since he had first seen the enemy and fired the first shot, and that the corner of the field he stood on was well-known and familiar ground.
  • Though he thought of everything, considered everything, and did everything the best of officers could do in his position, he was in a state akin to feverish delirium or drunkenness.
  • "Nothing... only a shell..." he answered.
  • "Come along, our Matvevna!" he said to himself.
  • He listened intently to the ebb and flow of these sounds.
  • Breathing again, breathing! he muttered to himself.
  • He imagined himself as an enormously tall, powerful man who was throwing cannon balls at the French with both hands.
  • "Now then, Matvevna, dear old lady, don't let me down!" he was saying as he moved from the gun, when a strange, unfamiliar voice called above his head: "Captain Tushin!
  • He was shouting in a gasping voice:
  • "I... don't..." he muttered, holding up two fingers to his cap.
  • But the staff officer did not finish what he wanted to say.
  • He turned his horse and galloped off.
  • All to retire! he shouted from a distance.
  • The first thing he saw on riding up to the space where Tushin's guns were stationed was an unharnessed horse with a broken leg, that lay screaming piteously beside the harnessed horses.
  • "I cannot be afraid," thought he, and dismounted slowly among the guns.
  • He delivered the order and did not leave the battery.
  • He decided to have the guns removed from their positions and withdrawn in his presence.
  • Together with Tushin, stepping across the bodies and under a terrible fire from the French, he attended to the removal of the guns.
  • "Well, till we meet again..." he said, holding out his hand to Tushin.
  • Tushin gave no orders, and, silently-- fearing to speak because at every word he felt ready to weep without knowing why--rode behind on his artillery nag.
  • I've hurt my arm, he said timidly.
  • He asked in a hesitating, piteous voice.
  • "Lay a cloak for him to sit on, lad," he said, addressing his favorite soldier.
  • He has been set down.
  • He died, replied someone.
  • With one hand he supported the other; he was pale and his jaw trembled, shivering feverishly.
  • He was placed on "Matvevna," the gun from which they had removed the dead officer.
  • After a while the moving mass became agitated, someone rode past on a white horse followed by his suite, and said something in passing: What did he say?
  • Did he thank us? came eager questions from all sides.
  • Drowsiness was irresistibly mastering him, but he kept awake by an excruciating pain in his arm, for which he could find no satisfactory position.
  • He kept closing his eyes and then again looking at the fire, which seemed to him dazzlingly red, and at the feeble, round-shouldered figure of Tushin who was sitting cross-legged like a Turk beside him.
  • "You don't mind your honor?" he asked Tushin.
  • After he had gone, two soldiers rushed to the campfire.
  • Thanks for the fire--we'll return it with interest, said he, carrying away into the darkness a glowing stick.
  • He is in the hut here, said a gunner, coming up to Tushin.
  • The general had so wished to do this and was so sorry he had not managed to do it that it seemed to him as if it had really happened.
  • He had not seen the hussars all that day, but had heard about them from an infantry officer.
  • Several of those present smiled at Zherkov's words, expecting one of his usual jokes, but noticing that what he was saying redounded to the glory of our arms and of the day's work, they assumed a serious expression, though many of them knew that what he was saying was a lie devoid of any foundation.
  • How was it that two guns were abandoned in the center? he inquired, searching with his eyes for someone.
  • "I think I sent you?" he added, turning to the staff officer on duty.
  • It is true that it was hot there, he added, modestly.
  • As he stepped past the generals in the crowded hut, feeling embarrassed as he always was by the sight of his superiors, he did not notice the staff of the banner and stumbled over it.
  • He was afraid of getting some other officer into trouble, and silently fixed his eyes on Bagration as a schoolboy who has blundered looks at an examiner.
  • "And, if your excellency will allow me to express my opinion," he continued, "we owe today's success chiefly to the action of that battery and the heroic endurance of Captain Tushin and his company," and without awaiting a reply, Prince Andrew rose and left the table.
  • He felt sad and depressed.
  • It was all so strange, so unlike what he had hoped.
  • To rid himself of them he closed his eyes.
  • For a moment he dozed, but in that short interval innumerable things appeared to him in a dream: his mother and her large white hand, Sonya's thin little shoulders, Natasha's eyes and laughter, Denisov with his voice and mustache, and Telyanin and all that affair with Telyanin and Bogdanich.
  • He tried to get away from them, but they would not for an instant let his shoulder move a hair's breadth.
  • He opened his eyes and looked up.
  • He was alone now, except for a soldier who was sitting naked at the other side of the fire, warming his thin yellow body.
  • He sighed and, doing so, groaned involuntarily.
  • He looked at the snowflakes fluttering above the fire and remembered a Russian winter at his warm, bright home, his fluffy fur coat, his quickly gliding sleigh, his healthy body, and all the affection and care of his family.
  • "And why did I come here?" he wondered.
  • Still less did he think of injuring anyone for his own advantage.
  • He was merely a man of the world who had got on and to whom getting on had become a habit.
  • Schemes and devices for which he never rightly accounted to himself, but which formed the whole interest of his life, were constantly shaping themselves in his mind, arising from the circumstances and persons he met.
  • Of these plans he had not merely one or two in his head but dozens, some only beginning to form themselves, some approaching achievement, and some in course of disintegration.
  • Nor did he say to himself: "Pierre is a rich man, I must entice him to marry my daughter and lend me the forty thousand rubles I need."
  • But when he came across a man of position his instinct immediately told him that this man could be useful, and without any premeditation Prince Vasili took the first opportunity to gain his confidence, flatter him, become intimate with him, and finally make his request.
  • He had Pierre at hand in Moscow and procured for him an appointment as Gentleman of the Bedchamber, which at that time conferred the status of Councilor of State, and insisted on the young man accompanying him to Petersburg and staying at his house.
  • Something always drew him toward those richer and more powerful than himself and he had rare skill in seizing the most opportune moment for making use of people.
  • Pierre, on unexpectedly becoming Count Bezukhov and a rich man, felt himself after his recent loneliness and freedom from cares so beset and preoccupied that only in bed was he able to be by himself.
  • He was always hearing such words as: "With your remarkable kindness," or, "With your excellent heart," "You are yourself so honorable Count," or, "Were he as clever as you," and so on, till he began sincerely to believe in his own exceptional kindness and extraordinary intelligence, the more so as in the depth of his heart it had always seemed to him that he really was very kind and intelligent.
  • He was always hearing such words as: "With your remarkable kindness," or, "With your excellent heart," "You are yourself so honorable Count," or, "Were he as clever as you," and so on, till he began sincerely to believe in his own exceptional kindness and extraordinary intelligence, the more so as in the depth of his heart it had always seemed to him that he really was very kind and intelligent.
  • It seemed so natural to Pierre that everyone should like him, and it would have seemed so unnatural had anyone disliked him, that he could not but believe in the sincerity of those around him.
  • Besides, he had no time to ask himself whether these people were sincere or not.
  • He was always busy and always felt in a state of mild and cheerful intoxication.
  • From the death of Count Bezukhov he did not let go his hold of the lad.
  • I was nearly forgetting, he added.
  • Formerly in Anna Pavlovna's presence, Pierre had always felt that what he was saying was out of place, tactless and unsuitable, that remarks which seemed to him clever while they formed in his mind became foolish as soon as he uttered them, while on the contrary Hippolyte's stupidest remarks came out clever and apt.
  • Even if Anna Pavlovna did not say so, he could see that she wished to and only refrained out of regard for his modesty.
  • When he read that sentence, Pierre felt for the first time that some link which other people recognized had grown up between himself and Helene, and that thought both alarmed him, as if some obligation were being imposed on him which he could not fulfill, and pleased him as an entertaining supposition.
  • If he ever thought of Helene, it was just of her beauty and her remarkable skill in appearing silently dignified in society.
  • Pierre was so used to that smile, and it had so little meaning for him, that he paid no attention to it.
  • "That is probably the work of Vinesse," said Pierre, mentioning a celebrated miniaturist, and he leaned over the table to take the snuffbox while trying to hear what was being said at the other table.
  • He half rose, meaning to go round, but the aunt handed him the snuffbox, passing it across Helene's back.
  • He was conscious of the warmth of her body, the scent of perfume, and the creaking of her corset as she moved.
  • He did not see her marble beauty forming a complete whole with her dress, but all the charm of her body only covered by her garments.
  • How and when this would be he did not know, he did not even know if it would be a good thing (he even felt, he knew not why, that it would be a bad thing), but he knew it would happen.
  • And Pierre, anxiously trying to remember whether he had done anything reprehensible, looked round with a blush.
  • It seemed to him that everyone knew what had happened to him as he knew it himself.
  • A little later when he went up to the large circle, Anna Pavlovna said to him: "I hear you are refitting your Petersburg house?"
  • He muttered something and colored.
  • When he got home he could not sleep for a long time for thinking of what had happened.
  • He had merely understood that the woman he had known as a child, of whom when her beauty was mentioned he had said absent-mindedly: "Yes, she's good looking," he had understood that this woman might belong to him.
  • He had merely understood that the woman he had known as a child, of whom when her beauty was mentioned he had said absent-mindedly: "Yes, she's good looking," he had understood that this woman might belong to him.
  • I have myself said she is stupid, he thought.
  • And he again saw her not as the daughter of Prince Vasili, but visualized her whole body only veiled by its gray dress.
  • Why did this thought never occur to me before? and again he told himself that it was impossible, that there would be something unnatural, and as it seemed to him dishonorable, in this marriage.
  • He recalled her former words and looks and the words and looks of those who had seen them together.
  • But at the very time he was expressing this conviction to himself, in another part of his mind her image rose in all its womanly beauty.
  • He had arranged this for himself so as to visit his neglected estates at the same time and pick up his son Anatole where his regiment was stationed, and take him to visit Prince Nicholas Bolkonski in order to arrange a match for him with the daughter of that rich old man.
  • "Youth, frivolity... well, God be with him," thought he, relishing his own goodness of heart, "but it must be brought to a head.
  • I will invite two or three people, and if he does not understand what he ought to do then it will be my affair--yes, my affair.
  • And though Prince Vasili, when he stayed in (as he said) for Pierre's sake, hardly exchanged a couple of words with him, Pierre felt unable to disappoint him.
  • Every day he said to himself one and the same thing: It is time I understood her and made up my mind what she really is.
  • No, she is not stupid, she is an excellent girl," he sometimes said to himself "she never makes a mistake, never says anything stupid.
  • He had often begun to make reflections or think aloud in her company, and she had always answered him either by a brief but appropriate remark--showing that it did not interest her--or by a silent look and smile which more palpably than anything else showed Pierre her superiority.
  • Pierre knew that everyone was waiting for him to say a word and cross a certain line, and he knew that sooner or later he would step across it, but an incomprehensible terror seized him at the thought of that dreadful step.
  • He wished to take a decision, but felt with dismay that in this matter he lacked that strength of will which he had known in himself and really possessed.
  • He wished to take a decision, but felt with dismay that in this matter he lacked that strength of will which he had known in himself and really possessed.
  • Pierre was one of those who are only strong when they feel themselves quite innocent, and since that day when he was overpowered by a feeling of desire while stooping over the snuffbox at Anna Pavlovna's, an unacknowledged sense of the guilt of that desire paralyzed his will.
  • Prince Vasili was not having any supper: he went round the table in a merry mood, sitting down now by one, now by another, of the guests.
  • To each of them he made some careless and agreeable remark except to Pierre and Helene, whose presence he seemed not to notice.
  • He enlivened the whole party.
  • At one end of the table, the old chamberlain was heard assuring an old baroness that he loved her passionately, at which she laughed; at the other could be heard the story of the misfortunes of some Mary Viktorovna or other.
  • "Well, and so he never got farther than: 'Sergey Kuzmich'?" asked one of the ladies.
  • He is such a worthy and excellent man, our dear Vyazmitinov....
  • Prince Vasili mimicked the sobbing of Sergey Kuzmich and at the same time his eyes glanced toward his daughter, and while he laughed the expression on his face clearly said: "Yes... it's getting on, it will all be settled today."
  • Pierre felt that he was the center of it all, and this both pleased and embarrassed him.
  • He was like a man entirely absorbed in some occupation.
  • He did not see, hear, or understand anything clearly.
  • "So it is all finished!" he thought.
  • Or he would suddenly feel ashamed of he knew not what.
  • He felt it awkward to attract everyone's attention and to be considered a lucky man and, with his plain face, to be looked on as a sort of Paris possessed of a Helen.
  • "But no doubt it always is and must be so!" he consoled himself.
  • And here he was sitting by her side as her betrothed, seeing, hearing, feeling her nearness, her breathing, her movements, her beauty.
  • Then it would suddenly seem to him that it was not she but he was so unusually beautiful, and that that was why they all looked so at him, and flattered by this general admiration he would expand his chest, raise his head, and rejoice at his good fortune.
  • Suddenly he heard a familiar voice repeating something to him a second time.
  • But Pierre was so absorbed that he did not understand what was said.
  • It's the truth! and he himself smiled his gentle childlike smile, and Helene smiled too.
  • "Yes, from Olmutz," he answered, with a sigh.
  • The diplomatist preserved a mournful silence as he left the drawing room.
  • He pictured the vanity of his diplomatic career in comparison with Pierre's happiness.
  • "Oh, the old fool," he thought.
  • He had often before, during the last six weeks, remained alone with her, but had never spoken to her of love.
  • Now he felt that it was inevitable, but he could not make up his mind to take the final step.
  • He felt ashamed; he felt that he was occupying someone else's place here beside Helene.
  • He felt ashamed; he felt that he was occupying someone else's place here beside Helene.
  • But, as he had to say something, he began by asking her whether she was satisfied with the party.
  • But then the expression of severity changed, and he drew Pierre's hand downwards, made him sit down, and smiled affectionately.
  • "Well, Lelya?" he asked, turning instantly to his daughter and addressing her with the careless tone of habitual tenderness natural to parents who have petted their children from babyhood, but which Prince Vasili had only acquired by imitating other parents.
  • And he again turned to Pierre.
  • "Sergey Kuzmich--From all sides-" he said, unbuttoning the top button of his waistcoat.
  • Pierre smiled, but his smile showed that he knew it was not the story about Sergey Kuzmich that interested Prince Vasili just then, and Prince Vasili saw that Pierre knew this.
  • He suddenly muttered something and went away.
  • The sight of the discomposure of that old man of the world touched Pierre: he looked at Helene and she too seemed disconcerted, and her look seemed to say: "Well, it is your own fault."
  • "The step must be taken but I cannot, I cannot!" thought Pierre, and he again began speaking about indifferent matters, about Sergey Kuzmich, asking what the point of the story was as he had not heard it properly.
  • He closed his eyes and seemed to be dozing.
  • His head sank forward and then he roused himself.
  • "Aline," he said to his wife, "go and see what they are about."
  • Shaking himself, he rose, threw back his head, and with resolute steps went past the ladies into the little drawing room.
  • With quick steps he went joyfully up to Pierre.
  • "Princess, come here!" he shouted.
  • Pierre was kissed, and he kissed the beautiful Helene's hand several times.
  • "Something special is always said in such cases," he thought, but could not remember what it was that people say.
  • He looked at her face.
  • He was about to stoop over her hand and kiss it, but with a rapid, almost brutal movement of her head, she intercepted his lips and met them with her own.
  • Old Prince Nicholas Bolkonski received a letter from Prince Vasili in November, 1805, announcing that he and his son would be paying him a visit.
  • A fortnight after the letter Prince Vasili's servants came one evening in advance of him, and he and his son arrived next day.
  • And now, from the hints contained in his letter and given by the little princess, he saw which way the wind was blowing, and his low opinion changed into a feeling of contemptuous ill will.
  • He snorted whenever he mentioned him.
  • He snorted whenever he mentioned him.
  • Whether he was in a bad temper because Prince Vasili was coming, or whether his being in a bad temper made him specially annoyed at Prince Vasili's visit, he was in a bad temper, and in the morning Tikhon had already advised the architect not to go to the prince with his report.
  • "Can a sleigh pass?" he asked his overseer, a venerable man, resembling his master in manners and looks, who was accompanying him back to the house.
  • Who gave orders? he said in his shrill, harsh voice.
  • I'll teach you to think! and lifting his stick he swung it and would have hit Alpatych, the overseer, had not the latter instinctively avoided the blow.
  • She thought: "If I seem not to notice he will think that I do not sympathize with him; if I seem sad and out of spirits myself, he will say (as he has done before) that I'm in the dumps."
  • "Fool... or dummy!" he muttered.
  • "Where is the princess?" he asked.
  • His plate seemed to him not quite clean, and pointing to a spot he flung it away.
  • The little princess was not unwell, but had such an overpowering fear of the prince that, hearing he was in a bad humor, she had decided not to appear.
  • (He looked at his blushing daughter.)
  • After dinner, he went to see his daughter-in-law.
  • He left the room and went to the waiting room where Alpatych stood with bowed head.
  • "All right, all right," interrupted the prince, and laughing his unnatural way, he stretched out his hand for Alpatych to kiss, and then proceeded to his study.
  • He was met in the avenue by coachmen and footmen, who, with loud shouts, dragged his sleighs up to one of the lodges over the road purposely laden with snow.
  • Anatole, having taken off his overcoat, sat with arms akimbo before a table on a corner of which he smilingly and absent-mindedly fixed his large and handsome eyes.
  • He regarded his whole life as a continual round of amusement which someone for some reason had to provide for him.
  • All this might, he thought, turn out very well and amusingly.
  • He shaved and scented himself with the care and elegance which had become habitual to him and, his handsome head held high, entered his father's room with the good-humored and victorious air natural to him.
  • Prince Vasili's two valets were busy dressing him, and he looked round with much animation and cheerfully nodded to his son as the latter entered, as if to say: "Yes, that's how I want you to look."
  • "If he starts a row I'll go away," said Prince Anatole.
  • Anatole was not quick-witted, nor ready or eloquent in conversation, but he had the faculty, so invaluable in society, of composure and imperturbable self-possession.
  • It was evident that he could be silent in this way for a very long time.
  • "If anyone finds this silence inconvenient, let him talk, but I don't want to," he seemed to say.
  • It was as if he said to them: I know you, I know you, but why should I bother about you?
  • Perhaps he did not really think this when he met women--even probably he did not, for in general he thought very little--but his looks and manner gave that impression.
  • "And didn't Hippolyte tell you?" asked Prince Vasili, turning to his son and seizing the little princess' arm as if she would have run away and he had just managed to catch her, "didn't he tell you how he himself was pining for the dear princess, and how she showed him the door?
  • Oh, she is a pearl among women, Princess, he added, turning to Princess Mary.
  • She took the liberty of inquiring whether it was long since Anatole had left Paris and how he had liked that city.
  • When he saw the pretty little Bourienne, Anatole came to the conclusion that he would not find Bald Hills dull either.
  • "Not at all bad!" he thought, examining her, "not at all bad, that little companion!
  • The old prince dressed leisurely in his study, frowning and considering what he was to do.
  • What angered him was that the coming of these visitors revived in his mind an unsettled question he always tried to stifle, one about which he always deceived himself.
  • The question was whether he could ever bring himself to part from his daughter and give her to a husband.
  • Life without Princess Mary, little as he seemed to value her, was unthinkable to him.
  • "And why should she marry?" he thought.
  • Prince Vasili had brought his son with the evident intention of proposing, and today or tomorrow he would probably ask for an answer.
  • "Well, I've nothing against it," the prince said to himself, "but he must be worthy of her.
  • That is what we shall see! he added aloud.
  • He entered the drawing room with his usual alert step, glancing rapidly round the company.
  • He noticed the change in the little princess' dress, Mademoiselle Bourienne's ribbon, Princess Mary's unbecoming coiffure, Mademoiselle Bourienne's and Anatole's smiles, and the loneliness of his daughter amid the general conversation.
  • "Got herself up like a fool!" he thought, looking irritably at her.
  • She is shameless, and he ignores her!
  • He went straight up to Prince Vasili.
  • Fine young fellow! he said.
  • "Well, come and kiss me," and he offered his cheek.
  • He seemed to listen attentively to what Prince Vasili said, but kept glancing at Princess Mary.
  • "And so they are writing from Potsdam already?" he said, repeating Prince Vasili's last words.
  • Then rising, he suddenly went up to his daughter.
  • And he sat down again, paying no more attention to his daughter, who was reduced to tears.
  • "You may go," he said to Anatole.
  • He took Prince Vasili's arm and led him to his study.
  • I will ask her tomorrow in your presence; if she is willing, then he can stay on.
  • He can stay and I'll see.
  • "Let her marry, it's all the same to me!" he screamed in the same piercing tone as when parting from his son.
  • Anatole is no genius, but he is an honest, goodhearted lad; an excellent son or kinsman.
  • He seemed to her kind, brave, determined, manly, and magnanimous.
  • I try to be reserved because in the depth of my soul I feel too near to him already, but then he cannot know what I think of him and may imagine that I do not like him.
  • And now he, a real Russian prince, had appeared.
  • He would carry her away and then sa pauvre mere would appear and he would marry her.
  • He would carry her away and then sa pauvre mere would appear and he would marry her.
  • But Anatole's expression, though his eyes were fixed on her, referred not to her but to the movements of Mademoiselle Bourienne's little foot, which he was then touching with his own under the clavichord.
  • Turning from Princess Mary he went up and kissed Mademoiselle Bourienne's hand.
  • They all separated, but, except Anatole who fell asleep as soon as he got into bed, all kept awake a long time that night.
  • "Is he really to be my husband, this stranger who is so kind--yes, kind, that is the chief thing," thought Princess Mary; and fear, which she had seldom experienced, came upon her.
  • And this someone was he--the devil--and he was also this man with the white forehead, black eyebrows, and red lips.
  • The old prince felt as though he had been insulted through his daughter.
  • The insult was the more pointed because it concerned not himself but another, his daughter, whom he loved more than himself.
  • He kept telling himself that he would consider the whole matter and decide what was right and how he should act, but instead of that he only excited himself more and more.
  • He kept telling himself that he would consider the whole matter and decide what was right and how he should act, but instead of that he only excited himself more and more.
  • The old prince knew that if he told his daughter she was making a mistake and that Anatole meant to flirt with Mademoiselle Bourienne, Princess Mary's self-esteem would be wounded and his point (not to be parted from her) would be gained, so pacifying himself with this thought, he called Tikhon and began to undress.
  • "What devil brought them here?" thought he, while Tikhon was putting the nightshirt over his dried-up old body and gray-haired chest.
  • "Devil take 'em!" he muttered, while his head was still covered by the shirt.
  • He guessed that the question referred to Prince Vasili and his son.
  • "No good... no good..." said the prince rapidly, and thrusting his feet into his slippers and his arms into the sleeves of his dressing gown, he went to the couch on which he slept.
  • He came to the point at once, treating her ceremoniously.
  • "I have had a proposition made me concerning you," he said with an unnatural smile.
  • "That's admirable!" he shouted.
  • He will take you with your dowry and take Mademoiselle Bourienne into the bargain.
  • He saw the effect these words had produced on his daughter.
  • "Now then, now then, I'm only joking!" he said.
  • He receives his orders and will marry you or anybody; but you are free to choose....
  • Yes or no, yes or no, yes or no! he still shouted when the princess, as if lost in a fog, had already staggered out of the study.
  • An hour later, Tikhon came to call Princess Mary to the old prince; he added that Prince Vasili was also there.
  • He hurriedly took a pinch of snuff.
  • "Ah, my dear, my dear!" he began, rising and taking her by both hands.
  • He drew back and a real tear appeared in his eye.
  • Reply: yes or no," he shouted, "and then I shall reserve the right to state my opinion also.
  • "Very, very glad to have seen you," repeated he, embracing Prince Vasili.
  • If he is not rich I will give her the means; I will ask my father and Andrew.
  • On receiving it, he ran on tiptoe to his study in alarm and haste, trying to escape notice, closed the door, and began to read the letter.
  • It's not that I don't remember--I know what he is like, but not as I remember Nikolenka.
  • Now that he was already an officer and a wounded hero, would it be right to remind him of herself and, as it might seem, of the obligations to her he had taken on himself?
  • I think if he writes, I will write too, she said, blushing.
  • "It's because she was in love with that fat one in spectacles" (that was how Petya described his namesake, the new Count Bezukhov) "and now she's in love with that singer" (he meant Natasha's Italian singing master), "that's why she's ashamed!"
  • At first he heard the sound of indifferent voices, then Anna Mikhaylovna's voice alone in a long speech, then a cry, then silence, then both voices together with glad intonations, and then footsteps.
  • After a brief description of the campaign and the two battles in which he had taken part, and his promotion, Nicholas said that he kissed his father's and mother's hands asking for their blessing, and that he kissed Vera, Natasha, and Petya.
  • From all he says one should be glad and not cry.
  • As twenty years before, it seemed impossible that the little creature who lived somewhere under her heart would ever cry, suck her breast, and begin to speak, so now she could not believe that that little creature could be this strong, brave man, this model son and officer that, judging by this letter, he now was.
  • About some Denisov or other, though he himself, I dare say, is braver than any of them.
  • He says nothing about his sufferings.
  • And how he has remembered everybody!
  • I always said when he was only so high--I always said....
  • That day Nicholas Rostov received a letter from Boris, telling him that the Ismaylov regiment was quartered for the night ten miles from Olmutz and that he wanted to see him as he had a letter and money for him.
  • On receiving Boris' letter he rode with a fellow officer to Olmutz, dined there, drank a bottle of wine, and then set off alone to the Guards' camp to find his old playmate.
  • He had on a shabby cadet jacket, decorated with a soldier's cross, equally shabby cadet's riding breeches lined with worn leather, and an officer's saber with a sword knot.
  • Boris, during the campaign, had made the acquaintance of many persons who might prove useful to him, and by a letter of recommendation he had brought from Pierre had become acquainted with Prince Andrew Bolkonski, through whom he hoped to obtain a post on the commander-in-chief's staff.
  • Boris, in the accurate way characteristic of him, was building a little pyramid of chessmen with his delicate white fingers while awaiting Berg's move, and watched his opponent's face, evidently thinking about the game as he always thought only of whatever he was engaged on.
  • "Well, how are you going to get out of that?" he remarked.
  • "Here he is at last!" shouted Rostov.
  • Oh, you petisenfans, allay cushay dormir! he exclaimed, imitating his Russian nurse's French, at which he and Boris used to laugh long ago.
  • He was about to embrace his friend, but Nicholas avoided him.
  • He wanted to pinch him, push him, do anything but kiss him--a thing everybody did.
  • "Eh, is she pretty?" he asked with a wink.
  • "I did not expect you today," he added.
  • I did not think he would get it to you so quickly....
  • "As you see," he said.
  • He went to his bed, drew a purse from under the clean pillow, and sent for wine.
  • "Yes, and I have some money and a letter to give you," he added.
  • After reading a few lines, he glanced angrily at Berg, then, meeting his eyes, hid his face behind the letter.
  • Do go somewhere, anywhere... to the devil!" he exclaimed, and immediately seizing him by the shoulder and looking amiably into his face, evidently wishing to soften the rudeness of his words, he added, "Don't be hurt, my dear fellow; you know I speak from my heart as to an old acquaintance."
  • "Oh dear, what a beast I am!" muttered Rostov, as he read the letter.
  • Oh, what a pig I am! he repeated, flushing suddenly.
  • Because when once a man starts on military service, he should try to make as successful a career of it as possible.
  • He looked intently and inquiringly into his friend's eyes, evidently trying in vain to find the answer to some question.
  • He would drink with you.
  • "He is a very, very nice, honest, and pleasant fellow," answered Boris.
  • ("Arnauts" was the Tsarevich's favorite expression when he was in a rage) and called for the company commander.
  • Well, he stormed at me, as the saying is, stormed and stormed and stormed!
  • 'Hey, are you dumb?' he shouted.
  • But Boris noticed that he was preparing to make fun of Berg, and skillfully changed the subject.
  • He asked him to tell them how and where he got his wound.
  • He asked him to tell them how and where he got his wound.
  • This pleased Rostov and he began talking about it, and as he went on became more and more animated.
  • He could not tell them simply that everyone went at a trot and that he fell off his horse and sprained his arm and then ran as hard as he could from a Frenchman into the wood.
  • He could not tell them simply that everyone went at a trot and that he fell off his horse and sprained his arm and then ran as hard as he could from a Frenchman into the wood.
  • His hearers expected a story of how beside himself and all aflame with excitement, he had flown like a storm at the square, cut his way in, slashed right and left, how his saber had tasted flesh and he had fallen exhausted, and so on.
  • And so he told them all that.
  • In the middle of his story, just as he was saying: "You cannot imagine what a strange frenzy one experiences during an attack," Prince Andrew, whom Boris was expecting, entered the room.
  • Prince Andrew, who liked to help young men, was flattered by being asked for his assistance and being well disposed toward Boris, who had managed to please him the day before, he wished to do what the young man wanted.
  • Rostov flushed up on noticing this, but he did not care, this was a mere stranger.
  • Glancing, however, at Boris, he saw that he too seemed ashamed of the hussar of the line.
  • To this Prince Andrew answered with a smile that he could give no opinion on such an important government order, and Berg laughed gaily.
  • "As to your business," Prince Andrew continued, addressing Boris, "we will talk of it later" (and he looked round at Rostov).
  • Au revoir! exclaimed Prince Andrew, and with a bow to them both he went out.
  • Only when Prince Andrew was gone did Rostov think of what he ought to have said.
  • And he was still more angry at having omitted to say it.
  • He ordered his horse at once and, coldly taking leave of Boris, rode home.
  • Should he go to headquarters next day and challenge that affected adjutant, or really let the matter drop, was the question that worried him all the way.
  • He gave the words of greeting, and the first regiment roared "Hurrah!" so deafeningly, continuously, and joyfully that the men themselves were awed by their multitude and the immensity of the power they constituted.
  • Till the Tsar reached it, each regiment in its silence and immobility seemed like a lifeless body, but as soon as he came up it became alive, its thunder joining the roar of the whole line along which he had already passed.
  • He longed to show that love in some way and knowing that this was impossible was ready to cry.
  • How gladly would he have died at once for his Tsar!
  • Rostov too, bending over his saddle, shouted "Hurrah!" with all his might, feeling that he would like to injure himself by that shout, if only to express his rapture fully.
  • The Tsar's foot, in the narrow pointed boot then fashionable, touched the groin of the bobtailed bay mare he rode, his hand in a white glove gathered up the reins, and he moved off accompanied by an irregularly swaying sea of aides-de-camp.
  • Farther and farther he rode away, stopping at other regiments, till at last only his white plumes were visible to Rostov from amid the suites that surrounded the Emperors.
  • "Of course not!" he now thought.
  • "My God, how happy I should be if he ordered me to leap into the fire this instant!" thought Rostov.
  • The day after the review, Boris, in his best uniform and with his comrade Berg's best wishes for success, rode to Olmutz to see Bolkonski, wishing to profit by his friendliness and obtain for himself the best post he could--preferably that of adjutant to some important personage, a position in the army which seemed to him most attractive.
  • He did not find Prince Andrew in Olmutz that day, but the appearance of the town where the headquarters and the diplomatic corps were stationed and the two Emperors were living with their suites, households, and courts only strengthened his desire to belong to that higher world.
  • In spite of this, or rather because of it, next day, November 15, after dinner he again went to Olmutz and, entering the house occupied by Kutuzov, asked for Bolkonski.
  • The one who was writing and whom Boris addressed turned round crossly and told him Bolkonski was on duty and that he should go through the door on the left into the reception room if he wished to see him.
  • Boris thanked him and went to the reception room, where he found some ten officers and generals.
  • When he entered, Prince Andrew, his eyes drooping contemptuously (with that peculiar expression of polite weariness which plainly says, "If it were not my duty I would not talk to you for a moment"), was listening to an old Russian general with decorations, who stood very erect, almost on tiptoe, with a soldier's obsequious expression on his purple face, reporting something.
  • "Very well, then, be so good as to wait," said Prince Andrew to the general, in Russian, speaking with the French intonation he affected when he wished to speak contemptuously, and noticing Boris, Prince Andrew, paying no more heed to the general who ran after him imploring him to hear something more, nodded and turned to him with a cheerful smile.
  • Boris smiled, as if he understood what Prince Andrew was alluding to as something generally known.
  • But it was the first time he had heard Weyrother's name, or even the term "dispositions."
  • He has had a letter from Prince Kuragin about me.
  • I only wanted to ask because I fear the Guards won't be in action, he added as if in apology.
  • While Prince Andrew went to report about the purple-faced general, that gentleman--evidently not sharing Boris' conception of the advantages of the unwritten code of subordination--looked so fixedly at the presumptuous lieutenant who had prevented his finishing what he had to say to the adjutant that Boris felt uncomfortable.
  • He turned away and waited impatiently for Prince Andrew's return from the commander-in- chief's room.
  • He would say a lot of pleasant things, ask you to dinner" ("That would not be bad as regards the unwritten code," thought Boris), "but nothing more would come of it.
  • We shall see whether he cannot attach you to himself or find a place for you somewhere nearer the sun.
  • Prince Andrew always became specially keen when he had to guide a young man and help him to worldly success.
  • Under cover of obtaining help of this kind for another, which from pride he would never accept for himself, he kept in touch with the circle which confers success and which attracted him.
  • He very readily took up Boris' cause and went with him to Dolgorukov.
  • And what did he say? inquired Bolkonski.
  • What can he say?
  • I tell you he is in our hands, that's certain!
  • But what was most amusing," he continued, with a sudden, good-natured laugh, "was that we could not think how to address the reply!
  • He suggested addressing him as 'Usurper and Enemy of Mankind.'
  • He is a wise and clever fellow.
  • My brother knows him, he's dined with him--the present Emperor--more than once in Paris, and tells me he never met a more cunning or subtle diplomatist--you know, a combination of French adroitness and Italian play-acting!
  • Again he pressed the hand of the latter with an expression of good-natured, sincere, and animated levity.
  • Boris was excited by the thought of being so close to the higher powers as he felt himself to be at that moment.
  • He is one of the most remarkable, but to me most unpleasant of men--the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Prince Adam Czartoryski....
  • One of them was leading by the bridle a fine large French horse he had taken from the prisoner.
  • He was breathless with agitation, his face was red, and when he heard some French spoken he at once began speaking to the officers, addressing first one, then another.
  • He was breathless with agitation, his face was red, and when he heard some French spoken he at once began speaking to the officers, addressing first one, then another.
  • And at every word he added: "But don't hurt my little horse!" and stroked the animal.
  • It was plain that he did not quite grasp where he was.
  • He brought with him into our rearguard all the freshness of atmosphere of the French army, which was so alien to us.
  • The Cossacks sold the horse for two gold pieces, and Rostov, being the richest of the officers now that he had received his money, bought it.
  • Rostov did not know or remember how he ran to his place and mounted.
  • He was filled with happiness at his nearness to the Emperor.
  • He felt that this nearness by itself made up to him for the day he had lost.
  • He felt that this nearness by itself made up to him for the day he had lost.
  • He was happy as a lover when the longed-for moment of meeting arrives.
  • Not daring to look round and without looking round, he was ecstatically conscious of his approach.
  • He felt it not only from the sound of the hoofs of the approaching cavalcade, but because as he drew near everything grew brighter, more joyful, more significant, and more festive around him.
  • He felt it not only from the sound of the hoofs of the approaching cavalcade, but because as he drew near everything grew brighter, more joyful, more significant, and more festive around him.
  • "The Pavlograd hussars?" he inquired.
  • Then all at once he raised his eyebrows, abruptly touched his horse with his left foot, and galloped on.
  • Before he came up with the hussars, several adjutants met him with news of the successful result of the action.
  • The Emperor, surrounded by his suite of officers and courtiers, was riding a bobtailed chestnut mare, a different one from that which he had ridden at the review, and bending to one side he gracefully held a gold lorgnette to his eyes and looked at a soldier who lay prone, with blood on his uncovered head.
  • Can't you do it more gently? said the Emperor apparently suffering more than the dying soldier, and he rode away.
  • Rostov saw tears filling the Emperor's eyes and heard him, as he was riding away, say to Czartoryski: What a terrible thing war is: what a terrible thing!
  • "Not 'our Sovereign, the Emperor,' as they say at official dinners," said he, "but the health of our Sovereign, that good, enchanting, and great man!
  • "If we fought before," he said, "not letting the French pass, as at Schon Grabern, what shall we not do now when he is at the front?
  • When the officers had emptied and smashed their glasses, Kirsten filled others and, in shirt sleeves and breeches, went glass in hand to the soldiers' bonfires and with his long gray mustache, his white chest showing under his open shirt, he stood in a majestic pose in the light of the campfire, waving his uplifted arm.
  • Hurrah! he exclaimed in his dashing, old, hussar's baritone.
  • "As there's no one to fall in love with on campaign, he's fallen in love with the Tsar," he said.
  • And Rostov got up and went wandering among the campfires, dreaming of what happiness it would be to die--not in saving the Emperor's life (he did not even dare to dream of that), but simply to die before his eyes.
  • He really was in love with the Tsar and the glory of the Russian arms and the hope of future triumph.
  • And he was not the only man to experience that feeling during those memorable days preceding the battle of Austerlitz: nine tenths of the men in the Russian army were then in love, though less ecstatically, with their Tsar and the glory of the Russian arms.
  • He ate nothing and had slept badly that night, those around him reported.
  • At midday he was admitted to the Emperor, and an hour later he rode off with Prince Dolgorukov to the advanced post of the French army.
  • I won't say he is out of sorts, but I fancy he would like to be heard.
  • But they heard him at the council of war and will hear him when he talks sense, but to temporize and wait for something now when Bonaparte fears nothing so much as a general battle is impossible.
  • How did he impress you?
  • If he weren't afraid of a battle why did he ask for that interview?
  • Believe me, he is afraid, afraid of a general battle.
  • "But tell me, what is he like, eh?" said Prince Andrew again.
  • He is a man in a gray overcoat, very anxious that I should call him 'Your Majesty,' but who, to his chagrin, got no title from me!
  • That's the sort of man he is, and nothing more, replied Dolgorukov, looking round at Bilibin with a smile.
  • "Despite my great respect for old Kutuzov," he continued, "we should be a nice set of fellows if we were to wait about and so give him a chance to escape, or to trick us, now that we certainly have him in our hands!
  • He wished to explain to Dolgorukov a plan of attack he had himself formed.
  • He wished to explain to Dolgorukov a plan of attack he had himself formed.
  • "Oh, that is all the same," Dolgorukov said quickly, and getting up he spread a map on the table.
  • If he is standing before Brunn...
  • "I wish you good luck and success, gentlemen!" he added and went out after shaking hands with Dolgorukov and Bilibin.
  • On the way home, Prince Andrew could not refrain from asking Kutuzov, who was sitting silently beside him, what he thought of tomorrow's battle.
  • What do you think he replied?
  • He was like a horse running downhill harnessed to a heavy cart.
  • Whether he was pulling it or being pushed by it he did not know, but rushed along at headlong speed with no time to consider what this movement might lead to.
  • He was evidently so busy that he even forgot to be polite to the commander in chief.
  • He was evidently so busy that he even forgot to be polite to the commander in chief.
  • He interrupted him, talked rapidly and indistinctly, without looking at the man he was addressing, and did not reply to questions put to him.
  • He interrupted him, talked rapidly and indistinctly, without looking at the man he was addressing, and did not reply to questions put to him.
  • He was bespattered with mud and had a pitiful, weary, and distracted air, though at the same time he was haughty and self-confident.
  • He was bespattered with mud and had a pitiful, weary, and distracted air, though at the same time he was haughty and self-confident.
  • Prince Andrew came in to inform the commander-in-chief of this and, availing himself of permission previously given him by Kutuzov to be present at the council, he remained in the room.
  • At the sound of Weyrother's voice, he opened his one eye with an effort.
  • It is already late, said he, and nodding his head he let it droop and again closed his eye.
  • If at first the members of the council thought that Kutuzov was pretending to sleep, the sounds his nose emitted during the reading that followed proved that the commander-in-chief at that moment was absorbed by a far more serious matter than a desire to show his contempt for the dispositions or anything else--he was engaged in satisfying the irresistible human need for sleep.
  • He really was asleep.
  • Weyrother, with the gesture of a man too busy to lose a moment, glanced at Kutuzov and, having convinced himself that he was asleep, took up a paper and in a loud, monotonous voice began to read out the dispositions for the impending battle, under a heading which he also read out:
  • He remained stubbornly silent, gazing at Weyrother's face, and only turned away his eyes when the Austrian chief of staff finished reading.
  • In the middle of one of the longest sentences, he stopped the rotary motion of the snuffbox, raised his head, and with inimical politeness lurking in the corners of his thin lips interrupted Weyrother, wishing to say something.
  • "A geography lesson!" he muttered as if to himself, but loud enough to be heard.
  • He asked Weyrother several times to repeat words he had not clearly heard and the difficult names of villages.
  • He asked Weyrother several times to repeat words he had not clearly heard and the difficult names of villages.
  • Langeron's objections were valid but it was obvious that their chief aim was to show General Weyrother--who had read his dispositions with as much self-confidence as if he were addressing school children--that he had to do, not with fools, but with men who could teach him something in military matters.
  • He listened to what Langeron said, as if remarking, "So you are still at that silly business!" quickly closed his eye again, and let his head sink still lower.
  • "If he could attack us, he would have done so today," said he.
  • "So you think he is powerless?" said Langeron.
  • "In that case he is inviting his doom by awaiting our attack," said Langeron, with a subtly ironical smile, again glancing round for support to Miloradovich who was near him.
  • "Ma foi!" said he, "tomorrow we shall see all that on the battlefield."
  • Weyrother again gave that smile which seemed to say that to him it was strange and ridiculous to meet objections from Russian generals and to have to prove to them what he had not merely convinced himself of, but had also convinced the sovereign Emperors of.
  • Either he is retreating, which is the only thing we need fear, or he is changing his position.
  • But even if he also took up a position in the Thuerassa, he merely saves us a great deal of trouble and all our arrangements to the minutest detail remain the same.
  • He moved as if to rise.
  • Whether Dolgorukov and Weyrother, or Kutuzov, Langeron, and the others who did not approve of the plan of attack, were right--he did not know.
  • Is it possible that on account of court and personal considerations tens of thousands of lives, and my life, my life," he thought, "must be risked?"
  • "Yes, it is very likely that I shall be killed tomorrow," he thought.
  • And suddenly, at this thought of death, a whole series of most distant, most intimate, memories rose in his imagination: he remembered his last parting from his father and his wife; he remembered the days when he first loved her.
  • He thought of her pregnancy and felt sorry for her and for himself, and in a nervously emotional and softened mood he went out of the hut in which he was billeted with Nesvitski and began to walk up and down before it.
  • He thought of her pregnancy and felt sorry for her and for himself, and in a nervously emotional and softened mood he went out of the hut in which he was billeted with Nesvitski and began to walk up and down before it.
  • "Yes, tomorrow, tomorrow!" he thought.
  • And then that happy moment, that Toulon for which he had so long waited, presents itself to him at last.
  • He firmly and clearly expresses his opinion to Kutuzov, to Weyrother, and to the Emperors.
  • All are struck by the justness of his views, but no one undertakes to carry them out, so he takes a regiment, a division-stipulates that no one is to interfere with his arrangements--leads his division to the decisive point, and gains the victory alone.
  • Nominally he is only an adjutant on Kutuzov's staff, but he does everything alone.
  • Kutuzov is removed and he is appointed...
  • He was saying, "Tit, I say, Tit!"
  • His hussars were placed along the line in couples and he himself rode along the line trying to master the sleepiness that kept coming over him.
  • What if he gave me a place near him?
  • He started and opened his eyes.
  • What a nuisance that our squadron will be in reserve tomorrow, he thought.
  • He readjusted himself in the saddle and touched up his horse to ride once more round his hussars.
  • To the left he saw a sloping descent lit up, and facing it a black knoll that seemed as steep as a wall.
  • He even thought something moved on that white spot.
  • "I expect it's snow... that spot... a spot--une tache," he thought.
  • He was succumbing to irresistible, youthful, childish drowsiness.
  • How he looked at me and wished to say something, but dared not....
  • All at once it seemed to him that he was being fired at.
  • At the moment he opened his eyes he heard in front of him, where the enemy was, the long-drawn shouts of thousands of voices.
  • The din of many voices was too great; all he could hear was: "ahahah!" and "rrrr!"
  • "It may be he or it may be nothing," muttered the hussar.
  • Steady! he cried to his fidgeting horse.
  • L'Empereur! he now heard distinctly.
  • "They can't be far off, probably just beyond the stream," he said to the hussar beside him.
  • He has retreated and ordered the rearguard to kindle fires and make a noise to deceive us.
  • "Well, go and see," he said, after a pause.
  • Having descended the hill at a trot, he no longer saw either our own or the enemy's fires, but heard the shouting of the French more loudly and distinctly.
  • In the valley he saw before him something like a river, but when he reached it he found it was a road.
  • Having come out onto the road he reined in his horse, hesitating whether to ride along it or cross it and ride over the black field up the hillside.
  • "Your honor, there he is!" cried one of the hussars behind him.
  • "What does that prove?" he was saying as Rostov rode up.
  • However far he has walked, whatever strange, unknown, and dangerous places he reaches, just as a sailor is always surrounded by the same decks, masts, and rigging of his ship, so the soldier always has around him the same comrades, the same ranks, the same sergeant major Ivan Mitrich, the same company dog Jack, and the same commanders.
  • Every soldier felt glad to know that to the unknown place where he was going, many more of our men were going too.
  • The general shouted a demand that the cavalry should be halted, the Austrian argued that not he, but the higher command, was to blame.
  • Napoleon, in the blue cloak which he had worn on his Italian campaign, sat on his small gray Arab horse a little in front of his marshals.
  • He gazed silently at the hills which seemed to rise out of the sea of mist and on which the Russian troops were moving in the distance, and he listened to the sounds of firing in the valley.
  • He gazed silently at the hills which seemed to rise out of the sea of mist and on which the Russian troops were moving in the distance, and he listened to the sounds of firing in the valley.
  • Part of the Russian force had already descended into the valley toward the ponds and lakes and part were leaving these Pratzen Heights which he intended to attack and regarded as the key to the position.
  • He saw over the mist that in a hollow between two hills near the village of Pratzen, the Russian columns, their bayonets glittering, were moving continuously in one direction toward the valley and disappearing one after another into the mist.
  • From information he had received the evening before, from the sound of wheels and footsteps heard by the outposts during the night, by the disorderly movement of the Russian columns, and from all indications, he saw clearly that the allies believed him to be far away in front of them, and that the columns moving near Pratzen constituted the center of the Russian army, and that that center was already sufficiently weakened to be successfully attacked.
  • But still he did not begin the engagement.
  • He looked now at the Pratzen Heights, now at the sun floating up out of the mist.
  • When the sun had entirely emerged from the fog, and fields and mist were aglow with dazzling light--as if he had only awaited this to begin the action--he drew the glove from his shapely white hand, made a sign with it to the marshals, and ordered the action to begin.
  • He greeted the men of the foremost regiment and gave them the order to march, thereby indicating that he intended to lead that column himself.
  • He greeted the men of the foremost regiment and gave them the order to march, thereby indicating that he intended to lead that column himself.
  • When he had reached the village of Pratzen he halted.
  • He was in a state of suppressed excitement and irritation, though controlledly calm as a man is at the approach of a long-awaited moment.
  • He was firmly convinced that this was the day of his Toulon, or his bridge of Arcola.
  • How it would come about he did not know, but he felt sure it would do so.
  • He could not look calmly at the standards of the passing battalions.
  • Seeing them he kept thinking, "That may be the very standard with which I shall lead the army."
  • "Do order them to form into battalion columns and go round the village!" he said angrily to a general who had ridden up.
  • Seeing him, Kutuzov's malevolent and caustic expression softened, as if admitting that what was being done was not his adjutant's fault, and still not answering the Austrian adjutant, he addressed Bolkonski.
  • Hardly had Prince Andrew started than he stopped him.
  • What are they doing? he murmured to himself, still not replying to the Austrian.
  • Overtaking the battalions that continued to advance, he stopped the third division and convinced himself that there really were no sharpshooters in front of our columns.
  • He had felt perfectly sure that there were other troops in front of him and that the enemy must be at least six miles away.
  • "All right, all right!" he said to Prince Andrew, and turned to a general who, watch in hand, was saying it was time they started as all the left-flank columns had already descended.
  • "Plenty of time," he repeated.
  • When the soldiers of the regiment in front of which Kutuzov was standing began to shout, he rode a little to one side and looked round with a frown.
  • He put on the air of a subordinate who obeys without reasoning.
  • At the Olmutz review he had seemed more majestic; here he seemed brighter and more energetic.
  • He was slightly flushed after galloping two miles, and reining in his horse he sighed restfully and looked round at the faces of his suite, young and animated as his own.
  • He was slightly flushed after galloping two miles, and reining in his horse he sighed restfully and looked round at the faces of his suite, young and animated as his own.
  • He beckoned to one of his white adjutants and asked some question--"Most likely he is asking at what o'clock they started," thought Prince Andrew, watching his old acquaintance with a smile he could not repress as he recalled his reception at Brunn.
  • He beckoned to one of his white adjutants and asked some question--"Most likely he is asking at what o'clock they started," thought Prince Andrew, watching his old acquaintance with a smile he could not repress as he recalled his reception at Brunn.
  • The Emperor, frowning slightly, bent his ear forward as if he had not quite heard.
  • The Tsar heard but obviously did not like the reply; he shrugged his rather round shoulders and glanced at Novosiltsev who was near him, as if complaining of Kutuzov.
  • "You know, Michael Ilarionovich, we are not on the Empress' Field where a parade does not begin till all the troops are assembled," said the Tsar with another glance at the Emperor Francis, as if inviting him if not to join in at least to listen to what he was saying.
  • "Old though he may be, he should not, he certainly should not, speak like that," their glances seemed to say.
  • The Tsar looked intently and observantly into Kutuzov's eye waiting to hear whether he would say anything more.
  • He touched his horse and having called Miloradovich, the commander of the column, gave him the order to advance.
  • My turn has come, thought Prince Andrew, and striking his horse he rode up to Kutuzov.
  • Nesvitski with an angry face, red and unlike himself, was shouting to Kutuzov that if he did not ride away at once he would certainly be taken prisoner.
  • "You are wounded?" he asked, hardly able to master the trembling of his lower jaw.
  • "Stop them!" he shouted, and at the same moment, probably realizing that it was impossible to stop them, spurred his horse and rode to the right.
  • But before he had finished speaking, Prince Andrew, feeling tears of shame and anger choking him, had already leapt from his horse and run to the standard.
  • "Forward, lads!" he shouted in a voice piercing as a child's.
  • "Here it is!" thought he, seizing the staff of the standard and hearing with pleasure the whistle of bullets evidently aimed at him.
  • "Hurrah!" shouted Prince Andrew, and, scarcely able to hold up the heavy standard, he ran forward with full confidence that the whole battalion would follow him.
  • And really he only ran a few steps alone.
  • A sergeant of the battalion ran up and took the flag that was swaying from its weight in Prince Andrew's hands, but he was immediately killed.
  • In front he saw our artillerymen, some of whom were fighting, while others, having abandoned their guns, were running toward him.
  • He also saw French infantry soldiers who were seizing the artillery horses and turning the guns round.
  • He heard the whistle of bullets above him unceasingly and to right and left of him soldiers continually groaned and dropped.
  • But he did not look at them: he looked only at what was going on in front of him--at the battery.
  • He now saw clearly the figure of a red-haired gunner with his shako knocked awry, pulling one end of a mop while a French soldier tugged at the other.
  • "What are they about?" thought Prince Andrew as he gazed at them.
  • Why doesn't the red-haired gunner run away as he is unarmed?
  • He will not get away before the Frenchman remembers his bayonet and stabs him....
  • My legs are giving way, thought he, and fell on his back.
  • But he saw nothing.
  • Bagration knew that as the distance between the two flanks was more than six miles, even if the messenger were not killed (which he very likely would be), and found the commander-in-chief (which would be very difficult), he would not be able to get back before evening.
  • The morning was bright, he had a good horse under him, and his heart was full of joy and happiness.
  • On receiving the order he gave his horse the rein and galloped along the line.
  • He could see puffs of musketry smoke that seemed to chase one another down the hillsides, and clouds of cannon smoke rolling, spreading, and mingling with one another.
  • He could also, by the gleam of bayonets visible through the smoke, make out moving masses of infantry and narrow lines of artillery with green caissons.
  • Give it them! he mentally exclaimed at these sounds, and again proceeded to gallop along the line, penetrating farther and farther into the region where the army was already in action.
  • After passing some Austrian troops he noticed that the next part of the line (the Guards) was already in action.
  • I shall see it close, he thought.
  • He was riding almost along the front line.
  • "That is no business of mine," he thought.
  • He had not ridden many hundred yards after that before he saw to his left, across the whole width of the field, an enormous mass of cavalry in brilliant white uniforms, mounted on black horses, trotting straight toward him and across his path.
  • He had not ridden many hundred yards after that before he saw to his left, across the whole width of the field, an enormous mass of cavalry in brilliant white uniforms, mounted on black horses, trotting straight toward him and across his path.
  • Hardly had the Horse Guards passed Rostov before he heard them shout, "Hurrah!" and looking back saw that their foremost ranks were mixed up with some foreign cavalry with red epaulets, probably French.
  • He could see nothing more, for immediately afterwards cannon began firing from somewhere and smoke enveloped everything.
  • At that moment, as the Horse Guards, having passed him, disappeared in the smoke, Rostov hesitated whether to gallop after them or to go where he was sent.
  • Passing behind one of the lines of a regiment of Foot Guards he heard a voice calling him by name.
  • "What?" he answered, not recognizing Boris.
  • "Have you?" he said.
  • "Can you imagine it?" and he began describing how the Guards, having taken up their position and seeing troops before them, thought they were Austrians, and all at once discovered from the cannon balls discharged by those troops that they were themselves in the front line and had unexpectedly to go into action.
  • He said something more, but Rostov did not wait to hear it and rode away.
  • Having passed the Guards and traversed an empty space, Rostov, to avoid again getting in front of the first line as he had done when the Horse Guards charged, followed the line of reserves, going far round the place where the hottest musket fire and cannonade were heard.
  • Suddenly he heard musket fire quite close in front of him and behind our troops, where he could never have expected the enemy to be.
  • "What can it be?" he thought.
  • And suddenly he was seized by a panic of fear for himself and for the issue of the whole battle.
  • "But be that what it may," he reflected, "there is no riding round it now.
  • The foreboding of evil that had suddenly come over Rostov was more and more confirmed the farther he rode into the region behind the village of Pratzen, which was full of troops of all kinds.
  • Rostov kept asking as he came up to Russian and Austrian soldiers running in confused crowds across his path.
  • It's all up now! he was told in Russian, German, and Czech by the crowd of fugitives who understood what was happening as little as he did.
  • He urged on his already weary horse to get quickly past these crowds, but the farther he went the more disorganized they were.
  • He urged on his already weary horse to get quickly past these crowds, but the farther he went the more disorganized they were.
  • The highroad on which he had come out was thronged with caleches, carriages of all sorts, and Russian and Austrian soldiers of all arms, some wounded and some not.
  • Rostov kept asking everyone he could stop, but got no answer from anyone.
  • At last seizing a soldier by his collar he forced him to answer.
  • There he sat in the carriage as pale as anything.
  • "Who is it you want?" he asked.
  • He was killed by a cannon ball--struck in the breast before our regiment.
  • Go that way, to that village, all the commanders are there, said the officer, pointing to the village of Hosjeradek, and he walked on.
  • Rostov rode on at a footpace not knowing why or to whom he was now going.
  • Rostov rode in the direction pointed out to him, in which he saw turrets and a church.
  • What was he now to say to the Tsar or to Kutuzov, even if they were alive and unwounded?
  • Where is he to go?
  • Rostov considered, and then went in the direction where they said he would be killed.
  • If the Emperor is wounded, am I to try to save myself? he thought.
  • He rode on to the region where the greatest number of men had perished in fleeing from Pratzen.
  • He remembered his mother's last letter.
  • "What would she feel," thought he, "if she saw me here now on this field with the cannon aimed at me?"
  • One officer told Rostov that he had seen someone from headquarters behind the village to the left, and thither Rostov rode, not hoping to find anyone but merely to ease his conscience.
  • When he had ridden about two miles and had passed the last of the Russian troops, he saw, near a kitchen garden with a ditch round it, two men on horseback facing the ditch.
  • One with a white plume in his hat seemed familiar to Rostov; the other on a beautiful chestnut horse (which Rostov fancied he had seen before) rode up to the ditch, struck his horse with his spurs, and giving it the rein leaped lightly over.
  • Turning the horse sharply, he again jumped the ditch, and deferentially addressed the horseman with the white plumes, evidently suggesting that he should do the same.
  • "But it can't be he, alone in the midst of this empty field!" thought Rostov.
  • He was happy to be seeing him.
  • He knew that he might and even ought to go straight to him and give the message Dolgorukov had ordered him to deliver.
  • He knew that he might and even ought to go straight to him and give the message Dolgorukov had ordered him to deliver.
  • Not one of the innumerable speeches addressed to the Emperor that he had composed in his imagination could he now recall.
  • Those speeches were intended for quite other conditions, they were for the most part to be spoken at a moment of victory and triumph, generally when he was dying of wounds and the sovereign had thanked him for heroic deeds, and while dying he expressed the love his actions had proved.
  • Better die a thousand times than risk receiving an unkind look or bad opinion from him, Rostov decided; and sorrowfully and with a heart full despair he rode away, continually looking back at the Tsar, who still remained in the same attitude of indecision.
  • He might... not only might but should, have gone up to the sovereign.
  • It was a unique chance to show his devotion to the Emperor and he had not made use of it....
  • And he turned round and galloped back to the place where he had seen the Emperor, but there was no one beyond the ditch now.
  • From one of the drivers he learned that Kutuzov's staff were not far off, in the village the vehicles were going to.
  • "Turn this way!" he shouted, jumping over the ice which creaked under him; "turn this way!" he shouted to those with the gun.
  • He tried to right himself but fell in up to his waist.
  • On the Pratzen Heights, where he had fallen with the flagstaff in his hand, lay Prince Andrew Bolkonski bleeding profusely and unconsciously uttering a gentle, piteous, and childlike moan.
  • Toward evening he ceased moaning and became quite still.
  • He did not know how long his unconsciousness lasted.
  • Suddenly he again felt that he was alive and suffering from a burning, lacerating pain in his head.
  • "And I did not know this suffering either," he thought.
  • He listened and heard the sound of approaching horses, and voices speaking French.
  • He opened his eyes.
  • He did not turn his head and did not see those who, judging by the sound of hoofs and voices, had ridden up and stopped near him.
  • "That's a fine death!" said Napoleon as he gazed at Bolkonski.
  • He heard the speaker addressed as Sire.
  • But he heard the words as he might have heard the buzzing of a fly.
  • Not only did they not interest him, but he took no notice of them and at once forgot them.
  • His head was burning, he felt himself bleeding to death, and he saw above him the remote, lofty, and everlasting sky.
  • He knew it was Napoleon--his hero--but at that moment Napoleon seemed to him such a small, insignificant creature compared with what was passing now between himself and that lofty infinite sky with the clouds flying over it.
  • At that moment it meant nothing to him who might be standing over him, or what was said of him; he was only glad that people were standing near him and only wished that they would help him and bring him back to life, which seemed to him so beautiful now that he had today learned to understand it so differently.
  • He collected all his strength, to stir and utter a sound.
  • He feebly moved his leg and uttered a weak, sickly groan which aroused his own pity.
  • He is alive, said Napoleon.
  • He did not regain consciousness till late in the day, when with other wounded and captured Russian officers he was carried to the hospital.
  • He did not regain consciousness till late in the day, when with other wounded and captured Russian officers he was carried to the hospital.
  • During this transfer he felt a little stronger and was able to look about him and even speak.
  • The first words he heard on coming to his senses were those of a French convoy officer, who said rapidly: "We must halt here: the Emperor will pass here immediately; it will please him to see these gentlemen prisoners."
  • "There are so many prisoners today, nearly the whole Russian army, that he is probably tired of them," said another officer.
  • Bolkonski recognized Prince Repnin whom he had met in Petersburg society.
  • "Which is the senior?" he asked, on seeing the prisoners.
  • The Emperor without waiting for an answer turned away and said to one of the officers as he went: Have these gentlemen attended to and taken to my bivouac; let my doctor, Larrey, examine their wounds.
  • Au revoir, Prince Repnin! and he spurred his horse and galloped away.
  • At every jolt he again felt unendurable pain; his feverishness increased and he grew delirious.
  • He was already enjoying that happiness when that little Napoleon had suddenly appeared with his unsympathizing look of shortsighted delight at the misery of others, and doubts and torments had followed, and only the heavens promised peace.
  • "He is a nervous, bilious subject," said Larrey, "and will not recover."
  • "Now then, get on," he shouted to the driver.
  • "Do wake up, Vaska!" he went on, turning to Denisov, whose head was again nodding.
  • He sprang out before the sleigh stopped, and ran into the hall.
  • Is everyone all right? he thought, stopping for a moment with a sinking heart, and then immediately starting to run along the hall and up the warped steps of the familiar staircase.
  • Prokofy, the footman, who was so strong that he could lift the back of the carriage from behind, sat plaiting slippers out of cloth selvedges.
  • He looked up at the opening door and his expression of sleepy indifference suddenly changed to one of delighted amazement.
  • The young count! he cried, recognizing his young master.
  • He could not distinguish which was Papa, which Natasha, and which Petya.
  • Only his mother was not there, he noticed that.
  • Here he is... our own...
  • How he has changed!...
  • He gave her a grateful look, but was still expectant and looking for someone.
  • Yet it was she, dressed in a new gown which he did not know, made since he had left.
  • All the others let him go, and he ran to her.
  • "Vasili Denisov, your son's friend," he said, introducing himself to the count, who was looking inquiringly at him.
  • "Is this your saber?" he shouted.
  • "Or is it yours?" he said, addressing the black-mustached Denisov with servile deference.
  • Sonya, when he came in, was twirling round and was about to expand her dresses into a balloon and sit down.
  • Rostov felt that, under the influence of the warm rays of love, that childlike smile which had not once appeared on his face since he left home now for the first time after eighteen months again brightened his soul and his face.
  • Sitting on the sofa with the little cushions on its arms, in what used to be his old schoolroom, and looking into Natasha's wildly bright eyes, Rostov re-entered that world of home and childhood which had no meaning for anyone else, but gave him some of the best joys of his life; and the burning of an arm with a ruler as a proof of love did not seem to him senseless, he understood and was not surprised at it.
  • "Well, and is that all?" he asked.
  • "I never go back on my word," he said.
  • Today, when he had caught a glimpse of her, she seemed still more lovely.
  • Why should he not love her now, and even marry her, Rostov thought, but just now there were so many other pleasures and interests before him!
  • "Yes, they have taken a wise decision," he thought, "I must remain free."
  • "Well, and are you still true to Boris?" he continued.
  • Is he very terrible, Denisov?
  • And is he very nice?
  • When Rostov met Sonya in the drawing room, he reddened.
  • He did not know how to behave with her.
  • He kissed her hand and addressed her not as thou but as you--Sonya.
  • His looks thanked her for offering him his freedom and told her that one way or another he would never cease to love her, for that would be impossible.
  • He felt that he had grown up and matured very much.
  • He felt that he had grown up and matured very much.
  • He knew a lady on one of the boulevards whom he visited of an evening.
  • He knew a lady on one of the boulevards whom he visited of an evening.
  • During Rostov's short stay in Moscow, before rejoining the army, he did not draw closer to Sonya, but rather drifted away from her.
  • He went to balls and into ladies' society with an affectation of doing so against his will.
  • Gallop off to our Moscow estate, he said to the factotum who appeared at his call.
  • "That's it, that's it!" exclaimed the count, and gaily seizing his son by both hands, he cried, "Now I've got you, so take the sleigh and pair at once, and go to Bezukhov's, and tell him 'Count Ilya has sent you to ask for strawberries and fresh pineapples.'
  • Though she came upon the count in his dressing gown every day, he invariably became confused and begged her to excuse his costume.
  • He has forwarded me a letter from Boris.
  • Is his wife with him? he asked.
  • "Ah, my dear friend, he is very unfortunate," she said.
  • What also conduced to Bagration's being selected as Moscow's hero was the fact that he had no connections in the city and was a stranger there.
  • Here, as elsewhere, he was surrounded by an atmosphere of subservience to his wealth, and being in the habit of lording it over these people, he treated them with absent-minded contempt.
  • By his age he should have belonged to the younger men, but by his wealth and connections he belonged to the groups of old and honored guests, and so he went from one group to another.
  • Young Rostov stood at a window with Dolokhov, whose acquaintance he had lately made and highly valued.
  • Bagration appeared in the doorway of the anteroom without hat or sword, which, in accord with the club custom, he had given up to the hall porter.
  • He had no lambskin cap on his head, nor had he a loaded whip over his shoulder, as when Rostov had seen him on the eve of the battle of Austerlitz, but wore a tight new uniform with Russian and foreign Orders, and the Star of St. George on his left breast.
  • He had no lambskin cap on his head, nor had he a loaded whip over his shoulder, as when Rostov had seen him on the eve of the battle of Austerlitz, but wore a tight new uniform with Russian and foreign Orders, and the Star of St. George on his left breast.
  • Evidently just before coming to the dinner he had had his hair and whiskers trimmed, which changed his appearance for the worse.
  • Bagration was embarrassed, not wishing to avail himself of their courtesy, and this caused some delay at the doors, but after all he did at last enter first.
  • He walked shyly and awkwardly over the parquet floor of the reception room, not knowing what to do with his hands; he was more accustomed to walk over a plowed field under fire, as he had done at the head of the Kursk regiment at Schon Grabern--and he would have found that easier.
  • He walked shyly and awkwardly over the parquet floor of the reception room, not knowing what to do with his hands; he was more accustomed to walk over a plowed field under fire, as he had done at the head of the Kursk regiment at Schon Grabern--and he would have found that easier.
  • It was at first impossible to enter the drawing-room door for the crowd of members and guests jostling one another and trying to get a good look at Bagration over each other's shoulders, as if he were some rare animal.
  • Count Ilya, again thrusting his way through the crowd, went out of the drawing room and reappeared a minute later with another committeeman, carrying a large silver salver which he presented to Prince Bagration.
  • But all eyes demanded that he should submit.
  • Someone obligingly took the dish from Bagration (or he would, it seemed, have held it till evening and have gone in to dinner with it) and drew his attention to the verses.
  • But before he had finished reading, a stentorian major-domo announced that dinner was ready!
  • The dinner, both the Lenten and the other fare, was splendid, yet he could not feel quite at ease till the end of the meal.
  • He winked at the butler, whispered directions to the footmen, and awaited each expected dish with some anxiety.
  • "There will be many toasts, it's time to begin," he whispered, and taking up his glass, he rose.
  • All were silent, waiting for what he would say.
  • "To the health of our Sovereign, the Emperor!" he cried, and at the same moment his kindly eyes grew moist with tears of joy and enthusiasm.
  • Bagration also rose and shouted "Hurrah!" in exactly the same voice in which he had shouted it on the field at Schon Grabern.
  • "To the health of our Sovereign, the Emperor!" he roared, "Hurrah!" and emptying his glass at one gulp he dashed it to the floor.
  • He brings foe men to their knees,... etc.
  • As usual, he ate and drank much, and eagerly.
  • He seemed to see and hear nothing of what was going on around him and to be absorbed by some depressing and unsolved problem.
  • Pierre absolutely disbelieved both the princess' hints and the letter, but he feared now to look at Dolokhov, who was sitting opposite him.
  • Every time he chanced to meet Dolokhov's handsome insolent eyes, Pierre felt something terrible and monstrous rising in his soul and turned quickly away.
  • He involuntarily remembered how Dolokhov, who had fully recovered his former position after the campaign, had returned to Petersburg and come to him.
  • "Yes, he is very handsome," thought Pierre, "and I know him.
  • He remembered the expression Dolokhov's face assumed in his moments of cruelty, as when tying the policeman to the bear and dropping them into the water, or when he challenged a man to a duel without any reason, or shot a post-boy's horse with a pistol.
  • He remembered the expression Dolokhov's face assumed in his moments of cruelty, as when tying the policeman to the bear and dropping them into the water, or when he challenged a man to a duel without any reason, or shot a post-boy's horse with a pistol.
  • "Yes, he is a bully," thought Pierre, "to kill a man means nothing to him.
  • Rostov was talking merrily to his two friends, one of whom was a dashing hussar and the other a notorious duelist and rake, and every now and then he glanced ironically at Pierre, whose preoccupied, absent-minded, and massive figure was a very noticeable one at the dinner.
  • "Why, I didn't recognize you!" he said.
  • But Rostov was otherwise engaged; he was shouting "Hurrah!"
  • He reddened and turned away.
  • "Well, now to the health of handsome women!" said Dolokhov, and with a serious expression, but with a smile lurking at the corners of his mouth, he turned with his glass to Pierre.
  • "Here's to the health of lovely women, Peterkin--and their lovers!" he added.
  • He was just going to take it when Dolokhov, leaning across, snatched it from his hand and began reading it.
  • He leaned his whole massive body across the table.
  • "How dare you take it?" he shouted.
  • "You shan't have it!" he said distinctly.
  • I challenge you! he ejaculated, and, pushing back his chair, he rose from the table.
  • He hated her and was forever sundered from her.
  • Despite Denisov's request that he would take no part in the matter, Rostov agreed to be Dolokhov's second, and after dinner he discussed the arrangements for the duel with Nesvitski, Bezukhov's second.
  • "Well then, till tomorrow at Sokolniki," said Dolokhov, as he took leave of Rostov in the club porch.
  • 'Everyone fears a bear,' he says, 'but when you see one your fear's all gone, and your only thought is not to let him get away!'
  • He had evidently not slept that night.
  • He looked about distractedly and screwed up his eyes as if dazzled by the sun.
  • He was entirely absorbed by two considerations: his wife's guilt, of which after his sleepless night he had not the slightest doubt, and the guiltlessness of Dolokhov, who had no reason to preserve the honor of a man who was nothing to him....
  • He was entirely absorbed by two considerations: his wife's guilt, of which after his sleepless night he had not the slightest doubt, and the guiltlessness of Dolokhov, who had no reason to preserve the honor of a man who was nothing to him....
  • Either I shall kill him, or he will hit me in the head, or elbow, or knee.
  • But just at moments when such thoughts occurred to him, he would ask in a particularly calm and absent-minded way, which inspired the respect of the onlookers, Will it be long?
  • "I should not be doing my duty, Count," he said in timid tones, "and should not justify your confidence and the honor you have done me in choosing me for your second, if at this grave, this very grave, moment I did not tell you the whole truth.
  • Is everything ready? he added.
  • "Only tell me where to go and where to shoot," he said with an unnaturally gentle smile.
  • "So I can fire when I like!" said Pierre, and at the word "three," he went quickly forward, missing the trodden path and stepping into the deep snow.
  • He held the pistol in his right hand at arm's length, apparently afraid of shooting himself with it.
  • His left hand he held carefully back, because he wished to support his right hand with it and knew he must not do so.
  • The smoke, rendered denser by the mist, prevented him from seeing anything for an instant, but there was no second report as he had expected.
  • He only heard Dolokhov's hurried steps, and his figure came in view through the smoke.
  • He was pressing one hand to his left side, while the other clutched his drooping pistol.
  • And after stumbling a few staggering steps right up to the saber, he sank on the snow beside it.
  • His left hand was bloody; he wiped it on his coat and supported himself with it.
  • "Please," he uttered with an effort.
  • He sucked and swallowed the cold snow, his lips quivered but his eyes, still smiling, glittered with effort and exasperation as he mustered his remaining strength.
  • He sucked and swallowed the cold snow, his lips quivered but his eyes, still smiling, glittered with effort and exasperation as he mustered his remaining strength.
  • He raised his pistol and aimed.
  • "Missed!" shouted Dolokhov, and he lay helplessly, face downwards on the snow.
  • Death... lies... he repeated, puckering his face.
  • But on entering Moscow he suddenly came to and, lifting his head with an effort, took Rostov, who was sitting beside him, by the hand.
  • How do you feel? he asked.
  • When he had become a little quieter, he explained to Rostov that he was living with his mother, who, if she saw him dying, would not survive it.
  • He implored Rostov to go on and prepare her.
  • The night after the duel he did not go to his bedroom but, as he often did, remained in his father's room, that huge room in which Count Bezukhov had died.
  • He lay down on the sofa meaning to fall asleep and forget all that had happened to him, but could not do so.
  • Such a storm of feelings, thoughts, and memories suddenly arose within him that he could not fall asleep, nor even remain in one place, but had to jump up and pace the room with rapid steps.
  • "What has happened?" he asked himself.
  • "But in what was I to blame?" he asked.
  • And he vividly recalled that moment after supper at Prince Vasili's, when he spoke those words he had found so difficult to utter: "I love you."
  • Even then I felt it, he thought.
  • He remembered his honeymoon and blushed at the recollection.
  • Her father in jest tried to rouse her jealousy, and she replied with a calm smile that she was not so stupid as to be jealous: 'Let him do what he pleases,' she used to say of me.
  • Often seeing the success she had with young and old men and women Pierre could not understand why he did not love her.
  • "Yes, I never loved her," said he to himself; "I knew she was a depraved woman," he repeated, "but dared not admit it to myself.
  • He digested his sufferings alone.
  • "It is all, all her fault," he said to himself; "but what of that?
  • Oh, that's nonsense, he thought.
  • "Louis XVI was executed because they said he was dishonorable and a criminal," came into Pierre's head, "and from their point of view they were right, as were those too who canonized him and died a martyr's death for his sake.
  • But at the moment when he imagined himself calmed by such reflections, she suddenly came into his mind as she was at the moments when he had most strongly expressed his insincere love for her, and he felt the blood rush to his heart and had again to get up and move about and break and tear whatever came to his hand.
  • "Why did I tell her that 'Je vous aime'?" he kept repeating to himself.
  • * "But what the devil was he doing in that galley?"
  • In the night he called his valet and told him to pack up to go to Petersburg.
  • He could not imagine how he could speak to her now.
  • He could not imagine how he could speak to her now.
  • He resolved to go away next day and leave a letter informing her of his intention to part from her forever.
  • He woke up and looked round for a while with a startled expression, unable to realize where he was.
  • He woke up and looked round for a while with a startled expression, unable to realize where he was.
  • But feeling this to be senseless and impossible, he again glanced timidly at her.
  • And how could you believe he was my lover?
  • He was suffering physically at that moment, there was a weight on his chest and he could not breathe.
  • He was suffering physically at that moment, there was a weight on his chest and he could not breathe.
  • He knew that he must do something to put an end to this suffering, but what he wanted to do was too terrible.
  • He knew that he must do something to put an end to this suffering, but what he wanted to do was too terrible.
  • "We had better separate," he muttered in a broken voice.
  • "I'll kill you!" he shouted, and seizing the marble top of a table with a strength he had never before felt, he made a step toward her brandishing the slab.
  • He felt the fascination and delight of frenzy.
  • He flung down the slab, broke it, and swooping down on her with outstretched hands shouted, "Get out!" in such a terrible voice that the whole house heard it with horror.
  • God knows what he would have done at that moment had Helene not fled from the room.
  • "Your son," wrote Kutuzov, "fell before my eyes, a standard in his hand and at the head of a regiment--he fell as a hero, worthy of his father and his fatherland.
  • To the great regret of myself and of the whole army it is still uncertain whether he is alive or not.
  • When Princess Mary went to him at the usual hour he was working at his lathe and, as usual, did not look round at her.
  • "Ah, Princess Mary!" he said suddenly in an unnatural voice, throwing down his chisel.
  • Kutuzov writes... and he screamed as piercingly as if he wished to drive the princess away by that scream...
  • She saw him tender and amused as he was when he put on the little icon.
  • Had he repented of his unbelief?
  • Was he now there?
  • He tried not to change his former way of life, but his strength failed him.
  • He walked less, ate less, slept less, and became weaker every day.
  • After a while he re-entered it as if to snuff the candles, and, seeing the prince was lying on the sofa, looked at him, noticed his perturbed face, shook his head, and going up to him silently kissed him on the shoulder and left the room without snuffing the candles or saying why he had entered.
  • I must go and meet him, he does not know Russian.
  • Yes, it was he, pale, thin, with a changed and strangely softened but agitated expression on his face.
  • He came up the stairs and embraced his sister.
  • "You did not get my letter?" he asked, and not waiting for a reply-- which he would not have received, for the princess was unable to speak-- he turned back, rapidly mounted the stairs again with the doctor who had entered the hall after him (they had met at the last post station), and again embraced his sister.
  • And having taken off his cloak and felt boots, he went to the little princess' apartment.
  • "My darling!" he said--a word he had never used to her before.
  • She was not surprised at his having come; she did not realize that he had come.
  • He covered his face with his hands and remained so for some minutes.
  • He began pacing the room.
  • Prince Andrew ran to the door; the scream ceased and he heard the wail of an infant.
  • Then suddenly he realized the joyful significance of that wail; tears choked him, and leaning his elbows on the window sill be began to cry, sobbing like a child.
  • He went into his wife's room.
  • She was lying dead, in the same position he had seen her in five minutes before and, despite the fixed eyes and the pallor of the cheeks, the same expression was on her charming childlike face with its upper lip covered with tiny black hair.
  • He was standing close to the door and as soon as it opened his rough old arms closed like a vise round his son's neck, and without a word he began to sob like a child.
  • He was standing close to the door and as soon as it opened his rough old arms closed like a vise round his son's neck, and without a word he began to sob like a child.
  • "Ah, what have you done to me?" it still seemed to say, and Prince Andrew felt that something gave way in his soul and that he was guilty of a sin he could neither remedy nor forget.
  • He could not weep.
  • He looked up joyfully at the baby when the nurse brought it to him and nodded approval when she told him that the wax with the baby's hair had not sunk in the font but had floated.
  • As a result he could not go to the country with the rest of the family, but was kept all summer in Moscow by his new duties.
  • "Yes, Count," she would say, "he is too noble and pure-souled for our present, depraved world.
  • Fancy what he had to go through!
  • Why, if he was so jealous, as I see things he should have shown it sooner, but he lets it go on for months.
  • And then to call him out, reckoning on Fedya not fighting because he owed him money!
  • He is such a lofty, heavenly soul!
  • "I know people consider me a bad man!" he said.
  • But those!... and he made a gesture of contempt.
  • "There's nothing for me to understand," she cried out with resolute self-will, "he is wicked and heartless.
  • There now, I like your Denisov though he is a rake and all that, still I like him; so you see I do understand.
  • And do you know he has fallen in love with Sonya?
  • Dolokhov, who did not usually care for the society of ladies, began to come often to the house, and the question for whose sake he came (though no one spoke of it) was soon settled.
  • He came because of Sonya.
  • He was pointedly attentive to Sonya and looked at her in such a way that not only could she not bear his glances without coloring, but even the old countess and Natasha blushed when they saw his looks.
  • Rostov noticed something new in Dolokhov's relations with Sonya, but he did not explain to himself what these new relations were.
  • "They're always in love with someone," he thought of Sonya and Natasha.
  • But he was not as much at ease with Sonya and Dolokhov as before and was less frequently at home.
  • He spent the greater part of his time away from home, at dinners, parties, and balls.
  • On the third day after Christmas Nicholas dined at home, a thing he had rarely done of late.
  • It was a grand farewell dinner, as he and Denisov were leaving to join their regiment after Epiphany.
  • As soon as he entered he noticed and felt the tension of the amorous air in the house, and also noticed a curious embarrassment among some of those present.
  • He asked you, and Vasili Dmitrich * is also going.
  • "Perhaps," coldly and angrily replied Dolokhov, glancing at Sonya, and, scowling, he gave Nicholas just such a look as he had given Pierre at the club dinner.
  • He called Natasha and asked her what was the matter.
  • He has proposed to Sonya!
  • He tried to say, "That's capital; of course she'll forget her childish promises and accept the offer," but before he had time to say it Natasha began again.
  • He tried to say, "That's capital; of course she'll forget her childish promises and accept the offer," but before he had time to say it Natasha began again.
  • What a darling Sonya is! he added with a smile.
  • And I beg you to consider Dolokhov's offer, he said, articulating his friend's name with difficulty.
  • What gwace! he said again after a pause.
  • "Look how many charming young ladies-" He turned with the same request to Denisov who was also a former pupil of his.
  • Denisov sat down by the old ladies and, leaning on his saber and beating time with his foot, told them something funny and kept them amused, while he watched the young people dancing, Iogel with Natasha, his pride and his best pupil, were the first couple.
  • Denisov did not take his eyes off her and beat time with his saber in a way that clearly indicated that if he was not dancing it was because he would not and not because he could not.
  • In the middle of a figure he beckoned to Rostov who was passing:
  • "This is not at all the thing," he said.
  • Knowing that Denisov had a reputation even in Poland for the masterly way in which he danced the mazurka, Nicholas ran up to Natasha:
  • He is a real dancer, a wonder! he said.
  • He is a real dancer, a wonder! he said.
  • Nicholas saw that Denisov was refusing though he smiled delightedly.
  • He ran up to them.
  • She can do anything with me! said Denisov, and he unhooked his saber.
  • He came out from behind the chairs, clasped his partner's hand firmly, threw back his head, and advanced his foot, waiting for the beat.
  • Only on horse back and in the mazurka was Denisov's short stature not noticeable and he looked the fine fellow he felt himself to be.
  • He glided silently on one foot half across the room, and seeming not to notice the chairs was dashing straight at them, when suddenly, clinking his spurs and spreading out his legs, he stopped short on his heels, stood so a second, stamped on the spot clanking his spurs, whirled rapidly round, and, striking his left heel against his right, flew round again in a circle.
  • He glided silently on one foot half across the room, and seeming not to notice the chairs was dashing straight at them, when suddenly, clinking his spurs and spreading out his legs, he stopped short on his heels, stood so a second, stamped on the spot clanking his spurs, whirled rapidly round, and, striking his left heel against his right, flew round again in a circle.
  • Natasha guessed what he meant to do, and abandoning herself to him followed his lead hardly knowing how.
  • First he spun her round, holding her now with his left, now with his right hand, then falling on one knee he twirled her round him, and again jumping up, dashed so impetuously forward that it seemed as if he would rush through the whole suite of rooms without drawing breath, and then he suddenly stopped and performed some new and unexpected steps.
  • When at last, smartly whirling his partner round in front of her chair, he drew up with a click of his spurs and bowed to her, Natasha did not even make him a curtsy.
  • For two days after that Rostov did not see Dolokhov at his own or at Dolokhov's home: on the third day he received a note from him:
  • He was at once shown to the best room, which Dolokhov had taken for that evening.
  • On the table was a pile of gold and paper money, and he was keeping the bank.
  • Dolokhov's clear, cold glance met Rostov as soon as he entered the door, as though he had long expected him.
  • "It's a long time since we met," he said.
  • "You may punt," he said.
  • Rostov recalled at that moment a strange conversation he had once had with Dolokhov.
  • Beneath his smile Rostov saw in him the mood he had shown at the club dinner and at other times, when as if tired of everyday life he had felt a need to escape from it by some strange, and usually cruel, action.
  • He tried, but failed, to find some joke with which to reply to Dolokhov's words.
  • But before he had thought of anything, Dolokhov, looking straight in his face, said slowly and deliberately so that everyone could hear:
  • Moving the money forward he prepared to deal.
  • "Why don't you play?" he asked.
  • And strange to say Nicholas felt that he could not help taking up a card, putting a small stake on it, and beginning to play.
  • "I have no money with me," he said.
  • "Gentlemen," said Dolokhov after he had dealt for some time.
  • One of the players said he hoped he might be trusted.
  • "Don't stint yourself, we'll settle afterwards," he added, turning to Rostov.
  • All Rostov's cards were beaten and he had eight hundred rubles scored up against him.
  • He wrote "800 rubles" on a card, but while the waiter filled his glass he changed his mind and altered it to his usual stake of twenty rubles.
  • He wrote "800 rubles" on a card, but while the waiter filled his glass he changed his mind and altered it to his usual stake of twenty rubles.
  • "Leave it," said Dolokhov, though he did not seem to be even looking at Rostov, "you'll win it back all the sooner.
  • Or are you afraid of me? he asked again.
  • He let the eight hundred remain and laid down a seven of hearts with a torn corner, which he had picked up from the floor.
  • He let the eight hundred remain and laid down a seven of hearts with a torn corner, which he had picked up from the floor.
  • He well remembered that seven afterwards.
  • He laid down the seven of hearts, on which with a broken bit of chalk he had written "800 rubles" in clear upright figures; he emptied the glass of warm champagne that was handed him, smiled at Dolokhov's words, and with a sinking heart, waiting for a seven to turn up, gazed at Dolokhov's hands which held the pack.
  • He laid down the seven of hearts, on which with a broken bit of chalk he had written "800 rubles" in clear upright figures; he emptied the glass of warm champagne that was handed him, smiled at Dolokhov's words, and with a sinking heart, waiting for a seven to turn up, gazed at Dolokhov's hands which held the pack.
  • On the previous Sunday the old count had given his son two thousand rubles, and though he always disliked speaking of money difficulties had told Nicholas that this was all he could let him have till May, and asked him to be more economical this time.
  • Nicholas had replied that it would be more than enough for him and that he gave his word of honor not to take anything more till the spring.
  • With a sinking heart he watched Dolokhov's hands and thought, "Now then, make haste and let me have this card and I'll take my cap and drive home to supper with Denisov, Natasha, and Sonya, and will certainly never touch a card again."
  • "Oh, those Moscow gossips!" said Dolokhov, and he took up the cards with a smile.
  • The seven he needed was lying uppermost, the first card in the pack.
  • He had lost more than he could pay.
  • He had lost more than he could pay.
  • "Still, don't ruin yourself!" said Dolokhov with a side glance at Rostov as he continued to deal.
  • Instead of sixteen hundred rubles he had a long column of figures scored against him, which he had reckoned up to ten thousand, but that now, as he vaguely supposed, must have risen to fifteen thousand.
  • He had decided to play until that score reached forty-three thousand.
  • He had fixed on that number because forty-three was the sum of his and Sonya's joint ages.
  • One tormenting impression did not leave him: that those broad- boned reddish hands with hairy wrists visible from under the shirt sleeves, those hands which he loved and hated, held him in their power.
  • And why is he doing this to me?
  • Sometimes he staked a large sum, but Dolokhov refused to accept it and fixed the stake himself.
  • He knows of course what this loss means to me.
  • He can't want my ruin.
  • Wasn't he my friend?
  • What's he to do if he has such luck?...
  • And it's not my fault either," he thought to himself, "I have done nothing wrong.
  • He was flushed and bathed in perspiration, though the room was not hot.
  • And at the same time he said in a cheerful voice:
  • Twenty-one rubles, he said, pointing to the figure twenty-one by which the total exceeded the round sum of forty-three thousand; and taking up a pack he prepared to deal.
  • Rostov submissively unbent the corner of his card and, instead of the six thousand he had intended, carefully wrote twenty-one.
  • "It's all the same to me," he said.
  • "You owe forty-three thousand, Count," said Dolokhov, and stretching himself he rose from the table.
  • "One does get tired sitting so long," he added.
  • He knew what a shock he would inflict on his father and mother by the news of this loss, he knew what a relief it would be to escape it all, and felt that Dolokhov knew that he could save him from all this shame and sorrow, but wanted now to play with him as a cat does with a mouse.
  • He knew what a shock he would inflict on his father and mother by the news of this loss, he knew what a relief it would be to escape it all, and felt that Dolokhov knew that he could save him from all this shame and sorrow, but wanted now to play with him as a cat does with a mouse.
  • "My cousin has nothing to do with this and it's not necessary to mention her!" he exclaimed fiercely.
  • To say "tomorrow" and keep up a dignified tone was not difficult, but to go home alone, see his sisters, brother, mother, and father, confess and ask for money he had no right to after giving his word of honor, was terrible.
  • Denisov, with sparkling eyes and ruffled hair, sat at the clavichord striking chords with his short fingers, his legs thrown back and his eyes rolling as he sang, with his small, husky, but true voice, some verses called "Enchantress," which he had composed, and to which he was trying to fit music:
  • "Everything's still the same with them," thought Nicholas, glancing into the drawing room, where he saw Vera and his mother with the old lady.
  • "Is Papa at home?" he asked.
  • "Oh, nothing," said he, as if weary of being continually asked the same question.
  • He continued to pace the room, looking gloomily at Denisov and the girls and avoiding their eyes.
  • And without noticing that he was singing, to strengthen the si he sung a second, a third below the high note.
  • How fortunate! he thought.
  • It was long since Rostov had felt such enjoyment from music as he did that day.
  • He got up without saying a word and went downstairs to his own room.
  • Nicholas tried to say "Yes," but could not: and he nearly burst into sobs.
  • And suddenly, in the most casual tone, which made him feel ashamed of himself, he said, as if merely asking his father to let him have the carriage to drive to town:
  • "Very much," said Nicholas flushing, and with a stupid careless smile, for which he was long unable to forgive himself, "I have lost a little, I mean a good deal, a great deal--forty three thousand."
  • "It can't be helped It happens to everyone!" said the son, with a bold, free, and easy tone, while in his soul he regarded himself as a worthless scoundrel whose whole life could not atone for his crime.
  • "Yes, yes," he muttered, "it will be difficult, I fear, difficult to raise... happens to everybody!
  • Pa-pa!" he called after him, sobbing, "forgive me!"
  • And seizing his father's hand, he pressed it to his lips and burst into tears.
  • He has made me...
  • If it is true that Monsieur Denisov has made you a proposal, tell him he is a fool, that's all!
  • You should have seen how he said it!
  • I know he did not mean to say it, but it came out accidently.
  • He jumped up at the sound of her light step.
  • "Nataly," he said, moving with rapid steps toward her, "decide my fate.
  • He tried to say more, but faltered.
  • He looked at the countess, and seeing her severe face said: "Well, good-by, Countess," and kissing her hand, he left the room with quick resolute strides, without looking at Natasha.
  • He looked at the countess, and seeing her severe face said: "Well, good-by, Countess," and kissing her hand, he left the room with quick resolute strides, without looking at Natasha.
  • He did not wish to stay another day in Moscow.
  • After Denisov's departure, Rostov spent another fortnight in Moscow, without going out of the house, waiting for the money his father could not at once raise, and he spent most of his time in the girls' room.
  • He filled the girls' albums with verses and music, and having at last sent Dolokhov the whole forty-three thousand rubles and received his receipt, he left at the end of November, without taking leave of any of his acquaintances, to overtake his regiment which was already in Poland.
  • He filled the girls' albums with verses and music, and having at last sent Dolokhov the whole forty-three thousand rubles and received his receipt, he left at the end of November, without taking leave of any of his acquaintances, to overtake his regiment which was already in Poland.
  • Without undressing, he lay down on the leather sofa in front of a round table, put his big feet in their overboots on the table, and began to reflect.
  • Pierre gave no answer, for he neither heard nor saw anything.
  • He had begun to think of the last station and was still pondering on the same question--one so important that he took no notice of what went on around him.
  • He had begun to think of the last station and was still pondering on the same question--one so important that he took no notice of what went on around him.
  • The postmaster came in and began obsequiously to beg his excellency to wait only two hours, when, come what might, he would let his excellency have the courier horses.
  • It was plain that he was lying and only wanted to get more money from the traveler.
  • It is good for me, bad for another traveler, and for himself it's unavoidable, because he needs money for food; the man said an officer had once given him a thrashing for letting a private traveler have the courier horses.
  • But the officer thrashed him because he had to get on as quickly as possible.
  • "I have hundreds of rubles I don't know what to do with, and she stands in her tattered cloak looking timidly at me," he thought.
  • And again he twisted the screw with the stripped thread, and again it turned uselessly in the same place.
  • He began reading about the sufferings and virtuous struggles of a certain Emilie de Mansfeld.
  • "And why did she resist her seducer when she loved him?" he thought.
  • His servant was also a yellow, wrinkled old man, without beard or mustache, evidently not because he was shaven but because they had never grown.
  • He brought in a boiling samovar.
  • When everything was ready, the stranger opened his eyes, moved to the table, filled a tumbler with tea for himself and one for the beardless old man to whom he passed it.
  • * To indicate he did not want more tea.
  • He seemed to emphasize the last word, as if to say--Yes, misfortune!
  • He paused, his gaze still on Pierre, and moved aside on the sofa by way of inviting the other to take a seat beside him.
  • And he suddenly smiled, in an unexpected and tenderly paternal way.
  • And again, glancing at the stranger's hands, he looked more closely at the ring, with its skull--a masonic sign.
  • "Allow me to ask," he said, "are you a Mason?"
  • Only by laying stone on stone with the cooperation of all, by the millions of generations from our forefather Adam to our own times, is that temple reared which is to be a worthy dwelling place of the Great God, he added, and closed his eyes.
  • The Mason looked intently at Pierre and smiled as a rich man with millions in hand might smile at a poor fellow who told him that he, poor man, had not the five rubles that would make him happy.
  • You do not know Him, but He is here, He is in me, He is in my words, He is in thee, and even in those blasphemous words thou hast just uttered! pronounced the Mason in a stern and tremulous voice.
  • He paused and sighed, evidently trying to calm himself.
  • "If He were not," he said quietly, "you and I would not be speaking of Him, my dear sir.
  • "If He were not," he said quietly, "you and I would not be speaking of Him, my dear sir.
  • Whom hast thou denied? he suddenly asked with exulting austerity and authority in his voice.
  • Who invented Him, if He did not exist?
  • He stopped and remained silent for a long time.
  • "He exists, but to understand Him is hard," the Mason began again, looking not at Pierre but straight before him, and turning the leaves of his book with his old hands which from excitement he could not keep still.
  • "He exists, but to understand Him is hard," the Mason began again, looking not at Pierre but straight before him, and turning the leaves of his book with his old hands which from excitement he could not keep still.
  • Thou dreamest that thou art wise because thou couldst utter those blasphemous words, he went on, with a somber and scornful smile.
  • And thou art more foolish and unreasonable than a little child, who, playing with the parts of a skillfully made watch, dares to say that, as he does not understand its use, he does not believe in the master who made it.
  • "He is not to be apprehended by reason, but by life," said the Mason.
  • He was afraid of any want of clearness, any weakness, in the Mason's arguments; he dreaded not to be able to believe in him.
  • He was afraid of any want of clearness, any weakness, in the Mason's arguments; he dreaded not to be able to believe in him.
  • "I don't understand," he said, "how it is that the mind of man cannot attain the knowledge of which you speak."
  • "The highest wisdom and truth are like the purest liquid we may wish to imbibe," he said.
  • "How about the horses?" he asked, without looking at Pierre.
  • "Can he really be going away leaving me alone without having told me all, and without promising to help me?" thought Pierre, rising with downcast head; and he began to pace the room, glancing occasionally at the Mason.
  • But this man knows the truth and, if he wished to, could disclose it to me.
  • He gulped and turned away.
  • Hand this to Count Willarski (he took out his notebook and wrote a few words on a large sheet of paper folded in four).
  • He firmly believed in the possibility of the brotherhood of men united in the aim of supporting one another in the path of virtue, and that is how Freemasonry presented itself to him.
  • One thing he continually realized as he read that book: the joy, hitherto unknown to him, of believing in the possibility of attaining perfection, and in the possibility of active brotherly love among men, which Joseph Alexeevich had revealed to him.
  • "I have come to you with a message and an offer, Count," he said without sitting down.
  • "One more question, Count," he said, "which I beg you to answer in all sincerity--not as a future Mason but as an honest man: have you renounced your former convictions--do you believe in God?"
  • "Yes... yes, I believe in God," he said.
  • "Yes, I do believe in God," he repeated.
  • To Pierre's inquiries as to what he must do and how he should answer, Willarski only replied that brothers more worthy than he would test him and that Pierre had only to tell the truth.
  • Willarski, stepping toward him, said something to him in French in an undertone and then went up to a small wardrobe in which Pierre noticed garments such as he had never seen before.
  • Then he drew his face down, kissed him, and taking him by the hand led him forward.
  • "Whatever happens to you," he said, "you must bear it all manfully if you have firmly resolved to join our Brotherhood."
  • "I wish you courage and success," and, pressing Pierre's hand, he went out.
  • Once or twice he shrugged his shoulders and raised his hand to the kerchief, as if wishing to take it off, but let it drop again.
  • His arms felt numb, his legs almost gave way, it seemed to him that he was tired out.
  • He felt afraid of what would happen to him and still more afraid of showing his fear.
  • He was not at all surprised by what he saw.
  • He was not at all surprised by what he saw.
  • Hoping to enter on an entirely new life quite unlike the old one, he expected everything to be unusual, even more unusual than what he was seeing.
  • A skull, a coffin, the Gospel--it seemed to him that he had expected all this and even more.
  • Trying to stimulate his emotions he looked around.
  • By the dim light, to which Pierre had already become accustomed, he saw a rather short man.
  • This short man had on a white leather apron which covered his chest and part of his legs; he had on a kind of necklace above which rose a high white ruffle, outlining his rather long face which was lit up from below.
  • With bated breath and beating heart he moved toward the Rhetor (by which name the brother who prepared a seeker for entrance into the Brotherhood was known).
  • Drawing nearer, he recognized in the Rhetor a man he knew, Smolyaninov, and it mortified him to think that the newcomer was an acquaintance--he wished him simply a brother and a virtuous instructor.
  • For a long time he could not utter a word, so that the Rhetor had to repeat his question.
  • "Very well," said Smolyaninov, and went on at once: "Have you any idea of the means by which our holy Order will help you to reach your aim?" said he quietly and quickly.
  • "No, I considered it erroneous and did not follow it," said Pierre, so softly that the Rhetor did not hear him and asked him what he was saying.
  • "Now I must disclose to you the chief aim of our Order," he said, "and if this aim coincides with yours, you may enter our Brotherhood with profit.
  • But since this mystery is of such a nature that nobody can know or use it unless he be prepared by long and diligent self-purification, not everyone can hope to attain it quickly.
  • The important mystery mentioned by the Rhetor, though it aroused his curiosity, did not seem to him essential, and the second aim, that of purifying and regenerating himself, did not much interest him because at that moment he felt with delight that he was already perfectly cured of his former faults and was ready for all that was good.
  • (He now felt so glad to be free from his own lawlessness and to submit his will to those who knew the indubitable truth.)
  • He listened to the Rhetor in silence, feeling from all he said that his ordeal was about to begin.
  • He listened to the Rhetor in silence, feeling from all he said that his ordeal was about to begin.
  • "But I have nothing here," replied Pierre, supposing that he was asked to give up all he possessed.
  • He went over his vices in his mind, not knowing to which of them to give the pre-eminence.
  • "Women," he said in a low, scarcely audible voice.
  • Soon after this there came into the dark chamber to fetch Pierre, not the Rhetor but Pierre's sponsor, Willarski, whom he recognized by his voice.
  • He was conducted from that room along passages that turned backwards and forwards and was at last brought to the doors of the Lodge.
  • Willarski coughed, he was answered by the masonic knock with mallets, the doors opened before them.
  • A bass voice (Pierre was still blindfolded) questioned him as to who he was, when and where he was born, and so on.
  • During these wanderings, Pierre noticed that he was spoken of now as the "Seeker," now as the "Sufferer," and now as the "Postulant," to the accompaniment of various knockings with mallets and swords.
  • As he was being led up to some object he noticed a hesitation and uncertainty among his conductors.
  • He heard those around him disputing in whispers and one of them insisting that he should be led along a certain carpet.
  • He heard those around him disputing in whispers and one of them insisting that he should be led along a certain carpet.
  • The candles were then extinguished and some spirit lighted, as Pierre knew by the smell, and he was told that he would now see the lesser light.
  • But the swords were drawn back from him and he was at once blindfolded again.
  • Then the candles were relit and he was told that he would see the full light; the bandage was again removed and more than ten voices said together: "Sic transit gloria mundi."
  • Round a long table covered with black sat some twelve men in garments like those he had already seen.
  • In the President's chair sat a young man he did not know, with a peculiar cross hanging from his neck.
  • Two of the brothers led Pierre up to the altar, placed his feet at right angles, and bade him lie down, saying that he must prostrate himself at the Gates of the Temple.
  • "He must first receive the trowel," whispered one of the brothers.
  • Pierre glanced at the serious faces of those around, remembered all he had already gone through, and realized that he could not stop halfway.
  • As to the first pair of gloves, a man's, he said that Pierre could not know their meaning but must keep them.
  • The second pair of man's gloves he was to wear at the meetings, and finally of the third, a pair of women's gloves, he said: Dear brother, these woman's gloves are intended for you too.
  • And after a pause, he added: "But beware, dear brother, that these gloves do not deck hands that are unclean."
  • While the Grand Master said these last words it seemed to Pierre that he grew embarrassed.
  • Then a place was assigned to Pierre, he was shown the signs of the Lodge, told the password, and at last was permitted to sit down.
  • He managed to follow only the last words of the statutes and these remained in his mind.
  • He finished and, getting up, embraced and kissed Pierre, who, with tears of joy in his eyes, looked round him, not knowing how to answer the congratulations and greetings from acquaintances that met him on all sides.
  • He acknowledged no acquaintances but saw in all these men only brothers, and burned with impatience to set to work with them.
  • Pierre would have liked to subscribe all he had, but fearing that it might look like pride subscribed the same amount as the others.
  • The meeting was at an end, and on reaching home Pierre felt as if he had returned from a long journey on which he had spent dozens of years, had become completely changed, and had quite left behind his former habits and way of life.
  • Now and then his attention wandered from the book and the Square and he formed in imagination a new plan of life.
  • On the previous evening at the Lodge, he had heard that a rumor of his duel had reached the Emperor and that it would be wiser for him to leave Petersburg.
  • He was joyfully planning this new life, when Prince Vasili suddenly entered the room.
  • You are under a delusion, said Prince Vasili, as he entered.
  • I know all about it and understand it all, he said.
  • But consider the position in which you are placing her and me in the eyes of society, and even of the court, he added, lowering his voice.
  • Remember, dear boy," and he drew Pierre's arm downwards, "it is simply a misunderstanding.
  • Pierre tried several times to speak, but, on one hand, Prince Vasili did not let him and, on the other, Pierre himself feared to begin to speak in the tone of decided refusal and disagreement in which he had firmly resolved to answer his father-in-law.
  • He blinked, went red, got up and sat down again, struggling with himself to do what was for him the most difficult thing in life--to say an unpleasant thing to a man's face, to say what the other, whoever he might be, did not expect.
  • He blinked, went red, got up and sat down again, struggling with himself to do what was for him the most difficult thing in life--to say an unpleasant thing to a man's face, to say what the other, whoever he might be, did not expect.
  • And he jumped up and opened the door for him.
  • "Go!" he repeated, amazed at himself and glad to see the look of confusion and fear that showed itself on Prince Vasili's face.
  • He shrugged his shoulders when Pierre was mentioned and, pointing to his forehead, remarked:
  • I said so even at the time when everybody was in raptures about him, when he had just returned from abroad, and when, if you remember, he posed as a sort of Marat at one of my soirees.
  • Anna Pavlovna gave him her shriveled hand to kiss and introduced him to several persons whom he did not know, giving him a whispered description of each.
  • He made friends with and sought the acquaintance of only those above him in position and who could therefore be of use to him.
  • He liked Petersburg and despised Moscow.
  • To be in Anna Pavlovna's drawing room he considered an important step up in the service, and he at once understood his role, letting his hostess make use of whatever interest he had to offer.
  • He himself carefully scanned each face, appraising the possibilities of establishing intimacy with each of those present, and the advantages that might accrue.
  • He took the seat indicated to him beside the fair Helene and listened to the general conversation.
  • Speaking of the position of Prussia, Anna Pavlovna very naturally asked Boris to tell them about his journey to Glogau and in what state he found the Prussian army.
  • Boris, speaking with deliberation, told them in pure, correct French many interesting details about the armies and the court, carefully abstaining from expressing an opinion of his own about the facts he was recounting.
  • For some time he engrossed the general attention, and Anna Pavlovna felt that the novelty she had served up was received with pleasure by all her visitors.
  • As soon as he had finished she turned to him with her usual smile.
  • "You absolutely must come and see me," she said in a tone that implied that, for certain considerations he could not know of, this was absolutely necessary.
  • Bending forward in his armchair he said: "Le Roi de Prusse!" and having said this laughed.
  • Anna Pavlovna waited for him to go on, but as he seemed quite decided to say no more she began to tell of how at Potsdam the impious Bonaparte had stolen the sword of Frederick the Great.
  • She seemed to promise to explain that necessity to him when he came on Tuesday.
  • There were other guests and the countess talked little to him, and only as he kissed her hand on taking leave said unexpectedly and in a whisper, with a strangely unsmiling face: Come to dinner tomorrow... in the evening.
  • He was continually traveling through the three provinces entrusted to him, was pedantic in the fulfillment of his duties, severe to cruel with his subordinates, and went into everything down to the minutest details himself.
  • But what was still stranger, though of this Prince Andrew said nothing to his sister, was that in the expression the sculptor had happened to give the angel's face, Prince Andrew read the same mild reproach he had read on the face of his dead wife: "Ah, why have you done this to me?"
  • Partly because of the depressing memories associated with Bald Hills, partly because Prince Andrew did not always feel equal to bearing with his father's peculiarities, and partly because he needed solitude, Prince Andrew made use of Bogucharovo, began building and spent most of his time there.
  • After the Austerlitz campaign Prince Andrew had firmly resolved not to continue his military service, and when the war recommenced and everybody had to serve, he took a post under his father in the recruitment so as to avoid active service.
  • He was told that the prince had gone to the nursery.
  • "If you please, your excellency, Petrusha has brought some papers," said one of the nursemaids to Prince Andrew who was sitting on a child's little chair while, frowning and with trembling hands, he poured drops from a medicine bottle into a wineglass half full of water.
  • "What is it?" he said crossly, and, his hand shaking unintentionally, he poured too many drops into the glass.
  • He threw the mixture onto the floor and asked for some more water.
  • "Perhaps we'd really better not wake him," he said hesitating.
  • "Devil take them!" he muttered, and after listening to the verbal instructions his father had sent and taking the correspondence and his father's letter, he returned to the nursery.
  • He was burning hot.
  • He took the glass with the drops and again went up to the cot.
  • But he scowled at her angrily though also with suffering in his eyes, and stooped glass in hand over the infant.
  • "But I wish it," he said.
  • He still had all the letters in his hand.
  • Opening them mechanically he began reading.
  • Though he is a German--I congratulate him!
  • Have received another letter about the Preussisch-Eylau battle from Petenka--he took part in it--and it's all true.
  • He is said to be fleeing in great disorder.
  • He folded it up without reading it and reread his father's letter, ending with the words: "Gallop off to Korchevo and carry out instructions!"
  • "No, pardon me, I won't go now till the child is better," thought he, going to the door and looking into the nursery.
  • "Ah yes, and what else did he say that's unpleasant?" thought Prince Andrew, recalling his father's letter.
  • And he began reading Bilibin's letter which was written in French.
  • The head of the garrison at Glogau, with ten thousand men, asks the King of Prussia what he is to do if he is summoned to surrender....
  • The mails are taken to the field marshal's room, for he likes to do everything himself.
  • Then he bursts into one of his wild furies and rages at everyone and everything, seizes the letters, opens them, and reads those from the Emperor addressed to others.
  • So he writes the famous order of the day to General Bennigsen:
  • 'Grant leave to retire to his country seat to an old man who is already in any case dishonored by being unable to fulfill the great and glorious task for which he was chosen.
  • The field marshal is angry with the Emperor and he punishes us all, isn't it logical?
  • Buxhowden is commander-in-chief by seniority, but General Bennigsen does not quite see it; more particularly as it is he and his corps who are within sight of the enemy and he wishes to profit by the opportunity to fight a battle 'on his own hand' as the Germans say.
  • He hardly crosses the river to our side before we recross to the other.
  • At first Prince Andrew read with his eyes only, but after a while, in spite of himself (although he knew how far it was safe to trust Bilibin), what he had read began to interest him more and more.
  • When he had read thus far, he crumpled the letter up and threw it away.
  • It was not what he had read that vexed him, but the fact that the life out there in which he had now no part could perturb him.
  • He shut his eyes, rubbed his forehead as if to rid himself of all interest in what he had read, and listened to what was passing in the nursery.
  • He shut his eyes, rubbed his forehead as if to rid himself of all interest in what he had read, and listened to what was passing in the nursery.
  • Suddenly he thought he heard a strange noise through the door.
  • He was seized with alarm lest something should have happened to the child while he was reading the letter.
  • He was seized with alarm lest something should have happened to the child while he was reading the letter.
  • He went on tiptoe to the nursery door and opened it.
  • Just as he went in he saw that the nurse was hiding something from him with a scared look and that Princess Mary was no longer by the cot.
  • "My dear," he heard what seemed to him her despairing whisper behind him.
  • As often happens after long sleeplessness and long anxiety, he was seized by an unreasoning panic--it occurred to him that the child was dead.
  • "All is over," he thought, and a cold sweat broke out on his forehead.
  • He drew the curtain aside and for some time his frightened, restless eyes could not find the baby.
  • At last he saw him: the rosy boy had tossed about till he lay across the bed with his head lower than the pillow, and was smacking his lips in his sleep and breathing evenly.
  • Prince Andrew was as glad to find the boy like that, as if he had already lost him.
  • He bent over him and, as his sister had taught him, tried with his lips whether the child was still feverish.
  • He was not dead, but evidently the crisis was over and he was convalescent.
  • He was not dead, but evidently the crisis was over and he was convalescent.
  • He stood over him, gazing at his head and at the little arms and legs which showed under the blanket.
  • He heard a rustle behind him and a shadow appeared under the curtain of the cot.
  • He did not look round, but still gazing at the infant's face listened to his regular breathing.
  • "He has perspired," said Prince Andrew.
  • "Yes, this is the one thing left me now," he said with a sigh.
  • When he reached Kiev he sent for all his stewards to the head office and explained to them his intentions and wishes.
  • Despite Count Bezukhov's enormous wealth, since he had come into an income which was said to amount to five hundred thousand rubles a year, Pierre felt himself far poorer than when his father had made him an allowance of ten thousand rubles.
  • The building of a new church, previously begun, had cost about 10,000 in each of the last two years, and he did not know how the rest, about 100,000 rubles, was spent, and almost every year he was obliged to borrow.
  • So the first task Pierre had to face was one for which he had very little aptitude or inclination--practical business.
  • He discussed estate affairs every day with his chief steward.
  • But he felt that this did not forward matters at all.
  • He felt that these consultations were detached from real affairs and did not link up with them or make them move.
  • In Kiev Pierre found some people he knew, and strangers hastened to make his acquaintance and joyfully welcomed the rich newcomer, the largest landowner of the province.
  • Temptations to Pierre's greatest weakness-- the one to which he had confessed when admitted to the Lodge--were so strong that he could not resist them.
  • Instead of the new life he had hoped to lead he still lived the old life, only in new surroundings.
  • He consoled himself with the thought that he fulfilled another of the precepts--that of reforming the human race--and had other virtues--love of his neighbor, and especially generosity.
  • He consoled himself with the thought that he fulfilled another of the precepts--that of reforming the human race--and had other virtues--love of his neighbor, and especially generosity.
  • In the spring of 1807 he decided to return to Petersburg.
  • Continuing to represent the liberation of the serfs as impracticable, he arranged for the erection of large buildings--schools, hospitals, and asylums--on all the estates before the master arrived.
  • Everywhere preparations were made not for ceremonious welcomes (which he knew Pierre would not like), but for just such gratefully religious ones, with offerings of icons and the bread and salt of hospitality, as, according to his understanding of his master, would touch and delude him.
  • The estates he had not before visited were each more picturesque than the other; the serfs everywhere seemed thriving and touchingly grateful for the benefits conferred on them.
  • On a third estate the priest, bearing a cross, came to meet him surrounded by children whom, by the count's generosity, he was instructing in reading, writing, and religion.
  • He did not know that since the nursing mothers were no longer sent to work on his land, they did still harder work on their own land.
  • He did not know that the priest who met him with the cross oppressed the peasants by his exactions, and that the pupils' parents wept at having to let him take their children and secured their release by heavy payments.
  • He did not know that the brick buildings, built to plan, were being built by serfs whose manorial labor was thus increased, though lessened on paper.
  • He was pleased at the gratitude he received, but felt abashed at receiving it.
  • He was pleased at the gratitude he received, but felt abashed at receiving it.
  • This gratitude reminded him of how much more he might do for these simple, kindly people.
  • Returning from his journey through South Russia in the happiest state of mind, Pierre carried out an intention he had long had of visiting his friend Bolkonski, whom he had not seen for two years.
  • Pierre was struck by the modesty of the small though clean house after the brilliant surroundings in which he had last met his friend in Petersburg.
  • He quickly entered the small reception room with its still-unplastered wooden walls redolent of pine, and would have gone farther, but Anton ran ahead on tiptoe and knocked at a door.
  • Pierre said nothing; he looked fixedly at his friend with surprise.
  • He was struck by the change in him.
  • The preoccupation and despondency which Pierre had noticed in his friend's look was now still more clearly expressed in the smile with which he listened to Pierre, especially when he spoke with joyful animation of the past or the future.
  • "My plans?" he said, as if astonished at the word.
  • But of course you know her already, he said, evidently trying to entertain a visitor with whom he now found nothing in common.
  • Prince Andrew spoke with some animation and interest only of the new homestead he was constructing and its buildings, but even here, while on the scaffolding, in the midst of a talk explaining the future arrangements of the house, he interrupted himself:
  • Pierre blushed, as he always did when it was mentioned, and said hurriedly: I will tell you some time how it all happened.
  • "And who has told you what is bad for another man?" he asked.
  • He spoke in French.
  • "When you see my sister, Princess Mary, you'll get on with her," he said.
  • "Perhaps you are right for yourself," he added after a short pause, "but everyone lives in his own way.
  • And he looked at Pierre with a mocking, challenging expression.
  • He evidently wished to draw him on.
  • And the main thing is," he continued, "that I know, and know for certain, that the enjoyment of doing this good is the only sure happiness in life."
  • Well, you want an argument," he added, "come on then."
  • "Come, let's argue then," said Prince Andrew, "You talk of schools," he went on, crooking a finger, "education and so forth; that is, you want to raise him" (pointing to a peasant who passed by them taking off his cap) "from his animal condition and awaken in him spiritual needs, while it seems to me that animal happiness is the only happiness possible, and that is just what you want to deprive him of.
  • I go to bed after two in the morning, thoughts come and I can't sleep but toss about till dawn, because I think and can't help thinking, just as he can't help plowing and mowing; if he didn't, he would go to the drink shop or fall ill.
  • Just as I could not stand his terrible physical labor but should die of it in a week, so he could not stand my physical idleness, but would grow fat and die.
  • He has a fit, he is dying, and you come and bleed him and patch him up.
  • He has a fit, he is dying, and you come and bleed him and patch him up.
  • He will drag about as a cripple, a burden to everybody, for another ten years.
  • And he does not want that.
  • Prince Andrew expressed his ideas so clearly and distinctly that it was evident he had reflected on this subject more than once, and he spoke readily and rapidly like a man who has not talked for a long time.
  • Well, as I was saying," he continued, recovering his composure, "now there's this recruiting.
  • He paused a little while.
  • But he is growing old, and though not exactly cruel he has too energetic a character.
  • He is so accustomed to unlimited power that he is terrible, and now he has this authority of a commander-in-chief of the recruiting, granted by the Emperor.
  • He is so accustomed to unlimited power that he is terrible, and now he has this authority of a commander-in-chief of the recruiting, granted by the Emperor.
  • His eyes glittered feverishly while he tried to prove to Pierre that in his actions there was no desire to do good to his neighbor.
  • He did not reply.
  • Prince Andrew, glancing at Pierre, broke the silence now and then with remarks which showed that he was in a good temper.
  • Pointing to the fields, he spoke of the improvements he was making in his husbandry.
  • But as soon as he thought of what he should say, he felt that Prince Andrew with one word, one argument, would upset all his teaching, and he shrank from beginning, afraid of exposing to possible ridicule what to him was precious and sacred.
  • And he began to explain Freemasonry as he understood it to Prince Andrew.
  • "Do you believe in a future life?" he asked.
  • We must live, we must love, and we must believe that we live not only today on this scrap of earth, but have lived and shall live forever, there, in the Whole, said Pierre, and he pointed to the sky.
  • Prince Andrew stood leaning on the railing of the raft listening to Pierre, and he gazed with his eyes fixed on the red reflection of the sun gleaming on the blue waters.
  • It vanished as soon as he returned to the customary conditions of his life, but he knew that this feeling which he did not know how to develop existed within him.
  • Though outwardly he continued to live in the same old way, inwardly he began a new life.
  • He orders these pilgrims to be driven away, but she receives them.
  • The servants came out to meet them, and he asked where the old prince was and whether he was expected back soon.
  • Prince Andrew led Pierre to his own apartments, which were always kept in perfect order and readiness for him in his father's house; he himself went to the nursery.
  • "Let us go and see my sister," he said to Pierre when he returned.
  • He is kind, he is one of God's chosen, he's a benefactor, he once gave me ten rubles, I remember.
  • He is kind, he is one of God's chosen, he's a benefactor, he once gave me ten rubles, I remember.
  • When I was in Kiev, Crazy Cyril says to me (he's one of God's own and goes barefoot summer and winter), he says, 'Why are you not going to the right place?
  • "Did you see it yourselves?" he inquired.
  • "They impose on the people," he repeated.
  • There was a general who did not believe, and said, 'The monks cheat,' and as soon as he'd said it he went blind.
  • And he dreamed that the Holy Virgin Mother of the Kiev catacombs came to him and said, 'Believe in me and I will make you whole.'
  • So he begged: 'Take me to her, take me to her.'
  • So he was brought, quite blind, straight to her, and he goes up to her and falls down and says, 'Make me whole,' says he, 'and I'll give thee what the Tsar bestowed on me.'
  • He received his sight!
  • His health was better in the winter, but last spring his wound reopened and the doctor said he ought to go away for a cure.
  • He has not a character like us women who, when we suffer, can weep away our sorrows.
  • He keeps it all within him.
  • Today he is cheerful and in good spirits, but that is the effect of your visit--he is not often like that.
  • He needs activity, and this quiet regular life is very bad for him.
  • "Who's that?" asked the old prince, noticing Pierre as he got out of the carriage.
  • Kiss me, he said, having learned who the young stranger was.
  • Old women's nonsense--old women's nonsense! he repeated, but still he patted Pierre affectionately on the shoulder, and then went up to the table where Prince Andrew, evidently not wishing to join in the conversation, was looking over the papers his father had brought from town.
  • He came to town and wanted to invite me to dinner--I gave him a pretty dinner!...
  • He stirs me up.
  • Make friends with my little fool, Princess Mary, he shouted after Pierre, through the door.
  • With the stern old prince and the gentle, timid Princess Mary, though he had scarcely known them, Pierre at once felt like an old friend.
  • And during the two days of the young man's visit he was extremely kind to him and told him to visit them again.
  • On approaching it, Rostov felt as he had done when approaching his home in Moscow.
  • After his losses, he had determined to pay back his debt to his parents in five years.
  • He received ten thousand rubles a year, but now resolved to take only two thousand and leave the rest to repay the debt to his parents.
  • On one of his foraging expeditions, in a deserted and ruined village to which he had come in search of provisions, Rostov found a family consisting of an old Pole and his daughter with an infant in arms.
  • "Ah, what a mad bweed you Wostovs are!" he muttered, and Rostov noticed tears in his eyes.
  • In April the troops were enlivened by news of the Emperor's arrival, but Rostov had no chance of being present at the review he held at Bartenstein, as the Pavlograds were at the outposts far beyond that place.
  • One morning, between seven and eight, returning after a sleepless night, he sent for embers, changed his rain-soaked underclothes, said his prayers, drank tea, got warm, then tidied up the things on the table and in his own corner, and, his face glowing from exposure to the wind and with nothing on but his shirt, lay down on his back, putting his arms under his head.
  • He was pleasantly considering the probability of being promoted in a few days for his last reconnoitering expedition, and was awaiting Denisov, who had gone out somewhere and with whom he wanted a talk.
  • He was pleasantly considering the probability of being promoted in a few days for his last reconnoitering expedition, and was awaiting Denisov, who had gone out somewhere and with whom he wanted a talk.
  • Suddenly he heard Denisov shouting in a vibrating voice behind the hut, evidently much excited.
  • Rostov moved to the window to see whom he was speaking to, and saw the quartermaster, Topcheenko.
  • He could hear that Lavrushka--that sly, bold orderly of Denisov's--was talking, as well as the quartermaster.
  • Lavrushka was saying something about loaded wagons, biscuits, and oxen he had seen when he had gone out for provisions.
  • In answer to Rostov's inquiry where he was going, he answered vaguely and crossly that he had some business.
  • He did not even trouble to find out where Denisov had gone.
  • Having got warm in his corner, he fell asleep and did not leave the hut till toward evening.
  • A little behind the hussars came Denisov, accompanied by two infantry officers with whom he was talking.
  • Go! he shouted at the officers.
  • "Very well, very well!" muttered the officer, threateningly, and turning his horse he trotted away, jolting in his saddle.
  • A weal dog astwide a fence! shouted Denisov after him (the most insulting expression a cavalryman can address to a mounted infantryman) and riding up to Rostov, he burst out laughing.
  • "I've taken twansports from the infantwy by force!" he said.
  • When Rostov asked what was the matter, he only uttered some incoherent oaths and threats in a hoarse, feeble voice.
  • Alarmed at Denisov's condition, Rostov suggested that he should undress, drink some water, and send for the doctor.
  • The regimental doctor, when he came, said it was absolutely necessary to bleed Denisov.
  • A deep saucer of black blood was taken from his hairy arm and only then was he able to relate what had happened to him.
  • Then he says: 'Go and give a weceipt to the commissioner, but your affair will be passed on to headquarters.'
  • Next day he woke calm and cheerful.
  • In answer to Rostov's renewed questions, Denisov said, laughing, that he thought he remembered that some other fellow had got mixed up in it, but that it was all nonsense and rubbish, and he did not in the least fear any kind of trial, and that if those scoundrels dared attack him he would give them an answer that they would not easily forget.
  • Perhaps at another time Denisov would not have left the regiment for so slight a wound, but now he took advantage of it to excuse himself from appearing at the staff and went into hospital.
  • Rostov, who felt his friend's absence very much, having no news of him since he left and feeling very anxious about his wound and the progress of his affairs, took advantage of the armistice to get leave to visit Denisov in hospital.
  • Directly Rostov entered the door he was enveloped by a smell of putrefaction and hospital air.
  • On the stairs he met a Russian army doctor smoking a cigar.
  • Only we two, Makeev and I" (he pointed to the assistant), "keep on here.
  • When a new one comes he is done for in a week, said the doctor with evident satisfaction.
  • Rostov explained that he wanted to see Major Denisov of the hussars, who was wounded.
  • It's well that the charitable Prussian ladies send us two pounds of coffee and some lint each month or we should be lost! he laughed.
  • Eh? he asked, turning to the assistant.
  • He was evidently vexed and impatient for the talkative doctor to go.
  • He was wounded at Molliten.
  • "Is he tall and with reddish hair?" asked the doctor.
  • "But if you'll step into the officers' wards you'll see for yourself," he added, turning to Rostov.
  • The smell was so strong there that Rostov held his nose and had to pause and collect his strength before he could go on.
  • The foul air, to which he had already begun to get used in the corridor, was still stronger here.
  • He stood still, looking silently around.
  • He had not at all expected such a sight.
  • He was knocking the back of his head against the floor, hoarsely uttering some word which he kept repeating.
  • He was knocking the back of his head against the floor, hoarsely uttering some word which he kept repeating.
  • "Who looks after the sick here?" he asked the assistant.
  • "Good day, your honor!" he shouted, rolling his eyes at Rostov and evidently mistaking him for one of the hospital authorities.
  • "Yes, your honor," the soldier replied complacently, and rolling his eyes more than ever he drew himself up still straighter, but did not move.
  • "Why, this one seems..." he began, turning to the assistant.
  • He shall be taken away--taken away at once, said the assistant hurriedly.
  • Rostov looked at him, trying to remember where he had seen him before.
  • And I've had a bit cut off, you see... he went on with a smile, pointing to the empty sleeve of his dressing gown.
  • My neighbor, he added, when he heard who Rostov wanted.
  • How are you, how are you? he called out, still in the same voice as in the regiment, but Rostov noticed sadly that under this habitual ease and animation some new, sinister, hidden feeling showed itself in the expression of Denisov's face and the intonations of his voice.
  • He did not ask about the regiment, nor about the general state of affairs, and when Rostov spoke of these matters did not listen.
  • He seemed to try to forget that old life and was only interested in the affair with the commissariat officers.
  • On Rostov's inquiry as to how the matter stood, he at once produced from under his pillow a paper he had received from the commission and the rough draft of his answer to it.
  • He became animated when he began reading his paper and specially drew Rostov's attention to the stinging rejoinders he made to his enemies.
  • He became animated when he began reading his paper and specially drew Rostov's attention to the stinging rejoinders he made to his enemies.
  • "Me petition the Empewo'!" exclaimed Denisov, in a voice to which he tried hard to give the old energy and fire, but which sounded like an expression of irritable impotence.
  • "It's certainly well written," said Tushin, "but that's not the point, Vasili Dmitrich," and he also turned to Rostov.
  • No doubt he" (indicating Rostov) "has connections on the staff.
  • He knew his stubborn will and straightforward hasty temper.
  • Late in the evening, when Rostov was about to leave, he asked Denisov whether he had no commission for him.
  • "Yes, wait a bit," said Denisov, glancing round at the officers, and taking his papers from under his pillow he went to the window, where he had an inkpot, and sat down to write.
  • "It seems it's no use knocking one's head against a wall!" he said, coming from the window and giving Rostov a large envelope.
  • He did not finish, but gave a painfully unnatural smile.
  • Boris Drubetskoy had asked the important personage on whom he was in attendance, to include him in the suite appointed for the stay at Tilsit.
  • "I should like to see the great man," he said, alluding to Napoleon, whom hitherto he, like everyone else, had always called Buonaparte.
  • Boris looked at his general inquiringly and immediately saw that he was being tested.
  • "I am speaking, Prince, of the Emperor Napoleon," he replied.
  • "You will go far," he said, and took him to Tilsit with him.
  • Since he had begun to move in the highest circles Boris had made it his habit to watch attentively all that went on around him and to note it down.
  • At the time of the meeting at Tilsit he asked the names of those who had come with Napoleon and about the uniforms they wore, and listened attentively to words spoken by important personages.
  • At the moment the Emperors went into the pavilion he looked at his watch, and did not forget to look at it again when Alexander came out.
  • He noted this down that same evening, among other facts he felt to be of historic importance.
  • He noted this down that same evening, among other facts he felt to be of historic importance.
  • He had not only become known, but people had grown accustomed to him and accepted him.
  • Rostov, in common with the whole army from which he came, was far from having experienced the change of feeling toward Napoleon and the French- -who from being foes had suddenly become friends--that had taken place at headquarters and in Boris.
  • Only recently, talking with one of Platov's Cossack officers, Rostov had argued that if Napoleon were taken prisoner he would be treated not as a sovereign, but as a criminal.
  • As soon as he noticed a French officer, who thrust his head out of the door, that warlike feeling of hostility which he always experienced at the sight of the enemy suddenly seized him.
  • He stopped at the threshold and asked in Russian whether Drubetskoy lived there.
  • Very glad, very glad to see you, he said, however, coming toward him with a smile.
  • I should not have come, but I have business, he said coldly.
  • The look of annoyance had already disappeared from Boris' face: having evidently reflected and decided how to act, he very quietly took both Rostov's hands and led him into the next room.
  • As if you could come at a wrong time! said Boris, and he led him into the room where the supper table was laid and introduced him to his guests, explaining that he was not a civilian, but an hussar officer, and an old friend of his.
  • He really was in their way, for he alone took no part in the conversation which again became general.
  • He really was in their way, for he alone took no part in the conversation which again became general.
  • The looks the visitors cast on him seemed to say: "And what is he sitting here for?"
  • He rose and went up to Boris.
  • "Anyhow, I'm in your way," he said in a low tone.
  • When he and Boris were alone, Rostov felt for the first time that he could not look Boris in the face without a sense of awkwardness.
  • "Well then, go, go, go..." said Rostov, and refusing supper and remaining alone in the little room, he walked up and down for a long time, hearing the lighthearted French conversation from the next room.
  • He could not himself go to the general in attendance as he was in mufti and had come to Tilsit without permission to do so, and Boris, even had he wished to, could not have done so on the following day.
  • He could not himself go to the general in attendance as he was in mufti and had come to Tilsit without permission to do so, and Boris, even had he wished to, could not have done so on the following day.
  • Rostov felt so ill at ease and uncomfortable with Boris that, when the latter looked in after supper, he pretended to be asleep, and early next morning went away, avoiding Boris.
  • In his civilian clothes and a round hat, he wandered about the town, staring at the French and their uniforms and at the streets and houses where the Russian and French Emperors were staying.
  • He is here! thought Rostov, who had unconsciously returned to the house where Alexander lodged.
  • He would understand on whose side justice lies.
  • He understands everything, knows everything.
  • And even if they did arrest me for being here, what would it matter? thought he, looking at an officer who was entering the house the Emperor occupied.
  • And suddenly with a determination he himself did not expect, Rostov felt for the letter in his pocket and went straight to the house.
  • He will lift me up, will listen, and will even thank me.
  • And passing people who looked after him with curiosity, he entered the porch of the Emperor's house.
  • A broad staircase led straight up from the entry, and to the right he saw a closed door.
  • This way, to the officer on duty" (he was shown the door leading downstairs), "only it won't be accepted."
  • On hearing this indifferent voice, Rostov grew frightened at what he was doing; the thought of meeting the Emperor at any moment was so fascinating and consequently so alarming that he was ready to run away, but the official who had questioned him opened the door, and Rostov entered.
  • "A good figure and in her first bloom," he was saying, but on seeing Rostov, he stopped short and frowned.
  • And go along with you... go, and he continued to put on the uniform the valet handed him.
  • Rostov went back into the hall and noticed that in the porch there were many officers and generals in full parade uniform, whom he had to pass.
  • Rostov, in dismay, began justifying himself, but seeing the kindly, jocular face of the general, he took him aside and in an excited voice told him the whole affair, asking him to intercede for Denisov, whom the general knew.
  • Forgetting the danger of being recognized, Rostov went close to the porch, together with some inquisitive civilians, and again, after two years, saw those features he adored: that same face and same look and step, and the same union of majesty and mildness....
  • He stopped and looked about him, brightening everything around by his glance.
  • He spoke a few words to some of the generals, and, recognizing the former commander of Rostov's division, smiled and beckoned to him.
  • I cannot, because the law is stronger than I, and he raised his foot to the stirrup.
  • He came at a gallop, wearing a small hat, a blue uniform open over a white vest, and the St. Andrew ribbon over his shoulder.
  • He was riding a very fine thoroughbred gray Arab horse with a crimson gold-embroidered saddlecloth.
  • On approaching Alexander he raised his hat, and as he did so, Rostov, with his cavalryman's eye, could not help noticing that Napoleon did not sit well or firmly in the saddle.
  • The crowd unexpectedly found itself so close to the Emperors that Rostov, standing in the front row, was afraid he might be recognized.
  • The members of his suite, guessing at once what he wanted, moved about and whispered as they passed something from one to another, and a page--the same one Rostov had seen the previous evening at Boris'--ran forward and, bowing respectfully over the outstretched hand and not keeping it waiting a moment, laid in it an Order on a red ribbon.
  • But receiving no orders, he remained for some time in that rigid position.
  • He must respond in kind.
  • On his way back, he noticed Rostov standing by the corner of a house.
  • In his mind, a painful process was going on which he could not bring to a conclusion.
  • Now he remembered Denisov with his changed expression, his submission, and the whole hospital, with arms and legs torn off and its dirt and disease.
  • So vividly did he recall that hospital stench of dead flesh that he looked round to see where the smell came from.
  • Then again he thought of Lazarev rewarded and Denisov punished and unpardoned.
  • He caught himself harboring such strange thoughts that he was frightened.
  • He caught himself harboring such strange thoughts that he was frightened.
  • The smell of the food the Preobrazhenskis were eating and a sense of hunger recalled him from these reflections; he had to get something to eat before going away.
  • He went to a hotel he had noticed that morning.
  • He went to a hotel he had noticed that morning.
  • There he found so many people, among them officers who, like himself, had come in civilian clothes, that he had difficulty in getting a dinner.
  • He finished a couple of bottles of wine by himself.
  • He feared to give way to his thoughts, yet could not get rid of them.
  • "How can you judge what's best?" he cried, the blood suddenly rushing to his face.
  • "We are not diplomatic officials, we are soldiers and nothing more," he went on.
  • Another bottle! he shouted.
  • He had in the highest degree a practical tenacity which Pierre lacked, and without fuss or strain on his part this set things going.
  • The other half he spent in "Bogucharovo Cloister," as his father called Prince Andrew's estate.
  • Warmed by the spring sunshine he sat in the caleche looking at the new grass, the first leaves on the birches, and the first puffs of white spring clouds floating across the clear blue sky.
  • He was not thinking of anything, but looked absent-mindedly and cheerfully from side to side.
  • They crossed the ferry where he had talked with Pierre the year before.
  • But apparently the coachman's sympathy was not enough for Peter, and he turned on the box toward his master.
  • "How pleasant it is, your excellency!" he said with a respectful smile.
  • "What is he talking about?" thought Prince Andrew.
  • "Oh, the spring, I suppose," he thought as he turned round.
  • As he passed through the forest Prince Andrew turned several times to look at that oak, as if expecting something from it.
  • During this journey he, as it were, considered his life afresh and arrived at his old conclusion, restful in its hopelessness: that it was not for him to begin anything anew--but that he must live out his life, content to do no harm, and not disturbing himself or desiring anything.
  • Prince Andrew had to see the Marshal of the Nobility for the district in connection with the affairs of the Ryazan estate of which he was trustee.
  • Prince Andrew, depressed and preoccupied with the business about which he had to speak to the Marshal, was driving up the avenue in the grounds of the Rostovs' house at Otradnoe.
  • He heard merry girlish cries behind some trees on the right and saw a group of girls running to cross the path of his caleche.
  • The girl was shouting something but, seeing that he was a stranger, ran back laughing without looking at him.
  • Suddenly, he did not know why, he felt a pang.
  • In 1809 Count Ilya Rostov was living at Otradnoe just as he had done in former years, that is, entertaining almost the whole province with hunts, theatricals, dinners, and music.
  • He was glad to see Prince Andrew, as he was to see any new visitor, and insisted on his staying the night.
  • He was glad to see Prince Andrew, as he was to see any new visitor, and insisted on his staying the night.
  • During the dull day, in the course of which he was entertained by his elderly hosts and by the more important of the visitors (the old count's house was crowded on account of an approaching name day), Prince Andrew repeatedly glanced at Natasha, gay and laughing among the younger members of the company, and asked himself each time, What is she thinking about?
  • That night, alone in new surroundings, he was long unable to sleep.
  • He read awhile and then put out his candle, but relit it.
  • He got up and went to the window to open it.
  • He opened the casement.
  • He heard female voices overhead.
  • Sonya! he again heard the first speaker.
  • He heard the sound of a scuffle and Sonya's disapproving voice: "It's past one o'clock."
  • From time to time he heard a soft rustle and at times a sigh.
  • In his soul there suddenly arose such an unexpected turmoil of youthful thoughts and hopes, contrary to the whole tenor of his life, that unable to explain his condition to himself he lay down and fell asleep at once.
  • It was already the beginning of June when on his return journey he drove into the birch forest where the gnarled old oak had made so strange and memorable an impression on him.
  • "But where is it?" he again wondered, gazing at the left side of the road, and without recognizing it he looked with admiration at the very oak he sought.
  • "Yes, it is the same oak," thought Prince Andrew, and all at once he was seized by an unreasoning springtime feeling of joy and renewal.
  • He could not now understand how he could ever even have doubted the necessity of taking an active share in life, just as a month before he had not understood how the idea of leaving the quiet country could ever enter his head.
  • He could not now understand how he could ever even have doubted the necessity of taking an active share in life, just as a month before he had not understood how the idea of leaving the quiet country could ever enter his head.
  • It now seemed clear to him that all his experience of life must be senselessly wasted unless he applied it to some kind of work and again played an active part in life.
  • He did not even remember how formerly, on the strength of similar wretched logical arguments, it had seemed obvious that he would be degrading himself if he now, after the lessons he had had in life, allowed himself to believe in the possibility of being useful and in the possibility of happiness or love.
  • He did not even remember how formerly, on the strength of similar wretched logical arguments, it had seemed obvious that he would be degrading himself if he now, after the lessons he had had in life, allowed himself to believe in the possibility of being useful and in the possibility of happiness or love.
  • After that journey to Ryazan he found the country dull; his former pursuits no longer interested him, and often when sitting alone in his study he got up, went to the mirror, and gazed a long time at his own face.
  • Then he would turn away to the portrait of his dead Lise, who with hair curled a la grecque looked tenderly and gaily at him out of the gilt frame.
  • And if anyone came into his room at such moments he was particularly cold, stern, and above all unpleasantly logical.
  • "If it were hot," Prince Andrew would reply at such times very dryly to his sister, "he could go out in his smock, but as it is cold he must wear warm clothes, which were designed for that purpose.
  • The Emperor, though he met him twice, did not favor him with a single word.
  • He mentioned what he had written to an old field marshal, a friend of his father's.
  • He mentioned what he had written to an old field marshal, a friend of his father's.
  • A few days later Prince Andrew received notice that he was to go to see the Minister of War, Count Arakcheev.
  • He did not know Arakcheev personally, had never seen him, and all he had heard of him inspired him with but little respect for the man.
  • He did not know Arakcheev personally, had never seen him, and all he had heard of him inspired him with but little respect for the man.
  • "Here!" and he handed it to Prince Andrew.
  • Who else is there? he shouted, bowing to Prince Andrew.
  • The reforming party cordially welcomed and courted him, in the first place because he was reputed to be clever and very well read, and secondly because by liberating his serfs he had obtained the reputation of being a liberal.
  • The party of the old and dissatisfied, who censured the innovations, turned to him expecting his sympathy in their disapproval of the reforms, simply because he was the son of his father.
  • He has promised to come this evening.
  • "There's one thing I don't understand," he continued.
  • Is he to go up for examination?
  • He rose, took Prince Andrew by the arm, and went to meet a tall, bald, fair man of about forty with a large open forehead and a long face of unusual and peculiar whiteness, who was just entering.
  • This was Speranski, Secretary of State, reporter to the Emperor and his companion at Erfurt, where he had more than once met and talked with Napoleon.
  • He spoke slowly, with assurance that he would be listened to, and he looked only at the person with whom he was conversing.
  • He spoke slowly, with assurance that he would be listened to, and he looked only at the person with whom he was conversing.
  • As happens to some people, especially to men who judge those near to them severely, he always on meeting anyone new-- especially anyone whom, like Speranski, he knew by reputation--expected to discover in him the perfection of human qualities.
  • He did not say that the Emperor had kept him, and Prince Andrew noticed this affectation of modesty.
  • I had heard of you, as everyone has, he said after a pause.
  • He paused at the full stop.
  • It was clear that he thought it necessary to interest himself in Bolkonski.
  • "I think, however, that these condemnations have some ground," returned Prince Andrew, trying to resist Speranski's influence, of which he began to be conscious.
  • He did not like to agree with him in everything and felt a wish to contradict.
  • Though he usually spoke easily and well, he felt a difficulty in expressing himself now while talking with Speranski.
  • He was too much absorbed in observing the famous man's personality.
  • "Si vous envisagez la question sous ce point de vue," * he began, pronouncing French with evident difficulty, and speaking even slower than in Russian but quite calmly.
  • "If you will do me the honor of calling on me on Wednesday," he added, "I will, after talking with Magnitski, let you know what may interest you, and shall also have the pleasure of a more detailed chat with you."
  • Closing his eyes, he bowed a la francaise, without taking leave, and trying to attract as little attention as possible, he left the room.
  • During the first weeks of his stay in Petersburg Prince Andrew felt the whole trend of thought he had formed during his life of seclusion quite overshadowed by the trifling cares that engrossed him in that city.
  • On returning home in the evening he would jot down in his notebook four or five necessary calls or appointments for certain hours.
  • He did nothing, did not even think or find time to think, but only talked, and talked successfully, of what he had thought while in the country.
  • He did nothing, did not even think or find time to think, but only talked, and talked successfully, of what he had thought while in the country.
  • He sometimes noticed with dissatisfaction that he repeated the same remark on the same day in different circles.
  • He sometimes noticed with dissatisfaction that he repeated the same remark on the same day in different circles.
  • But he was so busy for whole days together that he had no time to notice that he was thinking of nothing.
  • As he had done on their first meeting at Kochubey's, Speranski produced a strong impression on Prince Andrew on the Wednesday, when he received him tête-à-tête at his own house and talked to him long and confidentially.
  • To Bolkonski so many people appeared contemptible and insignificant creatures, and he so longed to find in someone the living ideal of that perfection toward which he strove, that he readily believed that in Speranski he had found this ideal of a perfectly rational and virtuous man.
  • Had Speranski sprung from the same class as himself and possessed the same breeding and traditions, Bolkonski would soon have discovered his weak, human, unheroic sides; but as it was, Speranski's strange and logical turn of mind inspired him with respect all the more because he did not quite understand him.
  • This first long conversation with Speranski only strengthened in Prince Andrew the feeling he had experienced toward him at their first meeting.
  • In Prince Andrew's eyes Speranski was the man he would himself have wished to be--one who explained all the facts of life reasonably, considered important only what was rational, and was capable of applying the standard of reason to everything.
  • If he replied and argued, it was only because he wished to maintain his independence and not submit to Speranski's opinions entirely.
  • This mirrorlike gaze and those delicate hands irritated Prince Andrew, he knew not why.
  • He was unpleasantly struck, too, by the excessive contempt for others that he observed in Speranski, and by the diversity of lines of argument he used to support his opinions.
  • He was unpleasantly struck, too, by the excessive contempt for others that he observed in Speranski, and by the diversity of lines of argument he used to support his opinions.
  • (This last resource was one he very frequently employed.)
  • It was evident that the thought could never occur to him which to Prince Andrew seemed so natural, namely, that it is after all impossible to express all one thinks; and that he had never felt the doubt, "Is not all I think and believe nonsense?"
  • During the first period of their acquaintance Bolkonski felt a passionate admiration for him similar to that which he had once felt for Bonaparte.
  • Prince Andrew said that for that work an education in jurisprudence was needed which he did not possess.
  • He arranged dining and funeral lodge meetings, enrolled new members, and busied himself uniting various lodges and acquiring authentic charters.
  • He supported almost singlehanded a poorhouse the order had founded in Petersburg.
  • He liked to dine and drink well, and though he considered it immoral and humiliating could not resist the temptations of the bachelor circles in which he moved.
  • He liked to dine and drink well, and though he considered it immoral and humiliating could not resist the temptations of the bachelor circles in which he moved.
  • Amid the turmoil of his activities and distractions, however, Pierre at the end of a year began to feel that the more firmly he tried to rest upon it, the more masonic ground on which he stood gave way under him.
  • When he had joined the Freemasons he had experienced the feeling of one who confidently steps onto the smooth surface of a bog.
  • When he put his foot down it sank in.
  • Joseph Alexeevich was not in Petersburg--he had of late stood aside from the affairs of the Petersburg lodges, and lived almost entirely in Moscow.
  • Under the masonic aprons and insignia he saw the uniforms and decorations at which they aimed in ordinary life.
  • Often after collecting alms, and reckoning up twenty to thirty rubles received for the most part in promises from a dozen members, of whom half were as well able to pay as himself, Pierre remembered the masonic vow in which each Brother promised to devote all his belongings to his neighbor, and doubts on which he tried not to dwell arose in his soul.
  • He divided the Brothers he knew into four categories.
  • He divided the Brothers he knew into four categories.
  • Pierre respected this class of Brothers to which the elder ones chiefly belonged, including, Pierre thought, Joseph Alexeevich himself, but he did not share their interests.
  • Pierre began to feel dissatisfied with what he was doing.
  • He did not think of doubting Freemasonry itself, but suspected that Russian Masonry had taken a wrong path and deviated from its original principles.
  • And so toward the end of the year he went abroad to be initiated into the higher secrets of the order.
  • The Petersburg Freemasons all came to see him, tried to ingratiate themselves with him, and it seemed to them all that he was preparing something for them and concealing it.
  • A solemn meeting of the lodge of the second degree was convened, at which Pierre promised to communicate to the Petersburg Brothers what he had to deliver to them from the highest leaders of their order.
  • "Dear Brothers," he began, blushing and stammering, with a written speech in his hand, "it is not sufficient to observe our mysteries in the seclusion of our lodge--we must act--act!
  • At that meeting he was struck for the first time by the endless variety of men's minds, which prevents a truth from ever presenting itself identically to two persons.
  • Even those members who seemed to be on his side understood him in their own way with limitations and alterations he could not agree to, as what he always wanted most was to convey his thought to others just as he himself understood it.
  • He was told that it would not, and without waiting for the usual formalities he left the lodge and went home.
  • He was told that it would not, and without waiting for the usual formalities he left the lodge and went home.
  • Again Pierre was overtaken by the depression he so dreaded.
  • For three days after the delivery of his speech at the lodge he lay on a sofa at home receiving no one and going nowhere.
  • It was just then that he received a letter from his wife, who implored him to see her, telling him how grieved she was about him and how she wished to devote her whole life to him.
  • Pierre saw that there was a conspiracy against him and that they wanted to reunite him with his wife, and in the mood he then was, this was not even unpleasant to him.
  • Nothing in life seemed to him of much importance, and under the influence of the depression that possessed him he valued neither his liberty nor his resolution to punish his wife.
  • "No one is right and no one is to blame; so she too is not to blame," he thought.
  • Had his wife come to him, he would not have turned her away.
  • Compared to what preoccupied him, was it not a matter of indifference whether he lived with his wife or not?
  • This is what he noted in his diary:
  • From morning till late at night, except when he eats his very plain food, he is working at science.
  • He received me graciously and made me sit down on the bed on which he lay.
  • He received me graciously and made me sit down on the bed on which he lay.
  • I made the sign of the Knights of the East and of Jerusalem, and he responded in the same manner, asking me with a mild smile what I had learned and gained in the Prussian and Scottish lodges.
  • He surprised me by asking whether I remembered the threefold aim of the order: (1) The preservation and study of the mystery.
  • Talking of my family affairs he said to me, the chief duty of a true Mason, as I have told you, lies in perfecting himself.
  • He was that absent-minded crank, a grand seigneur husband who was in no one's way, and far from spoiling the high tone and general impression of the drawing room, he served, by the contrast he presented to her, as an advantageous background to his elegant and tactful wife.
  • He was that absent-minded crank, a grand seigneur husband who was in no one's way, and far from spoiling the high tone and general impression of the drawing room, he served, by the contrast he presented to her, as an advantageous background to his elegant and tactful wife.
  • He entered his wife's drawing room as one enters a theater, was acquainted with everybody, equally pleased to see everyone, and equally indifferent to them all.
  • "No, now that she has become a bluestocking she has finally renounced her former infatuations," he told himself.
  • Pierre went on with his diary, and this is what he wrote in it during that time:
  • He told me of the Emperor's new projects.
  • I wished to meditate, but instead my imagination pictured an occurrence of four years ago, when Dolokhov, meeting me in Moscow after our duel, said he hoped I was enjoying perfect peace of mind in spite of my wife's absence.
  • He became silent, and I recollected myself only when it was too late.
  • But as soon as I drew near I saw that his face had changed and grown young, and he was quietly telling me something about the teaching of our order, but so softly that I could not hear it.
  • He was telling me something, and I wished to show him my sensibility, and not listening to what he was saying I began picturing to myself the condition of my inner man and the grace of God sanctifying me.
  • He was telling me something, and I wished to show him my sensibility, and not listening to what he was saying I began picturing to myself the condition of my inner man and the grace of God sanctifying me.
  • And tears came into my eyes, and I was glad he noticed this.
  • But he looked at me with vexation and jumped up, breaking off his remarks.
  • He lay down on the edge of it and I burned with longing to caress him and lie down too.
  • And he said, Tell me frankly what is your chief temptation?
  • To this he replied that one should not deprive a wife of one's embraces and gave me to understand that that was my duty.
  • That day I received a letter from my benefactor in which he wrote about "conjugal duties."
  • I embraced him and kissed his hands, and he said, "Hast thou noticed that my face is different?"
  • I looked at him, still holding him in my arms, and saw that his face was young, but that he had no hair on his head and his features were quite changed.
  • And suddenly I saw him lying like a dead body; then he gradually recovered and went with me into my study carrying a large book of sheets of drawing paper; I said, "I drew that," and he answered by bowing his head.
  • Among the men who very soon became frequent visitors at the Rostovs' house in Petersburg were Boris, Pierre whom the count had met in the street and dragged home with him, and Berg who spent whole days at the Rostovs' and paid the eldest daughter, Countess Vera, the attentions a young man pays when he intends to propose.
  • He narrated that episode so persistently and with so important an air that everyone believed in the merit and usefulness of his deed, and he had obtained two decorations for Austerlitz.
  • He narrated that episode so persistently and with so important an air that everyone believed in the merit and usefulness of his deed, and he had obtained two decorations for Austerlitz.
  • In the Finnish war he also managed to distinguish himself.
  • He had picked up the scrap of a grenade that had killed an aide-de-camp standing near the commander-in-chief and had taken it to his commander.
  • In 1809 he was a captain in the Guards, wore medals, and held some special lucrative posts in Petersburg.
  • Though some skeptics smiled when told of Berg's merits, it could not be denied that he was a painstaking and brave officer, on excellent terms with his superiors, and a moral young man with a brilliant career before him and an assured position in society.
  • Now in Petersburg, having considered the Rostovs' position and his own, he decided that the time had come to propose.
  • "You see," said Berg to his comrade, whom he called "friend" only because he knew that everyone has friends, "you see, I have considered it all, and should not marry if I had not thought it all out or if it were in any way unsuitable.
  • Well, you will be coming," he was going to say, "to dine," but changed his mind and said "to take tea with us," and quickly doubling up his tongue he blew a small round ring of tobacco smoke, perfectly embodying his dream of happiness.
  • He did not know at all how much he had, what his debts amounted to, or what dowry he could give Vera.
  • He did not know at all how much he had, what his debts amounted to, or what dowry he could give Vera.
  • Nor had he any money.
  • The count was so disconcerted by this long-foreseen inquiry that without consideration he gave the first reply that came into his head.
  • And patting Berg on the shoulder he got up, wishing to end the conversation.
  • But Berg, smiling pleasantly, explained that if he did not know for certain how much Vera would have and did not receive at least part of the dowry in advance, he would have to break matters off.
  • Berg smiled meekly, kissed the count on the shoulder, and said that he was very grateful, but that it was impossible for him to arrange his new life without receiving thirty thousand in ready money.
  • "Or at least twenty thousand, Count," he added, "and then a note of hand for only sixty thousand."
  • Since Boris left Moscow in 1805 to join the army he had not seen the Rostovs.
  • Anna Mikhaylovna also had of late visited them less frequently, seemed to hold herself with particular dignity, and always spoke rapturously and gratefully of the merits of her son and the brilliant career on which he had entered.
  • He drove to their house in some agitation.
  • But he went with the firm intention of letting her and her parents feel that the childish relations between himself and Natasha could not be binding either on her or on him.
  • He had a brilliant position in society thanks to his intimacy with Countess Bezukhova, a brilliant position in the service thanks to the patronage of an important personage whose complete confidence he enjoyed, and he was beginning to make plans for marrying one of the richest heiresses in Petersburg, plans which might very easily be realized.
  • He had a brilliant position in society thanks to his intimacy with Countess Bezukhova, a brilliant position in the service thanks to the patronage of an important personage whose complete confidence he enjoyed, and he was beginning to make plans for marrying one of the richest heiresses in Petersburg, plans which might very easily be realized.
  • When he entered the Rostovs' drawing room Natasha was in her own room.
  • Boris kissed Natasha's hand and said that he was astonished at the change in her.
  • He felt the weight of that resolute and affectionate scrutiny and glanced at her occasionally.
  • He looked round more frequently toward her, and broke off in what he was saying.
  • He looked round more frequently toward her, and broke off in what he was saying.
  • He did not stay more than ten minutes, then rose and took his leave.
  • Boris made up his mind to avoid meeting Natasha, but despite that resolution he called again a few days later and began calling often and spending whole days at the Rostovs'.
  • It seemed to him that he ought to have an explanation with Natasha and tell her that the old times must be forgotten, that in spite of everything... she could not be his wife, that he had no means, and they would never let her marry him.
  • From day to day he became more and more entangled.
  • He is very nice, and I love him like a son.
  • Because he is young, because he is poor, because he is a relation... and because you yourself don't love him.
  • He may already have found a suitable and wealthy match, and now he's half crazy.
  • Cyril Matveich... but he is old.
  • He was not always old.
  • He need not come so often....
  • Why not, if he likes to?
  • Well, I won't marry, but let him come if he enjoys it and I enjoy it.
  • But, Mamma, is he very much in love?
  • Only not quite my taste--he is so narrow, like the dining-room clock....
  • Bezukhov, now, is blue, dark-blue and red, and he is square.
  • No, he is a Freemason, I have found out.
  • He is fine, dark-blue and red....
  • Next day the countess called Boris aside and had a talk with him, after which he ceased coming to the Rostovs'.
  • Don't come in, Papa! she cried to her father as he opened the door--speaking from under the filmy skirt which still covered her whole face.
  • He was wearing a blue swallow-tail coat, shoes and stockings, and was perfumed and his hair pomaded.
  • He would have embraced her but, blushing, she stepped aside fearing to be rumpled.
  • "Charming!" said he, kissing the tips of his fingers.
  • Looks as if he were a king!
  • Put him beside his wife and he looks a regular buffoon!
  • Pierre, swaying his stout body, advanced, making way through the crowd and nodding to right and left as casually and good-naturedly as if he were passing through a crowd at a fair.
  • He pushed through, evidently looking for someone.
  • He had promised to be at the ball and introduce partners to her.
  • But before he reached them Pierre stopped beside a very handsome, dark man of middle height, and in a white uniform, who stood by a window talking to a tall man wearing stars and a ribbon.
  • You remember, he stayed a night with us at Otradnoe.
  • Just look how he treats the ladies!
  • There's one talking to him and he has turned away, she said, pointing at him.
  • I'd give it to him if he treated me as he does those ladies.
  • * "He is all the rage just now."
  • He walked in rapidly, bowing to right and left as if anxious to get the first moments of the reception over.
  • At last the Emperor stopped beside his last partner (he had danced with three) and the music ceased.
  • Ask her, he said.
  • "Excuse me!" he added, turning to the baron, "we will finish this conversation elsewhere--at a ball one must dance."
  • He stepped forward in the direction Pierre indicated.
  • He recognized her, guessed her feelings, saw that it was her debut, remembered her conversation at the window, and with an expression of pleasure on his face approached Countess Rostova.
  • "I have the pleasure of being already acquainted, if the countess remembers me," said Prince Andrew with a low and courteous bow quite belying Peronskaya's remarks about his rudeness, and approaching Natasha he held out his arm to grasp her waist before he had completed his invitation.
  • He asked her to waltz.
  • With her he behaved with special care and tenderness, sitting beside her and talking of the simplest and most unimportant matters; he admired her shy grace.
  • "If she goes to her cousin first and then to another lady, she will be my wife," said Prince Andrew to himself quite to his own surprise, as he watched her.
  • Such as she are rare here, he thought, as Natasha, readjusting a rose that was slipping on her bodice, settled herself beside him.
  • He invited Prince Andrew to come and see them, and asked his daughter whether she was enjoying herself.
  • He was gloomy and absent-minded.
  • A deep furrow ran across his forehead, and standing by a window he stared over his spectacles seeing no one.
  • "Yes, I am very glad," he said.
  • That was all he thought about yesterday's ball, and after his morning tea he set to work.
  • But either from fatigue or want of sleep he was ill-disposed for work and could get nothing done.
  • He kept criticizing his own work, as he often did, and was glad when he heard someone coming.
  • He kept criticizing his own work, as he often did, and was glad when he heard someone coming.
  • Hardly had he got rid of his hat before he ran into Prince Andrew's room with a preoccupied air and at once began talking.
  • He had just heard particulars of that morning's sitting of the Council of State opened by the Emperor, and he spoke of it enthusiastically.
  • He had just heard particulars of that morning's sitting of the Council of State opened by the Emperor, and he spoke of it enthusiastically.
  • The Sovereign plainly said that the Council and Senate are estates of the realm, he said that the government must rest not on authority but on secure bases.
  • Today's events mark an epoch, the greatest epoch in our history, he concluded.
  • He was going to dine that evening at Speranski's, "with only a few friends," as the host had said when inviting him.
  • At the appointed hour, however, he entered the modest house Speranski owned in the Taurida Gardens.
  • He entered the dining room.
  • Speranski, wearing a gray swallow-tail coat with a star on the breast, and evidently still the same waistcoat and high white stock he had worn at the meeting of the Council of State, stood at the table with a beaming countenance.
  • Stolypin gave a deep bass guffaw as he munched a piece of bread and cheese.
  • "Very pleased to see you, Prince," he said.
  • "One moment..." he went on, turning to Magnitski and interrupting his story.
  • Speranski related how at the Council that morning a deaf dignitary, when asked his opinion, replied that he thought so too.
  • Prince Andrew did not laugh and feared that he would be a damper on the spirits of the company, but no one took any notice of his being out of harmony with the general mood.
  • He tried several times to join in the conversation, but his remarks were tossed aside each time like a cork thrown out of the water, and he could not jest with them.
  • He tried several times to join in the conversation, but his remarks were tossed aside each time like a cork thrown out of the water, and he could not jest with them.
  • He patted the little girl with his white hand and kissed her.
  • Two letters brought by a courier were handed to Speranski and he took them to his study.
  • He was interrupted several times by applause.
  • That precise, mirthless laughter rang in Prince Andrew's ears long after he had left the house.
  • When he reached home Prince Andrew began thinking of his life in Petersburg during those last four months as if it were something new.
  • He remembered how carefully and at what length everything relating to form and procedure was discussed at those meetings, and how sedulously and promptly all that related to the gist of the business was evaded.
  • He recalled his labors on the Legal Code, and how painstakingly he had translated the articles of the Roman and French codes into Russian, and he felt ashamed of himself.
  • He recalled his labors on the Legal Code, and how painstakingly he had translated the articles of the Roman and French codes into Russian, and he felt ashamed of himself.
  • Then he vividly pictured to himself Bogucharovo, his occupations in the country, his journey to Ryazan; he remembered the peasants and Dron the village elder, and mentally applying to them the Personal Rights he had divided into paragraphs, he felt astonished that he could have spent so much time on such useless work.
  • Next day Prince Andrew called at a few houses he had not visited before, and among them at the Rostovs' with whom he had renewed acquaintance at the ball.
  • The whole family, whom he had formerly judged severely, now seemed to him to consist of excellent, simple, and kindly people.
  • Now this world disconcerted him no longer and was no longer alien to him, but he himself having entered it found in it a new enjoyment.
  • In the midst of a phrase he ceased speaking and suddenly felt tears choking him, a thing he had thought impossible for him.
  • He looked at Natasha as she sang, and something new and joyful stirred in his soul.
  • He felt happy and at the same time sad.
  • He had absolutely nothing to weep about yet he was ready to weep.
  • He had absolutely nothing to weep about yet he was ready to weep.
  • As soon as Natasha had finished she went up to him and asked how he liked her voice.
  • He smiled, looking at her, and said he liked her singing as he liked everything she did.
  • He smiled, looking at her, and said he liked her singing as he liked everything she did.
  • He went to bed from habit, but soon realized that he could not sleep.
  • He went to bed from habit, but soon realized that he could not sleep.
  • Having lit his candle he sat up in bed, then got up, then lay down again not at all troubled by his sleeplessness: his soul was as fresh and joyful as if he had stepped out of a stuffy room into God's own fresh air.
  • "Why do I strive, why do I toil in this narrow, confined frame, when life, all life with all its joys, is open to me?" said he to himself.
  • And for the first time for a very long while he began making happy plans for the future.
  • He decided that he must attend to his son's education by finding a tutor and putting the boy in his charge, then he ought to retire from the service and go abroad, and see England, Switzerland and Italy.
  • He decided that he must attend to his son's education by finding a tutor and putting the boy in his charge, then he ought to retire from the service and go abroad, and see England, Switzerland and Italy.
  • "I must use my freedom while I feel so much strength and youth in me," he said to himself.
  • Pierre was right when he said one must believe in the possibility of happiness in order to be happy, and now I do believe in it.
  • One morning Colonel Berg, whom Pierre knew as he knew everybody in Moscow and Petersburg, came to see him.
  • Unfortunately she could not grant my request, but I hope, Count, I shall be more fortunate with you, he said with a smile.
  • (He smiled still more pleasantly.)
  • Berg explained so clearly why he wanted to collect at his house a small but select company, and why this would give him pleasure, and why though he grudged spending money on cards or anything harmful, he was prepared to run into some expense for the sake of good society--that Pierre could not refuse, and promised to come.
  • He is very good to me.
  • (He rose and kissed Vera's hand, and on the way to her straightened out a turned-up corner of the carpet.)
  • Berg rose and embraced his wife carefully, so as not to crush her lace fichu for which he had paid a good price, kissing her straight on the lips.
  • "The only thing is, we mustn't have children too soon," he continued, following an unconscious sequence of ideas.
  • At the card table he happened to be directly facing Natasha, and was struck by a curious change that had come over her since the ball.
  • After playing out a whole suit and to his partner's delight taking five tricks, Pierre, hearing greetings and the steps of someone who had entered the room while he was picking up his tricks, glanced again at Natasha.
  • "What has happened to her?" he asked himself with still greater surprise.
  • Pierre changed places several times during the game, sitting now with his back to Natasha and now facing her, but during the whole of the six rubbers he watched her and his friend.
  • This return to the subject of Natalie caused Prince Andrew to knit his brows with discomfort: he was about to rise, but Vera continued with a still more subtle smile:
  • I expect he has told you of his childish love for Natasha?
  • "Oh, undoubtedly!" said Prince Andrew, and with sudden and unnatural liveliness he began chaffing Pierre about the need to be very careful with his fifty-year-old Moscow cousins, and in the midst of these jesting remarks he rose, taking Pierre by the arm, and drew him aside.
  • "Well?" asked Pierre, seeing his friend's strange animation with surprise, and noticing the glance he turned on Natasha as he rose.
  • (He referred to the masonic gloves given to a newly initiated Brother to present to the woman he loved.)
  • (He referred to the masonic gloves given to a newly initiated Brother to present to the woman he loved.)
  • But at that moment Berg came to Pierre and began insisting that he should take part in an argument between the general and the colonel on the affairs in Spain.
  • The party was very successful and quite like other parties he had seen.
  • Everything was similar: the ladies' subtle talk, the cards, the general raising his voice at the card table, and the samovar and the tea cakes; only one thing was lacking that he had always seen at the evening parties he wished to imitate.
  • Everyone in the house realized for whose sake Prince Andrew came, and without concealing it he tried to be with Natasha all day.
  • The countess looked with sad and sternly serious eyes at Prince Andrew when he talked to Natasha and timidly started some artificial conversation about trifles as soon as he looked her way.
  • She felt that he wanted to say something to her but could not bring himself to do so.
  • She told her how he had complimented her, how he told her he was going abroad, asked her where they were going to spend the summer, and then how he had asked her about Boris.
  • And it had to happen that he should come specially to Petersburg while we are here.
  • What else did he say to you?
  • Since the ball he had felt the approach of a fit of nervous depression and had made desperate efforts to combat it.
  • At the same time the feeling he had noticed between his protegee Natasha and Prince Andrew accentuated his gloom by the contrast between his own position and his friend's.
  • He tried equally to avoid thinking about his wife, and about Natasha and Prince Andrew; and again everything seemed to him insignificant in comparison with eternity; again the question: for what? presented itself; and he forced himself to work day and night at masonic labors, hoping to drive away the evil spirit that threatened him.
  • He tried equally to avoid thinking about his wife, and about Natasha and Prince Andrew; and again everything seemed to him insignificant in comparison with eternity; again the question: for what? presented itself; and he forced himself to work day and night at masonic labors, hoping to drive away the evil spirit that threatened him.
  • Toward midnight, after he had left the countess' apartments, he was sitting upstairs in a shabby dressing gown, copying out the original transaction of the Scottish lodge of Freemasons at a table in his low room cloudy with tobacco smoke, when someone came in.
  • He pointed to his manuscript book with that air of escaping from the ills of life with which unhappy people look at their work.
  • "Well, dear heart," said he, "I wanted to tell you about it yesterday and I have come to do so today.
  • Pierre was the only person to whom he made up his mind to speak openly; and to him he told all that was in his soul.
  • Prince Andrew needed his father's consent to his marriage, and to obtain this he started for the country next day.
  • He could not comprehend how anyone could wish to alter his life or introduce anything new into it, when his own life was already ending.
  • With his son, however, he employed the diplomacy he reserved for important occasions and, adopting a quiet tone, discussed the whole matter.
  • Thirdly, he had a son whom it would be a pity to entrust to a chit of a girl.
  • Three weeks after the last evening he had spent with the Rostovs, Prince Andrew returned to Petersburg.
  • Next day after her talk with her mother Natasha expected Bolkonski all day, but he did not come.
  • He just came and then left off, left off...
  • As soon as he saw Natasha his face brightened.
  • He kissed the countess' hand and Natasha's, and sat down beside the sofa.
  • I only got back last night," he said glancing at Natasha; "I want to have a talk with you, Countess," he added after a moment's pause.
  • Again he glanced at her, and that glance convinced her that she was not mistaken.
  • He remained silent, looking into her eyes.
  • She held out her hand to him, and with a mixed feeling of estrangement and tenderness pressed her lips to his forehead as he stooped to kiss her hand.
  • She wished to love him as a son, but felt that to her he was a stranger and a terrifying man.
  • He is asking for your hand, said the countess, coldly it seemed to Natasha.
  • He alone is now dearer to me than everything in the world.
  • He looked at her and was struck by the serious impassioned expression of her face.
  • He took her hand and kissed it.
  • Yes, but what did he ask me?
  • "Forgive me!" he said.
  • He came every day to the Rostovs', but did not behave to Natasha as an affianced lover: he did not use the familiar thou, but said you to her, and kissed only her hand.
  • He came every day to the Rostovs', but did not behave to Natasha as an affianced lover: he did not use the familiar thou, but said you to her, and kissed only her hand.
  • At first the family felt some constraint in intercourse with Prince Andrew; he seemed a man from another world, and for a long time Natasha trained the family to get used to him, proudly assuring them all that he only appeared to be different, but was really just like all of them, and that she was not afraid of him and no one else ought to be.
  • After a few days they grew accustomed to him, and without restraint in his presence pursued their usual way of life, in which he took his part.
  • He could talk about rural economy with the count, fashions with the countess and Natasha, and about albums and fancywork with Sonya.
  • Prince Andrew blushed, as he often did now--Natasha particularly liked it in him--and said that his son would not live with them.
  • When Prince Andrew spoke (he could tell a story very well), Natasha listened to him with pride; when she spoke she noticed with fear and joy that he gazed attentively and scrutinizingly at her.
  • She asked herself in perplexity: What does he look for in me?
  • He is trying to discover something by looking at me!
  • What if what he seeks in me is not there?
  • He seldom laughed, but when he did he abandoned himself entirely to his laughter, and after such a laugh she always felt nearer to him.
  • He seldom laughed, but when he did he abandoned himself entirely to his laughter, and after such a laugh she always felt nearer to him.
  • He was talking to the countess, and Natasha sat down beside a little chess table with Sonya, thereby inviting Prince Andrew to come too.
  • "You have known Bezukhov a long time?" he asked.
  • He has a heart of gold.
  • He is a most absent-minded and absurd fellow, but he has a heart of gold.
  • He is a most absent-minded and absurd fellow, but he has a heart of gold.
  • She did not even cry when, on taking leave, he kissed her hand for the last time.
  • Nor did she cry when he was gone; but for several days she sat in her room dry-eyed, taking no interest in anything and only saying now and then, "Oh, why did he go away?"
  • He grew still more irritable, and it was Princess Mary who generally bore the brunt of his frequent fits of unprovoked anger.
  • He seemed carefully to seek out her tender spots so as to torture her mentally as harshly as possible.
  • Whatever was spoken of he would bring round to the superstitiousness of old maids, or the petting and spoiling of children.
  • Prince Andrew wants a son and not an old maid, he would say.
  • Or, turning to Mademoiselle Bourienne, he would ask her in Princess Mary's presence how she liked our village priests and icons and would joke about them.
  • He continually hurt Princess Mary's feelings and tormented her, but it cost her no effort to forgive him.
  • Could he be to blame toward her, or could her father, whom she knew loved her in spite of it all, be unjust?
  • All the complex laws of man centered for her in one clear and simple law--the law of love and self-sacrifice taught us by Him who lovingly suffered for mankind though He Himself was God.
  • She felt that something had happened to him, but he said nothing to her about his love.
  • Before he left he had a long talk with his father about something, and Princess Mary noticed that before his departure they were dissatisfied with one another.
  • The case is this: my father's health is growing noticeably worse, he cannot stand any contradiction and is becoming irritable.
  • He cannot endure the notion that Buonaparte is negotiating on equal terms with all the sovereigns of Europe and particularly with our own, the grandson of the Great Catherine!
  • He, as I wrote you before, has changed very much of late.
  • After his sorrow he only this year quite recovered his spirits.
  • He has again become as I used to know him when a child: kind, affectionate, with that heart of gold to which I know no equal.
  • He has realized, it seems to me, that life is not over for him.
  • But together with this mental change he has grown physically much weaker.
  • He has become thinner and more nervous.
  • I am anxious about him and glad he is taking this trip abroad which the doctors recommended long ago.
  • You write that in Petersburg he is spoken of as one of the most active, cultivated, and capable of the young men.
  • The good he has done to everybody here, from his peasants up to the gentry, is incalculable.
  • On his arrival in Petersburg he received only his due.
  • I do not think my brother will ever marry again, and certainly not her; and this is why: first, I know that though he rarely speaks about the wife he has lost, the grief of that loss has gone too deep in his heart for him ever to decide to give her a successor and our little angel a stepmother.
  • I do not think he would choose her for a wife, and frankly I do not wish it.
  • In the middle of the summer Princess Mary received an unexpected letter from Prince Andrew in Switzerland in which he gave her strange and surprising news.
  • He informed her of his engagement to Natasha Rostova.
  • He wrote that he had never loved as he did now and that only now did he understand and know what life was.
  • He wrote that he had never loved as he did now and that only now did he understand and know what life was.
  • He asked his sister to forgive him for not having told her of his resolve when he had last visited Bald Hills, though he had spoken of it to his father.
  • He asked his sister to forgive him for not having told her of his resolve when he had last visited Bald Hills, though he had spoken of it to his father.
  • "Besides," he wrote, "the matter was not then so definitely settled as it is now.
  • Write and tell him that he may marry tomorrow if he likes.
  • He mustn't be without a stepmother either!
  • Perhaps you will go and live with him too? he added, turning to Princess Mary.
  • "Why shouldn't I marry her?" he asked his daughter.
  • Prince Andrew had loved his wife, she died, but that was not enough: he wanted to bind his happiness to another woman.
  • Her father objected to this because he wanted a more distinguished and wealthier match for Andrew.
  • She disclosed this thought to no one but to her confessor, Father Akinfi, the monk, and he approved of her intention.
  • Nicholas Rostov experienced this blissful condition to the full when, after 1807, he continued to serve in the Pavlograd regiment, in which he already commanded the squadron he had taken over from Denisov.
  • Reading these letters, Nicholas felt a dread of their wanting to take him away from surroundings in which, protected from all the entanglements of life, he was living so calmly and quietly.
  • He felt that sooner or later he would have to re-enter that whirlpool of life, with its embarrassments and affairs to be straightened out, its accounts with stewards, quarrels, and intrigues, its ties, society, and with Sonya's love and his promise to her.
  • He felt that sooner or later he would have to re-enter that whirlpool of life, with its embarrassments and affairs to be straightened out, its accounts with stewards, quarrels, and intrigues, its ties, society, and with Sonya's love and his promise to her.
  • It was all dreadfully difficult and complicated; and he replied to his mother in cold, formal letters in French, beginning: "My dear Mamma," and ending: "Your obedient son," which said nothing of when he would return.
  • In 1810 he received letters from his parents, in which they told him of Natasha's engagement to Bolkonski, and that the wedding would be in a year's time because the old prince made difficulties.
  • But in the spring of that year, he received a letter from his mother, written without his father's knowledge, and that letter persuaded him to return.
  • She wrote that if he did not come and take matters in hand, their whole property would be sold by auction and they would all have to go begging.
  • He had that common sense of a matter-of- fact man which showed him what he ought to do.
  • He had that common sense of a matter-of- fact man which showed him what he ought to do.
  • A week later he obtained his leave.
  • Thoughts of home grew stronger the nearer he approached it--far stronger, as though this feeling of his was subject to the law by which the force of attraction is in inverse proportion to the square of the distance.
  • At the last post station before Otradnoe he gave the driver a three-ruble tip, and on arriving he ran breathlessly, like a boy, up the steps of his home.
  • As for Natasha, for a long while Nicholas wondered and laughed whenever he looked at her.
  • "You're not the same at all," he said.
  • A princess! he whispered to her.
  • He is an excellent fellow....
  • I know that no better man than he exists, and I am calm and contented now.
  • Her brother often wondered as he looked at her.
  • Why no betrothal? he thought.
  • Once, when he had touched on this topic with his mother, he discovered, to his surprise and somewhat to his satisfaction, that in the depth of her soul she too had doubts about this marriage.
  • "You see he writes," said she, showing her son a letter of Prince Andrew's, with that latent grudge a mother always has in regard to a daughter's future married happiness, "he writes that he won't come before December.
  • He is an excellent man!
  • He was worried by the impending necessity of interfering in the stupid business matters for which his mother had called him home.
  • To throw off this burden as quickly as possible, on the third day after his arrival he went, angry and scowling and without answering questions as to where he was going, to Mitenka's lodge and demanded an account of everything.
  • She went several times to his door on tiptoe and listened, as he lighted one pipe after another.
  • You were angry that he had not entered those 700 rubles.
  • Papa, he is a blackguard and a thief!
  • I know he is!
  • "Devil take all these peasants, and money matters, and carryings forward from page to page," he thought.
  • But once the countess called her son and informed him that she had a promissory note from Anna Mikhaylovna for two thousand rubles, and asked him what he thought of doing with it.
  • Well then, this! and he tore up the note, and by so doing caused the old countess to weep tears of joy.
  • On the fifteenth, when young Rostov, in his dressing gown, looked out of the window, he saw it was an unsurpassable morning for hunting: it was as if the sky were melting and sinking to the earth without any wind.
  • He doffed his Circassian cap to his master and looked at him scornfully.
  • He says she's moved them into the Otradnoe enclosure.
  • Daniel himself felt this, and as usual stood just inside the door, trying to speak softly and not move, for fear of breaking something in the master's apartment, and he hastened to say all that was necessary so as to get from under that ceiling, out into the open under the sky once more.
  • "Yes, we are going," replied Nicholas reluctantly, for today, as he intended to hunt seriously, he did not want to take Natasha and Petya.
  • He cast down his eyes and hurried out as if it were none of his business, careful as he went not to inflict any accidental injury on the young lady.
  • He cast down his eyes and hurried out as if it were none of his business, careful as he went not to inflict any accidental injury on the young lady.
  • He had a look at all the details of the hunt, sent a pack of hounds and huntsmen on ahead to find the quarry, mounted his chestnut Donets, and whistling to his own leash of borzois, set off across the threshing ground to a field leading to the Otradnoe wood.
  • Each man in the hunt knew his business, his place, what he had to do.
  • (He was a distant relative of the Rostovs', a man of small means, and their neighbor.)
  • He did not like to combine frivolity with the serious business of hunting.
  • He knew me, said Natasha, referring to her favorite hound.
  • "A good thing too, little countess," said "Uncle," "only mind you don't fall off your horse," he added, "because--that's it, come on!--you've nothing to hold on to."
  • "Karay, here!" he shouted, answering "Uncle's" remark by this call to his borzoi.
  • Having straightened his coat and fastened on his hunting knives and horn, he mounted his good, sleek, well-fed, and comfortable horse, Viflyanka, which was turning gray, like himself.
  • He was somewhat flushed with the wine and the drive.
  • His eyes were rather moist and glittered more than usual, and as he sat in his saddle, wrapped up in his fur coat, he looked like a child taken out for an outing.
  • The thin, hollow-cheeked Chekmar, having got everything ready, kept glancing at his master with whom he had lived on the best of terms for thirty years, and understanding the mood he was in expected a pleasant chat.
  • A third person rode up circumspectly through the wood (it was plain that he had had a lesson) and stopped behind the count.
  • He was the buffoon, who went by a woman's name, Nastasya Ivanovna.
  • "Have you seen the young countess?" he asked.
  • He knows where to stand.
  • He understands the matter so well that Daniel and I are often quite astounded, said Simon, well knowing what would please his master.
  • And how well he looks on his horse, eh?
  • "To search far," he said, turning back the skirt of his coat to get at his snuffbox.
  • The other day when he came out from Mass in full uniform, Michael Sidorych...
  • Simon did not finish, for on the still air he had distinctly caught the music of the hunt with only two or three hounds giving tongue.
  • He bent down his head and listened, shaking a warning finger at his master.
  • "They are on the scent of the cubs..." he whispered, "straight to the Lyadov uplands."
  • "Look out!" he shouted, in a voice plainly showing that he had long fretted to utter that word, and letting the borzois slip he galloped toward the count.
  • "Ulyulyulyu! ulyulyu!..." he cried.
  • When he caught sight of the count his eyes flashed lightning.
  • "Blast you!" he shouted, holding up his whip threateningly at the count.
  • What sportsmen! and as if scorning to say more to the frightened and shamefaced count, he lashed the heaving flanks of his sweating chestnut gelding with all the anger the count had aroused and flew off after the hounds.
  • He was galloping round by the bushes while the field was coming up on both sides, all trying to head the wolf, but it vanished into the wood before they could do so.
  • By the way the hunt approached and receded, by the cries of the dogs whose notes were familiar to him, by the way the voices of the huntsmen approached, receded, and rose, he realized what was happening at the copse.
  • He knew that young and old wolves were there, that the hounds had separated into two packs, that somewhere a wolf was being chased, and that something had gone wrong.
  • He expected the wolf to come his way any moment.
  • He made thousands of different conjectures as to where and from what side the beast would come and how he would set upon it.
  • He made thousands of different conjectures as to where and from what side the beast would come and how he would set upon it.
  • Several times he addressed a prayer to God that the wolf should come his way.
  • He prayed with that passionate and shamefaced feeling with which men pray at moments of great excitement arising from trivial causes.
  • "What would it be to Thee to do this for me?" he said to God.
  • "Only once in my life to get an old wolf, I want only that!" thought he, straining eyes and ears and looking to the left and then to the right and listening to the slightest variation of note in the cries of the dogs.
  • Again he looked to the right and saw something running toward him across the deserted field.
  • Nicholas did not hear his own cry nor feel that he was galloping, nor see the borzois, nor the ground over which he went: he saw only the wolf, who, increasing her speed, bounded on in the same direction along the hollow.
  • "Karay, ulyulyu!..." he shouted, looking round for the old borzoi who was now his only hope.
  • But, coming toward him, he saw hounds and a huntsman galloping almost straight at the wolf.
  • With his hand on his saddlebow, he was ready to dismount and stab the wolf, when she suddenly thrust her head up from among that mass of dogs, and then her forepaws were on the edge of the gully.
  • He saw Karay seize the wolf, and checked his horse, supposing the affair to be over.
  • But when he saw that the horsemen did not dismount and that the wolf shook herself and ran for safety, Daniel set his chestnut galloping, not at the wolf but straight toward the wood, just as Karay had run to cut the animal off.
  • The count remembered the wolf he had let slip and his encounter with Daniel.
  • He saw the whips in their red caps galloping along the edge of the ravine, he even saw the hounds, and was expecting a fox to show itself at any moment on the ryefield opposite.
  • He saw the whips in their red caps galloping along the edge of the ravine, he even saw the hounds, and was expecting a fox to show itself at any moment on the ryefield opposite.
  • He is not 'Uncle's' man.
  • While still at a distance he took off his cap and tried to speak respectfully, but he was pale and breathless and his face was angry.
  • One of his eyes was black, but he probably was not even aware of it.
  • He snatches at the fox!
  • Nicholas, though he had never seen Ilagin, with his usual absence of moderation in judgment, hated him cordially from reports of his arbitrariness and violence, and regarded him as his bitterest foe.
  • He rode in angry agitation toward him, firmly grasping his whip and fully prepared to take the most resolute and desperate steps to punish his enemy.
  • Hardly had he passed an angle of the wood before a stout gentleman in a beaver cap came riding toward him on a handsome raven-black horse, accompanied by two hunt servants.
  • Having ridden up to Nicholas, Ilagin raised his beaver cap and said he much regretted what had occurred and would have the man punished who had allowed himself to seize a fox hunted by someone else's borzois.
  • Ilagin lifted his beaver cap still higher to Natasha and said, with a pleasant smile, that the young countess resembled Diana in her passion for the chase as well as in her beauty, of which he had heard much.
  • To expiate his huntsman's offense, Ilagin pressed the Rostovs to come to an upland of his about a mile away which he usually kept for himself and which, he said, swarmed with hares.
  • "A fine little bitch, that!" said he in a careless tone.
  • Yes, she's a good dog, gets what she's after, answered Ilagin indifferently, of the red-spotted bitch Erza, for which, a year before, he had given a neighbor three families of house serfs.
  • "So in your parts, too, the harvest is nothing to boast of, Count?" he went on, continuing the conversation they had begun.
  • "Yes, she's fast enough," replied Nicholas, and thought: "If only a full-grown hare would cross the field now I'd show you what sort of borzoi she is," and turning to his groom, he said he would give a ruble to anyone who found a hare.
  • (he again raised his cap to Natasha) "but as for counting skins and what one takes, I don't care about that."
  • He stood on a knoll in the stubble, holding his whip aloft, and again repeated his long-drawn cry, "A-tu!"
  • (This call and the uplifted whip meant that he saw a sitting hare.)
  • "Ah, he has found one, I think," said Ilagin carelessly.
  • "And suppose they outdo my Milka at once!" he thought as he rode with "Uncle" and Ilagin toward the hare.
  • "A full-grown one?" asked Ilagin as he approached the whip who had sighted the hare--and not without agitation he looked round and whistled to Erza.
  • "And you, Michael Nikanorovich?" he said, addressing "Uncle."
  • "Rugay, hey, hey!" he shouted.
  • "Rugayushka!" he added, involuntarily by this diminutive expressing his affection and the hopes he placed on this red borzoi.
  • When he jumped up he did not run at once, but pricked his ears listening to the shouting and trampling that resounded from all sides at once.
  • He took a dozen bounds, not very quickly, letting the borzois gain on him, and, finally having chosen his direction and realized his danger, laid back his ears and rushed off headlong.
  • He spoke without himself knowing whom to or what about.
  • That's it, come on! said he, panting and looking wrathfully around as if he were abusing someone, as if they were all his enemies and had insulted him, and only now had he at last succeeded in justifying himself.
  • "Rugay, here's a pad for you!" he said, throwing down the hare's muddy pad.
  • "Uncle" himself twisted up the hare, threw it neatly and smartly across his horse's back as if by that gesture he meant to rebuke everybody, and, with an air of not wishing to speak to anyone, mounted his bay and rode off.
  • When, much later, "Uncle" rode up to Nicholas and began talking to him, he felt flattered that, after what had happened, "Uncle" deigned to speak to him.
  • Toward evening Ilagin took leave of Nicholas, who found that they were so far from home that he accepted "Uncle's" offer that the hunting party should spend the night in his little village of Mikhaylovna.
  • "Uncle" too was in high spirits and far from being offended by the brother's and sister's laughter (it could never enter his head that they might be laughing at his way of life) he himself joined in the merriment.
  • "Uncle's" face was very significant and even handsome as he said this.
  • Involuntarily Rostov recalled all the good he had heard about him from his father and the neighbors.
  • Open the door, there! he shouted.
  • "He doesn't play that part right!" said "Uncle" suddenly, with an energetic gesture.
  • Here he ought to burst out--that's it, come on!-- ought to burst out.
  • He took the guitar a little above the fingerboard, arching his left elbow with a somewhat theatrical gesture, and, with a wink at Anisya Fedorovna, struck a single chord, pure and sonorous, and then quietly, smoothly, and confidently began playing in very slow time, not My Lady, but the well-known song: Came a maiden down the street.
  • Go on, Uncle, go on! shouted Natasha as soon as he had finished.
  • Played "Uncle" once more, running his fingers skillfully over the strings, and then he stopped short and jerked his shoulders.
  • "Now then, niece!" he exclaimed, waving to Natasha the hand that had just struck a chord.
  • What did Nicholas' smile mean when he said 'chosen already'?
  • Is he glad of it or not?
  • It is as if he thought my Bolkonski would not approve of or understand our gaiety.
  • But he would understand it all.
  • Where is he now? she thought, and her face suddenly became serious.
  • "Uncle" played another song and a valse; then after a pause he cleared his throat and sang his favorite hunting song:
  • He accompanied them on foot as far as the bridge that could not be crossed, so that they had to go round by the ford, and he sent huntsmen to ride in front with lanterns.
  • He accompanied them on foot as far as the bridge that could not be crossed, so that they had to go round by the ford, and he sent huntsmen to ride in front with lanterns.
  • Well, you see, first I thought that Rugay, the red hound, was like Uncle, and that if he were a man he would always keep Uncle near him, if not for his riding, then for his manner.
  • "Rubbish, nonsense, humbug!" exclaimed Nicholas, and he thought: "How charming this Natasha of mine is!
  • There was still the hunting establishment which Nicholas had enlarged.
  • The count moved in his affairs as in a huge net, trying not to believe that he was entangled but becoming more and more so at every step, and feeling too feeble to break the meshes or to set to work carefully and patiently to disentangle them.
  • Then she told him that she knew of a splendid girl and tried to discover what he thought about marriage.
  • Because Sonya is poor I must not love her," he thought, "must not respond to her faithful, devoted love?
  • I can always sacrifice my feelings for my family's welfare," he said to himself, "but I can't coerce my feelings.
  • He distrusted the order and asked whether the samovar was really wanted.
  • Her brother Petya was upstairs too; with the man in attendance on him he was preparing fireworks to let off that night.
  • She jumped on it, putting her arms round his neck, and he pranced along with her.
  • She sat awhile, wondering what the meaning of it all having happened before could be, and without solving this problem, or at all regretting not having done so, she again passed in fancy to the time when she was with him and he was looking at her with a lover's eyes.
  • Oh, if only he would come quicker!
  • Perhaps he has come and is sitting in the drawing room.
  • Perhaps he came yesterday and I have forgotten it.
  • "Ah, here she is!" said the old count, when he saw Natasha enter.
  • "I should think so!" he replied.
  • He was gray, you remember, and had white teeth, and stood and looked at us...
  • He took off its cloth covering, and the harp gave out a jarring sound.
  • "May I join you?" said Dimmler who had come up quietly, and he sat down by them.
  • "Ah, Countess," he said at last, "that's a European talent, she has nothing to learn--what softness, tenderness, and strength...."
  • But the countess would not agree to his going; he had had a bad leg all these last days.
  • Nicholas, in his old lady's dress over which he had belted his hussar overcoat, stood in the middle of the sleigh, reins in hand.
  • It was so light that he could see the moonlight reflected from the metal harness disks and from the eyes of the horses, who looked round in alarm at the noisy party under the shadow of the porch roof.
  • "That used to be Sonya," thought he, and looked at her closer and smiled.
  • "Nothing," said he and turned again to the horses.
  • And shouting to his horses, he began to pass the first sleigh.
  • "Now, look out, master!" he cried.
  • "No you won't, master!" he shouted.
  • And he looked round in the sleigh.
  • "Aren't you cold?" he asked.
  • But Herr Dimmler--isn't he good!
  • And how he dances.
  • He comes in, just in the shape of a man, like an officer--comes in and sits down to table with her.
  • And how... did he speak?
  • Then he caught her up.
  • It seemed to him that it was only today, thanks to that burnt-cork mustache, that he had fully learned to know her.
  • Nicholas went hastily to the front porch, saying he felt too hot.
  • He knew Sonya would pass that way.
  • From the back porch came the sound of feet descending the steps, the bottom step upon which snow had fallen gave a ringing creak and he heard the voice of an old maidservant saying, Straight, straight, along the path, Miss.
  • She was only a couple of paces away when she saw him, and to her too he was not the Nicholas she had known and always slightly feared.
  • He was in a woman's dress, with tousled hair and a happy smile new to Sonya.
  • He slipped his arms under the cloak that covered her head, embraced her, pressed her to him, and kissed her on the lips that wore a mustache and had a smell of burnt cork.
  • They ran to the barn and then back again, re-entering, he by the front and she by the back porch.
  • On the way back Nicholas drove at a steady pace instead of racing and kept peering by that fantastic all-transforming light into Sonya's face and searching beneath the eyebrows and mustache for his former and his present Sonya from whom he had resolved never to be parted again.
  • He looked and recognizing in her both the old and the new Sonya, and being reminded by the smell of burnt cork of the sensation of her kiss, inhaled the frosty air with a full breast and, looking at the ground flying beneath him and at the sparkling sky, felt himself again in fairyland.
  • "Sonya, is it well with thee?" he asked from time to time.
  • "Natasha!" he whispered in French, "do you know I have made up my mind about Sonya?"
  • Oh, how funny you look! cried Nicholas, peering into her face and finding in his sister too something new, unusual, and bewitchingly tender that he had not seen in her before.
  • Then he jumped down and, his boots scrunching the snow, ran back to his sleigh.
  • Is he ill? asked Natasha, her frightened eyes fixed on her friend.
  • His face was cheerful, and he turned to me.
  • When will he come back?
  • Coldly, without looking at her son, she sent for her husband and, when he came, tried briefly and coldly to inform him of the facts, in her son's presence, but unable to restrain herself she burst into tears of vexation and left the room.
  • Nicholas replied that he could not go back on his word, and his father, sighing and evidently disconcerted, very soon became silent and went in to the countess.
  • He first implored her to forgive him and Sonya and consent to their marriage, then he threatened that if she molested Sonya he would at once marry her secretly.
  • He first implored her to forgive him and Sonya and consent to their marriage, then he threatened that if she molested Sonya he would at once marry her secretly.
  • The countess, with a coldness her son had never seen in her before, replied that he was of age, that Prince Andrew was marrying without his father's consent, and he could do the same, but that she would never receive that intriguer as her daughter.
  • Exploding at the word intriguer, Nicholas, raising his voice, told his mother he had never expected her to try to force him to sell his feelings, but if that were so, he would say for the last time....
  • But he had no time to utter the decisive word which the expression of his face caused his mother to await with terror, and which would perhaps have forever remained a cruel memory to them both.
  • Natasha set to work to effect a reconciliation, and so far succeeded that Nicholas received a promise from his mother that Sonya should not be troubled, while he on his side promised not to undertake anything without his parents' knowledge.
  • It hurt her to think that while she lived only in the thought of him, he was living a real life, seeing new places and new people that interested him.
  • He ceased keeping a diary, avoided the company of the Brothers, began going to the club again, drank a great deal, and came once more in touch with the bachelor sets, leading such a life that the Countess Helene thought it necessary to speak severely to him about it.
  • In Moscow he felt at peace, at home, warm and dirty as in an old dressing gown.
  • As soon as he sank into his place on the sofa after two bottles of Margaux he was surrounded, and talking, disputing, and joking began.
  • When after a bachelor supper he rose with his amiable and kindly smile, yielding to the entreaties of the festive company to drive off somewhere with them, shouts of delight and triumph arose among the young men.
  • At balls he danced if a partner was needed.
  • Young ladies, married and unmarried, liked him because without making love to any of them, he was equally amiable to all, especially after supper.
  • * "He is charming; he has no sex."
  • * "He is charming; he has no sex."
  • He could not have believed it!
  • Had he not at one time longed with all his heart to establish a republic in Russia; then himself to be a Napoleon; then to be a philosopher; and then a strategist and the conqueror of Napoleon?
  • Had he not seen the possibility of, and passionately desired, the regeneration of the sinful human race, and his own progress to the highest degree of perfection?
  • Had he not established schools and hospitals and liberated his serfs?
  • But instead of all that--here he was, the wealthy husband of an unfaithful wife, a retired gentleman-in-waiting, fond of eating and drinking and, as he unbuttoned his waistcoat, of abusing the government a bit, a member of the Moscow English Club, and a universal favorite in Moscow society.
  • For a long time he could not reconcile himself to the idea that he was one of those same retired Moscow gentlemen-in-waiting he had so despised seven years before.
  • Sometimes he consoled himself with the thought that he was only living this life temporarily; but then he was shocked by the thought of how many, like himself, had entered that life and that club temporarily, with all their teeth and hair, and had only left it when not a single tooth or hair remained.
  • He had the unfortunate capacity many men, especially Russians, have of seeing and believing in the possibility of goodness and truth, but of seeing the evil and falsehood of life too clearly to be able to take a serious part in it.
  • Whatever he tried to be, whatever he engaged in, the evil and falsehood of it repulsed him and blocked every path of activity.
  • It was too dreadful to be under the burden of these insoluble problems, so he abandoned himself to any distraction in order to forget them.
  • He frequented every kind of society, drank much, bought pictures, engaged in building, and above all--read.
  • He read, and read everything that came to hand.
  • On coming home, while his valets were still taking off his things, he picked up a book and began to read.
  • From reading he passed to sleeping, from sleeping to gossip in drawing rooms of the club, from gossip to carousals and women; from carousals back to gossip, reading, and wine.
  • Though the doctors warned him that with his corpulence wine was dangerous for him, he drank a great deal.
  • He was only quite at ease when having poured several glasses of wine mechanically into his large mouth he felt a pleasant warmth in his body, an amiability toward all his fellows, and a readiness to respond superficially to every idea without probing it deeply.
  • He was only quite at ease when having poured several glasses of wine mechanically into his large mouth he felt a pleasant warmth in his body, an amiability toward all his fellows, and a readiness to respond superficially to every idea without probing it deeply.
  • Only after emptying a bottle or two did he feel dimly that the terribly tangled skein of life which previously had terrified him was not as dreadful as he had thought.
  • But under the influence of wine he said to himself: It doesn't matter.
  • Sometimes he remembered how he had heard that soldiers in war when entrenched under the enemy's fire, if they have nothing to do, try hard to find some occupation the more easily to bear the danger.
  • Like the old emigre who declined to marry the lady with whom he had spent his evenings for years, she regretted Julie's presence and having no one to write to.
  • The idea that at the first moment of receiving the news of his son's intentions had occurred to him in jest--that if Andrew got married he himself would marry Bourienne--had evidently pleased him, and latterly he had persistently, and as it seemed to Princess Mary merely to offend her, shown special endearments to the companion and expressed his dissatisfaction with his daughter by demonstrations of love of Bourienne.
  • Next day the prince did not say a word to his daughter, but she noticed that at dinner he gave orders that Mademoiselle Bourienne should be served first.
  • I said it twice... and he doesn't obey!
  • "And if you allow yourself," he screamed in a fury, addressing Princess Mary for the first time, "to forget yourself again before her as you dared to do yesterday, I will show you who is master in this house.
  • "He is old and feeble, and I dare to condemn him!" she thought at such moments, with a feeling of revulsion against herself.
  • He was enormously tall, handsome, amiable as Frenchmen are, and was, as all Moscow said, an extraordinarily clever doctor.
  • He was received in the best houses not merely as a doctor, but as an equal.
  • Nicholas' Day and the prince's name day--all Moscow came to the prince's front door but he gave orders to admit no one and to invite to dinner only a small number, a list of whom he gave to Princess Mary.
  • Metivier, who came in the morning with his felicitations, considered it proper in his quality of doctor de forcer la consigne, * as he told Princess Mary, and went in to see the prince.
  • Keep calm, I will call again tomorrow, said Metivier; and putting his fingers to his lips he hastened away.
  • Had he not told her, yes, told her to make a list, and not to admit anyone who was not on that list?
  • With her, he said, he could not have a moment's peace and could not die quietly.
  • I cannot endure any more, he said, and left the room.
  • But he could not restrain himself and with the virulence of which only one who loves is capable, evidently suffering himself, he shook his fists at her and screamed:
  • Then he slammed the door, sent for Mademoiselle Bourienne, and subsided into his study.
  • Boris had realized this the week before when the commander-in-chief in his presence invited Rostopchin to dinner on St. Nicholas' Day, and Rostopchin had replied that he could not come:
  • Prince Bolkonski listened as a presiding judge receives a report, only now and then, silently or by a brief word, showing that he took heed of what was being reported to him.
  • "Bonaparte treats Europe as a pirate does a captured vessel," said Count Rostopchin, repeating a phrase he had uttered several times before.
  • Count Rostopchin paused, feeling that he had reached the limit beyond which censure was impossible.
  • He shifts the Dukes about as I might move my serfs from Bald Hills to Bogucharovo or my Ryazan estates.
  • He said this because on his journey from Petersburg he had had the honor of being presented to the Duke.
  • He said this because on his journey from Petersburg he had had the honor of being presented to the Duke.
  • Pierre looked at Rostopchin with naive astonishment, not understanding why he should be disturbed by the bad composition of the Note.
  • "Does it matter, Count, how the Note is worded," he asked, "so long as its substance is forcible?"
  • Nowadays they are always writing! and he laughed unnaturally.
  • Yes, I heard something: he said something awkward in His Majesty's presence.
  • He was here; they admitted him in spite of my request that they should let no one in, he went on, glancing angrily at his daughter.
  • He was here; they admitted him in spite of my request that they should let no one in, he went on, glancing angrily at his daughter.
  • And he narrated his whole conversation with the French doctor and the reasons that convinced him that Metivier was a spy.
  • He gave her a cold, angry look and offered her his wrinkled, clean- shaven cheek to kiss.
  • The whole expression of his face told her that he had not forgotten the morning's talk, that his decision remained in force, and only the presence of visitors hindered his speaking of it to her now.
  • He began speaking louder, evidently to be heard by everyone.
  • There now, you turned Metivier out by the scruff of his neck because he is a Frenchman and a scoundrel, but our ladies crawl after him on their knees.
  • "May I stay a little longer?" he said, letting his stout body sink into an armchair beside her.
  • He looked straight before him and smiled quietly.
  • "Have you known that young man long, Princess?" he asked.
  • Yes, he is an agreeable young man....
  • "Yes," returned Pierre with a smile, "and this young man now manages matters so that where there is a wealthy heiress there he is too.
  • At present he is hesitating whom to lay siege to-- you or Mademoiselle Julie Karagina.
  • He is very attentive to her.
  • And do you know the new way of courting? said Pierre with an amused smile, evidently in that cheerful mood of good humored raillery for which he so often reproached himself in his diary.
  • He is very melancholy with Mademoiselle Karagina, said Pierre.
  • He is kind and generous.
  • He would give me advice.
  • "And how does he now regard the matter?" asked Pierre, referring to the old prince.
  • "I don't know how to answer your question," he said, blushing without knowing why.
  • Boris had not succeeded in making a wealthy match in Petersburg, so with the same object in view he came to Moscow.
  • There he wavered between the two richest heiresses, Julie and Princess Mary.
  • When they had last met on the old prince's name day, she had answered at random all his attempts to talk sentimentally, evidently not listening to what he was saying.
  • On another page he drew a tomb, and wrote:
  • He has suffered so many disappointments and is so sensitive, said she to the mother.
  • He laughed blandly at her naive diplomacy but listened to what she had to say, and sometimes questioned her carefully about the Penza and Nizhegorod estates.
  • He spent every day and whole days at the Karagins', and every day on thinking the matter over told himself that he would propose tomorrow.
  • He spent every day and whole days at the Karagins', and every day on thinking the matter over told himself that he would propose tomorrow.
  • He drove to the Karagins' with the firm intention of proposing.
  • Boris began, wishing to sting her; but at that instant the galling thought occurred to him that he might have to leave Moscow without having accomplished his aim, and have vainly wasted his efforts--which was a thing he never allowed to happen.
  • He checked himself in the middle of the sentence, lowered his eyes to avoid seeing her unpleasantly irritated and irresolute face, and said:
  • He glanced at her to make sure that he might go on.
  • He glanced at her to make sure that he might go on.
  • He blushed hotly, raised his eyes to hers, and said:
  • There was no need to say more: Julie's face shone with triumph and self- satisfaction; but she forced Boris to say all that is said on such occasions--that he loved her and had never loved any other woman more than her.
  • He is here too, with his wife.
  • He ran away from her and she came galloping after him.
  • He dined with me on Wednesday.
  • I am glad for your sake and I've known him since he was so high.
  • She loved and knew Prince Andrew, he loved her only, and was to come one of these days and take her.
  • When he comes, he'll find you already know his sister and father and are liked by them.
  • The count did not set out cheerfully on this visit, at heart he felt afraid.
  • He well remembered the last interview he had had with the old prince at the time of the enrollment, when in reply to an invitation to dinner he had had to listen to an angry reprimand for not having provided his full quota of men.
  • He well remembered the last interview he had had with the old prince at the time of the enrollment, when in reply to an invitation to dinner he had had to listen to an angry reprimand for not having provided his full quota of men.
  • She had decided to receive them, but feared lest the prince might at any moment indulge in some freak, as he seemed much upset by the Rostovs' visit.
  • The count had devised this diplomatic ruse (as he afterwards told his daughter) to give the future sisters-in-law an opportunity to talk to one another freely, but another motive was to avoid the danger of encountering the old prince, of whom he was afraid.
  • He did not mention this to his daughter, but Natasha noticed her father's nervousness and anxiety and felt mortified by it.
  • The princess told the count that she would be delighted, and only begged him to stay longer at Anna Semenovna's, and he departed.
  • "Ah, madam!" he began.
  • God is my witness, I didn't know-" he repeated, stressing the word "God" so unnaturally and so unpleasantly that Princess Mary stood with downcast eyes not daring to look either at her father or at Natasha.
  • God is my witness, I did not know, muttered the old man, and after looking Natasha over from head to foot he went out.
  • Oh, why doesn't he come?...
  • I would not be silly and afraid of things, I would simply embrace him, cling to him, and make him look at me with those searching inquiring eyes with which he has so often looked at me, and then I would make him laugh as he used to laugh.
  • He looked at the Rostovs from under his brows and said something, smiling, to his betrothed.
  • And he no doubt is calming her jealousy of me.
  • What right has he not to wish to receive me into his family?
  • Oh, better not think of it--not till he comes back! she told herself, and began looking at the faces, some strange and some familiar, in the stalls.
  • Around him thronged Moscow's most brilliant young men, whom he evidently dominated.
  • "And where has he sprung from?" he asked, turning to Shinshin.
  • Didn't he vanish somewhere?
  • "He did," replied Shinshin.
  • He was in the Caucasus and ran away from there.
  • "Yes, he meant to look in," answered Helene, and glanced attentively at Natasha.
  • "Handsome, isn't she?" he whispered to Natasha.
  • He was now in an adjutant's uniform with one epaulet and a shoulder knot.
  • Though the performance was proceeding, he walked deliberately down the carpeted gangway, his sword and spurs slightly jingling and his handsome perfumed head held high.
  • Having looked at Natasha he approached his sister, laid his well gloved hand on the edge of her box, nodded to her, and leaning forward asked a question, with a motion toward Natasha.
  • "Mais charmante!" said he, evidently referring to Natasha, who did not exactly hear his words but understood them from the movement of his lips.
  • Then he took his place in the first row of the stalls and sat down beside Dolokhov, nudging with his elbow in a friendly and offhand way that Dolokhov whom others treated so fawningly.
  • He winked at him gaily, smiled, and rested his foot against the orchestra screen.
  • Shinshin, lowering his voice, began to tell the count of some intrigue of Kuragin's in Moscow, and Natasha tried to overhear it just because he had said she was "charmante."
  • Natasha knew he was talking about her and this afforded her pleasure.
  • She even turned so that he should see her profile in what she thought was its most becoming aspect.
  • His face looked sad, and he had grown still stouter since Natasha last saw him.
  • He passed up to the front rows, not noticing anyone.
  • When he got there he leaned on his elbows and, smiling, talked to her for a long time.
  • Almost smiling, he gazed straight into her eyes with such an enraptured caressing look that it seemed strange to be so near him, to look at him like that, to be so sure he admired her, and not to be acquainted with him.
  • Have you heard he is getting married?
  • (He was Duport, who received sixty thousand rubles a year for this art.)
  • "And do you know, Countess," he said, suddenly addressing her as an old, familiar acquaintance, "we are getting up a costume tournament; you ought to take part in it!
  • While saying this he never removed his smiling eyes from her face, her neck, and her bare arms.
  • Natasha knew for certain that he was enraptured by her.
  • When she was not looking at him she felt that he was looking at her shoulders, and she involuntarily caught his eye so that he should look into hers rather than this.
  • When she turned away she feared he might seize her from behind by her bare arm and kiss her on the neck.
  • During one of these moments of awkward silence when Anatole's prominent eyes were gazing calmly and fixedly at her, Natasha, to break the silence, asked him how he liked Moscow.
  • But now I like it very much indeed, he said, looking at her significantly.
  • Do come!" and putting out his hand to her bouquet and dropping his voice, he added, "You will be the prettiest there.
  • Natasha did not understand what he was saying any more than he did himself, but she felt that his incomprehensible words had an improper intention.
  • But as soon as she had turned away she felt that he was there, behind, so close behind her.
  • How is he now?
  • She smiled just as he was doing, gazing straight into his eyes.
  • In the fourth act there was some sort of devil who sang waving his arm about, till the boards were withdrawn from under him and he disappeared down below.
  • As he was putting Natasha in he pressed her arm above the elbow.
  • He was looking at her with glittering eyes, smiling tenderly.
  • And again in imagination she went over her whole conversation with Kuragin, and again saw the face, gestures, and tender smile of that bold handsome man when he pressed her arm.
  • His father announced to him that he would now pay half his debts for the last time, but only on condition that he went to Moscow as adjutant to the commander-in-chief--a post his father had procured for him--and would at last try to make a good match there.
  • He indicated to him Princess Mary and Julie Karagina.
  • Anatole consented and went to Moscow, where he put up at Pierre's house.
  • As Shinshin had remarked, from the time of his arrival Anatole had turned the heads of the Moscow ladies, especially by the fact that he slighted them and plainly preferred the gypsy girls and French actresses--with the chief of whom, Mademoiselle George, he was said to be on intimate relations.
  • He had never missed a carousal at Danilov's or other Moscow revelers', drank whole nights through, outvying everyone else, and was at all the balls and parties of the best society.
  • There was talk of his intrigues with some of the ladies, and he flirted with a few of them at the balls.
  • But he did not run after the unmarried girls, especially the rich heiresses who were most of them plain.
  • There was a special reason for this, as he had got married two years before--a fact known only to his most intimate friends.
  • Anatole had very soon abandoned his wife and, for a payment which he agreed to send to his father-in-law, had arranged to be free to pass himself off as a bachelor.
  • He was instinctively and thoroughly convinced that it was impossible for him to live otherwise than as he did and that he had never in his life done anything base.
  • He was instinctively and thoroughly convinced that it was impossible for him to live otherwise than as he did and that he had never in his life done anything base.
  • He was convinced that, as a duck is so made that it must live in water, so God had made him such that he must spend thirty thousand rubles a year and always occupy a prominent position in society.
  • He was convinced that, as a duck is so made that it must live in water, so God had made him such that he must spend thirty thousand rubles a year and always occupy a prominent position in society.
  • He believed this so firmly that others, looking at him, were persuaded of it too and did not refuse him either a leading place in society or money, which he borrowed from anyone and everyone and evidently would not repay.
  • He believed this so firmly that others, looking at him, were persuaded of it too and did not refuse him either a leading place in society or money, which he borrowed from anyone and everyone and evidently would not repay.
  • He was not a gambler, at any rate he did not care about winning.
  • He was not a gambler, at any rate he did not care about winning.
  • He was not vain.
  • He did not mind what people thought of him.
  • Still less could he be accused of ambition.
  • More than once he had vexed his father by spoiling his own career, and he laughed at distinctions of all kinds.
  • He was not mean, and did not refuse anyone who asked of him.
  • All will be forgiven her, for she loved much; and all will be forgiven him, for he enjoyed much.
  • Apart from the advantage he derived from Anatole, the very process of dominating another's will was in itself a pleasure, a habit, and a necessity to Dolokhov.
  • At supper after the opera he described to Dolokhov with the air of a connoisseur the attractions of her arms, shoulders, feet, and hair and expressed his intention of making love to her.
  • Anatole had no notion and was incapable of considering what might come of such love-making, as he never had any notion of the outcome of any of his actions.
  • She was expecting Prince Andrew any moment and twice that day sent a manservant to the Vozdvizhenka to ascertain whether he had come.
  • He had not arrived.
  • She continually fancied that either he would never come or that something would happen to her before he came.
  • We have an excellent priest, he conducts the service decently and with dignity, and the deacon is the same.
  • My brother dined with me yesterday--we nearly died of laughter--he ate nothing and kept sighing for you, my charmer!
  • He is madly, quite madly, in love with you, my dear.
  • Immediately after greeting the count he went up to Natasha and followed her.
  • He said this at a moment when she alone could hear him.
  • "Come, come, Natasha!" said the count, as he turned back for his daughter.
  • Anatole asked Natasha for a valse and as they danced he pressed her waist and hand and told her she was bewitching and that he loved her.
  • Can I never...? and, blocking her path, he brought his face close to hers.
  • "Natalie?" he whispered inquiringly while she felt her hands being painfully pressed.
  • "Natalie, just a word, only one!" he kept repeating, evidently not knowing what to say and he repeated it till Helene came up to them.
  • It means that he is kind, noble, and splendid, and I could not help loving him.
  • He took it into his head to begin shouting, but I am not one to be shouted down.
  • "Well, and he?" asked the count.
  • He's crazy... he did not want to listen.
  • If your betrothed comes here now--there will be no avoiding a quarrel; but alone with the old man he will talk things over and then come on to you.
  • But if he won't--that's his affair, said Marya Dmitrievna, looking for something in her reticule.
  • He is an invalid and an old man who must be forgiven; but he is good and magnanimous and will love her who makes his son happy.
  • He is an invalid and an old man who must be forgiven; but he is good and magnanimous and will love her who makes his son happy.
  • Then he went on to say that he knew her parents would not give her to him--for this there were secret reasons he could reveal only to her--but that if she loved him she need only say the word yes, and no human power could hinder their bliss.
  • He would steal her away and carry her off to the ends of the earth.
  • He is a deceiver and a villain, that's plain!
  • What will Nicholas, dear noble Nicholas, do when he hears of it?
  • Sonya, darling, he writes...
  • As soon as I saw him I felt he was my master and I his slave, and that I could not help loving him.
  • Whatever he orders I shall do.
  • What has he said to you?
  • Why doesn't he come to the house?
  • Why doesn't he come to the house? asked Sonya.
  • Why doesn't he openly ask for your hand?
  • Does he love you?
  • Does he love me?
  • But if he is dishonorable?
  • If he is an honorable man he should either declare his intentions or cease seeing you; and if you won't do this, I will.
  • How dare you say he is dishonorable?
  • What did he say?
  • What did he say?
  • He asked me what I had promised Bolkonski.
  • He was glad I was free to refuse him.
  • You'll see what a man he is!
  • Anatole had a passport, an order for post horses, ten thousand rubles he had taken from his sister and another ten thousand borrowed with Dolokhov's help.
  • "Well," he said, "Khvostikov must have two thousand."
  • "Really it's no time for your stupid jokes," and he left the room.
  • "You wait a bit," he called after him.
  • "Didn't I explain to you that I have come to this conclusion: if this marriage is invalid," he went on, crooking one finger, "then I have nothing to answer for; but if it is valid, no matter!
  • He took Dolokhov's hand and put it on his heart.
  • A goddess! he added in French.
  • He glanced at his watch.
  • More than once when Anatole's regiment was stationed at Tver he had taken him from Tver in the evening, brought him to Moscow by daybreak, and driven him back again the next night.
  • More than once he had enabled Dolokhov to escape when pursued.
  • More than once he had driven them through the town with gypsies and "ladykins" as he called the cocottes.
  • He had ruined more than one horse in their service.
  • More than once they had beaten him, and more than once they had made him drunk on champagne and Madeira, which he loved; and he knew more than one thing about each of them which would long ago have sent an ordinary man to Siberia.
  • In their service he risked his skin and his life twenty times a year, and in their service had lost more horses than the money he had from them would buy.
  • But he liked them; liked that mad driving at twelve miles an hour, liked upsetting a driver or running down a pedestrian, and flying at full gallop through the Moscow streets.
  • He liked to hear those wild, tipsy shouts behind him: Get on!
  • He liked giving a painful lash on the neck to some peasant who, more dead than alive, was already hurrying out of his way.
  • "Real gentlemen!" he considered them.
  • Anatole and Dolokhov liked Balaga too for his masterly driving and because he liked the things they liked.
  • But with "his gentlemen" he always drove himself and never demanded anything for his work.
  • Only a couple of times a year--when he knew from their valets that they had money in hand--he would turn up of a morning quite sober and with a deep bow would ask them to help him.
  • He wore a fine, dark-blue, silk-lined cloth coat over a sheepskin.
  • On entering the room now he crossed himself, turning toward the front corner of the room, and went up to Dolokhov, holding out a small, black hand.
  • "Theodore Ivanych!" he said, bowing.
  • Well, here he is!
  • "Good day, your excellency!" he said, again holding out his hand to Anatole who had just come in.
  • After refusing it for manners' sake, he drank it and wiped his mouth with a red silk handkerchief he took out of his cap.
  • "That time I'd harnessed two young side horses with the bay in the shafts," he went on, turning to Dolokhov.
  • Having looked in a mirror, and standing before Dolokhov in the same pose he had assumed before it, he lifted a glass of wine.
  • "Well, comrades and friends..." he considered for a moment "...of my youth, farewell!" he said, turning to Makarin and the others.
  • He spoke slowly in a loud voice and throwing out his chest slightly swayed one leg.
  • Hurrah!... he cried, and emptying his glass flung it on the floor.
  • Hey, Matrena, the sable! he shouted so that his voice rang far through the rooms.
  • "That's the way," said Dolokhov, "and then so!" and he turned the collar up round her head, leaving only a little of the face uncovered.
  • "And then so, do you see?" and he pushed Anatole's head forward to meet the gap left by the collar, through which Matrena's brilliant smile was seen.
  • "Go!" he cried, twisting the reins round his hands, and the troyka tore down the Nikitski Boulevard.
  • He was met by Gabriel, Marya Dmitrievna's gigantic footman.
  • "It's lucky for him that he escaped me; but I'll find him!" she said in her rough voice.
  • Suppose he finds out, and your brother, and your betrothed?
  • He, your father, I know him... if he challenges him to a duel will that be all right?
  • He, your father, I know him... if he challenges him to a duel will that be all right?
  • Well, if he had carried you off... do you think they wouldn't have found him?
  • "He is better than any of you!" exclaimed Natasha getting up.
  • Next day Count Rostov returned from his estate near Moscow in time for lunch as he had promised.
  • He was in very good spirits; the affair with the purchaser was going on satisfactorily, and there was nothing to keep him any longer in Moscow, away from the countess whom he missed.
  • He was in very good spirits; the affair with the purchaser was going on satisfactorily, and there was nothing to keep him any longer in Moscow, away from the countess whom he missed.
  • She was evidently expecting news of him and that he would come or would write to her.
  • From the pretense of illness, from his daughter's distress, and by the embarrassed faces of Sonya and Marya Dmitrievna, the count saw clearly that something had gone wrong during his absence, but it was so terrible for him to think that anything disgraceful had happened to his beloved daughter, and he so prized his own cheerful tranquillity, that he avoided inquiries and tried to assure himself that nothing particularly had happened; and he was only dissatisfied that her indisposition delayed their return to the country.
  • He went to Tver to see Joseph Alexeevich's widow, who had long since promised to hand over to him some papers of her deceased husband's.
  • When he returned to Moscow Pierre was handed a letter from Marya Dmitrievna asking him to come and see her on a matter of great importance relating to Andrew Bolkonski and his betrothed.
  • And what can they want with me? thought he as he dressed to go to Marya Dmitrievna's.
  • "If only Prince Andrew would hurry up and come and marry her!" thought he on his way to the house.
  • What wouldn't I give to be like him! he thought enviously.
  • When he opened the ballroom door Pierre saw Natasha sitting at the window, with a thin, pale, and spiteful face.
  • He could not reconcile the charming impression he had of Natasha, whom he had known from a child, with this new conception of her baseness, folly, and cruelty.
  • He could not reconcile the charming impression he had of Natasha, whom he had known from a child, with this new conception of her baseness, folly, and cruelty.
  • He thought of his wife.
  • "They are all alike!" he said to himself, reflecting that he was not the only man unfortunate enough to be tied to a bad woman.
  • But still he pitied Prince Andrew to the point of tears and sympathized with his wounded pride, and the more he pitied his friend the more did he think with contempt and even with disgust of that Natasha who had just passed him in the ballroom with such a look of cold dignity.
  • He did not know that Natasha's soul was overflowing with despair, shame, and humiliation, and that it was not her fault that her face happened to assume an expression of calm dignity and severity.
  • He could not marry--he is married!
  • He could not marry--he is married!
  • "Troubles, troubles, my dear fellow!" he said to Pierre.
  • Natasha, pale and stern, was sitting beside Marya Dmitrievna, and her eyes, glittering feverishly, met Pierre with a questioning look the moment he entered.
  • She did not smile or nod, but only gazed fixedly at him, and her look asked only one thing: was he a friend, or like the others an enemy in regard to Anatole?
  • As for Pierre, he evidently did not exist for her.
  • "He knows all about it," said Marya Dmitrievna pointing to Pierre and addressing Natasha.
  • "Natalya Ilynichna," Pierre began, dropping his eyes with a feeling of pity for her and loathing for the thing he had to do, "whether it is true or not should make no difference to you, because..."
  • "Is he still here?" she asked, quickly.
  • He drove through the town seeking Anatole Kuragin, at the thought of whom now the blood rushed to his heart and he felt a difficulty in breathing.
  • He drove through the town seeking Anatole Kuragin, at the thought of whom now the blood rushed to his heart and he felt a difficulty in breathing.
  • He was not at the ice hills, nor at the gypsies', nor at Komoneno's.
  • One of Pierre's acquaintances, while they were talking about the weather, asked if he had heard of Kuragin's abduction of Rostova which was talked of in the town, and was it true?
  • Pierre laughed and said it was nonsense for he had just come from the Rostovs'.
  • He asked everyone about Anatole.
  • One man told him he had not come yet, and another that he was coming to dinner.
  • He paced through the ballroom, waited till everyone had come, and as Anatole had not turned up did not stay for dinner but drove home.
  • In the evening he drove to his sister's to discuss with her how to arrange a meeting.
  • Pierre without greeting his wife whom he had not seen since his return-- at that moment she was more repulsive to him than ever--entered the drawing room and seeing Anatole went up to him.
  • I must speak to you, he added in French.
  • He seized Anatole by the collar of his uniform with his big hand and shook him from side to side till Anatole's face showed a sufficient degree of terror.
  • "You're a scoundrel and a blackguard, and I don't know what deprives me from the pleasure of smashing your head with this!" said Pierre, expressing himself so artificially because he was talking French.
  • He took a heavy paperweight and lifted it threateningly, but at once put it back in its place.
  • Any letters? he said, moving toward Anatole.
  • "First, the letters," said he, as if repeating a lesson to himself.
  • "Secondly," he continued after a short pause, again rising and again pacing the room, "tomorrow you must get out of Moscow."
  • "I don't know that and don't want to," he said, not looking at Pierre and with a slight tremor of his lower jaw, "but you have used such words to me--'mean' and so on--which as a man of honor I can't allow anyone to use."
  • Pierre glanced at him with amazement, unable to understand what he wanted.
  • "Oh, vile and heartless brood!" he exclaimed, and left the room.
  • Pierre saw the distracted count, and Sonya, who had a tear-stained face, but he could not see Natasha.
  • He was awaiting Prince Andrew's return with dread and went every day to the old prince's for news of him.
  • He seemed in better spirits than usual and awaited his son with great impatience.
  • As soon as he reached Moscow, Prince Andrew had received from his father Natasha's note to Princess Mary breaking off her engagement (Mademoiselle Bourienne had purloined it from Princess Mary and given it to the old prince), and he heard from him the story of Natasha's elopement, with additions.
  • "He says he expected it," she remarked.
  • "He says he expected it," she remarked.
  • I know his pride will not let him express his feelings, but still he has taken it better, far better, than I expected.
  • She did not understand how he could ask such a question.
  • He paused at the sight of Pierre.
  • "Posterity will do him justice," he concluded, and at once turned to Pierre.
  • Still getting stouter? he said with animation, but the new wrinkle on his forehead deepened.
  • "Yes, I am well," he said in answer to Pierre's question, and smiled.
  • Pierre now recognized in his friend a need with which he was only too familiar, to get excited and to have arguments about extraneous matters in order to stifle thoughts that were too oppressive and too intimate.
  • Prince Andrew went to one and took out a small casket, from which he drew a packet wrapped in paper.
  • He did it all silently and very quickly.
  • He stood up and coughed.
  • This expression irritated Prince Andrew, and in a determined, ringing, and unpleasant tone he continued:
  • He took the packet from the table and handed it to Pierre.
  • "And Prince Kuragin?" he added quickly.
  • He left long ago.
  • "I much regret her illness," said Prince Andrew; and he smiled like his father, coldly, maliciously, and unpleasantly.
  • "So Monsieur Kuragin has not honored Countess Rostova with his hand?" said Prince Andrew, and he snorted several times.
  • "He could not marry, for he was married already," said Pierre.
  • "He could not marry, for he was married already," said Pierre.
  • "And where is your brother-in-law now, if I may ask?" he said.
  • He has gone to Peters...
  • Prince Andrew, as if trying to remember whether he had something more to say, or waiting to see if Pierre would say anything, looked fixedly at him.
  • When he appeared at the door she grew flurried, evidently undecided whether to go to meet him or to wait till he came up.
  • He thought she would give him her hand as usual; but she, stepping up to him, stopped, breathing heavily, her arms hanging lifelessly just in the pose she used to stand in when she went to the middle of the ballroom to sing, but with quite a different expression of face.
  • He told me once to apply to you...
  • Pierre sniffed as he looked at her, but did not speak.
  • Till then he had reproached her in his heart and tried to despise her, but he now felt so sorry for her that there was no room in his soul for reproach.
  • He is here now: tell him... to for... forgive me!
  • He did not know what to say.
  • Natasha was evidently dismayed at the thought of what he might think she had meant.
  • A sense of pity he had never before known overflowed Pierre's heart.
  • He felt the tears trickle under his spectacles and hoped they would not be noticed.
  • He took her hand and kissed it.
  • He knew he had something more to say to her.
  • He knew he had something more to say to her.
  • But when he said it he was amazed at his own words.
  • You have your whole life before you, said he to her.
  • "All over?" he repeated.
  • All men seemed so pitiful, so poor, in comparison with this feeling of tenderness and love he experienced: in comparison with that softened, grateful, last look she had given him through her tears.
  • "Home!" said Pierre, and despite twenty-two degrees of frost Fahrenheit he threw open the bearskin cloak from his broad chest and inhaled the air with joy.
  • It naturally seemed to Napoleon that the war was caused by England's intrigues (as in fact he said on the island of St. Helena).
  • The higher a man stands on the social ladder, the more people he is connected with and the more power he has over others, the more evident is the predestination and inevitability of his every action.
  • And the botanist who finds that the apple falls because the cellular tissue decays and so forth is equally right with the child who stands under the tree and says the apple fell because he wanted to eat it and prayed for it.
  • Equally right or wrong is he who says that Napoleon went to Moscow because he wanted to, and perished because Alexander desired his destruction, and he who says that an undermined hill weighing a million tons fell because the last navvy struck it for the last time with his mattock.
  • On the twenty-ninth of May Napoleon left Dresden, where he had spent three weeks surrounded by a court that included princes, dukes, kings, and even an emperor.
  • Before leaving, Napoleon showed favor to the emperor, kings, and princes who had deserved it, reprimanded the kings and princes with whom he was dissatisfied, presented pearls and diamonds of his own--that is, which he had taken from other kings--to the Empress of Austria, and having, as his historian tells us, tenderly embraced the Empress Marie Louise--who regarded him as her husband, though he had left another wife in Paris--left her grieved by the parting which she seemed hardly able to bear.
  • He went in a traveling coach with six horses, surrounded by pages, aides-de-camp, and an escort, along the road to Posen, Thorn, Danzig, and Konigsberg.
  • On the tenth of June, * coming up with the army, he spent the night in apartments prepared for him on the estate of a Polish count in the Vilkavisski forest.
  • Early in the morning of the twelfth of June he came out of his tent, which was pitched that day on the steep left bank of the Niemen, and looked through a spyglass at the streams of his troops pouring out of the Vilkavisski forest and flowing over the three bridges thrown across the river.
  • Oh, when he takes it in hand himself, things get hot... by heaven!...
  • There he is, do you see him?
  • He mounted it and rode at a gallop to one of the bridges over the Niemen, deafened continually by incessant and rapturous acclamations which he evidently endured only because it was impossible to forbid the soldiers to express their love of him by such shouting, but the shouting which accompanied him everywhere disturbed him and distracted him from the military cares that had occupied him from the time he joined the army.
  • He mounted it and rode at a gallop to one of the bridges over the Niemen, deafened continually by incessant and rapturous acclamations which he evidently endured only because it was impossible to forbid the soldiers to express their love of him by such shouting, but the shouting which accompanied him everywhere disturbed him and distracted him from the military cares that had occupied him from the time he joined the army.
  • He rode across one of the swaying pontoon bridges to the farther side, turned sharply to the left, and galloped in the direction of Kovno, preceded by enraptured, mounted chasseurs of the Guard who, breathless with delight, galloped ahead to clear a path for him through the troops.
  • On reaching the broad river Viliya, he stopped near a regiment of Polish uhlans stationed by the river.
  • Then he became absorbed in a map laid out on the logs.
  • Without lifting his head he said something, and two of his aides-de-camp galloped off to the Polish uhlans.
  • What did he say? was heard in the ranks of the Polish uhlans when one of the aides-de-camp rode up to them.
  • The colonel of the Polish uhlans, a handsome old man, flushed and, fumbling in his speech from excitement, asked the aide-de-camp whether he would be permitted to swim the river with his uhlans instead of seeking a ford.
  • In evident fear of refusal, like a boy asking for permission to get on a horse, he begged to be allowed to swim across the river before the Emperor's eyes.
  • He gave an angry thrust to his horse, which had grown restive under him, and plunged into the water, heading for the deepest part where the current was swift.
  • He called for his horse and rode to his quarters.
  • * Those whom (God) wishes to destroy he drives mad.
  • He was meeting Helene in Vilna after not having seen her for a long time and did not recall the past, but as Helene was enjoying the favors of a very important personage and Boris had only recently married, they met as good friends of long standing.
  • The Emperor was not dancing, he stood in the doorway, stopping now one pair and now another with gracious words which he alone knew how to utter.
  • As the mazurka began, Boris saw that Adjutant General Balashev, one of those in closest attendance on the Emperor, went up to him and contrary to court etiquette stood near him while he was talking to a Polish lady.
  • Having finished speaking to her, the Emperor looked inquiringly at Balashev and, evidently understanding that he only acted thus because there were important reasons for so doing, nodded slightly to the lady and turned to him.
  • He took Balashev by the arm and crossed the room with him, unconsciously clearing a path seven yards wide as the people on both sides made way for him.
  • All the time Boris was going through the figures of the mazurka, he was worried by the question of what news Balashev had brought and how he could find it out before others.
  • In the figure in which he had to choose two ladies, he whispered to Helene that he meant to choose Countess Potocka who, he thought, had gone out onto the veranda, and glided over the parquet to the door opening into the garden, where, seeing Balashev and the Emperor returning to the veranda, he stood still.
  • Boris, fluttering as if he had not had time to withdraw, respectfully pressed close to the doorpost with bowed head.
  • He was satisfied with the form in which he had expressed his thoughts, but displeased that Boris had overheard it.
  • He was satisfied with the form in which he had expressed his thoughts, but displeased that Boris had overheard it.
  • Boris was thus the first to learn the news that the French army had crossed the Niemen and, thanks to this, was able to show certain important personages that much that was concealed from others was usually known to him, and by this means he rose higher in their estimation.
  • In fact, the ambassador, as he himself has declared, was never authorized to make that demand, and as soon as I was informed of it I let him know how much I disapproved of it and ordered him to remain at his post.
  • There he was stopped by French cavalry sentinels.
  • Balashev mentioned who he was.
  • He wore a red mantle, and stretched his long legs forward in French fashion.
  • On seeing the Russian general he threw back his head, with its long hair curling to his shoulders, in a majestically royal manner, and looked inquiringly at the French colonel.
  • The colonel respectfully informed His Majesty of Balashev's mission, whose name he could not pronounce.
  • "Charmed to make your acquaintance, General!" he added, with a gesture of kingly condescension.
  • As soon as the King began to speak loud and fast his royal dignity instantly forsook him, and without noticing it he passed into his natural tone of good-natured familiarity.
  • He laid his hand on the withers of Balashev's horse and said:
  • "Well, General, it all looks like war," as if regretting a circumstance of which he was unable to judge.
  • Murat's face beamed with stupid satisfaction as he listened to "Monsieur de Bal-macheve."
  • But royaute oblige! * and he felt it incumbent on him, as a king and an ally, to confer on state affairs with Alexander's envoy.
  • He dismounted, took Balashev's arm, and moving a few steps away from his suite, which waited respectfully, began to pace up and down with him, trying to speak significantly.
  • He referred to the fact that the Emperor Napoleon had resented the demand that he should withdraw his troops from Prussia, especially when that demand became generally known and the dignity of France was thereby offended.
  • He referred to the fact that the Emperor Napoleon had resented the demand that he should withdraw his troops from Prussia, especially when that demand became generally known and the dignity of France was thereby offended.
  • "Then you don't consider the Emperor Alexander the aggressor?" he asked unexpectedly, with a kindly and foolish smile.
  • Balashev told him why he considered Napoleon to be the originator of the war.
  • And he went on to inquiries about the Grand Duke and the state of his health, and to reminiscences of the gay and amusing times he had spent with him in Naples.
  • Balashev rode on, supposing from Murat's words that he would very soon be brought before Napoleon himself.
  • He became still more absorbed in his task when the Russian gener